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St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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     Part, Question
501 2, 34 | they ~themselves have been bested in something great. Hence 502 2, 102 | have worshipped the kine of Bethaven." And in detestation ~of 503 3, 31 | who was a foreigner; and Bethsabee, the wife of Urias, who 504 3, 36 | believe and ask, as it were, betokening ~those who walk by faith 505 3, 40 | one or other of which He betook Himself whenever ~he was 506 3, 83 | all ~there was Christ's betrayal, which was the work of God, 507 3, 80 | a harlot? "Judas, thou ~betrayest the Son of Man with a kiss!" 508 Suppl, 43| someone else. Now he who betroths himself ~promises his body 509 2, 169 | could not express, discern ~betwixt Divine revelations, and 510 Suppl, 84| their sins singly and will bewail them, wherefore they say ( 511 1, 116 | eyes, who by a single look bewitch others, especially children." 512 1, 116 | words (Gal. 3:1): "Who hath bewitched you, that ~you should not 513 1, 116 | Avicenna assigns the cause of bewitchment to the fact that ~corporeal 514 1, 7 | against the nature of a bicubical or ~tricubical magnitude, 515 2, 75 | must not impose upon the bidder, nor the buyer upon one 516 2, 75 | announcing its defects, the bidders would be frightened to buy, ~ 517 2, 46 | Therefore {kotos} does not bide its time for taking vengeance, 518 Suppl, 66| Innocent III (cap. Dubium, De bigamia). Nor again is it on ~account 519 Suppl, 66| For it is said (Extra, De bigamis, cap. Nuper): "It is not ~ 520 Suppl, 6 | appears in the matter of bigamists. Therefore he can also ~ 521 2, 49 | principle; thus monstrous births of animals are ~beside the 522 2, 102 | it drinks ~only when it bites, since it dips all its food 523 2, 102 | brightness of ~virtue. The bittern is a bird of the East: it 524 2, 95 | Further, Scripture never blames a man for ceasing from sin, 525 1, 100 | soul is naturally "like a blank tablet on ~which nothing 526 2, 12 | written (Lev. 24:16): "He that blasphemeth the ~name of the Lord, dying 527 3, 45 | transgressing the Law, and of ~blasphemously appropriating to Himself 528 1, 116 | gloss says that "some have blazing ~eyes, who by a single look 529 3, 77 | species, since a drop of water blended with much wine ~passes into 530 2, 80 | adapts itself to shapes, ~blends with colors, mingles with 531 3, 83 | What is dipped, means the blest;~What is dry, means the 532 2, 102 | by the horns which they blew. The feast of ~Trumpets 533 2, 93 | because man's eyes are ~blindfolded [praestringuntur]. Sometimes 534 2, 79 | 34). Now He ~directs the blinding of some, to their salvation, 535 1, 92 | nature to which the mind will blissfully adhere, whatever it ~sees 536 3, 78 | Take away the stumbling blocks out of the way of ~My people." 537 3, 22 | Melchisedech in which there was no ~blood-shedding. But if we consider the 538 2, 38 | exercises of arms" or "bloodless ~wars," as Jerome states 539 Suppl, 92| the words (Ex. 4:25), "A bloody spouse ~thou art to me." 540 3, 35 | it shall bud forth ~and blossom, and shall rejoice with 541 2, 102 | the rod of Aaron that had blossomed, and the tables" (Heb. 9: 542 2, 152 | know" [*Translation W. K. Blount].~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[154] 543 2, 96 | 33): "He that violently bloweth his nose, ~bringeth out 544 2, 102 | putting in them ribands of blue . . . they may ~remember . . . 545 2, 61 | Evang.): "Our pride is blunted, since in men we honor, 546 2, 142 | acts in secret, but ~he who blushes fears to be disgraced."~ 547 3, 89 | same chapter, the elder son boasted saying (Lk. ~15:29): "Behold, 548 2, 111 | that it is "the practice of boasters both to make overmuch of ~ 549 2, 184 | Him after drawing their boats on ~to the beach, not as 550 2, 156 | arises, ~the angry passion boils over and blinds the eye 551 3, 52 | thither in order to break the bolts of hell. Therefore ~He did 552 2, 105 | let them not be sold as ~bondmen": and consequently, since 553 2, 105 | she shall not go out as bondwomen are wont to go out." Moreover, 554 3, 66 | the ~Trinity, such as the Bonosians and Cataphrygians" (who 555 1, 5 | useful and ~the pleasant? [*"Bonum honestum" is the virtuous 556 2, 70 | whom the salutary flame ~[bonus ignis] of love has enkindled 557 2, 105 | the case with Ruth whom Booz married. ~Wherefore she 558 2, 106 | no ~green leaves on the bough of good works, unless charity 559 2, 102 | and A. V. and R. V. read: 'Boughs of ~thick trees'], i.e. 560 2, 49 | from the {eu}, good, and {boule}, counsel, being "a good ~ 561 1, 21 | what is due to them more bountifully than is proportionate ~to 562 Suppl, 77| time was ~under the form of bovine flesh rises again in man 563 3, 46 | of His death, when with bowed head He gave up the ghost." 