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St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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     Part, Question
2006 2, 91 | unspotted," i.e. allowing no foulness of sin; ~"converting souls," 2007 2, 60 | thief is bound to restore ~four- or fivefold.~Aquin.: SMT 2008 3, 49 | consequently, He ~merited a four-fold exaltation from His Passion. 2009 2, 181 | in Ezech.): "The stone is foursquare, and is ~stable on all sides, 2010 2, 31 | care of ~him, even if he be fractious or contemptuous, because 2011 3, 76 | sacrament, if any of its fragments remain until the next ~day: 2012 Suppl, 29| because on account of its fragrance it is indicative ~of a good 2013 2, 96 | the ~power of man, which frames human law, is beneath the 2014 Suppl, 52| for instance in honors, franchise, inheritance and so ~forth. 2015 2, 60 | towards another by being frank with him, in ~words and 2016 2, 60 | truthfulness" [*{aletheia}]. For frankness is more akin to the ~reason 2017 3, 88 | in the following verse:~"Fratres odit, apostata fit, spernitque, 2018 2, 115 | the subject of a man's ~free-handedness towards others are the goods 2019 Suppl, 39| this very fact he becomes a freedman. But if his master be in ~ 2020 1, 110 | Sodom - namely, dazzling ~(French version, "eblouissement"), 2021 Suppl, 71| members, who had the ~faith, frequented the sacraments and performed 2022 3, 83 | look upon a picture or a fresco, we say, 'This ~is Cicero 2023 2, 184 | religious order, that of the Friars Preachers, where ~such like 2024 3, 5 | disciples, "troubled and frighted, supposed that they saw 2025 2, 105 | this was done ~in order to frighten people, in detestation of 2026 Suppl, 58| It is stated (Extra, De Frigidis et Malefic., cap. Quod ~ 2027 2, 23 | among the works ~of Paul of Friuli, more commonly known as 2028 2, 89 | laughter, and other like frivolities. ~Now the circumstance of 2029 2, 87 | solemnity, and an oath by God frivolously and ~without deliberation.~ 2030 2, 38 | Stratagematum i, 1] by Frontinus. Such like concealment is 2031 1, 117 | spirit in the semen which is frothy, as is attested by its whiteness. 2032 2, 10 | gentle, but also to the ~froward." Now this command would 2033 Suppl, 76| sowing and resurrection to fructifying. Therefore the ~same body 2034 Suppl, 93| signification we ~are said to enjoy [frui] God perfectly in heaven, 2035 2, 70 | Trin. x, 10), "we enjoy ~[*'Fruimur', from which verb we have 2036 2, 102 | seldom happens that the fruit-stones or seeds encased in a pod 2037 2, 11 | Para. 1/1~I answer that, "Fruitio" [enjoyment] and "fructus" [ 2038 Suppl, 41| he forbade enjoyment [*"Fruitionem," i.e. enjoyment of a ~thing 2039 3, 81 | thy oblation be from the frying-pan," the gloss says: "The ~ 2040 2, 96 | possible to a child as to a full-grown ~man: for which reason the 2041 3, 54 | powerful nature, that from ~its fullest beatitude the fulness of 2042 3, 7 | said of others. Of these ~fulnesses one is greater than another, 2043 3, 40 | to be fed out of a common fund, but ~not to possess wealth, 2044 2, 80 | De Homine xii) [*Orat. funebr. de ~Placilla Imp.] that " 2045 Suppl, 71| iii; De Civ. Dei i): "The ~funereal equipment, the disposition 2046 2, 64 | Isidore says (Etym. x): "'Fur' [thief] is derived from ~' 2047 2, 79 | necessity" [*Jerome, Ep. liv, ad Furiam.], by ~doing his duty voluntarily. 2048 2, 10 | or concupiscence become furious or ~insane, just as they 2049 2, 102 | proud spirit in the deep furrow of self-examination.~Aquin.: 2050 2, 64 | it is stated ~(Extra, De furtis, Cap. Si quis): "If anyone, 2051 2, 64 | thief] is derived from ~'furvus' and so from 'fuscus' [dark], 2052 2, 64 | from ~'furvus' and so from 'fuscus' [dark], because he takes 2053 2, 83 | the soul's creation ~and fusion.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[83] A[ 2054 2, 116 | because he makes a great fuss about things of ~little 2055 3, 55 | Caesarea; Cf. Migne, P. G., xxii, 1003] says, "Two ~ 2056 2, 176 | Move not, O sun, toward Gabaon," ~it is said afterwards ( 2057 3, 50 | impious to say with Julian and Gaian that the Lord's body was ~ 2058 3, 50 | which is the ~heresy of the Gaianites, as Isidore says (Etym. 2059 2, 60 | thing was taken would be the gainer, both ~because he would 2060 Suppl, 11| the truth should not be gainsayed for fear of scandal. ~Wherefore 2061 2, 71 | this is done either by gainsaying his good, or by maliciously ~ 2062 2, 36 | contending before a judge, a man gainsays the truth of justice, or 2063 2, 55 | dictates it. Hence the jurist Gaius says (Digest. i, ~1; De 2064 Suppl, 83| animal can live in fire." Galen also (De simp. medic.) says " 2065 3, 71 | says (Epist. ad Episcop. Galliae): ~"Whether children or 2066 2, 148 | given to drunkenness or gambling, or ~incites others thereto, 2067 2, 82 | Samaritans who adored on ~Mount Garizim. For both these rites ceased 2068 2, 93 | chattering of birds [avium garritu], just as "auspice" is derived 2069 2, 102 | all ~plovers.], which is a garrulous bird, signifies the gossip. 