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St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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     Part, Question
1505 2, 75 | Thy silver is turned into ~dross, thy wine is mingled with 1506 2, 93 | things ~concerning rains and droughts, and physicians, concerning 1507 2, 33 | altogether, while others are drowsy and fulfil them with negligence. 1508 1, 96 | The tree of life, like a drug, warded off all bodily ~ 1509 3, 84 | externally, such as plasters and ~drugs, while others are acts of 1510 3, 81 | agility, when He ~walked dryshod upon the sea; clarity, in 1511 2, 182 | Decret. xix, qu. 2, ~can. Duae sunt) - or again an archdeacon 1512 3, 17 | personal ~property. Now the dual number is placed in Christ 1513 2, 10 | reason in settlement of a dubious matter: whereas things ~ 1514 Suppl, 66| decree of Innocent III (cap. Dubium, De bigamia). Nor again 1515 2, 102 | walking: for it swims ~like a duck in the water, and walks 1516 2, 93 | apply to the law concerning duels, save that ~it approaches 1517 Suppl, 35| sense in understanding, and dukedom in ~kingdom. Afterwards, 1518 3, 74 | for its sweetness [*"Aut dulcis musti Vulcano ~decoquit 1519 2, 36 | Augustine says (De viii QQ. Dulcit. ~qu. 1) that sorrow is 1520 3, 15 | contemplation of Divine things dulls ~the sense of pain; hence 1521 Suppl, 86| imprisoned for ever in the dungeon of hell, so that ~they will 1522 3, 26 | who ~was the master of Duns Scotus (1308)]. No doubt 1523 2, 93 | lest his ~soul become the dupe of the demons and by making 1524 2, 79 | Further, Fulgentius says (De Dupl. Praedest. i, 19): "God 1525 1, 96 | greater a ~force is, the more durable is its effect; therefore, 1526 Suppl, 88| who endeavors to prove ~(Dux errantium iii) that the 1527 Suppl, 78| the resurrection, ~as in dwarfs, and in like manner in those 1528 Suppl, 88| dwelling should befit the dweller. But the world was made ~ 1529 3, 25 | His lance, and His sacred dwelling-places, such as the ~manger, the 1530 2, 108 | received in eternal life, dwindled into a temporal meed on 1531 2, 102 | purple, on ~account of the dyes which are taken out of the 1532 2, 102 | kinds were forbidden. In the eagle ~which flies at a great 1533 2, 85 | 4), special ~tithes were earmarked for the assistance of the 1534 2, 187 | in the world in order to earn the means of paying the ~ 1535 2, 123 | pain, if nothing, not even ~earthquakes nor deluges, inspired him 1536 2, 70 | which is ~revenge: since the easiest way for the angry man to 1537 2, 145 | is solemnly conferred on Easter-eve, on which day our ~Lord' 1538 3, 44 | sun and passes it on its ~eastward course. But in this case 1539 3, 44 | consequently it had to return eastwards towards the sun, ~so as 1540 Suppl, 77| nature, besides something ebbing and flowing, that ~belongs. 1541 2, 32 | this portion ~of things ebbs and flows alternately displeased 1542 3, 28 | belongs to the heresy of the ~Ebionites and Cerinthus, who held 1543 1, 110 | dazzling ~(French version, "eblouissement"), which the Latin "caecitas" ( 1544 Suppl, 83| fire without hurt, such as ebony. The ~instance of the salamander 1545 1, 22 | speaking, commands all that 'ebulia' has rightly ~counselled 1546 1, 32 | astrology the theory of ~eccentrics and epicycles is considered 1547 1, 18 | Nom. vi, 1) that "The last echo of ~life is heard in the 1548 3, 44 | having occurred by the moon eclipsing the ~sun. For he says (Ep. 1549 2, 159 | publican (Lk. ~18), says [*Eclog. hom. vii de Humil. Animi.] 1550 1, 91 | subjection which is ~called economic or civil, whereby the superior 1551 2, 46 | science. But ~politics, economics, logic, rhetoric, physics 1552 2, 28 | 2/2~The first of these ecstasies is caused by love dispositively 1553 2, 186 | whereas, with ~charity, it "edifieth and begets concord." Hence 1554 3, 83 | Basil, bishop of ~Caesarea, edited the rite of celebrating 1555 3, 26 | THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION (EDITORIAL NOTE)~The privilege of the 1556 2, 19 | as following [*Leonine ~edn.: 'accompanying'] it. The 1557 2, 105 | Thou shalt not abhor the Edomite, because he is thy brother; ~ 1558 2, 187 | person with necessaries by educating him in the world for ~the 1559 2, 102 | excessive moisture; such as eels and the like. They were, 1560 2, 94 | men, which iniquity itself effaces not." But the law which ~ 1561 2, 97 | concepts of reason are most effectually ~declared; for when a thing 1562 Suppl, 66| officium," some read ~"effectum"; the meaning is the same, 1563 1, 88 | things, because ~of the efficaciousness of the intellectual power 1564 2, 181 | duty] takes ~its name from 'efficere' [to effect], as though 1565 2, 181 | though it were instead of ~'efficium,' by the change of one letter 1566 3, 25 | But if we speak of the effigy of Christ's cross in any ~ 1567 2, 85 | 