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St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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     Part, Question
1005 Suppl, 95| on the Canticle [*Cf. De Consideratione v, 12; De ~Gratia et Libero 1006 2, 86 | shall not sow, and he that considereth the clouds shall never ~ 1007 2, 14 | means a sitting ~together [considium], from the fact that many 1008 Appen1, 1| and eternal ~Judge will consign them neither to heavenly 1009 2, 159 | heaven." ~Likewise heavenly consolations are promised to those who 1010 2, 182 | of that book wherein he consoles himself and Basil in that ~ 1011 2, 102 | considered as something ~not yet consolidated: wherefore neither are animals 1012 Suppl, 61| 1~Reply OBJ 1: When both consorts take a like vow of continence, 1013 2, 68 | they ~would seem to have conspired together to say the same 1014 3, 49 | assigned him by God, by ~conspiring to bring about Christ's 1015 2, 90 | Jurist (Lib. i, ~ff., De Const. Prin. leg. i): "Whatsoever 1016 2, 123 | Decretals (I, Q[1], Cap. Constat.): ~"A man who has been 1017 1, 114 | twins born under the same constellation, one may be ~male, the other 1018 Suppl, 79| reason of its essential constituents. Consequently we must ~say 1019 2, 97 | Append. Gratian, on can. ~Constituit.] that if any man shall 1020 3, 78 | and secondarily of the constructing. ~Accordingly, in this form 1021 1, 103 | of fire; thus a ~builder constructs a house, by making use of 1022 2, 98 | law" [*Cap. Cum tanto, de Consuetud.; cf. FS, Q[97], A[3]]. 1023 Suppl, 44| 1~OBJ 3: Further, habit [consuetudo] pertains to morals. Yet 1024 Suppl, 43| Pope Nicholas I (Resp. ~ad Consul. Bulgar., iii). For as Isidore 1025 2, 95 | of the ~Senate" [Senatus consulta]. Another form is "oligarchy," 1026 2, 93 | earthly promises, there were ~consultations about the future in connection 1027 2, 93 | Stephen ~V [*II, qu. v., can. Consuluist i]: "The sacred canons do 1028 3, 83 | De Celebr. Miss., chap. Consuluisti) that "except on the day 1029 Suppl, 53| Alexander III] says (cap. Consuluit, De ~his qui cler. vel vovent.) 1030 2, 37 | consumed enters within the consumer. Therefore ~depression should 1031 2, 56 | be in that power ~which consummates the good act. But the knowledge 1032 2, 133 | Latin it may be called ~"consumptio" [waste].~Aquin.: SMT SS 1033 3, 66 | murderer's administration contaminates it."~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[66] 1034 3, 64 | irreverence towards God and ~the contamination of holy things, as far as 1035 2, 186 | holy reflections," i.e. contemplations, "on invisible things, to ~ 1036 2, 13 | through certain malice, by ~contemptuously rejecting the things whereby 1037 2, 36 | Job ~39:32: "Shall he that contendeth with God be so easily silenced?" 1038 2, 167 | wherefore he ~says that "contentedness is the habit that makes 1039 2, 36 | speech, this is called "contentio," which Tully ~calls one 1040 Suppl, 72| sea, roar ~at one another contentiously; on the "fifth" day, all 1041 Suppl, 2 | The same thing is crushed [conteritur] which hitherto was ~hard 1042 Suppl, 39| his Cler., dist. 1; cap. Continebatur, De ~homic. volunt.], as 1043 2, 153 | in its every action." [*"Continentem" according to St. ~Thomas' 1044 1, 92 | as much as they happen [contingit] to be so, ~but not absolutely.~ 1045 3, 80 | they should not be put in contra-distinction to one another, ~because 1046 2, 83 | derived from the will of the contractor, but through his ~natural 1047 Suppl, 55| Pope ~Julius I says (cap. Contradicimus 35, qu. iii): "No man may 1048 3, Note| positions ~which directly contradicted the Master may be seen by 1049 Suppl, 80| since this would imply that ~contradictions are true at the same time. 1050 2, 114 | person who speaks, the contradictor refusing to consent with 1051 2, 88 | considered to be a term in ~contraposition to the immutable good, unless 1052 Suppl, 58| dispensation, he sins by ~contravening the law of the Church, but 1053 2, 152 | another man or woman in contravention of the ~marriage compact, 1054 3, 27 | grace ~of her sanctification contributed to this effect, yet it did 1055 2, 186 | because their temporal contributions can be liberally repaid 1056 Suppl, 3 | body"; and Augustine [*De Contritione Cordis, work of ~an unknown 1057 1, 110 | and ~unclean passion is contrived by the demons and put into 1058 2, 44 | caused by a lack of power ~in controlling the members: which lack 1059 Suppl, 24| Apostle declares (Heb. 6:16), controversies between men are decided 1060 2, 97 | quis contumax]: ~"If anyone contumaciously or arrogantly take away 1061 2, 70 | heard ~reviling [Douay: 'contumelies'] on every side." Therefore 1062 2, 70 | Etym. x) that a reviler [contumeliosus] "is ~hasty and bursts out [ 1063 2, 102 | catholic church, and not in the conventicles of heretics.