564 Suppl, 38| Now the cruet with ~water, bowl* and towel, are given to 565 2, 26 | and we wish one of the boxers to win. ~But the love, which 566 2, 26 | to ~us if we look on at a boxing-match, and we wish one of the 567 3, 74 | Pope Julius says (Concil. Bracarens iii, Can. ~1): "We see that 568 Suppl, 66| Pope Martin [*Martinus Bracarensis: cap. xliii] says: "If a ~ 569 2, 184 | properly to ~religious to brace themselves up in order to 570 2, 184 | some of the ~righteous who bracing themselves up to lay hold 571 2, 179 | mind's attention, since "brains avail when the mind is ~ 572 3, 43 | to heaven, He blessed and brake: It ~was to be believed 573 2, 68 | the case of those who are branded with ~infamy. Now a penalty 574 3, 45 | God's ~sake: since Moses braved death in opposing Pharaoh, 575 2, 129 | iii, 8) that "with the ~bravest men, cowards are held in 576 2, 10 | in one matter, whereas a breach ~of the rule happens in 577 3, 29 | called ~His "father," as bread-winner.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[29] A[ 578 3, 77 | remains, and in ~consequence breakableness.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[77] A[ 579 3, 83 | there might arise danger of ~breakage; and the same applies to 580 2, 105 | sabbath, he was stoned as ~a breaker of the Law, which commanded 581 2, 86 | good: whereas now if ~thou breakest faith with God (which God 582 2, 182 | truth, ~and having on the breast-plate of justice . . . in all 583 2, 102 | the blood, the fat, the breastbone and the right shoulder.~ 584 2, 23 | written (Jn. 3:8): "The Spirit breatheth where He ~will," and (1 585 Suppl, 37| spirit in her," for she was breathless from admiration of his wisdom. ~ 586 2, 79 | Cato ~[*Dionysius Cato, Breves Sententiae], "Worship thy 587 2, 15 | heat and ~of cold (since bricks are hardened by the fire, 588 3, 38 | bridegroom is ~begun by the bridesman," i.e. by John. Consequently 589 2, 180 | directs the ~art of the bridle-maker [*Ethic. i, 1]. Now it belongs 590 2, 149 | then ~certain vices are bridled by abstinence, it seems 591 3, 18 | e.g. when a judge wishes a brigand to be hanged for ~the good 592 3, 53 | sun had ~already begun to brighten the sky. Hence it is written ( 593 Suppl, 88| the sun is said to shine brighter for a person, and the whole ~ 594 3, 39 | the ~horizon, and by its brilliance dims its shining: so Christ 595 3, 55 | could not ~gaze upon that brilliancy. For if before He died for 596 2, 18 | of charity, just as the bristle introduces the ~thread, 597 3, 83 | remain in it; while glass is brittle and there might arise danger 598 2, 102 | was not to be made in a broadcast manner from any family, ~ 599 2, 73 | him, let the ravens of the brooks pick it out, and the ~young 600 Suppl, 65| sentenced to be ~taken to brothels. Therefore it is not against 601 2, 73 | sins man is, so to speak, brutalized; for which same ~reason 602 2, 102 | of Israel on one of the buck-goats, that it might carry ~them 603 1, 104 | Gentiles are as a drop from a ~bucket, and are counted as the 604 2, 102 | of calves and lambs ~and buckgoats." But, as stated above, 605 3, 35 | Like the lily, it shall bud forth ~and blossom, and 606 2, 117 | to be poor, namely, to ~buffoons and flatterers, whereas 607 Suppl, 46| says (Resp. ad Consult. Bulg. iii; Cap. ~Tuas dudum, 608 Suppl, 43| Nicholas I (Resp. ~ad Consul. Bulgar., iii). For as Isidore says ( 609 3, 70 | prescribed (Lev. 22:27): "When a bullock, or a sheep, or a goat, 610 2, 105 | forgotten sheaves, ~and the bunches of grapes and fruit, should 611 2, 185 | Secondly, in order to avoid ~burdening those to whom he preached; 612 2, 64 | and commits a robbery, ~as burglars do. As regards princes, 613 2, 64 | violence, it is robbery even as burglary is. Hence Augustine ~says ( 614 2, 175 | 9:11): "Her conversation burneth as fire." ~Thirdly, because 615 Suppl, 72| them focused together in a burning-glass; for at that time in lieu ~ 616 2, 76 | shall dwell with everlasting burnings? . . . He that shaketh his ~ 617 2, 84 | offer the whole ram for ~a burnt-offering upon the altar; it is an 618 2, 102 | concerning the matter of burnt-offerings and sacrifices."