1~OBJ 3: Further, in the eighteenth chapter of Numbers (26,28), 1568 2, 111 | signification of the Greek {eironia}, whence it is derived: 1569 2, 81 | very short prayers, rapid ejaculations, as it were, lest ~that 1570 1, 97 | account of sin they were ~ejected from paradise shortly after 1571 2, 7 | particular things [*{ta kath' ekasta}], i.e. the ~particular 1572 2, 173 | David, in an ecstasy]: "{Ekstasis} in Greek signifies in Latin ~' 1573 2, 113 | sew cushions ~under every elbow," says, "that is to say, 1574 1, 32 | Samuel was not the son of Elcana, for it follows that ~the 1575 2, 13 | Further, the very word "electio" [choice] seems to signify 1576 2, 183 | Can. Cum dilectus, de Electione] says ~that "it suffices 1577 2, 26 | addition to love, a ~choice [electionem] made beforehand, as the 1578 2, 61 | regards the conscience of an elector, it is necessary to elect 1579 2, 30 | derived ~from having mercy {eleein} even as the Latin "miseratio" 1580 2, 30 | very name, for in Greek {eleemosyne} it is derived ~from having 1581 2, 178 | feebly, nevertheless so ~elevating is the knowledge that they 1582 2, 46 | good and evil in a certain elevation or arduousness. Now it has 1583 2, 148 | for ~Ambrose says [*De Elia et de Jejunio v] that "there 1584 Suppl, 49| from the ~virtue as its elicitive principle, and from its 1585 1, 23 | predestined are chosen by God? [*"Eligantur."]~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[23] 1586 2, 52 | who fails to choose [nec eligens]": and the right ~choice 1587 2, 184 | s own ~actions, which is eliminated by the vow of obedience, 1588 3, 31 | blood which by a process ~of elimination is prepared for conception, 1589 1, 10 | be ~continuous; for ten ells of cloth are continuous 1590 2, 183 | beseech thee, Lord, I am not eloquent from yesterday, and the ~ 1591 3, 82 | Gelasius I says (Ep. ad Elphid., ~cf. Decret. i, q. 1): " 1592 1, 83 | should be said in order to elucidate this question, ~that the 1593 1, 34 | alone signifies that which ~emanates from another. For what the 1594 3, 36 | myrrh, which is used in embalming the bodies of the dead, 1595 Suppl, 93| Even so civic happiness is embellished by nobility and bodily ~ 1596 1, 117 | who held that souls were embodies in ~punishment of sin. Since, 1597 2, 1 | articles;~(9) Of the manner of embodying the articles in a symbol;~( 1598 2, 94 | curious, and more and more embroiled in the manifold snares of 1599 2, 147 | the good of ~reason, by embroiling the reason with immoderate 1600 3, 44 | when the sun had completely emerged from the eclipse.~Aquin.: 1601 3, 44 | that the occultation and emersion did not begin from the same ~ 1602 3, 75 | On the contrary, Eusebius Emesenus says: "To thee it ought 1603 3, 2 | Christ's coming, whatsoever ~eminency of righteousness they may 1604 3, 78 | OBJ 2: Further, Eusebius Emissenus (Pseudo-Hieron: Ep. xxix; ~ 1605 3, 77 | De Anima ii), that ~what emits sound is a hard body, having 1606 2, 151 | matters not how they are emitted, provided one observe the ~ 1607 Suppl, 79| were to have sensations by emitting and not by ~receiving species, 1608 2, 187 | pressure of sickness and emotional fervour, promised to become 1609 3, 12 | was perfected; first by empirical ~knowledge of sensible things, 1610 2, 60 | by its very nature, being employable for the good of the body, 1611 3, 72 | clerk, is signed by his employer. ~Now the faithful of Christ 1612 2, 110 | of virtue inasmuch as it empowers us to act rightly. ~And 1613 2, 32 | good. But in ~so far as it empties us of our own good it may 1614 3, 31 | Another motive was to show the emptiness of pride of birth: for many 1615 3, 55 | others may be ~stirred to emulation. But the punishments and 1616 2, 70 | enmities, contentions, emulations, wraths and quarrels, ~there 1617 3, 46 | of [Vulg.: 'among'] the Enacims was laid there."~Aquin.: 1618 2, 97 | benefit conferred by the new enactment; or from ~the extreme urgency 1619 2, 152 | like manner one who is over enamored of any woman. Now every 1620 3, 36 | angel of the Lord shall encamp round ~about them that fear 1621 2, 102 | the fruit-stones or seeds encased in a pod are ~sown: since 1622 2, 93 | diviners, who mutter in their enchantments," it is ~added by way of 1623 2, 3 | to give good example and ~encouragement to the rest of the faithful, 1624 3, 44 | any doubt we saw the moon ~encroach on the sun," he being in 1625 Suppl, 58| marriages." Cf. Catholic ~Encyclopedia, article Canonical Impediments.]~ 1626 Suppl, 90| ability together with the endeavour to obtain ~grace [*Cf. SS, 1627 2, 36 | division [*Aristotle ~wrote {endeian}, 'want'; St. Thomas, in 1628 Suppl, 69| proportion ~to his thirst, endlessly happy." Therefore Abraham' 1629 2, 5 | happiness is from one cause, its endlessness is from another.