~Aquin.: SMT 1064 2, 83 | signify, not by ~nature but by convention," according to the Philosopher ( 1065 3, 7 | whom the prophet dwells and converses in this state of life. ~ 1066 2, 81 | bestowed on thee, when thou ~conversest with God in prayer, when 1067 2, 70 | is exposed by "taunts" [convicium], ~because "vice" is commonly 1068 2, 51 | self-evident proposition convinces the intellect, so ~that 1069 2, 1 | whole Church, such as to convoke a general ~council and so 1070 2, 34 | pleasure, namely, "the art of cookery and the art of making arguments," ~ 1071 2, 120 | the Sabbath, such as the cooking of food and ~so forth. And 1072 2, 51 | seen in that which heats or cools. If therefore habits were 1073 2, 60 | five of these cases the cooperator ~is always bound to restitution. 1074 2, 173 | intellect ~judges of and coordinates sensible objects. Hence 1075 2, 171 | understanding, so the various coordinations of the phantasms ~produce 1076 2, 186 | princes being unable to cope with unbelievers in certain ~ 1077 2, 152 | crime," ~says that "they copulated with cattle." After this 1078 2, 68 | Eccles. 4:12): "A threefold cord is not easily ~broken": 1079 2, 183 | churches for preaching to the Corinthians, wherefore it is clear ~ 1080 2, 102 | his deeds of darkness. The cormorant, so ~constituted that it 1081 2, 95 | about adultery, the "Lex ~Cornelia" concerning assassins, and 1082 2, 95 | that one be called the "Cornelian" law, another the ~"Falcidian" 1083 3, 44 | did not hide Himself in a corner of the Temple, as ~if afraid, 1084 3, 36 | the Magi. Yet ~did this Corner-Stone draw both to Itself; inasmuch 1085 3, 36 | to Him together as to the cornerstone." There was also ~another 1086 3, 39 | namely, "by the dove corning upon the Lord when ~He was 1087 2, 100 | the decalogue, as so many ~corollaries. Thus the first commandment 1088 2, 31 | ensues therefrom, if the corrector's sin be well known, ~because 1089 1, 5 | and actuality properly correlates to potentiality; ~a thing 1090 2, 109 | And Augustine says (De Corrept. et Gratia ii) ~that "without 1091 3, 36 | Consequently this does not corroborate the error of those who " 1092 1, 87 | opinion, which experience corroborates, our intellect ~in its present 1093 2, 32 | sorrow: because ~his "body is corroded by a base humor," as stated 1094 2, 64 | commits a rape is called a corrupter, and the ~victim of the 1095 2, 62 | since "a little leaven corrupteth the whole lump" (1 Cor. ~ 1096 2, 48 | outward assailants and corruptives: and for this reason she 1097 2, 115 | under the designation of costs or ~expenditure; while the 1098 2, 93 | some claim on thee, thou couldst not act more justly than ~ 1099 1, 24 | for instance, soldiers, or counsellors, who formerly were called ~" 1100 2, 57 | so far as they are good counselors in matters of warfare, or ~ 1101 2, 59 | the just is the same as ~counter-passion?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[61] A[ 1102 2, 53 | agencies which need to be counteracted by acts ~proceeding from 1103 1, 80 | because it has no superior ~counteracting appetite. On the contrary, 1104 Suppl, 43| age in one is ~more than counterbalanced in the other.~Aquin.: SMT 1105 3, 43 | And this is how He worked countless ~miracles." Hence on Mt. 1106 2, 150 | false ~opinion of his fellow countrymen," as Augustine remarks ( 1107 2, 23 | faculty there are ~three couples of passions; viz. love and 1108 2, 185 | his tongue. For watchmen, ~couriers, and such like who live 1109 2, 38 | certain "rights of war and covenants, which ~ought to be observed 1110 1, 22 | 14): "The clouds ~are His covert; and He doth not consider 1111 2, 38 | port of Rome secretly and covertly; ~for which reason we commanded 1112 2, 122 | thief, or a railer, or a coveter of other men's things. But 1113 2, 129 | with the ~bravest men, cowards are held in dishonor, and 1114 1, 118 | sometimes the flesh of ~cows, pigs and suchlike. If therefore, 1115 2, 53 | he adds ~that "Venus doth cozen the wits of the wisest man" [* 1116 3, 36 | judgment-seat; since from His cradle He struck terror into ~the 1117 1, 95 | accounts for the fact that ~cranes follow their leader, and 1118 2, 184 | Paulin.): "The famous Theban, Crates, once a very wealthy man, 1119 3, 16 | Godhead is passible or ~creatable." Now the Godhead is the 1120 1, 14 | not only what is common to creatures--viz. being - belongs to ~ 1121 1, 1 | Augustine says (De util. cred. iii) that "the Old ~Testament 1122 2, 1 | under ~the common aspect of credibility; and in this way they are 1123 2, 30 | duty by all," and the most ~creditable way of doing this is to 1124 2, 105 | readiness ceases if the creditors do not return the pledges: 1125 2, 148 | feeding sometimes hath ~crept upon Thy servant."