2070 Suppl, 65| Decretal (De divortiis, cap. Gaudemus) it is asserted ~that is 2071 Suppl, 71| certain martyrs at Lyons in Gaul (Eusebius, Eccl. ~Hist. 2072 2, 174 | CXLI]: "On this day Thou gavest ~Christ's apostles an unwonted 2073 2, 112 | show not thy countenance gay towards them."~Aquin.: SMT 2074 3, 51 | carried ~off the gates of Gaza during the night, even so 2075 2, 102 | unclean food, as pigs and geese: and nothing but what is 2076 2, 59 | in the words ~of Aulus Gellius [*Noct. Attic. xix, 1], 2077 3, 51 | but not with gold or gems, or silk," as Jerome ~observes: 2078 2, 95 | determination of certain generalities. The first way is like to 2079 2, 72 | of their species [*"Ex ~genere," genus in this case denoting 2080 2, 126 | also in ~discussing them generously in the mind. Constancy may 2081 2, 93 | who ~are also called "genethliacs," because they take note 2082 Suppl, 31| related of the ~Blessed Genevieve that she anointed the sick 2083 2, 14 | perfection of their natural genius, or of some habit ~superadded 2084 3, 51 | Chrysostom says (Cont. Jud. et ~Gent. quod 'Christus sit Deus') 2085 Suppl, 67| 108], A[3], ad 2; Contra Gentes ~iii, cap. 123].~Aquin.: 2086 2, 7 | that he strike hard or gently, and so forth.~Aquin.: SMT 2087 2, 82 | sight," etc. The triple genuflection represents ~the Trinity 2088 3, 74 | decoquit humorem"; Virgil, Georg. i, 295] indicates fermentation 2089 2, 94 | considered wrong among the Germans, as Julius Caesar relates ~( 2090 1, 14 | contingent cause; just as the ~germination of a plant is contingent 2091 2, 109 | countenance before" Achis, king of Geth (1 Kgs. 21:13). Therefore 2092 Suppl, 92| the king of Egypt, ~took Gezer . . . and gave it for a 2093 3, 43 | so great majesty, for the ghostly cleansing" ~whereby He cast 2094 2, 98 | only "simoniacs" but also "giezites."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[100] 2095 2, 102 | members. More over it was gilded: for Christ was full of 2096 2, 102 | it is written: "You shall gird ~your reins, and you shall 2097 Suppl, 40| the ~"succinctory" which girds the stole with the alb, 2098 2, 112 | mirth," not that they may ~gladden others, but that they may 2099 3, 79 | sacrament, by being spiritually gladdened, and as it were inebriated 2100 1, 8 | for in a succession of glances it comprehends the ~entire 2101 Suppl, 72| at that time in lieu ~of glasses there will be concave clouds, 2102 3, 30 | with ~glowing countenance, gleaming robe, and wondrous step." 2103 3, 82 | way of inquiry, as can be gleaned from the context.~Aquin.: 2104 Suppl, 15| the same ~fire makes gold glisten and straw reek," so by the 2105 Appen2, 1| as in the same fire gold glistens and straw ~smokes, so in 2106 2, 185 | i.e. ~black, "equally with glittering apparel. Fine and coarse 2107 3, 44 | according to some, this gloom or darkening of the ~sun, 2108 3, 83 | intones the "Creed" and the "Gloria in excelsis Deo." Other 2109 2, 130 | neither as regards the matter gloried in, nor ~as to the intention 2110 2, 127 | brought to ~nothing, but he glorifieth,' etc.]," which indicates 2111 3, 55 | Further, Christ rose again gloriously, that is, having a human ~ 2112 2, 103 | they gathered from certain glosses, which ~expound these prohibitions 2113 3, 30 | archangel Gabriel with ~glowing countenance, gleaming robe, 2114 Suppl, 77| members. This is called "gluten," and since ~it belongs 2115 2, 152 | sacrilege by partaking ~gluttonously of sacred food. Nevertheless, 2116 2, 34 | frenzy in the heart, there is gnashing with ~the teeth." Therefore 2117 2, 94 | forth; when the rats have gnawed a hole in your ~clothes, 2118 Suppl, 94| corruption torments by ~gnawing.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[97] A[ 2119 2, 156 | Moral. v, 45): "The ~heart goaded by the pricks of anger is 2120 2, 185 | about in ~sheep-skins in goat-skins," and a gloss adds - "as 2121 2, 167 | about in sheepskins and in ~goatskins." Therefore it seems that 2122 2, 99 | of Ceres (who was ~the goddess of fruits), as some say: 2123 2, 145 | which we call October, Godolias was slain, and the remnants 2124 Suppl, 85| of an unjust judgment on Golgotha. Therefore these ~places 2125 2, 102 | written (Ex. 16:32): "Fill a gomor ~of it, and let it be kept 2126 2, 32 | knowing ~that he has something good--riches, honor, or the like; 2127 2, 49 | since many sinners take good-counsel, and many godly men ~are 2128 2, 185 | The Apostle wishes ~the gospeler to understand that to accept 2129 2, 185 | Monach. xxi): "If they be ~gospelers, I allow, they have" (a 2130 2, 102 | garrulous bird, signifies the gossip. The hoopoe, ~which builds 2131 1, 36 | Criste was the worde ~and the goste of Good." (See Oxford Dictionary).] 