~Aquin.: 619 2, 70 | contumeliosus] "is ~hasty and bursts out [tumet] in injurious 620 2, 185 | Bear ye one another's burthens: and so you shall fulfil 621 2, 185 | but that I ~myself was not burthensome to you?" Thirdly, in order 622 2, 98 | Ephron a double cave for a burying-place (Gn. 23:8, sqq.), and Jacob ~ 623 1, 80 | for ~sometimes the soul busies itself with unpleasant things, 624 2, 75 | entangleth himself with ~secular businesses." Nevertheless it is lawful 625 2, 45 | he ~is called a prudent businessman, or a prudent sailor; secondly, 626 2, 93 | the dreams of Pharaoh's butler and of his chief ~baker ( 627 2, 105 | severely punished if his ox had butted anyone "yesterday or the 628 3, 18 | Is. 7:15): "He shall eat butter and ~honey, that He may 629 2, 105 | might have been taken to butting suddenly). ~Or again, the 630 2, 95 | from premises, e.g. just buyings and sellings, ~and the like, 631 3, 83 | represents what ~took place in by-gone days; and so it does not 632 2, 166 | rude, or despise you as a cad." Now a man ~who is without 633 1, 110 | eblouissement"), which the Latin "caecitas" (blindness) ~does not necessarily 634 2, 33 | Monast. x, [*De ~Institutione Caeobiorum]): "The monk is troubled 635 2, 99 | town near ~Rome called "Caere": since, when Rome was taken 636 2, 152 | Symmachus ~says [*Ep. v ad Caesarium; Cf. can. Raptores xxxvi, 637 3, 45 | Hence Dionysius says (Ep. ad Cai. iv): ~"Christ excelled 638 3, 30 | being sent by ~the devil to cajole the woman by the spirit 639 2, 22 | presence, not by crafty and cajoling flattery, but by the ~fear 640 2, 102 | knead the dough, to make cakes to the queen of heaven."~ 641 2, 145 | Nevertheless when some great ~calamity threatens, even children 642 Suppl, 72| which can ~be approximately calculated from the height of the mountains 643 2, 145 | based, not on a strict ~calculation, but on a rough estimate: 644 2, 61 | pebble [*'Lapillus' or 'calculus' ~whence the English word ' 645 2, 171 | Jeremiah saw the "boiling caldron . . . from the face of ~ 646 1, 85 | evanescent. The night air is calmer, when silence reigns, hence 647 1, 97 | or wanton incentive, with calmness of ~soul and body."~Aquin.: 648 Suppl, 55| cap. Literas, De juram. calumn.).~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[55] 649 2, 67 | allegations (Extra, De juramento calumniae, cap. Inhaerentes): ~and 650 2, 66 | another with a crime is not a calumniator unless he gives ~utterance 651 2, 67 | has to be taken against ~calumnious allegations (Extra, De juramento 652 Suppl, 77| and thus it is called "cambium": but in ~neither state 653 2, 38 | more ought the ~plan of campaign to be hidden from the enemy. 654 3, 43 | of miracles ~did Jesus in Cana of Galilee."~Aquin.: SMT 655 Suppl, 59| inhabitants of the land of Canaan, both because ~the Lord 656 Suppl, 28| OBJ 3: Although Penance cancels all deficiencies, by restoring 657 Suppl, 37| name of acolyte signifies candle-bearer. Therefore the character 658 2, 67 | OBJ 2: The imperfection of candlelight is not opposed to the ~perfection 659 2, 31 | custom some take pleasure in cannibalism or ~in the unnatural intercourse 660 Suppl, 24| that which is known by canonists as "similar bigamy"].~Aquin.: 661 2, 176 | wherefore in the Church the canonization of certain persons is based 662 3, 62 | sign of the conferring of a canonry. Hence, according to this ~ 663 2, 33 | itself ~so as to become more capacious.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[33] A[ 664 3, 28 | After this He went down to ~Capharnaum, He" - that is, Christ - " 665 2, 145 | The quotation is from the ~Capitularies (Cap. 39) of Theodulf, bishop 666 1, 85 | all anxiety moving at the caprice of ~whatever is brought 667 3, 55 | except the beholder's eyes be captivated by some illusions. But since ~ 668 2, 77 | the law of my mind, and captivating me in the ~law of sin." 669 3, 55 | the sea of Tiberias at the capture of the ~fishes; the eighth 670 2, 102 | expecting to feed on the carcases of the slain, signifies 671 Suppl, 91| shall go out and see ~the carcasses of the men that have transgressed 672 2, 121 | door turns upon a hinge ~[cardine]. But fortitude is about 673 Suppl, 71| funerals of just men were cared for with dutiful piety, ~ 674 2, 152 | Consequently, when these kisses and caresses ~are done for this delectation, 675 3, 46 | Hebron before was called Cariath-Arbe: Adam the greatest in the ~ 676 2, 170 | me all ~Israel unto mount Carmel, and the prophets of Baal 677 1, 7 | infinitely multiplied, the carpentering work would ~never be finished, 678 3, 36 | Christ's birth, "are like the carpenters who built the Ark of Noe, 679 2, 166 | is one that reflects the carriage of ~authority, has the tread 680 2, 103 | or anyone that touched carrion, ~was said to be unclean: 681 2, 2 | as food, drink, clothing, cars, ~dwellings, and such like, 682 2, 26 | Referring to the ~Latin "carus" (dear)].~Aquin.: SMT FS 683 2, 57 | e.g. that a knife should carve well, or that a saw should 684 3, 25 | a thing - for ~instance, carved or painted wood: because 685 2, 94 | circumstance (for instance that the casket be three-cornered, or the ~ 686 2, 23 | Deacon, a monk of ~Monte Cassino.] Therefore it was no charity 687 2, 181 | IX, De Senatoribus] (Lib. Cassius ff. De ~Senatoribus) it 688 3, 41 | I myself should become a castaway."