~Aquin.: 1126 Suppl, 40| which reason it has two crests; the "crozier," his ~pastoral 1127 1, 36 | example from Maunder, "Jhesu Criste was the worde ~and the goste 1128 Suppl, 93| are not to be taken as a criterion of ~the statements of Holy 1129 3, 54 | of ~the blood some keener critic will press us and say; If 1130 2, 102 | behind [Vulg.: 'if he be crook-backed']: by which is signified 1131 2, 13 | following a stag, on coming to a crossroad, tries by scent whether 1132 2, 97 | because ~the laws of old were crude in many points. Therefore 1133 2, 157 | apparently takes its name from "cruditas" ~[rawness]. Now just as 1134 Suppl, 37| subdeacons to minister with the cruets. Therefore it ~should not 1135 Suppl, 2 | away by contrition which crushes it.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[2] 1136 Suppl, 74| 10, ~whereas 1,000 is a cube resulting from the multiplication 1137 3, 78 | nearly all these words can be culled from various passages of 1138 3, 88 | Poenituisse piget, pristina culpa redit."~For the more grievous 1139 2, 140 | disgraceful. The reason is that culpability is ~measured by inordinateness 1140 2, 93 | our authority, ~after the culprit has made spontaneous confession, 1141 2, 79 | presence: we even speak of cultivating ~things that are beneath 1142 2, 79 | unlettered but even most cultured persons ere ~wont to speak 1143 2, 152 | happens when nature is ~cumbered with other superfluities, 1144 2, 116 | kyminopristes} [skinflint], a ~cumin-seller, as it were, because he 1145 2, 182 | said ~(XVI, qu. i, can. Cunctis): "Priests and deacons must 1146 2, 139 | Tim. 6:10). ~"Desire [*'Cupiditas,' which is the Douay version 1147 3, 38 | observe, the washings of cups and of pots, ~and of brazen 1148 2, 164 | 14): "Make not provision [curam] for the flesh in ~its concupiscences."~ 1149 2, 140 | 167]], such as the nice [curiosa] preparation of food, or 1150 3, 16 | qualification that he is curly, since this ~can only belong 1151 2, 115 | anything ~that can be valued in currency."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[117] 1152 2, 117 | great expense in ~order to curry favor with certain persons 1153 2, 74 | according to 1 Cor. ~6:10, "Nor cursers [Douay: 'railers'], nor 1154 Suppl, 96| punishment is ~prolonged or curtailed, according as is expedient 1155 2, 113 | 18, "Woe to them that sew cushions ~under every elbow," says, " 1156 2, 21 | itself against him that cutteth with it? Or ~shall the saw 1157 2, 34 | education of her daughter (Ep. cvii): "Let her have companions, ~ 1158 Suppl, 95| Augustine ~(Enchiridion cxi). Therefore after the judgment 1159 1, 14 | says (De Vid. Deum. ep. cxii), "The whole is ~comprehended 1160 2, 174 | Migne, Patr. Lat. tom. CXLI]: "On this day Thou gavest ~ 1161 3, 80 | De Verbis Domini (Serm. cxlii) ~says: "Christ is to be 1162 2, 60 | Augustine says (Ep. ad Maced. cxliii): "Unless a man ~restore 1163 2, 159 | Augustine says in a letter ~(Ep. cxlix) that it is "grievous pride," 1164 2, 93 | Augustine [*QQ. in Genes., qu. cxlv], when ~Joseph said that 1165 2, 71 | the Great, Sum. Theol. II, cxvii.], "the blackening of another' 1166 2, 151 | Hales, Summ. Theol. ii, cxvli]. But wanton pleasure ~regards 1167 2, 86 | Ep. ad Arment. et Paulin. cxxcii): "Repent not of thy vow: 1168 3, 36 | sermon on the Epiphany ~(cxxii): "While God yet clings 1169 3, 36 | sermon on ~the Epiphany (cxxxi, cxxxii), say that the star 1170 3, 36 | on ~the Epiphany (cxxxi, cxxxii), say that the star was 1171 Suppl, 88| and ~thus there will be a cycle of changes in the world 1172 Suppl, 79| With ~singing and with cymbals." Wherefore, according to 1173 2, 94 | incantations or of ~certain cyphers which they call characters, 1174 1, 114 | the same effect in heat in Dacia as in Ethiopia); so the 1175 2, 93 | Christ. ii, 23,24; De Divin. Daem. 3]. Therefore ~it is not, 1176 Suppl, 40| it first came into use in Dalmatia), to ~signify that he is 1177 Suppl, 72| Further, Jerome [*St. Peter Damian, Opuscul. xlix; he quotes 1178 2, 19 | 2: Further, God wills to damn the man whom He foresees 1179 Suppl, 68| but ~a person cannot be damnified except for a fault. Hence 1180 2, 60 | equivalent: for instance if a man damnifies another by ~destroying his 1181 2, 60 | English than in Latin, ~where 'damnum' stands for 'loss,' and ' 1182 2, 87 | swore to the ~damsel, who danced before him, that he would 1183 2, 120 | the Sabbath than to be dancing lewdly all day in their 1184 Appen1, 2| instanced in those who ~lie dangerously ill; nor again does it calm 1185 2, 83 | administer ~sacred things (sacra dantes): cf. 1 Cor. 4:1] are so 1186 3, 69 | Presence of God, addressed ~to Dardanus (Ep. clxxxvii).