2132 1, 36 | against the spiritual wicked gostes of the ayre" ~(More, "Comfort 2133 2, 81 | corruption is not ~leprosy or gout. Now since the body is proportionate 2134 1, 22 | Thy providence, O Father, governeth ~it.']."~Aquin.: SMT FP 2135 2, 166 | model; her ~reflection is gracefulness of conduct and beauty of 2136 2, 160 | of deed." Bernard ~[*De Grad. Humil. et Superb. x, seqq.] 2137 2, 77 | movement, when he steps [graditur] beyond [trans] a fixed ~ 2138 3, 83 | lesson," the choir sing the "Gradual," ~which signifies progress 2139 2, 102 | either from seed, or from a graft, or from a cutting: but ~ 2140 3, 44 | Contrary to nature thou wert grafted," etc.): "God, the ~Creator 2141 3, 74 | such ~countries wherein the grape-vine does not flourish, in a 2142 2, 104 | Who receives a favor gratefully, has already begun to pay 2143 3, 82 | power of baptizing" (App. Gratiani). ~Therefore it seems that 2144 2, 64 | De Trin. i [*De Fide, ad ~Gratianum, i, 1]) "dominion denotes 2145 2, 104 | answer that, Thanksgiving [gratiarum actio] in the recipient ~ 2146 2, 42 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: A man gratifies more the person he loves 2147 2, 45 | knew "to grave all sort of graving, and to ~devise ingeniously [ 2148 2, 10 | Body Para. 3/4~Of these two gravities the first surpasses the 2149 2, 61 | understanding of a man is gray hairs, and a spotless life ~ 2150 3, 31 | Heb. 7:6-9) that Levi, the great-grandson of Abraham, ~"paid tithes 2151 Suppl, 72| shrubs which ~lose their greenery, and again by a kind of 2152 2, 102 | brook," which retain their greenness a ~long time; and these 2153 3, 83 | the people, and often to greet the people. ~Consequently, 2154 2, 156 | called "zealous anger" [*Cf. Greg., Moral. v, ~45]. On the 2155 2, 187 | Per tuas) the Bishop of Grenoble, who had ~accepted the episcopate 2156 2, 102 | pride is forbidden: in the griffon which ~is hostile to horses 2157 3, 86 | Wis. 5:3: "Repenting, and groaning ~for anguish of spirit." 2158 3, 26 | of Clare (1170), ~Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln (1253), 2159 3, 55 | proof ~would have to be grounded on some principles: and 2160 Suppl, 71| statements of holy ~men, and groundless as being based on no authority. 2161 2, 23 | like manner there are three groups in the irascible ~faculty; 2162 2, 35 | hence wild ~desires and grovelling fears/And human laughter, 2163 2, 104 | and are rudely, slowly and grudgingly ~given. Therefore gratitude 2164 2, 87 | obligation falls on the thing guaranteed by oath. For a ~man is bound 2165 Suppl, 43| code, and they provided guarantors. This promise is made in ~ 2166 2, 186 | is, whether at Rome, ~or Gubbio, or Constantinople, or Reggio, 2167 Suppl, 74| prophetic spirit, but by the ~guess-work of the human mind, which 2168 3, 81 | Jesus ~Christ, Himself the guest and banquet, is both the 2169 2, 186 | delight in the ~service of the guesthouse," i.e. in hospitality.~Aquin.: 2170 2, 106 | exile (XXIII, Q. ~iv, Cap. Guilisarius). But in so far as the wrong 2171 2, 102 | spiritual matters. The ~gull, which flies both in the 2172 3, 46 | wooden rod a salutary spring gushed forth from a ~spiritual 2173 3, 66 | plants. It was pure ~water gushing forth miraculously like 2174 Suppl, 22| another. But ~spiritual gyves are stronger than bodily 2175 2, 49 | habit] is derived from "habere" [to ~have]. Now habit is 2176 2, 150 | Cyprian says (De Virgin. [*De Habitu Virg.]): "We address ourselves 2177 2, 49 | answer that, This word "habitus" [habit] is derived from " 2178 2, 66 | 1~On the contrary, Pope Hadrian I says (Cap. lii): "He that 2179 2, 64 | Augustine says (De Haeres., haer. 40): "The ~'Apostolici' 2180 2, 10 | Augustine observes (De Haeresibus).~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[10] A[ 2181 2, 79 | in with the Greek, ~for {hagios} means "unsoiled." In another 2182 2, 38 | ambushes for the city of Hai ~(Joshua 8:2).~Aquin.: SMT 2183 3, 49 | say, so that He shall be hailed as ~God by all; and all 2184 2, 167 | is scandalous for anyone hailing ~from a reputable place 2185 Suppl, 84| did, even as the confessor hails a man who courageously ~ 2186 2, 11 | From the Greek {airein} [hairein], to cut off], so does sect 2187 Suppl, 28| their shoulders ~with a hairshirt, and sorrowfully announces 2188 3, 37 | forth first was red and hairy like a skin; and his name 2189 2, 27 | a thing, we love it but half-heartedly or not at all, even if we ~ 2190 Suppl, 79| reason sleep is described as half-life. ~[*This is what Aristotle 2191 1, 23 | knowledge are said to be half-witted or foolish; ~but they who 2192 3, 73 | 63], ~A[6]): for by the hallowings of all the sacraments preparation 2193 2, 85 | instance, if a quantity be ~halved, and one half be diminished 2194 2, 106 | and a sin offering ({peri hamartias}), ~hath," etc.]