~Aquin.: 1630 Suppl, 92| Person ~of the Father, as endowing, since He possesses authority; 1631 2, 98 | the ~Holy Ghost, is more endurable than that of those who are 1632 2, 18 | this chaste fear that endureth for ~ever and ever is to 1633 3, 75 | by the power of natural energies. And in this way it produces 1634 2, 152 | thus men's minds would be enervated by lust. Hence in the Old 1635 2, 157 | love, but not that which enervates, ~let there be severity, 1636 2, 87 | Divine justice does ~not enfeeble the fortitude of the virtuous 1637 2, 151 | inasmuch as the latter enfeebles a man's ~heart and renders 1638 2, 33 | offering, as it were, to enfold it ~within itself. And thus 1639 Suppl, 65| conclusions ~from these custom enforces, as Tully declares (De Inv. 1640 2, 140 | the fulfilment of certain engagements: thus athletes and soldiers ~ 1641 2, 183 | for his good conduct by engaging oneself to a ~stranger. 1642 2, 55 | virtus': thus we speak of an engine ~being so many horse-power, 1643 2, 13 | movements ~of clocks and all engines put together by the art 1644 3, 26 | Conception. [*Principally in England, where, ~owing to the influence 1645 2, 102 | forehead, with the name of God engraved thereon. Secondly, they 1646 Suppl, 72| judge ~except as regards the engulfing of the wicked: in this respect 1647 2, 102 | candlestick was set up to enhance the beauty of the temple, 1648 Suppl, 59| XXVIII, qu. i, can. Sic enim.). Neither therefore is 1649 2, 98 | commandments, when Thou didst enlarge my heart," i.e. by giving 1650 2, 45 | reason of the dilatation and enlargement of the heart.~Aquin.: SMT 1651 3, 63 | through dread of the ~mark of enlistment on his body, throws himself 1652 2, 93 | of partnership ~with them enmesh itself in their fellowship."~ 1653 2, 114 | as Augustine says [*Cf. Ennar. i super Ps. lxx.], according 1654 Suppl, 72| the removal of that which ~ennobles a thing is not called a 1655 2, 156 | is inflamed, the eyes are enraged and ~fail utterly to recognize 1656 3, 40 | bodily poverty, in ~order to enrich us spiritually, according 1657 1, 1 | the ancient doctors so enriched their books with ~the ideas 1658 3, 69 | by Baptism, so as not to enslave us, so also ~are both the 1659 2, 102 | certain sorcerers were wont to ensnare ~the mother bird with her 1660 2, 38 | Wherefore just as commercial enterprises are forbidden to clerics, ~ 1661 3, 55 | the angels whom Abraham entertained. and ~in the Book of Tobias, 1662 2, 61 | the mind unbent by ~the enticements of pleasures, either in 1663 1, 17 | appears that the ~senses entrap us into error by their deceptive 1664 2, 159 | more liable is he to be ~entrapped." Now the measure of a man' 1665 3, 84 | Ambrose says on Ps. 118:58, "I entreated Thy face," ~etc., that " 1666 2, 185 | on: "A beggar is one who entreats ~another, and a poor man 1667 2, 76 | usury, there is no sin in entrusting it to ~him that it may be 1668 1, 16 | eternal. But ~the truth of enunciables is without beginning and 1669 1, 14 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Enunciatory composition signifies some 1670 2, 47 | perhaps he thinks that he is envied ~or insulted not through 1671 2, 98 | written (I, qu. i [*Can. Eos qui per pecunias.]): ~"The 1672 3, 8 | the Apostle writes to the Ephesians (5:25,27): "Christ ~delivered 1673 3, 75 | when Christ had said, ~"'Ephpheta,' which is 'Be thou opened,' 1674 3, 35 | And thou, Bethlehem, ~Ephrata . . . out of thee shall 1675 2, 118 | for it is derived from {epi}, i.e. "above," and {dikaion}, 1676 3, 16 | Athanasius says (Ep. ad Epictetum), "when he said, 'The Word 1677 1, 32 | theory of ~eccentrics and epicycles is considered as established, 1678 2, 118 | Greek has {epieikeia} [*{to epieikes}]. Now, according to Tully ~( 1679 2, 77 | the incontinent man to an epileptic, whose limbs move in ~a 1680 3, 71 | Celestine says (Epist. ad Episcop. Galliae): ~"Whether children 1681 Suppl, 8 | ix, Q[2]; ~Can. Si quis episcoporum xvi, Q[5]), for a bishop 1682 2, 183 | if we like we may render {episkopein} by the Latin ~'superintendere' [ 1683 2, 182 | Referring to the Greek {episkopos} and ~{presbyteros} from 1684 2, 71 | hateful to God," ~which epithet, according to a gloss, is 1685 2, 187 | I, Epist. ii, Victricio ~Epo. Rotomag., cap. 14; Cf. 1686 3, 53 | also signified that a third epoch began with the ~Resurrection: 1687 2, 7 | whereby one shrinks from equalling oneself to Him, and holds ~ 1688 1, 16 | to ~complex things can be equated to things, so also with 1689 1, 101 | that paradise was on the equinoctial line are ~of opinion that 1690 3, 41 | need of fasting in order to equip ourselves against temptation. 1691 Suppl, 47| contrary, Matrimony is an equiparant relation. Now a relation 1692 Suppl, 64| Marriage is a relation of equiparence, since it is a kind of ~ 1693 2, 5 | seems that he must be better equipped than they. But irrational 1694 2, 104 | to do what he cannot do equitably and ~advantageously. Now 1695 Suppl, 86| expression "to judge" is used equivalently, so to ~say; for consent 1696 1, 13 | not totally diverse as in equivocals; but a term ~which is thus 1697 3, 25 | Dear Cross, best hope o'er all beside,~That cheers 1698 2, 97 | evil customs should be ~eradicated by law and reason."