~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[41] A[ 689 2, 63 | can. i] punished those who castrated themselves that they might ~ 690 Suppl, 58| copulation by some power or by castration; and this ~is an impediment 691 3, 74 | and sheep." Others, called Cataphrygae and Pepuziani, "are ~reputed 692 2, 40 | it, as being in hopes of catching ~it. Because as stated above ( 693 2, 81 | Hom. xxx in Genes. ]; Cf. Caten. Aur. on Lk. 18]: "Think ~ 694 2, 42 | Jerome [*Pelagius, Exposit. ~Cath. Fid.] "accursed is he who 695 2, 67 | Decretals II, qu. vi, can. Catholicus: ~"The Catholic who appeals 696 2, 172 | the figure of a boiling cauldron (Jer. 1:13). ~Thirdly, it 697 2, 187 | written (James 5:20): "He who ~causeth a sinner to be converted 698 Appen1, 2| conditional act of the ~will: thus cautery is voluntary for the sake 699 3, 57 | the four elements, and is cautioned not to transgress the Decalogue."~ 700 Suppl, 77| humidity that is found in the cavities of ~the smaller veins - 701 1, 29 | is produced through the cavity in the mask. These ~"persons" 702 3, 36 | sermon on the Epiphany ~(ccclxxiv), that "the Magi had received 703 3, 36 | sermon on the Epiphany (cci): ~"Christ was made known 704 3, 36 | sermon on the Epiphany (cciv): "The angels ~inhabit, 705 2, 85 | Augustine [*Append. Serm. cclxxcii], whose words are ~quoted 706 3, 36 | walk not" (Augustine, Serm. cclxxiii). It was also by God's will 707 2, 85 | Decimae, says [*Append. Serm. cclxxvii]: "Tithes must be paid on ~ 708 3, 7 | Augustine says (Ep. ad Dardan. cclxxxvii) that "as in ~the head are 709 2, 106 | Perfect. Justit. iv) [*Cf. Ep. ccvii; De Pecc. Mer. ~et Rem. 710 2, 152 | Agone Christiano [*Serm. ccxciii; ccl de Temp.; ~see Appendix 711 2, 187 | Augustine says (Ep. ad Laetum ccxliii), is nothing less than ~ 712 3, 54 | in a sermon for Easter (ccxlvii) that some men argue in 713 3, 51 | Augustine says in a sermon ~(ccxlviii), "because He died for the 714 2, 145 | et ~Jejun. [*Serm. lxxii (ccxxx, de Tempore)]): "Fasting 715 Suppl, 72| the ~coming of Christ in ceaselessly visiting His Church. So 716 Suppl, 93| as instanced in blessed ~Cecilia who survived for three days, 717 3, 74 | Because Cyprian says to Cecilius (Ep. lxiii): "Thus the Lord' 718 2, 172 | treated about ~trees from the cedar that is in Libanus unto 719 2, 113 | Wherefore Jerome says (Ep. ad Celant): ~"Nothing so easily corrupts 720 3, 67 | the chief and official ~celebrant in conferring a sacrament, 721 3, 82 | his own power, ~then other celebrants would be superfluous, since 722 3, 83 | sacrament. Hence (Extra, De Celebratione missae, chap. Ex parte), ~ 723 3, 71 | 1~On the contrary, Pope Celestine says (Epist. ad Episcop. 724 2, 150 | were punished who led a celibate life, as Valerius Maximus ~ 725 1, 103 | house, by making use of cement, stones, and wood ~which 726 2, 22 | Bible: "True friendship cemented by ~Christ, is where men 727 2, 98 | ordinary field as a site for a cemetery or even a church. Nevertheless ~ 728 2, 21 | opposed to virtue ~deserve censure and blame." But good actions 729 3, 31 | Thamar is mentioned, who is ~censured for her sin with her father-in-law; 730 3, 35 | be enrolled in Caesar's census, and thus submit Himself ~ 731 2, 105 | and make them tribunes and centurions; and may ~take many things 732 Suppl, 85| nor fix the month, year, century, or thousand years as ~Augustine 733 2, 101 | were so called from the "cerei" ~[candles] which are lit 734 3, 28 | heresy of the ~Ebionites and Cerinthus, who held Christ to be a 735 2, 66 | behooves one to ~proceed on certainties, as far as possible. Since 736 Suppl, 85| judgment should also be certified to us.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[ 737 3, 69 | There was a certain man in Cesarea, named ~Cornelius, a centurion 738 3, 80 | Christ's body into mud or a ~cess-pool, his sin would be reputed 739 Suppl, 92| not yet; wherefore hope chafes somewhat on account of the ~ 740 Suppl, 72| into His barn, but the ~chaff," i.e. the wicked, "He will 741 Suppl, 70| for its body, so it is ~chained to the fire, as receiving 742 2, 101 | salvation: because the Greek {chaire} is the same as the Latin ~" 743 2, 183 | at feasts, and the first chairs ~in the synagogues, and 744 2, 46 | time; and some he ~calls {chalepoi} [ill-tempered], because 745 3, 83 | not use golden but wooden chalices; but Pope Zephyrinus ~ordered 746 2, 36 | heretics, unless they are first challenged to ~dispute." Therefore 747 3, 80 | likewise ~(Second Council of Chalon, Canon xlvii) declares that 748 2, 145 | contrary, The Council of Chalons [*The quotation is from 749 2, 81 | shalt pray, enter into thy chamber, and ~having shut the door, 750 3, 42 | heard in the ear in the chambers shall be preached on the ~ 751 1, 80 | irascible is, as it were, the champion and defender of the concupiscible ~ 752 3, 42 | Samaritan woman (Jn. 4) ~and the Chananaean woman (Mt. 15). Much more 753 2, 91 | the earthly kingdom of the Chananaeans ~(Ex. 3:8,17). Again it 754 Suppl, 71| Praepositivus [*Gilbert Prevostin, Chancellor of the See of Paris, A.D. ~ 755 1, 10 | still they agree in having a changeless being, ~and are thus measured 756 1, 10 | innovation, comes from its changelessness; and ~consequently its measure 757 2, 83 | first generator, through the channel of generation, reaches first 758 3, 83 | masses may be celebrated in chapels, ~with a consecrated altar." 