~Aquin.: 1187 2, 132 | fortitude is about fear and darings. But magnificence ~seems 1188 3, 83 | sign that He came to the darknesses of our infirmity; hence 1189 3, 15 | but brought no pain; as a dart piercing the water." ~Hence 1190 Suppl, 72| divided into four parts dashing against ~one another; on 1191 2, 94 | Dist. v): "The natural law ~dates from the creation of the 1192 2, 106 | Again, for the sin of Dathan and Abiron their children ~ 1193 3, 83 | whereby Christ rises "as the day-star in ~our [Vulg.: 'your'] 1194 Suppl, 50| of ~matrimony (Sent. iv, DD 29,30). Here, however, he 1195 Suppl, 39| deaconesses and priestesses. But deaconess ~there denotes a woman who 1196 Suppl, 39| qu. i) mention is made of deaconesses and priestesses. But deaconess ~ 1197 Appen2, 1| that falls into mortal sin, deadens all the good he has ~done 1198 3, 41 | into all sorts of folly, deafening ~it with their bestial clamor."~ 1199 2, 184 | is our ~liberty, which is dearer to man than aught else. 1200 2, 162 | day when they heard the ~death-decree, condemning them to decline 1201 Suppl, 86| merit exalts, whereas sin debases. ~Wherefore since the angelic 1202 2, 167 | abusing its needs, ~and debasing art by art."~ 1203 2, 151 | venereal pleasures above all debauch a ~man's mind. Therefore 1204 2, 151 | lustful man is one who is ~debauched with pleasures." Now venereal 1205 Suppl, 55| iv, can. 50: ~cap. Non debent, De consang. et affinit.), " 1206 3, 88 | Forgive us our trespasses [debita]." Therefore they too return 1207 3, 66 | Baptismo et ejus effectu, cap. ~Debitum).~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[66] A[ 1208 2, 175 | to women, as we read of Deborah (Judges 4:4), and ~of Holda 1209 2, 80 | relates ~of the two Decii (Decad. I, viii, 9; x, 28). Hence 1210 2, 103 | former old: ~and that which decayeth and groweth old, is near 1211 3, 45 | spoke" with Him "of His decease that He should ~accomplish 1212 2, 182 | perfect are in mortal sin, as deceivers and liars.~Aquin.: SMT SS 1213 Suppl, 93| of Dominican ~Breviary, December 13th]; not that she has 1214 2, 80 | Livy relates ~of the two Decii (Decad. I, viii, 9; x, 28). 1215 2, 84 | 14; cf. Cap. ~Decimam, de Decim. Primit. et Oblat.]: "According 1216 2, 84 | Ezech. 45:13,14; cf. Cap. ~Decimam, de Decim. Primit. et Oblat.]: " 1217 2, 84 | down (16, qu. vii, can. Decimas): "We ~confirm the right 1218 2, 156 | assigned "hell-fire," i.e. "decisive ~condemnation."~Aquin.: 1219 2, 107 | And ~it is in the point of declarations of this kind that the precepts 1220 2, 87 | Cf. Bede, Homil. xix, in Decoll. S. Joan. Bapt.]~Aquin.: 1221 3, 51 | 3) Whether His body was decomposed in the tomb?~(4) Concerning 1222 3, 74 | Aut dulcis musti Vulcano ~decoquit humorem"; Virgil, Georg. 1223 1, 96 | disposed by God as to be decorous and ~suitable to the state.~ 1224 Suppl, 55| other either increasing or decreasing then, although ~previously 1225 2, 55 | it ~just, for instance by decreeing that it is lawful to steal 1226 Suppl, 95| strength faileth; who is in a decrepit age, and that is in care ~ 1227 3, 37 | et Circumcis.]: from the decrepitude of which we ~are freed by 1228 3, 67 | contrary, Pope Urban II says (Decreta xxx): "In reply to the ~ 1229 2, 185 | Decretals (Dist. xxxviii, ~can. Decrevit): "The holy synod decrees 1230 3, 83 | celebrated each year: and that dedications are to be kept up for eight ~ 1231 2, 178 | others are concerned with deducing from the ~principles, the 1232 2, 85 | Hence it is not right to ~deduct one's taxes and the wages 1233 2, 47 | demonstrations. Now every deduction of reason proceeds from 1234 Suppl, 80| geometry which are ~infallible deductions from common principles - 1235 3, 45 | boundaries" [*Euclid, bk i, def. xiv]. ~Therefore whatever 1236 2, 167 | that nowise should they deface God's work and ~fabric, 1237 2, 71 | as it were. And if such defamatory ~words be uttered for the 1238 2, 113 | defamed, since at times ~he defames him in secret, but seeks 1239 2, 156 | justice and the correction of defaults, then the desire of anger 1240 2, 136 | cast down ~by fear, to be defeated by lust, or who has proved 1241 1, 19 | cannot fail; but to others ~defectible and contingent causes, from 1242 3, 31 | Jechonias there was a ~certain defection to strange nations during 1243 Suppl, 63| defect in a sacrament [*"Defectus ~sacramenti," i.e. defect 1244 1, 80 | it were, the champion and defender of the concupiscible ~when 1245 3, 80 | But there are other bodily defilements which ~according to the 1246 2, 66 | of the ~precept" [*Can. Definimus, caus. iv, qu. 1; caus. 1247 2, 52 | so had a certain ~want of definiteness, on account of the infinity 1248 2, 95 | But if in any point it deflects from the law of nature, 1249 Suppl, 58| therefore ~insufficient for the deflowering of a virgin. Or again it 1250 Suppl, 89| of a ~white thing were to degenerate to the image of a black 1251 2, 105 | framing ~unjust laws, and by degenerating into tyrants who preyed 1252 1, 12 | intellect in a kind of "deiformity," as appears from what is 1253 2, 112 | necessary that God alone should deify, bestowing a partaking of 1254 3, 28 | the substantial ~Word, deigning to be born, destroy virginity."