~Aquin.: 2195 3, 87 | whatever might happen to him to hamper that tendency would be displeasing ~ 2196 1, 36 | read in the former sense (Hampole, Psalter x, 7), ~"The Gost 2197 2, 84 | quoted X, qu. i ~[*Can. Hanc consuetudinem], says: "None 2198 3, 31 | s brethren were born of hand-maidens, and yet all were patriarchs ~ 2199 Suppl, 40| a maniple is a kind ~of handkerchief for wiping the face; for 2200 2, 176 | from his body to the sick, handkerchiefs . . . ~and the diseases 2201 2, 152 | in to Bala and Zelpha the handmaids of ~his wives; and again ( 2202 3, 46 | is accursed of God that hangeth on ~a tree." Therefore it 2203 Suppl, 40| of the priest the "stole" hangs from both shoulders, to ~ 2204 3, 89 | pretended ~repentance through hankering after honors and power."~ 2205 2, 165 | be passing, that coursing haply will ~distract me from some 2206 Suppl, 92| by their means she may be happily ~united with the bridegroom.~ 2207 3, 41 | says on Lk. 4:5: "Ambition ~harbors yet another danger within 2208 2, 98 | imposed on ~some men who are hard-hearted and proud, whom the law 2209 Suppl, 18| so far as He is said to ~harden, when He withholds His grace; 2210 2, 79 | will, and whom He will He hardeneth."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[79] A[ 2211 2, 31 | delight in the smell of hares, but in eating them; . . . ~ 2212 3, 2 | becoming that God should harken to those who obeyed Him.~ 2213 2, 9 | estimation of ~fitness or harmfulness, does not move the sensitive 2214 2, 167 | foreigner. For any part, which harmonizeth not with ~its whole, is 2215 2, 76 | it ~looks upon usury as harmonizing with justice, but lest the 2216 2, 159 | two-horse chariots: in the one harness pride ~with justice, in 2217 2, 89 | musical ~instruments such as harps and psalteries, in the divine 2218 2, 31 | judging the latter's sins with harsh severity, as though he ~ 2219 Suppl, 71| angered party is provoked ~to harsher measures." Now every sinner 2220 Suppl, 75| the contrary, such as the hastening of ~their resurrection, 2221 2, 104 | De Benef. iv): "He that hastens to repay, ~is animated with 2222 Suppl, 40| dignity, for it was a kind of ~hat, as Jerome says (Ep. ad 2223 2, 48 | that "he is open ~in his hatreds and his friendships . . . 2224 2, 110 | is exceeding proud: his haughtiness, and his arrogancy, ~and 2225 2, 185 | Para. 1/1 ~Reply OBJ 3: To haunt the palaces of kings from 2226 2, 151 | anything else work the greatest havoc in a ~man's mind, yet secondarily 2227 Suppl, 75| Para. 1/2~On the contrary, Haymo says (on Rm. 5:10, "For 2228 2, 102 | God. Then he offered two he-goats for ~the people: one of 2229 3, 38 | which is accomplished by the head-craftsman. Now grace was to be ~conferred 2230 2, 136 | ischyrognomones}, that is "head-strong," or {idiognomones}, ~that 2231 2, 93 | public, the power of the Healer might shine forth ~more 2232 Suppl, 29| foreshadowed ~remotely by all the healings related in the Old Testament.~ 2233 2, 63 | which ~their respective healths are directed. In the same 2234 2, 160 | thereof," says that "by heaping vice upon vice a man ~will 2235 3, 79 | by taking ~the sacrament heaps sin upon sin, rather than 2236 3, 21 | 11:42): "I know that Thou hearest Me always, but because of 2237 2, 180 | the Word': to Him was Mary hearkening: 'The Word was ~made flesh': 2238 2, 175 | so that a man willingly hearkens to the ~word of God. This 2239 Suppl, 55| excommunicated if contumacious; that hearsay evidence is admitted; and ~ 2240 2, 69 | we do ~the same much more heartily, by accomplishing works 2241 2, 102 | would seem to savor of ~heartlessness if the dam's milk, which 2242 Suppl, 5 | afflicted spirit," says: "A hearty contrition is the sacrifice 2243 2, 4 | with all its might to the heavenward journey," i.e. ~to the vision 2244 1, 5 | the saying of Boethius (De Hebrom.), "I perceive that in ~ 2245 1, 112 | I will take away the ~hedge" - that is, "the guardianship 2246 2, 10 | out into the highways and hedges; and compel them to come 2247 3, 81 | contrary, Jerome says (Ad Hedib., Ep. xxx), "The Lord Jesus ~ 2248 2, 40 | on account of wine, and heedlessness of dangers and ~shortcomings. 2249 2, 102 | because ~they worshipped heifers after the custom of Egypt, 2250 3, 9 | not dimmed, but rather ~is heightened in the soul of Christ by 2251 2, 152 | virgins on account of the heinousness ~of their crime."~Aquin.: 2252 2, 105 | property, the Law ~enacted that heiresses should marry within their 2253 2, 92 | certain heretics [*The ~Helcesaitae], who affirmed that it is 2254 3, 52 | descended into each of ~the hells, but in different manner. 2255 2, 81 | stated in the same passage, "helpeth our ~infirmity," since by 2256 2, 185 | a ~gloss, to assist the helpless in their time of need.~Aquin.: 2257 2, 116 | iv, 1) that "old age and ~helplessness of any kind make men illiberal." 