759 2, 185 | guise of religion assume the characteristics of ~the black and red horses 760 2, 102 | transcribed ~from the Vulgate: 'charadrion'; 'charadrius' is the generic 761 2, 102 | Vulgate: 'charadrion'; 'charadrius' is the generic name for 762 Suppl, 54| potentially: for instance, charcoal has ~more in common with 763 Suppl, 2 | prudence, which is called the ~charioteer of the virtues. Consequently 764 2, 31 | man reproves his ~prelate charitably, it does not follow that 765 2, 38 | qu. 8, can. Hortatu) that Charles went to war with ~the Lombards 766 2, 100 | there by any wizard nor charmer, nor anyone that consulteth 767 2, 94 | not hear the voice of the charmers, nor of the ~wizard that 768 2, 94 | nor of the ~wizard that charmeth wisely." Therefore it is 769 3, 59 | whom the Lord loveth, He chasteneth: and as a father ~in the 770 1, 105 | heavenly hierarchy the ~chastening of the inferior essence 771 2, 75 | says he, "but buying at a ~cheap price with the purpose of 772 2, 100 | pleasure, i.e. joyfully or cheerfully, in ~one respect falls under 773 3, 25 | hope o'er all beside,~That cheers the solemn passion-tide:~ 774 2, 93 | divination of the hand (because ~{cheir} is the Greek for hand): 775 3, 2 | Nazianzen says in a ~letter to Chelidonius (Ep. ci): "In the Saviour 776 2, 41 | Further, Jerome [*Hugh de S. Cher., In Matth. xviii; in Luc. ~ 777 1, 13 | means to care of] and to cherish all things; or from the ~{ 778 1, 104 | wrought, for instance a chest or a bed; and ~applies to 779 2, 102 | of good and evil. While chewing the ~cud signifies meditation 780 2, 102 | unclean." The animal that chews the cud and has a ~divided 781 3, 38 | after instructing men, chide them for their sins, and 782 2, 31 | If a man refrains from chiding ~and reproving wrongdoers, 783 3, 46 | His slayers arose from the chiefs ~of the Jewish people. Hence 784 2, 7 | doing so he give ~him a chill, or scald him; heal him 785 2, 93 | of ~the hand is called "chiromancy," i.e. divination of the 786 2, 9 | Reply OBJ 2: Men's acts and choices are in reference to singulars. ~ 787 1, 25 | is raised above all the choirs of angels, and ~so cannot 788 Suppl, 86| other hand, outward riches choke the word of God by ~the 789 2, 53 | care of this world . . . chokes up the word." Thirdly, ~ 790 2, 48 | whence it takes its name {chole}."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[48] 791 2, 89 | the ~diaconate to serve as choristers, for it behooves them to 792 1, 13 | Nom. i): "You will find a chorus of ~holy doctors addressed 793 Suppl, 73| resurrection of others by means of Christ-man rising again.~Aquin.: SMT 794 2, 185 | cannot confer penance, nor christen, nor ~absolve in virtue 795 2, 7 | delivery of the state, or of Christendom, or some ~such purpose. 796 2, 94 | qu. v, ~cap. Non liceat Christianis): "In blending together 797 2, 152 | Augustine says (De Agone Christiano [*Serm. ccxciii; ccl de 798 2, 80 | the Preface [*Preface for ~Christmastide], "that through knowing 799 3, 51 | Cont. Jud. et ~Gent. quod 'Christus sit Deus') that "with other 800 3, 44 | Phlegon "relates in his chronicles that this took place during ~ 801 2, 135 | the contrary, Andronicus [*Chrysippus: in De Affect.] says that ~" 802 2, 102 | being sprinkled with those cinders.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[102] A[ 803 1, 7 | Neither could it move ~circularly; forasmuch as circular motion 804 1, 22 | attributed to the divinities ~who circulate in the heavens; that is, 805 3, Note| Sentences, which had been in ~circulation for some twenty years or 806 3, 70 | circumcision, as Bede says (Hom. in Circum.). ~But now Baptism is not 807 3, 70 | Nevertheless, certain ~well-known circumcisions are related as having been 808 3, 83 | or else to express the "circuminsession" of all the Divine ~Persons.~ 809 3, 3 | impossible for the intellect ~to circumscribe something in God and leave 810 1, 13 | applied to ~man in some degree circumscribes and comprehends the thing 811 2, 47 | walk ~cautiously [Douay: 'circumspectly']."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[49] 812 2, 7 | But that which ~surrounds [circumstat] is rather out than in. 813 2, 165 | dog coursing a hare in the circus; but in ~the open country, 814 1, 18 | are called dead, as in cisterns and ponds. This is merely 815 2, 31 | it is ~befitting that a citation of witnesses should be placed 816 2, 109 | representation of the truth." And he cites figures of ~speech as an 817 2, 31 | may be three reasons for citing witnesses. First, to ~show 818 2, 102 | fairest tree," i.e. the citron, "and ~the trees of dense 819 2, 170 | of Plato [*Phaed. xxvii; Civit. vi], who held that our ~ 820 2, 179 | Augustine says at the end of De ~Civitate Dei xxii, 30, "there we 821 2, 183 | as the lawful ~heir, of claiming his paternal inheritance." 