~Aquin.: 1699 Suppl, 25| contribute ~towards the erection of a certain building. If, 1700 Suppl, 88| endeavors to prove ~(Dux errantium iii) that the world was 1701 Suppl, 51| said in the Digests (Si per errorem, ff. De ~jurisdic. omn. 1702 1, 102 | said to be evil through its escaping from the order of some particular ~ 1703 2, 23 | the sword as ~related in 2 Esdr 4:17 about those who built 1704 Suppl, 59| according to ~Osee 2:20, "I will espouse thee to Me in faith." Hence 1705 2, 58 | whereas he himself is a fool, esteemeth all men fools." Secondly, 1706 3, 31 | and the ~same wife, named Estha. For Mathan, who traced 1707 2, 33 | however, they hinder both estimates. Thirdly, by fettering the 1708 2, 10 | nations, they should be estranged from the faith: hence the 1709 Suppl, 64| according to Jerome [*Serm. de Esu Agni viii] ~quoted in the 1710 1, 81 | as also Aristotle says (Eth. Eudemic. vii, 14), and 1711 1, 114 | effect in heat in Dacia as in Ethiopia); so the grossness of ~matter, 1712 2, 58 | for each, for the word "ethos" is ~written sometimes with 1713 1, 31 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: In its etymological sense, this word "Trinity" 1714 2, 49 | it ~is derived from the {eu}, good, and {boule}, counsel, 1715 2, 78 | further on (Q[81], A[8]). {Eucharistia} (gratitude) means ~"good 1716 2, 80 | says in a chapter of the Eudemein Ethics ~(vii, 18): "There 1717 2, 9 | concludes in a chapter of the Eudemian Ethics (vii, ~14).~Aquin.: 1718 1, 81 | also Aristotle says (Eth. Eudemic. vii, 14), and in ~this 1719 2, 183 | Augustine says (Ep. xlviii ad Eudox.): "If Mother ~Church requires 1720 1, 34 | whence Basil infers (Cont. Eunom. v, 11) that the ~Holy Ghost 1721 2, 59 | wise man there are three {eupatheiai}, i.e. ~"three good passions," 1722 3, 15 | the Stoics held three {eupatheias} ~i.e. good passions, in 1723 2, 49 | persons of sense," or {eusynetoi}, ~i.e. "men of good sense," 1724 Suppl, 80| Further, this is the heresy of Eutychius, Bishop of Constantinople, 1725 2, 185 | purpose of serving God, or of evading a ~life of want and toil 1726 2, 186 | Jerome says (Ep. cxlvi ad Evan.): "Wherever a bishop is, 1727 1, 85 | impressions made by day are ~evanescent. The night air is calmer, 1728 3, 52 | Fide Orth. iii): "As He evangelized them who are upon ~the earth, 1729 1, 90 | of elements would not be ~evenly balanced, unless the inferior 1730 3, 46 | on the fourteenth day at eventide," as is ~stated in Ex. 12: 1731 Suppl, 2 | past act, but also to its eventual result: ~and consequently 1732 1, 101 | atmosphere, and decked with ever-flowering plants." Whence it ~is clear 1733 2, 172 | and whom he knew by his ever-increasing ~fame to be endowed with 1734 3, 23 | without detriment ~to the ever-living Father.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[ 1735 3, 72 | itself, through being an evergreen, ~signifies the refreshing 1736 Suppl, 72| Gregory, are confirmatory evidences of our faith in the ~resurrection.~ 1737 2, 74 | whereas it belongs to the ~evil-speaker, as we understand it here, 1738 Suppl, 71| man is punished for the evildoings ~of another; indeed, according 1739 1, 21 | or any kind of multitude ~evinces justice of this kind in 1740 3, 52 | text in his ~Epistle to Evodius quoted above, namely, that 1741 2, 172 | the demons are unable ~to evoke the soul of a saint, or 1742 2, 134 | about fear, which of itself evokes flight which fortitude avoids; 1743 2, 102 | Fourth in order ~were the "ex-voto" peace-offerings, the flesh 1744 2, 85 | minute things with careful exactitude, ~for this is reckoned sinful 1745 2, 86 | a kind and not a needy ~exactor, for he does not grow rich 1746 Suppl, 96| Secondly, because ~this opinion exaggerated God's mercy in one direction 1747 Suppl, 11| both these opinions, by exaggerating ~the seal of confession, 1748 2, 107 | be more prudent ~because exaggerations give annoyance." For those 1749 2, 160 | ii, 6): "Pride imitates exaltedness; ~whereas Thou alone art 1750 Suppl, 86| this difference: that merit exalts, whereas sin debases. ~Wherefore 1751 2, 46 | Quaest. Tusc. iv, 9) that ~"excandescentia [irascibility] is what the 1752 3, 83 | Creed" and the "Gloria in excelsis Deo." Other words are ~uttered 1753 2, 173 | Greek signifies in Latin ~'excessus mentis,' an aberration of 1754 2, 62 | whole body demands the excision of a member, through its 1755 2, 93 | a ~centurion happened to exclaim at the time: 'Standard-bearer, 1756 2, 23 | brought ~to perfection, it exclaims, 'I desire to be dissolved 1757 2, 156 | Raca!" which is an ~angry exclamation. The third degree is when 1758 Suppl, 21| cause on the part of ~the excommunicator, but not on the part of 1759 2, 146 | secretion, digestion, and excretion, and to it hunger and thirst 1760 2, 67 | lies in court in order to exculpate ~himself, he does an injury 1761 3, 46 | of death, none was more execrable, more ~fear-inspiring, than 1762 3, 80 | Nevertheless the sick are exempted from this general rule, 1763 Suppl, 96| of ~eternal life, or to exemption from eternal punishment, 1764 1, 77 | smelling"; for in order to ~exhale an odor, a body must be 1765 2, 185 | be shunned, for the one exhales pleasure, the other ~vainglory." 