2258 2, 102 | stones denoted the two hemispheres, or the sun and moon. The 2259 Suppl, 92| case of Sichem's ~father Hemor, who on account of his son' 2260 3, 68 | holy synod commands that ~henceforward none of them be forced to 2261 2, 45 | the principles of the {ou ~heneka}" [*Literally, 'for the 2262 2, 102 | the tamer kinds, such ~as hens, partridges, and the like. 2263 3, 13 | Hence He did not wish ~to be heralded by His own, and yet He wished 2264 1, 102 | as if we were to say that Hercules is the end of the statue ~ 2265 2, 170 | Psalmist; He fills the herdsman plucking wild figs, and 2266 2, 182 | heretical doctrines (De Heres. liii), where he says that 2267 Suppl, 96| Moreover it is clear that heresiarchs who renounce the Catholic 2268 | hereupon 2269 2, 64 | stated at the end of Peri Hermenias. ~For though "to be" and " 2270 2, 187 | community, because the ~hermetical life had fallen into decline 2271 2, 184 | enlightenment." Hence neither hermits nor ~religious superiors 2272 2, 88 | vi, 19] that he caused Hermogenes to be brought to him, by 2273 2, 102 | if he have a ~rupture" or hernia; through baseness rending 2274 2, 102 | will. The heron [*Vulg.: 'herodionem'], commonly ~called a falcon, 2275 2, 68 | divine virtue [*{arete heroike kai theia}]," in respect 2276 2, 102 | water of his own will. The heron [*Vulg.: 'herodionem'], 2277 2, 10 | circumstances. Hence Augustine ~hesitated to decide between a bad 2278 2, 2 | from obstinacy in ~their heterodox sentiments, and that it 2279 2, 10 | to send master workmen to hew the ~trees, as related in 2280 3, 51 | own, which was "new," and "hewed out in a rock." ~Therefore 2281 1, 5 | measure; for Ambrose says (Hexam. i, 9): "It ~is of the nature 2282 2, 50 | read in the Greek [*{isos hexin} (Categor. viii)]. On the ~ 2283 2, 105 | motives of pleasure, and hiddenly, since "the eye of the adulterer ~ 2284 3, 62 | penetrates every secret ~hiding-place of the conscience. For subtle 2285 Suppl, 89| according to Dionysius (Ep. ad Hieroth.) "God is ~invisible on 2286 2, 95 | will, as Dionysius says of Hierotheos (Div. Nom. ii) that "he ~ 2287 2, 128 | measure, it makes a man high-handed, proud, ~haughty restless, 2288 3, 40 | of this world not to be ~high-minded." Therefore it seems that 2289 2, 96 | such fear as may overcome a high-principled man.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[98] 2290 2, 83 | anyone else, it is a crime of high-treason. Therefore, ~in the Divine 2291 2, 93 | of Babylon stood in the highway, at the head of two ways, 2292 2, 10 | 14:23): "Go out into the highways and hedges; and compel them 2293 2, 47 | those too who show signs of hilarity when ~another is in misfortune, 2294 2, 184 | serve.' For on every high hill and under every green tree ~ 2295 2, 122 | Christ's sake, and of whom ~Hillary says (Super Matth. i) that " 2296 2, 102 | permitted which have the hind-legs longer ~than the forelegs, 2297 2, 121 | just as a door turns upon a hinge ~[cardine]. But fortitude 2298 3, 72 | descent ~of the Holy Ghost on hint, in order to consecrate 2299 3, 2 | its merited fulfilment are hinted at." Therefore the ~Incarnation 2300 2, 184 | says (Ep. lxxviii ad ~Pleb. Hippon.): "From the time I began 2301 2, 31 | Augustine (Ep. ad pleb. Hipponens. lxxviii): "When a few of ~ 2302 2, 45 | Paralip. ii, ~14) concerning Hiram, that he knew "to grave 2303 2, 60 | one head. ~Now a man who hires the services of a wage-earner, 2304 3, 54 | not wish it" [*Apocryphal Historia Apost. viii, ~2]. Christ, 2305 2, 88 | From the apocryphal ~Historiae Certam. Apost. vi. 19.]~ 2306 3, 31 | is given by Africanus the historian. For these writers says 2307 2, 72 | covetous man, in order to hoard money, both robs, and omits 2308 2, 116 | naked man's cloak that thou hoardest, the needy man's money ~ 2309 2, 175 | Deborah (Judges 4:4), and ~of Holda the prophetess, the wife 2310 3, 52 | impossible that He should be ~holden by it." But there are no 2311 3, 48 | object pays the price to the ~holder. But it was not to the devil, 2312 2, 87 | do unjust things'], and ~holdest Thy peace, when the wicked 2313 2, 42 | all three cases has {ex holes tes ischyos}, which the 2314 Suppl, 36| that man handle holy things holily. Therefore no one can ~dispense 2315 2, 61 | love of truth demands a hollowed leisure; charity ~necessitates 2316 3, 77 | just as water added to ~holy-water becomes holy. But the consecrated 2317 Suppl, 39| cap. Continebatur, De ~homic. volunt.], as also the custom 2318 2, 62 | Cap. Significasti, De Homicid. volunt. vel casual.], " 2319 2, 87 | result is evil" [*Cf. Bede, Homil. xix, in Decoll. S. Joan. 2320 Suppl, 94| that, According to Basil (Homilia vi in Hexaemeron and Hom. 2321 1, 92 | self-movement." Gregory of Nyssa (De Homin. ~Opificio xvi) also asserts 2322 2, 85 | By ~common