822 2, 36 | disclaimer of ~the truth with clamorous confidence." If, however, 823 3, 26 | Albans (1175), Osbert of Clare (1170), ~Robert Grosseteste, 824 1, 114 | in the majority of cases, clashes sometimes with this cause 825 Suppl, 89| surveyed by the sight, nor clasped by the touch." Therefore 826 3, 81 | twelve as guests He greets,~Clasping Himself in His hands,~The 827 1, 102 | ii), quoting Aristotle [*Cleanthes]. Secondly, this is clear ~ 828 3, 46 | Passion. But because of the cleavage ~between believers and unbelievers, 829 3, 2 | Nazianzen says (Ep. i ad ~Cledon.) that the human nature 830 3, 39 | dove builds its nest in the cleft of ~a rock. This refers 831 2, 102 | of animals that have many clefts in their feet, because ~ 832 2, 182 | is said (XIX, qu. i, can. Clerici qui monachorum.): ~"Clerics 833 2, 62 | I, Dist. 1, can. De his clericis] ~says in the Decretals: " 834 Suppl, 37| Decretals, Dist. xxi, cap. ~Cleros) the "psalmist" is reckoned 835 2, 102 | denotes those ~who are clever in temporal affairs, but 836 2, 45 | Ethic. vi, 12) there is "cleverness," ~[*{deinotike}] i.e. natural 837 1, 95 | say that, according to the climate, or the movement of the ~ 838 Suppl, 81| But even after they have climbed the ~heavens, it is likely 839 Suppl, 40| from the lower part by ~clipping, lest their senses be entangled 840 3, 52 | Augustine says (Ep. ad Evod. cliv.): "Nor could I find ~anywhere 841 2, 102 | were ~inserted in their cloaks signify the godly intention 842 2, 13 | seen in the movements ~of clocks and all engines put together 843 3, 87 | sin man's ~affections are clogged, so that they are slow in 844 2, 85 | the soul's strength and clogs the ~reason. Bede, however, 845 2, 31 | objects of touch bear the closest relation to this usefulness: 846 2, 167 | even the shoemakers' and clothiers' arts stand in need of ~ 847 3, 74 | of carnal desires, which ~clung to their hearts like fibre." 848 2, 160 | pride. For he who is in the ~clutches of pride and feels it not, 849 3, 64 | epistle to Leo Augustus (clvi): "It is a matter of notoriety 850 3, 52 | a sermon on the Passion (clx) that "of ~a sudden at our 851 3, 54 | Append. Opp. August., Serm. clxii] says: "It sufficed for 852 3, 67 | in a sermon for Easter (clxviii): "In ~the first place I 853 3, 69 | As Augustine says (Serm. clxxvi): "Mother Church lends ~ 854 2, 64 | says ~in a homily (Serm. clxxviii; De Verb. Apost.): "If thou 855 3, 69 | addressed ~to Dardanus (Ep. clxxxvii).~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[69] A[ 856 Suppl, 8 | other priest; and ~since a co-adjutor is subordinate to the person 857 1, 23 | Cor. 3:9: "We are God's ~co-adjutors." Nor is this on account 858 1, 30 | although in God love is co-essential as being divine; and therefore 859 1, 92 | representing the connaturality and co-eternity of the Divine Persons. The ~ 860 Suppl, 80| avail, because to hinder the co-existence of a body in the same place 861 3, 69 | before Baptism, or even ~co-existent with Baptism. Hence Augustine 862 1, 89 | participated ~existence necessarily co-exists with the soul's essence, 863 2, 25 | of carnal connection and ~co-habitation.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[26] A[ 864 2, 153 | division. But continence is ~co-ordinated with virtue, according to 865 Suppl, 56| answer that, A may become co-parent with B in two ways. First, 866 Suppl, 56| Hence the verse:~"Of two co-parents one is always spiritual, 867 Suppl, 56| godchild; another called co-paternity between the godparent ~and 868 1, 8 | inasmuch as it excludes the co-presence ~of another body; whereas 869 2, 15 | 2: Further, consent is "co-sense." But sense is an apprehensive ~ 870 3, 3 | word's signification or ~co-signification, we must consider the things 871 2, 56 | body: "For instance, if my coachman, through obedience to my ~ 872 Suppl, 8 | delegate is appointed the coadjutor of this other priest; and ~ 873 2, 2 | seems to be equivalent to "coagitare," i.e. "to ~discuss together." 874 1, 77 | perceives them by means of coalition of ideas. ~Therefore the 875 3, 44 | would depart from ~their coasts" (Mt. 8:31-34). Therefore 876 Suppl, 71| They found under the coats of the slain some ~of the 877 2, 102 | cedar-wood and scarlet or cochineal, and hyssop, i.e. faith, 878 2, 96 | coerced is subject ~to the coercer. In this way the virtuous 879 3, 55 | Resurrection by proofs?~(6) Of the cogency of those proofs.~Aquin.: 880 2, 2 | implies a research, for ~"cogitare" [to think] seems to be 881 2, 2 | Because the Latin word "cogitatio" [thought] implies a research, 882 Suppl, 45| Rescrip., cap. Si Vir, De cognat. spir.). Now he who gives 883 2, 96 | Cum ~dilectus, de Ord. Cognit.]