1766 2, 72 | on account of ~a rapid exhaustion of the digestive humors; 1767 2, 79 | referred to those things one exhibits to one's ~human kindred, 1768 1, 82 | free-will: otherwise counsels, exhortations, ~commands, prohibitions, 1769 1, 21 | therefore, is implied a certain exigence or necessity of ~the thing 1770 2, 96 | demands it on account of the ~exigencies of a duty imposed on him. 1771 2, 105 | wherefore if any man were exiled from that people ~absolutely, 1772 2, 55 | and ~matter "in which" it exits, namely, the subject. The 1773 3, 80 | when the brethren have to exonerate themselves ~of such acts, 1774 3, 83 | places are cleansed and exorcised before being ~consecrated, 1775 Suppl, 78| the ~proportion of heat as expanding, and of humidity as expansive, 1776 Suppl, 78| expanding, and of humidity as expansive, in point ~of which all 1777 2, 102 | which follows an army, ~expecting to feed on the carcases 1778 2, 186 | quoted (XII, qu. ~1, can. Expedit): "It is sufficiently clear 1779 2, 108 | this end more assured and expeditious.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[108] A[ 1780 2, 127 | them in order to act ~more expeditiously.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[129] A[ 1781 1, 21 | with works of giving ~and expending; such as justice, liberality, 1782 2, 112 | just wrought, he could know experimentally that he ~had the fear of 1783 2, 105 | be doubtful even among ~experts: and therefore, in order 1784 2, 102 | uncleannesses; and also ~expiations from sins; while, as to 1785 3, 31 | delineate Christ as the expiator of our sins, he ~makes no 1786 3, 50 | cried out when about to expire by being severed from the 1787 3, 37 | mother's purification were expired," a ~sacrifice was to be 1788 Suppl, 61| profession, if made before the expiry of a year, is ~accounted 1789 2, 1 | same faith with greater ~explicitness. For every council has taken 1790 1, 22 | De Provid. viii, 3), is ~exploded. He taught a threefold providence. 1791 1, 101 | Further, although men have explored the entire habitable world, ~ 1792 2, 120 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: These expositions are mystical. The literal 1793 1, 31 | is God alone, he speaks expositively, as he might ~explain the 1794 2, 69 | Para. 1/3~I answer that, Expounders of Holy Writ are not agreed 1795 2, 172 | differentiated according to the ~expressiveness of the imaginary signs whereby 1796 2, 1 | St. Thomas wrote 'first' (expunged by Nicolai) to distinguish ~ 1797 1, 101 | a temperate, pure, and ~exquisite atmosphere, and decked with 1798 2, 40 | help as though to await [exspectare] ~implied keeping one's 1799 2, 98 | together with ~fruits still extant; but he is not bound to 1800 2, 123 | Yet one's sin would be extenuated somewhat, for what is done ~ 1801 2, 71 | reason of aggravating or extenuating circumstances.~Aquin.: SMT 1802 Suppl, 60| both by correcting and by exterminating him, for ~the betterment 1803 2, 102 | door-posts, from the danger of extermination which threatened the ~Egyptians.~ 1804 3, 80 | devil's power is not yet extinct, since it thrives ~in them 1805 2, 187 | admonishes us (1 Thess. 5:19): "Extinguish not ~the Spirit," and (Acts 1806 3, 68 | satisfaction consists in extirpating the causes of ~vice, and 1807 2, 93 | canons do not approve of ~extorting a confession from anyone 1808 2, 65 | injurious words ~uttered extra-judicially.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[67] Out. 1809 3, 66 | or wine, or any liquid extracted from plants. It was pure ~ 1810 2, 4 | their whiteness, even after extraction. ~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[4] A[ 1811 2, 102 | the aid of ~its long neck extracts its food from deep places 1812 Suppl, 55| as ~decided by law (can. Extraordinaria, xxxv, qu. 2,3). Therefore 1813 Suppl, 32| sickness that brings man to the extremity of his life, since ~some 1814 2, 38 | together, each one ~has more exuberant joy, for they are kindled 1815 2, 51 | straight ~on, and let thine eye-lids go before thy steps." Now 1816 2, 54 | Prov. 4:25): "Let thine eyelids go before thy steps." Therefore 1817 3, 44 | to Dionysius, who ~is an eyewitness as to this having occurred 1818 Suppl, 40| as Jerome says (Ep. ad Fabiol.). But the diadem which 1819 2, 185 | glory." Hence Jerome praises Fabiola (Ep. lxxvii ad ocean.) for ~ 1820 2, 142 | many, such as jokers and ~fable-tellers." But those who are more 1821 1, 114 | namely, that "on ~earth men fabricate certain powers useful in 1822 2, 92 | and hold many vain and fabulous fancies about God. It is ~ 1823 2, 147 | a measure, a cup; Cf. Facciolati and Forcellini's Lexicon]. 