law [*Cap. Cum homines, de Decimis, etc.] the parish 2323 1, 80 | Nyssa (Nemesius, De Natura Hominis) and ~Damascene (De Fide 2324 2, 166 | of Braga, Formula Vitae Honestae: cap. De Continentia] says ( 2325 2, 143 | more abundant comeliness [honestatem], ~but our comely [honesta] 2326 2, 186 | consumeth the flesh." [*Vigilia honestatis ~St. Thomas would seem to 2327 2, 143 | things be ~done decently [honeste] and according to order" 2328 1, 107 | the ~middle-class [populus honorabilis]. In the same way we find 2329 2, 95 | Praetorian," also ~called "Honorary," law. Another form of government 2330 2, 183 | Augustine says (Ep. ccxxviii ad Honorat.): "Christ's ~servants may 2331 Suppl, 91| Whether his ~children come to honour or dishonour, he shall not 2332 2, 102 | signifies the gossip. The hoopoe, ~which builds its nest 2333 2, 183 | shall come in a day that he hopeth not . . . and shall separate ~ 2334 2, 15 | oion tois akmaiois he hora}--as youthful vigor ~perfects 2335 2, 105 | lest the ~people should be horror-stricken at the sight of their misfortune: 2336 2, 55 | an engine ~being so many horse-power, to indicate its 'strength'] 2337 2, 22 | art commands the art of horse-riding ~(Ethic. i). Accordingly 2338 2, 86 | is expedient to mount on horseback, ~though there be the danger 2339 2, 110 | comparison as that of a horseman to the horse - but not as 2340 2, 38 | written (xxiii, qu. 8, can. Hortatu) that Charles went to war 2341 2, 177 | Rachel: and by the two ~hostesses of our Lord; the contemplative 2342 3, 73 | Further, a host [*From Latin "hostia," a victim] seems to be 2343 2, 32 | in so far as they show hostility ~towards us, and this is 2344 2, 156 | unreasonable patience is the hotbed ~of many vices, it fosters 2345 2, 171 | supper-room [*Vulg.: ~'the house-top' or 'upper-chamber'] "he 2346 2, 10 | that the servants of the ~householder, in whose field cockle had 2347 2, 10 | of unbelieving princes' ~households, for we read in the Epistle 2348 2, 75 | tradesmen, but rather to ~housekeepers or civil servants who have 2349 2, 30 | marriage act, yet in matters of housekeeping, the ~head of the woman 2350 3, 42 | shall be preached on the ~housetops" [*St. Thomas, probably 2351 2, 17 | sorrow of heart, and shall howl for grief of spirit." Therefore ~ 2352 2, 88 | flowers and fresh ~with green hues this is opposed to drought. 2353 2, 82 | consists in ~an exterior humbling of the body. And since in 2354 3, 23 | humanity [*Some editions read ~'humilitas' - 'the humility or lowliness 2355 2, 159 | because he is, as it were, 'humo acclinis'" [*Literally, ' 2356 3, 74 | musti Vulcano ~decoquit humorem"; Virgil, Georg. i, 295] 2357 2, 166 | delight, are called playful or humorous. Hence it is necessary at ~ 2358 1, 95 | Polit. i, 5) that the ~hunting of wild animals is just 2359 3, 45 | of the Jews who wished to hurl Him down or ~to stone Him. 2360 3, 46 | reputation, from the blasphemies hurled at Him; in His honor and 2361 2, 75 | in his judgment, and be hurried into buying a thing without ~ 2362 2, 29 | hurtful and repugnant; since hurtfulness and repugnance are not ~ 2363 Suppl, 76| was first sown without a husk, yet is born with one: and 2364 2, 5 | strange gods, and ~love the husks of the grapes," the demons 2365 2, 93 | geomancy," if in water "hydromancy," if in ~the air "aeromancy," 2366 Suppl, 58| who is not a virgin, the ~hymeneal membrane may be broken by 2367 2, 109 | outwardly as being good; {hypo} denoting falsehood, and ~{ 2368 Suppl, 28| penance" as Ambrose ~[*Cf. Hypognost. iii, among the spurious 2369 2, 6 | and the infinitive of "I-do-not-wish." Consequently just ~as 2370 2, 178 | Metaph. ii, text. 3 [*Ed Did. ia, 1]) that "the end of ~contemplation 2371 2, 76 | usufruct, according ~to law (ibid., ad 3). Wherefore if such 2372 2, 102 | waters of pleasure. The ibis is an African bird with ~ 2373 2, 169 | Commentator [*Averroes or Ibn Roshd, 1120-1198] says ( 2374 1, 87 | philosopher named ~Avempace [*Ibn-Badja, Arabian Philosopher; ob. 2375 1, 114 | the typal ideas [rationes ideales].~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[115] 2376 2, 136 | that is "head-strong," or {idiognomones}, ~that is "self-opinionated," 2377 2, 185 | other hand, he lives not ~idly who in any way lives usefully.