~ 1255 2, 80 | that "God calls whom He deigns to ~call, and whom He wills 1256 2, 45 | there is "cleverness," ~[*{deinotike}] i.e. natural diligence 1257 3, 41 | assault to tempt Christ to dejection and hatred of ~His neighbor; 1258 2, 74 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, delectations differ in goodness and malice, 1259 Suppl, 8 | other. Now a higher superior delegates a man in two ways: first, 1260 3, 66 | act of procreation is not deleted, but the soul is freed ~ 1261 Suppl, 52| decision of the time-honored deliberations of many ~wise men. Moreover 1262 2, 74 | Further, since the reason is a deliberative power, there can be ~no 1263 2, 185 | those who have thus ~been delicately brought up are wont to be 1264 2, 139 | secondarily it regards its delicious savor and the way in which 1265 1, 114 | that a man in a ~state of delirium should speak an unknown 1266 2, 123 | not even ~earthquakes nor deluges, inspired him with fear." 1267 2, 71 | at least by our pained ~demeanor show him that we are displeased 1268 Suppl, 95| of Sentent. iv. But they ~demerited by the evil will that they 1269 2, 180 | De Compunct. i, 7 ~[*Ad Demetr. de Compunct. Cordis.]): " 1270 2, 138 | affairs there are laws of democracies, others of kingdoms, and ~ 1271 2, 107 | a state-law ordained to democratic ~government, would differ 1272 2, 105 | aristocracy. But it was a ~democratical government in so far as 1273 3, 80 | on that ~account, and the demoniacal illusion ceased.~Aquin.: 1274 2, 148 | for Gregory [*Cf. Canon Denique, dist. 4 where ~Gratian 1275 2, 92 | stated to be certain animal denizens of the air, and beneath 1276 2, 66 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The denouncer does not bind himself to 1277 Suppl, 80| it would be ~rarefied and densified, which is impossible. Secondly, 1278 2, 31 | rather than accusations or denunciations. ~If, however, they should 1279 Suppl, 70| perfect substance nowise ~dependant on the body, and merely 1280 2, 118 | for instance, in his ~deportment, dress or the like. Possibly 1281 Suppl, 40| hands, dedicate churches, depose clerics, celebrate ~synods, 1282 2, 98 | punishments, namely, infamy and deposition, if they be clerics, and ~ 1283 Suppl, 29| form, viz. the prayer ~of deprecation, are said by all; but other 1284 Suppl, 72| any foreign matter ~that depreciates it is removed therefrom: 1285 2, 131 | nothing hinders him from ~depreciating himself in some things, 1286 2, 37 | sorrow at times does not depress ~or consume the soul, so 1287 Suppl, 15| perfects him: so that the deprivation ~cannot be effected by a 1288 Suppl, 60| sin, just as the ~judge's deputy does not sin by killing 1289 2, 77 | as it were ~contemptuous dereliction of duty: and then it has 1290 2, 77 | to signify the same as ~"derelictum" [*Augustine, QQ. in Levit., 1291 2, 73 | written (Prov. 3:34): "He derideth [Vulg.: 'shall ~scorn'] 1292 Suppl, 54| more distantly related to a descendant from the ~common stock, 1293 3, 28 | unbecoming that it should be desecrated by intercourse ~with man.~ 1294 3, 1 | needful. But because man, on deserting God, had ~stooped to corporeal 1295 2, 185 | Jerome says (ad Ripar. et ~Desider. [*Contra Vigilant. xvi]): " 1296 1, 81 | soul is divided into the desiderative and ~irascible, and Damascene 1297 1, 2 | that not ~fortuitously, but designedly, do they achieve their end. 1298 3, 36 | and for the time ~being desisted from his anxiety to slay 1299 2, 6 | happens frequently that a man desists from ~one act of sin, through 1300 1, 92 | are a trace of fire, and desolation of the land a trace of ~ 1301 2, 40 | The very name of despair [desperatio] implies that it ~is contrary 1302 2, 47 | ii, 2, viz. "contempt," "despiteful ~treatment," i.e. hindering 1303 2, 116 | whoredom, usurers, gamblers, despoilers of the dead, ~and robbers." 1304 2, 116 | thou possessest, hence thou despoilest as many as thou mightest ~ 1305 Suppl, 47| law (cap. Ex litteris, De despon. impub.). Therefore, etc.~ 1306 2, 58 | soul rules the body like a despot," i.e. as a master rules 1307 2, 85 | directed to virtue; ~which destitution is called a wounding of 1308 Suppl, 70| bestows nothing on it but ~detains it, as stated above. Hence 1309 3, 75 | this ~sacrament cannot be detected by sense, nor understanding, 1310 Suppl, 88| that ~the heaven should deteriorate when he sinned, or that 1311 2, 162 | of our first parents as a deterrent to ~others, for whose benefit 1312 2, 39 | will, well disposed and detesting that evil. Now ~every virtuous 1313 2, 40 | while the rest strive to dethrone him. Therefore there can 1314 2, 71 | man is said to backbite [detrehere] another, not because ~he 1315 1, 23 | Reply OBJ 1: These words of Deuteronomy must be taken as applied 1316 3, 33 | it behooved His body to develop in the same way ~as the 1317 1, 32 | third person, ~because they deviated from the goodness appropriated 1318 2, 12 | dominion, since dominion is a device of the law of ~nations which 1319 3, 75 | who had been the first deviser of this ~heresy, was afterwards 1320 3, 36 | He was born, because it devolved on them to show reverence ~ 1321 2, 102 | that obeys tend no less devotedly [*Cf. Q[82], A[2]] to ~the 1322 3, 42 | excellence of their faith and devotedness.