1824 3, 9 | knowledge, as ~the clear "face-to-face" vision removes the enigmatical 1825 2, 160 | sometimes convinced by being faced with a more evident absurdity, ~ 1826 2, 132 | virtues, either by making ~[faciendo], or by any kind of action, 1827 2, 115 | far as ~it is directed to facilitate the use of money, is like 1828 2, 83 | does ~something sacred [facit sacrum]. On the other hand 1829 2, 79 | Douay ~Version: the Latin "factae sunt in abominationem" admits 1830 2, 66 | attaching to the deed [infamia facti], or that sometimes it is 1831 2, 132 | produced in external matter [factibili].~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[134] 1832 2, 132 | something ~great, the doing [factio] being understood in the 1833 3, 46 | him. But if the external factor which induces necessity 1834 2, 132 | that the work produced [factum] by the act is something 1835 2, 121 | pleasure in the end of virtue fades away, so to speak, in the ~ 1836 Suppl, 95| and to him ~whose strength faileth; who is in a decrepit age, 1837 2, 102 | take "the fruits of the fairest tree," i.e. the citron, " 1838 2, 95 | Cornelian" law, another the ~"Falcidian" law, etc.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1839 1, 1 | Hence no argument, but only ~fallacies, can be deduced from a multiplicity 1840 3, 39 | appeared to men's eyes in a fallacious ~manner: but we say that 1841 1, 17 | false is derived from "fallere" [to deceive]. But things ~ 1842 2, 187 | West," namely mortal and fallible man. Secondly, ~the entrance 1843 2, 68 | caus. xi, qu. 3, cap. ~Falsidicus; cf. Isidore, Sentent. iii, 1844 2, 167 | themselves: this is a ~kind of falsification, which cannot be devoid 1845 2, 10 | encouraged those ~whom he saw faltering under torture, and, the 1846 Suppl, 72| said (Lk. 3:17): "Whose fan is in His hand, and He will 1847 2, 173 | some ~imaginary vision or fanciful apparition.~Aquin.: SMT 1848 2, 167 | that are superfluous and fantastic. Hence Chrysostom says ( 1849 2, 169 | they tell from afar ~[porro fantur]," that is, speak from a 1850 1, 85 | most imprudent ~are most far-seeing; for their intelligence 1851 1, 115 | derived from the verb ~'fari' which means to speak"; 1852 2, 85 | dwells in one parish, ~and farms in another; or a shepherd 1853 3, 69 | the gift of ~Christ is farther-reaching than the sin of Adam. But 1854 3, 87 | till thou repay the last farthing," by which venial ~sin is 1855 2, 92 | by the skill of ~his art fashioneth it, and maketh it like the 1856 3, 32 | spirit enclosed therein, fashions the body in the generation 1857 2, 38 | reproached (Is. 58:3) because on ~fast-days they exacted what was owing 1858 2, 94 | Hebrew names of angels, and fasten them to their ~persons. 1859 2, 185 | added: "But ~thou, when thou fastest, anoint thy head and wash 1860 2, 70 | thou ~hast dealt him a fatal blow." Therefore one ought 1861 3, 88 | apostata fit, spernitque, fateri,~Poenituisse piget, pristina 1862 3, 31 | censured for her sin with her father-in-law; Rahab who was a whore; 1863 Suppl, 89| essence. ~Hence He cannot be fathomed by our intellect: but our 1864 2, 32 | through being toilsome and fatiguing are not ~pleasant but disagreeable. 1865 2, 102 | holocausts of rams, and fat of fatlings, and blood of calves and 1866 2, 113 | not the oil of the sinner ~fatten my head," says: "The false 1867 2, 44 | pure negation: since the fatuous man ~lacks the sense of 1868 2, 102 | Hence Augustine says (Contra Faustum iv, 7): "If the swine and 1869 2, 68 | or their standing, or the favorableness of the suit, or the ~nature 1870 2, 183 | conceit, nor ~refuse with fawning indolence"; and afterwards 1871 3, 47 | to the sacredness of the feast-day, which they had already 1872 2, 39 | mourning, than to the house of feasting: for in that we are put ~ 1873 1, 90 | and quantity of hair or feathers, which are the ~clothing 1874 3, 75 | because it is the special ~feature of friendship to live together 1875 3, 80 | ways. First, ~when they are feeble-minded, as a man who sees dimly 1876 2, 98 | at his own ~charges? Who feedeth the flock, and eateth not 1877 2, 105 | bound to pay the doctor's fees incurred by the victim ~ 1878 2, 156 | which is ~called wrath [*'Fellea,' i.e. like gall. But in 1879 2, 25 | with us, or because he is a fellow-countryman or ~for any like reason 1880 2, 184 | he ~is assisted by his fellow-religious to rise again, according 1881 2, 29 | battlefield is bound to help a ~fellow-soldier