. Therefore, seemingly, 884 2, 54 | concur in the one aspect of cognoscibility, they belong to one ~cognitive 885 2, 56 | and for ~this reason the cognoscitive virtues are in the intellect 886 Suppl, 51| matter how long they have cohabited, unless she be ~willing 887 Suppl, 62| him the marriage debt and cohabiting with him, the ~marriage 888 Suppl, 40| otherwise there would be no cohesion ~towards the one object. 889 3, 62 | grace ~save by a certain coincidence, deny the sacraments any 890 Suppl, 80| body. Now two points can be coincident, as in the ~case of two 891 2, 79 | the Latin the same word 'colere' stands for 'worship' and ~' 892 1, 103 | cease, and all nature would collapse." In the same work (Gen. 893 1, 116 | his not having sufficient ~collating power to be able to draw 894 2, 152 | alone. Thus we read in the ~Collationes Patrum (Coll. xxii, 6) of 895 Suppl, 90| called an ~establishment [collocatio] or mansion. Wherefore since 896 2, 85 | force in displacing two columns, it does not follow that 897 2, 93 | expected thereupon, unless the combatants be very unequal in ~strength 898 3, 22 | Testament could not "make" (the comers thereunto) "perfect: for 899 3, 41 | Ecclus. 2): Son, when thou comest to the service of God, ~ 900 3, 1 | xxviii): "There are two comings ~of Christ: the first, for 901 2, 23 | Salutaribus Documentis ad quemdam comitem, vii., among the works ~ 902 2, 100 | order to be given by the commanders in ~the war, which is undertaken 903 1, 10 | says (De Consol. iii) "Who commandest time to ~be separate from 904 2, 108 | is Beatitude; and after commending the authority of the ~apostles, 905 1, 17 | that a diameter is a false commensurable thing, as the Philosopher 906 2, 7 | end by means of a certain ~commensurateness, which results from the 907 Suppl, 88| with the authority and ~commentaries of holy men. Consequently 908 2, 38 | cleric. ~Wherefore just as commercial enterprises are forbidden 909 2, 28 | this sense that we pity and commiserate sinners. Thus ~Gregory says 910 2, 102 | Verb. Dom. viii). "If a commissioner issue an order, are ~you 911 3, 5 | the poorest . ~. . lay and commonest earth, they show the power 912 2, 140 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The commonness of a sin diminishes the 913 2, 95 | sanctioned by the "Lords and ~Commons," as stated by Isidore ( 914 2, 78 | liberality, kindliness, revenge, ~commonsense, [*{eugnomosyne}] piety, 915 1, 31 | lest we take away the communicability of the divine essence. Hence 916 3, 82 | unto him, God speed you, ~communicateth with his wicked works." 917 3, 63 | making ~them Godlike and communicators of Divine gifts." Now the 918 2, 112 | for its principal object commutable good, which is ~known to 919 2, 86 | commuted." Hence it is less to commute a vow than to dispense from ~ 920 2, 65 | Licet ratione, de Foro ~Comp.] a man is tried in this 921 1, 107 | in Evang.), that "some ~companies of the angels, because others 922 3, 46 | the Jews, being ~busied in compassing Christ's death against the 923 Suppl, 91| is. Yet in a sense God compassionates our afflictions, wherefore 924 3, 46 | of a perishing people, by compassionating them." But His soul would 925 Suppl, 94| the ~stars that are their compeers. But this is absolutely 926 3, 54 | greater beauty of glory compensates for all ~this, so that the 927 Suppl, 49| connected with it, which by compensating for that loss ~makes that 928 Suppl, 49| ordinate except by certain compensations whereby that same ~union 929 3, Note| the ~Summa Theologica. The compiler of the Supplement was evidently 930 Suppl, 93| aureole of doctors, since the ~compiling of writing is a way of teaching.~ 931 2, 12 | punished, will nevertheless ~complain that God is so powerful 932 2, 113 | pleasing he is said to be "complaisant," according to the Philosopher ~( 933 2, 107 | prescribing the ~safest way of complying with the statutes of the 934 1, 14 | belongs to our intellect as it composes and divides. ~But in the 935 1, 112 | that a good angel is a compounder of wrong; which is ~unseemly. 936 1, 14 | has nothing outside the comprehender. Hence it ~is not against 937 3, 51 | Scriptural language, wished to compute as night those three ~hours, 938 2, 29 | this in view succors ~his comrade, succors him not as a private 939 2, 25 | much as the friendship of comrades originates through ~their 940 2, 109 | now ascribed to Pelagius] concedes that "our will is ~in such 941 2, 93 | entangle ~men's minds with vain conceits. Of this kind of vanity 942 1, 1 | opponent will make some concession; but if he concede ~nothing, 943 1, 29 | attack, it was ordained by conciliar decree ~that it was to be 944 2, 153 | reading; St. Ambrose wrote "concinentem = harmonious"].