~ 2378 2, 10 | Can. Uxor legitima, and Idololatria, qu. i] says that "if ~the 2379 2, 165 | the love songs of pastoral idylls." Secondly, ~when a man 2380 2, 38 | writes (xxiii, qu. 8, can. Igitur): "As ~untoward tidings 2381 2, 70 | the salutary flame ~[bonus ignis] of love has enkindled the 2382 1, 12 | to be united to God while ignoring of Him "what He is," comes 2383 Appen2, 1| Further, Gregory of Nyssa [*De iis qui in fide dormiunt] says: " 2384 3, 68 | be baptized, but by ~some ill-chance he is forestalled by death 2385 2, 26 | love, and a wrong will is ill-directed love." However, the ~fact 2386 2, 32 | pleasure in certain kinds of ill-doing, such as ~overcoming, contradicting 2387 2, 159 | Sometimes, however, this may be ill-done, for instance when man, ~" 2388 3, 67 | even the uneducated and ill-instructed are ~allowed to raise people 2389 1, 93 | first man would have been ill-ordered had he wished to have, while 2390 Suppl, 64| but must do penance for an ill-taken vow [*Cf. Q[53], AA[1],4; ~ 2391 2, 105 | that a ~man should not ill-use his wife through hatred 2392 Suppl, 68| undone by the law. Now ~the illegitimacy of children is an effect 2393 3, 44 | understanding that they were illiterate ~and ignorant men . . . 2394 3, 36 | being deceived by the illusory appearance of the ~star, 2395 2, 47 | necessity of finding these illustrations or images, is ~that simple 2396 Suppl, 85| in Jerome's book De Viris Illustribus lii.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[88] 2397 1, 1 | extinguished by the ~sensible imagery wherewith it is veiled, 2398 Suppl, 81| with the most subtle body imaginable, ~since the greater the 2399 3, 68 | children, that they may imbibe the ~sacred mysteries: for 2400 2, 10 | their parents ~who would imbue them with their unbelief, 2401 1, 4 | He, Who is not perfectly imitable, can be ~imitated; unlike 2402 1, 83 | the heathens are spurious ~imitations or superstitious inventions, 2403 2, 81 | rest in them, it remains immersed therein; but when it is 2404 2, 167 | excessively, shamelessly, and immodestly.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[169] A[ 2405 3, 74 | the moon. So, then, after immolating the ~Paschal Lamb, Christ 2406 2, 79 | mortals is ~unbecoming to immortals. But such things are much 2407 2, 186 | things, whether movables or immovables, as ~suffice for a livelihood, 2408 1, 86 | object, ~however, cannot immute itself; but one is immuted 2409 1, 96 | have ~suffered from the impact. Therefore the first man 2410 1, 14 | Nevertheless this ~does not impair the nobility of His speculative 2411 2, 6 | voluntariness. But ~concupiscence impairs knowledge; for the Philosopher 2412 3, 41 | describe ~the desert as being impassable to man and full of beasts.~ 2413 1, 36 | property of ~love to move and impel the will of the lover towards 2414 Suppl, 67| chastity." Such causes ~are imperfections either of body, as sickness 2415 Suppl, 62| admonish him to beware of imperiling his own soul and of scandalizing ~ 2416 Suppl, 39| the exercise of his Order imperilled; otherwise ~he is not debarred. 2417 Suppl, 37| directed to God; because to impersonate the ~whole Church belongs 2418 Suppl, 62| another man has fraudulently impersonated her ~husband in the marriage-bed; 2419 3, 72 | bishop, who, in the Church, impersonates Christ.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[ 2420 Suppl, 72| meritorious on one count, and impetratory ~on another. For merit consists 2421 2, 139 | who can bear the violence [impetum] of one provoked?" ~Therefore 2422 2, 82 | proper movement, and the more impetuously, ~as it is stronger. Now 2423 3, 2 | of a part, for every part implicates the ~notion of imperfection. 2424 2, 108 | of the Gospel; viz. by ~imploring the help of God; by striving 2425 2, 30 | through giving too much she impoverish her ~husband. Otherwise 2426 2, 117 | since much useless spending ~impoverishes him and makes him unable 2427 3, 28 | that the Holy Ghost shall impregnate her, and ~that the Lord 2428 Suppl, 65| voided (since a woman may be impregnated a ~second time after impregnation 2429 1, 116 | have a tender and most impressionable body. It is also possible 2430 2, 68 | Decretals II, qu. 1, can. Imprimis.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[70] A[ 2431 2, 63 | hindered by binding or ~imprisoning or any kind of detention. ~ 2432 1, 89 | substance involves ~a manifest improbability. For, as is clear from what 2433 Suppl, 24| the cleric behaving with impropriety towards his wife ~his mother, 2434 2, 97 | it was found possible ~to improve them, considerable inconvenience 2435 2, 51 | referable to ~"precipitation"; improvidence, lack of intelligence and 2436 2, 52 | A babbler and a fool ~[imprudens] will regard no time." Now 2437 2, 41 | because he did this ~somewhat imprudently, so that the gentiles who 2438 2, 31 | becoming manner, not ~with impudence and harshness, but with 2439 2, 136 | pertinacious who holds on impudently, as being utterly tenacious." ~" 2440 2, 98 | and of those who with him impugned the ~Holy Ghost, is more 2441 2, 36 | voice, for the purpose of impugning the truth, so that it is 2442 2, 91 | influence of his sensual impulses: in fact this happens to 2443 2, 14 | whose ~behalf and by whose impulsion the inquiry is made, and 2444 2, 152 | Incestus' is equivalent to 'in-castus = 'unchaste'] takes ~its 2445 Suppl, 92| and yet the dowry remains inalienable from