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[42] A[ 1323 2, 80 | times among the heathens a devotee was one who vowed ~to his 1324 Suppl, 72| know in ~the Word the vows, devotions, and prayers of those who 1325 2, 87 | man oppresseth [Vulg.: 'devoureth'], ~the man that is more 1326 2, 31 | lowing of an ox, but in devouring ~it" (Ethic. iii, 10).~Aquin.: 1327 3, 4 | Innocent III ~[*Paschas. Diac., De Spiritu Sanct. ii] 1328 Suppl, 39| Mulieres dist. 32; cap. Diaconissam, ~27, qu. i) mention is 1329 3, 46 | purple robes, on their diadems, on their weapons, on the 1330 2, 102 | parts that leprosy is ~first diagnosed and felt. In this rite, 1331 3, 26 | seen from the following diagram:~THE LAW AND THE COURSE 1332 Suppl, 69| in the fourth book of the Dialogues. There is, however, this ~ 1333 3, 44 | with the sun," so as to be diametrically ~opposite, having withdrawn 1334 Suppl, 89| instance Socrates; the son of ~Diares; a friend and the like which 1335 2, 93 | the lesser. or by throwing dice, and ~observing who throws 1336 2, 58 | he asserts the right [jus dicens] ~and right is the object 1337 2, 74 | as to speak ill [malum ~dicere]. Now "speaking" has a threefold 1338 1, 13 | transcendental ~[secundum dici]. Thus, there is the same 1339 2, 19 | know that human reason was dictating something contrary ~to God' 1340 3, 42 | which they ~knew under His dictation. For at His command they, 1341 2, 161 | greatest ~(Metaph. ii, 4 [*Ed. Diel. i, 1]). Now the sin of 1342 Suppl, 48| according to Boethius (De Diff., Topic. ii) "a thing is ~ 1343 1, 26 | according to 1 Cor. 15:41: "Star differeth from star in glory." But ~ 1344 2, 13 | children of despair" [*'Filios diffidentiae,' ~which the Douay version 1345 2, 1 | contained in Holy Writ, diffusely, ~under various modes of 1346 2, 72 | rapid exhaustion of the digestive humors; and that he desire 1347 2, 39 | the servants of Isaac ~"digged" another well, "and for 1348 1, 115 | form this proposition: "The digger of a grave found a ~treasure." 1349 3, 51 | that He was stolen away by digging away the ~foundations of 1350 2, 93 | be discovered when a man digs a grave - for these and 1351 2, 118 | epi}, i.e. "above," and {dikaion}, i.e. "just." ~Therefore " 1352 2, 33 | as being derived ~from "dilatatio" [expansion], as stated 1353 1, 78 | wisdom], and phronesis if dilated ~makes thought, that is, 1354 2, 45 | being a defect, but ~through dilating the heart: and again through 1355 2, 31 | gladness] is derived from the ~"dilation" of the heart, as if one 1356 Suppl, 8 | et Remiss., Cap. Ne pro dilatione) to choose a priest for ~ 1357 2, 26 | contrary, Bernard says (De Dilig. Deum 1) that "God is the 1358 3, 36 | to the time which he had diligently ~inquired from the wise 1359 2, 52 | because the ~more we love [diligimus] a thing the more solicitous 1360 3, 66 | earth rather than water, and diluted wine ~is wine rather than 1361 1, 3 | error is that of David of Dinant, ~who most absurdly taught 1362 3, 28 | that his mind was set on dining in port." ~In like manner 1363 2, 10 | military cloak in the palace of Diocletian.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[10] A[ 1364 3, 45 | as Augustine says (Ep. ad Diosc. cxviii). And in like manner 1365 Suppl, 58| man impotent would not disable the woman. Yet there may 1366 2, 36 | vainglory, because each of the disaccording parties clings to his own ~ 1367 2, 152 | accomplished in a manner ~disadvantageous to the future child.~Aquin.: 1368 1, 77 | advantages and uses, or ~disadvantages: just as the sheep runs 1369 3, 46 | the eye is pricked, or is disaffected by ~heat.~Aquin.: SMT TP 1370 Suppl, 64| reads "judicare."] her ~disaffection, lest this make her husband 1371 2, 38 | account of the difficulty and disappointment in the search for truth; 1372 3, 64 | to the Church, ~will reap disaster from their Baptism." In 1373 2, 5 | contrary to charity, so is ~disbelief in one article of faith 1374 2, 65 | would be impossible, if one disbelieved in, or ~despaired of, the 1375 3, 83 | no account are they to be discarded ~for works of the laity." 1376 1, 14 | and the marrow, and is a discerner of thoughts and intents 1377 2, 108 | and 10, they were either ~disciplinary commands for that particular 1378 2, 36 | not with the ~intention of disclaiming the truth, since each one 1379 Suppl, 85| the Apostle (2 Thess. 2:2) disclaims the false signification ~ 1380 3, 80 | secret sinners must ~not be disclosed, for, once the blush of 1381 2, 35 | other results in a kind of discomfort.