who is a stranger rather 1882 2, 113 | them in relation to his fellowman - or as legal justice, which ~ 1883 3, 28 | is ~here used instead of 'femina,' according to the custom 1884 2, 76 | to ~many nations," etc., fenerating is to be taken in a broad 1885 Suppl, 71| Cf. Oratio ad Vesperas, Fer. ii, post Dom. Pass.] ~can 1886 3, 74 | Georg. i, 295] indicates fermentation which is ~"the result of 1887 2, 187 | of sickness and emotional fervour, promised to become a monk. 1888 3, 68 | Baptism at the principal ~festivities, viz. of Easter and Pentecost, 1889 2, 23 | St. Bernard, Serm. ii in Festo Purif.] says ~that "to stand 1890 2, 102 | that sins which are the ~fetid excretions of the mind should 1891 Suppl, 24| 8) if there be a deadly feud between them.~Aquin.: SMT 1892 1, 84 | example, the taste of a ~fever-stricken person judges a sweet thing 1893 Suppl, 37| Church, on account of the fewness of ~ministers, all the lower 1894 Suppl, 49| suiting of deed ~to word [fiant dicta] by keeping one's 1895 Suppl, 46| et matrim., cap. Is qui fidem).~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[46] A[ 1896 Suppl, 93| the ~aureole is due to the fighter, according to 2 Tim. 2:5, " 1897 2, 170 | the herdsman plucking wild figs, and makes him a ~prophet." 1898 3, 45 | changed into ~various shapes [figuras], but only for an imaginary 1899 1, 1 | itself, but that which is figured, the literal sense. When 1900 3, 60 | were to say "patrias et ~filias." For although the words 1901 2, 13 | children of despair" [*'Filios diffidentiae,' ~which the 1902 2, 102 | thoughts. The violet-colored fillets which were ~inserted in 1903 3, 66 | can be so used, which has filtered through a sulphurous vein, ~ 1904 2, 81 | that is filthy, let him be ~filthier still." Therefore children 1905 3, 69 | be cleansed from all your filthiness."~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[69] A[ 1906 Suppl, 8 | ordination ~of the Church is con. fined within certain limits.~Aquin.: 1907 2, 167 | think that attention to finery and ~costly dress is no 1908 2, 106 | banished from ~his country; "fines," whereby he is mulcted 1909 2, 89 | As silver is tried in the fining-pot . . . so a ~man is tried 1910 2, 34 | end [*St. Thomas took "finis" as being the nominative, 1911 3, 10 | manner of infinite, but ~finitely; and thus what are in themselves 1912 Suppl, 4 | creature whence it ~derives its finiteness. On the other hand, the 1913 2, 50 | first hierarchy are called: "Fire-bearers and Thrones and Outpouring ~ 1914 Suppl, 59| binds more firmly. Now the firmer tie always looses the weaker 1915 2, 111 | of nature - e.g. that a fisherman should be replete ~with 1916 2, 93 | Further, fighting with the fists, or "monomachy," i.e. single ~ 1917 2, 86 | his word" ~[*'Fides . . . fiunt dicta' Cicero gives the 1918 3, 83 | the trenches beneath the flag-stones, so as not to be defiled 1919 3, 2 | put a drop of ~water in a flagon of wine. And hence, since 1920 2, 89 | other actual like an outward flash of light. Now venial sin 1921 3, 44 | fiery and heavenly light flashed from His eyes, and the majesty 1922 2, 102 | shown by their having not a flat but a cloven hoof. Of ~fishes 1923 2, 102 | forbidden to eat the ~flesh of flat-footed animals, i.e. animals having 1924 2, 113 | seeks to please the person flattered, whereas the ~detractor 1925 2, 113 | death; whereas no one by flattering can be a ~sufficient cause 1926 3, 43 | Wherefore Pope Leo ~says (Ep. ad Flav. xxviii) that, while there 1927 1, 77 | moistened by the humidity of the flavored morsel. But the organs of ~ 1928 Suppl, 79| far as it is cognizant ~of flavors in the way mentioned above.~ 1929 Suppl, 65| until the ~young are fully fledged. Now this obligation which 1930 Suppl, 81| Even as nature gives to fleeter animals instruments of a ~ 1931 2, 113 | the words ~"the hireling fleeth," etc. (Jn. 10:12): "Our 1932 2, 102 | some refrain ~from wine and flesh-meat.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[102] A[ 1933 2, 102 | Godhead cannot die: hence it flew away, for the Godhead could 1934 3, 80 | throw it to dogs to eat, or fling it in the mire to ~be trodden 1935 2, 25 | enduring for usefulness quickly flits by, and the ~pleasure of 1936 3, 36 | themselves perished in the ~flood. Those who asked, heard 1937 3, 70 | faith and natural reason flourished in man to such an ~extent, 1938 2, 153 | Now the good of reason flourishes more in ~the temperate man 1939 2, 17 | to command: wherefore it fluctuates ~between the two, and fails 1940 2, 24 | into the body, viz., "the flush ~of health and incorruption," 1941 2, 89 | not be accompanied with a flute or any artificial instrument 1942 Suppl, 72| bodies, just as ~we see them focused together in a burning-glass; 1943 Suppl, 72| intervening space ~through the focusing together of the rays of 1944 2, 104 | me like a man who seeks fodder for ~his cattle." And farther 1945 1, 117 | Animal. ~ii, 3); but the foetal matter is provided by the 1946 2, 102 | its nest on dung, feeds on foetid ordure, and whose song is ~ 1947 2, 102 | and ~the trees of dense foliage" [*Douay and A. V. and R. 1948 2, 102 | jaws are furnished with follicules, wherein it stores its food 1949 2, 93 | regard to vanities and lying follies." Now it is ~vain to seek 1950 Suppl, 29| are not ~. . . dressed nor fomented with oil." Therefore the 1951 2, 148 | avoided by the clergy, ~for it foments and fosters all the vices."