the ~bride, so that 2446 2, 110 | pleasure in ~boasting, is an inane thing to do, as the Philosopher 2447 3, 41 | not in the third, which is inapplicable to spiritual men, who are 2448 2, 81 | to God if the prayer ~is inattentive. Therefore attention is 2449 Suppl, 72| entirely, as instanced by incandescent iron, which by virtue of ~ 2450 2, 94 | I answer that, In every incantation or wearing of written words, 2451 1, 102 | each ~other, except by the incapacity or unskillfulness of the 2452 3, 12 | men"; and Ambrose says (De Incar. Dom. vii) ~that "He advanced 2453 2, 51 | parts ~mentioned above. Thus incautiousness and incircumspection are 2454 2, 140 | and ~these are certain incentives to desire devised by human 2455 2, 155 | shameful, and harass ~more incessantly, for which reason temperance 2456 2, 152 | of lust. ~For incest [*'Incestus' is equivalent to 'in-castus = ' 2457 1, 103 | of fire imperfectly and inchoately, the heat will remain for 2458 Appen1, 2| free, as ~appears from many incidents related in the Dialogue 2459 2, 51 | Thus incautiousness and incircumspection are included in ~"thoughtlessness"; 2460 2, 36 | the Latin version, read ~'incisionem'; should he have read 'indigentiam'?], 2461 2, 102 | nor beard, and not to make incisions in their flesh, ~in order 2462 2, 45 | daring is caused through the ~incitement of hope and the banishment 2463 2, 21 | contained in the Law are incitements to hope.~Aquin.: SMT SS 2464 2, 79 | land, and an inhabitant [incola] is one who cultivates the ~ 2465 1, 117 | concur - to wit, that of the incoming soul, and that of the begetter. 2466 1, 29 | the sense which ~implies incommunicability. "Substance" can be applied 2467 Suppl, 53| sacrament, it has a certain incompatibility with marriage in respect 2468 2, 65 | the emperor [*Can. Nos si incompetenter, ~caus. ii, qu. 7].~Aquin.: 2469 2, 70 | enumerated ~insufficiently and incompletely. For it has been stated ( 2470 2, 159 | Hence Chrysostom says [*De incompr. Nat. Dei, ~Hom. v]: "Bring 2471 1, 13 | the ~thing signified as incomprehended, and as exceeding the signification 2472 Suppl, 85| this ~would require an inconceivable length of time. Thus Augustine 2473 Suppl, 89| this reasoning is seemingly inconclusive. First, because the ~quiddity 2474 2, 70 | grave that being uttered inconsiderately it might dishonor the ~person 2475 2, 81 | hast asked ~amiss, either inconsistently, or lightly, or because 2476 2, 51 | Now this is a mark of "incontinency" in ~pleasurable matters, 2477 1, 1 | canonical Scriptures as an ~incontrovertible proof, and the authority 2478 Suppl, 77| transformation and ~become incorporate with the members. This is 2479 2, 114 | light, ~goeth forward and increaseth even to perfect day," which 2480 1, 12 | a creature see what is ~increatable?" Dionysius also says (Div. 2481 2, 102 | bird with her young during incubation, and to employ them for ~ 2482 2, 152 | of marriage if he use her indecently, ~although he be not unfaithful, 2483 2, 74 | imagination is sudden and ~indeliberate: wherefore it can cause 2484 2, 105 | inflicted punishment ~by indemnification: while in the case of blows 2485 2, 76 | everyone may lawfully seek to indemnify ~himself. Now sometimes 2486 Suppl, 64| for her to make known [*"Indicare," as in the ~commentary 2487 2, 7 | act. Thus a man becomes indictable, first, through ~being guilty 2488 2, 36 | incisionem'; should he have read 'indigentiam'?], the cause of sorrow, ~" 2489 2, 105 | asked Him to do ~so, being indignant with them, so to speak, 2490 2, 156 | whom he deems unworthy ~[indignum] of acting thus towards 2491 Suppl, 20| Church ~Militant, so that an indiscriminate authority over all should 2492 Suppl, 87| damned have the intellect indisposed, it would seem that the ~ 2493 2, 81 | is "the ~understanding of indivisibles," by which operation we 2494 2, 52 | its species must ~remain indivisibly fixed and constant in something 2495 Suppl, 52| qu. iv, in ~gloss.: cap. Inducens, De natis ex libero ventre) 2496 Suppl, 78| unhealthy, in so far as man ~indulges in those pleasures inordinately, 2497 3, 78 | because, like a cup, ~it inebriates, according to Lam. 3:15: " 2498 2, 147 | 22:5, "My chalice which inebriateth me, how goodly is ~it!" 2499 2, 147 | wisdom is said to be ~an inebriating draught, because it allures 2500 3, 22 | not on account of the ~inefficacy of the priesthood of Christ, 2501 1, 107 | the angels and virtues are ineptly named.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[ 2502 1, 98 | by ~insufficient power or ineptness of matter: thus a small 2503 Suppl, 52| through his losing the ~inestimable good of freedom; whereas 2504 2, 42 | on ~account of its being inevitable, wherefore we look upon 2505 2, 121 | She it is that wages an inexorable war on all vice, undeterred ~


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