~Aquin.: 945 2, 98 | idolatrous worship, it enclosed [concludebat] them in the ~worship of 946 2, 77 | hinders it from arguing and concluding ~under the first proposition; 947 2, 98 | kept under the law shut up [conclusi], unto that faith which 948 2, 109 | because by ~truth we mean the concordance between sign and thing signified, 949 2, 28 | because the order of each concordant is not ~observed, but is 950 2, 35 | discord among those who concorded together in ~evil, because 951 2, 28 | there is no peace when a man concords with another man counter 952 1, 3 | from ~sensitive nature, by concretion as it were, for that is 953 3, 82 | the ~mass of one living in concubinage. However, this is to be 954 2, 154 | concupiscence is liable to be concupiscent: wherefore ~also it happens 955 1, 81 | power is so called from "concupiscere" [to desire], and the ~irascible 956 2, 30 | My soul hath coveted [concupivit] to long for thy ~justifications." 957 1, 80 | appetite, the irascible and concupscible, obey reason.~Aquin.: SMT 958 3, 46 | besides deliverance from sin concurred for man's salvation. ~In 959 Suppl, 85| is here given to ~certain condensations of the light shining from 960 2, 185 | semel, de Paenitentia): "To condescend to ~the humblest duties, 961 3, 31 | signify ~that Christ had condescended to our mortal nature, he 962 3, 58 | to sit there one day, but condescending to the supplication of the ~ 963 2, 1 | take it all in, but he condescends to the disciple's capacity 964 2, 84 | human law [*Dig. xii, v, de Condict. ob. ~turp. vel iniust. 965 2, 114 | this time ~are not worthy [condignae] to be compared with the 966 2, 86 | depends on its ~nature [conditio]: thus when a man takes 967 2, 135 | Macrobius (In Somn. Scip. i) condivides constancy ~with firmness 968 2, 38 | because when a man's friends condole with ~him, he sees that 969 2, 105 | only the virtuous man that ~conducts himself well in the midst 970 3, 67 | altars, to consecrate ~[conficere] the chrism; he it is that 971 2, 126 | OBJ 2: Hope whereby one confides in God is accounted a theological ~ 972 2, 159 | greater things through ~confiding in one's own powers: but 973 3, 63 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Configuration is a certain boundary of 974 3, 45 | transfigured), to which He will configure those who are His; ~according 975 Suppl, 72| Apostle and Gregory, are confirmatory evidences of our faith in 976 3, 87 | i.e. the recital of the Confiteor or of ~an act of contrition], 977 2, 18 | dreads the ~punishment which confronts him for his sin and no longer 978 1, 30 | vicious circle results, confusing the mind and obscuring the ~ 979 Suppl, 72| Para. 2/5~This opinion is confuted with sufficient probability 980 3, 58 | the ~Father, sits in His conglorified flesh; for, under one adoration 981 1, 36 | declared that those who ~were congregated together in the council 982 2, 47 | Shrewdness is a habit whereby congruities are ~discovered rapidly."~ 983 2, 35 | human tears." ~[Translation: Conington.]~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[35] A[ 984 2, 152 | Cf. Augustine, De Bono Conjugali, ~viii.]) that "of all these," 985 3, 60 | beginning of words in the conjugation of ~verbs.~Aquin.: SMT TP 986 Suppl, 44| the genus. Now a joining [conjunctio] is the genus of ~matrimony. 987 2, 102 | according to their various conjunctions. The second reason was in ~ 988 Suppl, 58| the terrors which a man conjures from his thoughts, and because, ~ 989 2, 65 | this does not ~suffice to connect the moral virtues together. 990 1, 115 | things, by which Providence connects each one with its proper ~ 991 2, 121 | and looks out as from the conning-tower of his mind, so as to encounter ~ 992 2, 106 | some kind of "consent" or "connivance": thus ~sometimes even the 993 Suppl, 68| according to the canons ~(Cap. Conquestus; Cap. Tanta), namely when 994 Suppl, 55| 50: ~cap. Non debent, De consang. et affinit.), "length of 995 Suppl, 54| said to be tied by blood [consanguinei]. ~Hence in the above definition " 996 Suppl, 54| than ~blood-relationship [consanguinitas].~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[54] A[ 997 1, 24 | who formerly were called ~"conscript" fathers. Now it is clear 998 2, 145 | Cap. Non mediocriter, De ~Consecrationibus, dist. 5). Gratian there 999 3, 83 | above; provided that the consecrators held faith in the Holy ~ 1000 2, 98 | that" must be taken as consecutive and not ~final: in so far 1001 2, 95 | flood-gates of heaven," ~but consecutively, because, to wit, if they 1002 2, 15 | which assent is given. But "consentire" [to consent] is "to feel ~ 1003 Suppl, 77| Augustine in his letter to Consentius (Ep. cxlvi) that "flesh 1004 1, 19 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Consequents have necessity from their


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