~~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[35] A[ 1382 3, 36 | King, they would have been disconcerted at finding that they had ~ 1383 1, 3 | quantity alone; and unity, of discontinuous quantity. But God ~is the 1384 2, 64 | this sort, evil consists in discordance from their rule or ~measure. 1385 2, 104 | promptness enhances, delay discounts a favor."~Aquin.: SMT SS 1386 2, 172 | out ~of the wall, and he discoursed of beasts and of fowls, 1387 1, 2 | there would be no evil discoverable; but there is evil in the ~ 1388 2, 169 | according to Job 12:22, ~"He discovereth great things out of darkness."~ 1389 3, 40 | one might quote to his ~discredit that which is written, Lk. 1390 1, 31 | the terms "alien" and ~"discrepant." For Ambrose says (De Fide 1391 2, 182 | ministers is cleansing and discretive." Hence ~it is evident that 1392 2, 105 | of God, eunuchs were not discriminated from ~others, as neither 1393 2, 178 | because they all denote discursions of ~reason. For if the reason 1394 2, 69 | ill becomes one who has disdained to be just himself, to plead 1395 3, 27 | mind a unity of purpose and disengaged it from a ~multiplicity 1396 2, 111 | men (Mt. 6:16) that "they disfigure their faces that ~they may 1397 1, 92 | reason; ~"or obscured and disfigured," as in sinners; or "clear 1398 2, 154 | concupiscence is fain to disguise itself and creeps in by ~ 1399 2, 109 | come on to the stage with a disguised ~face, by changing the color 1400 2, 92 | forasmuch as the things he ~did dishonestly were so done by him that 1401 2, 53 | renounce the hidden ~things of dishonesty, not walking in craftiness, 1402 2, 73 | to Micah 7:6: "the son ~dishonoreth the father, and the daughter 1403 Suppl, 91| children come to honour or dishonour, he shall not understand,' 1404 2, 105 | negligence or from some disinclination to virtue in him. And yet ~ 1405 2, 121 | through the will being disinclined to follow that which is 1406 Suppl, 83| likening ~them to itself it disintegrates them. Therefore if the bodies 1407 2, 92 | each of them desired or disliked, and by what ~name to invite 1408 2, 44 | drives away all ~thought, and dislocates the mind," as Cicero observes ( 1409 2, 144 | impatience ~not unfrequently dislodges the abstainer's mind from 1410 2, 149 | awhoring ~from [Douay: 'are disloyal to'] Thee." Therefore chastity 1411 3, 83 | deacon on festival days "dismisses" the people at the ~end 1412 Suppl, 33| can be repeated without disparaging that sacrament, in order 1413 Suppl, 40| threatened captivity and ~dispersion to those who were shaven 1414 2, 88 | displaces a pillar is said ~to displace the stone that rests on 1415 2, 88 | removing an obstacle, as he who displaces a pillar is said ~to displace 1416 3, 5 | esteemed not merely for displaying their skill in ~precious 1417 2, 167 | established morality, it displays its deformity in ~a most 1418 1, 22 | the Supreme Ruler; which ~disposeth all things": which disposition 1419 2, 132 | its difficulty from the dispossession of one's property, ~which 1420 2, 165 | and to the discovery and dispraise of our ~neighbor's faults," 1421 2, 87 | in connection with human disputes, as the Apostle declares ( 1422 Suppl, 42| Law as regards ~personal disqualifications; and it was instituted in 1423 2, 70 | one object, he cannot be disquieted by ~any other, since he 1424 2, 145 | those who ~are humbled by disquietude, and this is not befitting 1425 2, 64 | against ~general justice by disregarding the order of justice and 1426 2, 142 | man is ashamed of poverty, disrepute, servitude, and the like.~ 1427 2, 95 | a greater sin to behave disrespectfully ~to one's parents, than 1428 2, 109 | evident therefore that neither dissembled.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[111] A[ 1429 2, 109 | which he is not, yet he dissembles not ~if he omits to signify 1430 2, 109 | simulate ~holiness in order to disseminate false doctrine, or that 1431 2, 15 | commanded to slay anyone who ~disseminated doctrine contrary to faith. 1432 2, 40 | sense, is between mutually dissentient parts of one people, as ~ 1433 Suppl, 22| that there would be no ~dissentients. Now God, Who judges all 1434 2, 73 | venial sin is to relapse or dissimulate altogether, but only ~dispositively 1435 2, 109 | as the Latin ~has it, a dissimulator, is a covetous thief: for 1436 2, 173 | swine ~debased himself by a dissipated mind and an unclean life; 1437 2, 28 | spoke." Therefore love is a dissolvent: therefore it is a ~corruptive 1438 Suppl, 67| that the husband might be ~dissuaded by the counsel of the notaries 1439 2, 146 | 19): "When the belly is distended by gluttony, ~the virtues 1440 2, 167 | the Divine ~handiwork, a distortion of the truth. Thou shalt 1441 2, 11 | the Holy Ghost, when he so distorts the meaning of Holy ~Writ, 1442 1, 85 | and freer from external distractions. The