~ 1952 2, 166 | tread of gravity, and the foot-print of tranquillity: ~yet so 1953 2, 175 | Cf. FP, Q[93], A[6], ad 2 footnote]." Now the grace of the 1954 3, 45 | brings those who follow ~the footsteps of His Passion, according 1955 2, 63 | slaves [Vulg.: 'to them'] forbearing ~threatenings." Now some 1956 Suppl, 71| idols . . . which the law forbiddeth to the Jews," ~and yet we 1957 2, 147 | cup; Cf. Facciolati and Forcellini's Lexicon]. Now ~we ought 1958 2, 121 | earthly wrongs, if we are forearmed ~with the shield of foreknowledge." 1959 2, 20 | always presumes [Douay: 'forecasteth'] grievous ~things," and ( 1960 3, 4 | midway, in ~whom certain forecasts of (His) future holiness 1961 2, 105 | prescribed that all should foregather in some chief place chosen 1962 2, 93 | is true in the matter of foreknowing the future from ~dreams. 1963 2, 102 | hind-legs longer ~than the forelegs, so that they can leap: 1964 1, 22 | of the ~order of things foreordained towards an end; and the 1965 3, 38 | Old Law: nor should the forerunner ~withdraw until the truth 1966 2, 110 | it charity, ~since "grace foreruns charity," as Augustine says 1967 Suppl, 72| every created thing appears foreshortened to it." Now ~apparently 1968 3, 47 | of Christ's Passion was foreshown by the very ~manner of His 1969 Suppl, 72| animals will come from ~forest and mountain to the fields, 1970 3, 60 | swear: and whoever has ~foresworn himself once, must no more 1971 2, 169 | described as "proefatores [foretellers], because they tell from 1972 2, 170 | Whatsoever that ~same prophet foretelleth in the name of the Lord, 1973 2, 173 | wherein He is to be ~seen forevermore."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[175] 1974 Suppl, 72| for the judgment, being forewarned by those signs. ~But it 1975 2, 11 | quickens ~the soul, than to forge money, which supports temporal 1976 1, 115 | all, the ~chain of fate is forged." Of each of these things 1977 2, 11 | temporal life. Wherefore if ~forgers of money and other evil-doers 1978 3, 60 | for this would amount to forgery. It would amount to the 1979 2, 173 | in ~heavenly things and forgetful of this lower world." Now 1980 2, 183 | sins by being unwilling to forgo better ~things in order 1981 3, 68 | however, two reasons for forgoing this delay. First, when ~ 1982 2, 105 | thus suffered a loss they ~forgot their private quarrels, 1983 1, 15 | word {Idea} is in Latin "forma." Hence by ideas are understood ~ 1984 2, 4 | charity?~(4) Whether living [formata] faith and lifeless [informis] 1985 2, 166 | Seneca ~[*Martin of Braga, Formula Vitae Honestae: cap. De 1986 2, 1 | authority of the Church who formulates the ~articles thus.~Aquin.: 1987 2, 152 | his: "thirdly, she hath fornicated in adultery, and hath ~gotten 1988 1, 16 | Therefore that this person fornicates is from ~God", is a fallacy 1989 2, 65 | Cap. Licet ratione, de Foro ~Comp.] a man is tried in 1990 3, 26 | for which reason He never forsook us." ~Wherefore He is "the 1991 2, 184 | poverty, I should steal and forswear the name of my ~God," and 1992 Suppl, 64| which perhaps would not be forthcoming.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[64] A[ 1993 2, 159 | fortitude both curbs daring and fortifies the soul against fear. Now 1994 Suppl, 71| their ~punishment, but by fortifying the person punished: even 1995 2, 121 | cleaving most resolutely [fortissime] to good, the ~result being 1996 2, 42 | text which reads "ex tota fortitudine tua" (Dt.), ~"ex tota virtue 1997 1, 2 | Hence it is plain that not ~fortuitously, but designedly, do they 1998 3, 66 | contrary, Augustine (Ad Fortunatum) speaking of the comparison ~ 1999 2, 100 | consulteth pythonic ~spirits, or fortune-tellers, or that seeketh the truth 2000 3, 33 | body, is said to ~have been forty-six years in building: so that 2001 Suppl, 24| jurisdiction in the external forum, whereas ~absolution from 2002 1, 89 | But ~"inferior things are forwarded by the higher," as Dionysius 2003 1, 89 | beginning corresponds to the forwarding of them to their end. But ~" 2004 2, 34 | looked ~bitterly on its foster-brother." Therefore envy is not 2005 3, 37 | Joseph, who ~was to be his foster-father.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[37] A[


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