same may also come 1443 Suppl, 41| occupation about lower things distracts the mind so that ~it is 1444 2, 41 | that "the man who is not distraught by fear, is ~neither harassed 1445 Suppl, 70| in any way be hurtful or ~distressful to it, except in so far 1446 3, 7 | participations, bestowed distributively and ~particularly upon divers 1447 2, 60 | Compensation is made by the distributor to the man to whom ~less 1448 Suppl, 95| about all things, and to the distrustful that loseth wisdom [Vulg.: ~' 1449 2, 73 | together. But self-love disunites man's ~affections among 1450 3, 31 | Further, there seem to be divergencies between them on several ~ 1451 3, 46 | Therefore, lest anyone might divert the thought of so great 1452 3, 59 | appointed Me judge, or ~divider over you?" Consequently, 1453 2, 93 | Decretals (26, qu. v, can. Qui ~divinationes): "Those who seek for divinations 1454 2, 170 | says that "Balaam was a diviner, ~for he sometimes foreknew 1455 2, 28 | love in chapter iv of De ~Divinis Nominibus.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1456 1, 22 | corrupted, he attributed to the divinities ~who circulate in the heavens; 1457 3, 19 | i.e. a God-manlike ~or Divino-human, operation not by any confusion 1458 3, 89 | Gregory declares (Hom. de Divite et Lazaro, 41 in Evang.) 1459 Suppl, 65| OBJ 2: In a Decretal (De divortiis, cap. Gaudemus) it is asserted ~ 1460 2, 11 | Decretals (xxiv, qu. 3, can. Dixit Apostolus): "By no means 1461 2, 23 | is ~from De Salutaribus Documentis ad quemdam comitem, vii., 1462 2, 106 | execute wrath upon him ~that doeth evil." If, however, a man 1463 1, 13 | barking dog, and of the dogfish, it must be said of some ~ 1464 2, 102 | sin-offerings because their song is ~doleful.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[101] A[ 1465 2, 63 | the household [Douay: ~'domestics'] of God" (Eph. 2:19), differ 1466 3, 83 | Cyprian ~observes (De Orat. Domin. 31), "The priest, in saying 1467 2, 134 | prevails, because it is dominant in man. Hence man is more ~ 1468 3, 86 | diminished, so as not ~to domineer over man, and they are after 1469 1, 95 | command not by the love of domineering, but by ~the service of 1470 3, 16 | speak of our Lord as 'homo ~dominicus' (a lordly man)].~Aquin.: 1471 2, 64 | i, De ~acquirend, rerum dominio, 9: Inst. II, i, 48]: wherefore 1472 2, 105 | gratuitous and absolute donations, but also of mutual transfers: 1473 3, 66 | Haeres. lxix) ~relates of the Donatists. Wherefore, in detestation 1474 2, 102 | the worship of Venus men donned women's ~attire. The second 1475 2, 185 | religious works, in which the donors of temporal goods wish to 1476 3, 44 | Him, He foreshadows their doom by His sentence on the ~ 1477 3, 47 | the imperial message ~is doomed to die, as despising the 1478 2, 94 | walking together; kicking ~the door-post when anyone passes in front 1479 2, 102 | blood of the lamb on the ~door-posts, from the danger of extermination 1480 Appen2, 1| Nyssa [*De iis qui in fide dormiunt] says: "If one ~who loves 1481 Suppl, 92| FIVE ARTICLES) [*The Latin 'dos' signifies a dowry.]~We 1482 2, 75 | should be entirely free from double-dealing: the ~seller must not impose 1483 2, 51 | written (James 1:8): "A double-minded man is ~inconstant in all 1484 2, 102 | 18): "The women knead the dough, to make cakes to the queen 1485 Suppl, 92| by the masters. Hence the dower of which ~we speak now is 1486 2, 19 | is due to his being over ~downcast, because when this state 1487 2, 185 | wont to be ~despised and downtrodden. Such persons surely cannot 1488 Suppl, 71| Judas "sent twelve ~thousand drachms of silver to Jerusalem . . . 1489 2, 88 | related to have adjured dragons and ~to have commanded them 1490 3, 31 | dry up the ~filth in the drain, and yet not be defiled: 1491 2, 101 | of the theatre or of the drama: ~because formerly the actions 1492 3, 80 | on account of the many drawbacks ~both spiritual and corporal 1493 2, 44 | what he fears seems more dreadful. ~Consequently owing to 1494 1, 93 | consequently have slept and dreamed. Therefore he would have 1495 1, 113 | which whether thinking or ~dreaming, takes the forms of an innumerable 1496 3, 47 | as one person is said to drench another by not ~closing 1497 Suppl, 29| sores: they are not ~. . . dressed nor fomented with oil." 1498 1, 103 | certain things. Thus ~a cook dresses the food by applying the 1499 1, 101 | and keep paradise, which dressing would not have involved 1500 2, 102 | allowed to partake of the drier kinds, of which the fins ~ 1501 1, 113 | we might say that he who ~dries the wood is the cause of 1502 2, 102 | drank the wine of their drink-offerings." Secondly, ~in order to 1503 3, 36 | to the fleetness of the dromedaries. And I say ~this on the 1504 Suppl, 33| duration, as hectic fever, dropsy and the like, and those


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