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St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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1003-bespa | beste-conse | consi-drops | dross-foste | fouln-inexo | inexp-megal | melan-penit | pepuz-refut | regai-socra | sodom-truth | tu-zone

     Part, Question
2506 2, 45 | so far as through ~being inexperienced they do not know their own 2507 1, 107 | angels have in themselves an inextinguishable light, and that ~they also 2508 2, 66 | attaching to the deed [infamia facti], or that sometimes 2509 3, 82 | Divine symbols, his unclean infamies, for I will not call them 2510 1, 98 | could have been ~certain infantile defects which result from 2511 Suppl, 94| that it is beneath us [inferius], what earth is in relation 2512 Suppl, 94| it ~the nether regions (infernus [*The Latin for 'hell']), 2513 2, 6 | were one word, and the infinitive of "I-do-not-wish." Consequently 2514 2, 130 | Quaest. i) that "glory inflames every man to strive his 2515 Suppl, 70| A gloss on ~James 3:6, "inflameth the wheel of our nativity," 2516 Suppl, 1 | metaphor. For just as the ~inflation of one's own will unto wrong-doing 2517 1, 107 | signifies that they are borne inflexibly towards God. ~Secondly, 2518 2, 106 | without fault of his own to an inflictive punishment, such ~as death, 2519 3, 28 | must observe that it ~not infrequently points merely to some thing 2520 3, 68 | Consequently, neither should anyone infringe the ~order of the natural 2521 2, 59 | whose protection he has infringed. Nor again would there be 2522 2, 145 | OBJ 2: Further, whoever infringes a precept commits a mortal 2523 2, 51 | against prudence, except by infringing the ~rules on which the 2524 1, 15 | things are one, except "ingenerability, ~generation, and procession." 2525 2, 45 | graving, and to ~devise ingeniously [prudenter] all that there 2526 2, 102 | preservation, obedience is ~said to ingraft and protect all virtues. 2527 2, 102 | is the only ~virtue that ingrafts virtues in the soul and 2528 2, 79 | cultivates the land, and an inhabitant [incola] is one who cultivates 2529 2, 112 | 1 Tim. 6:16: "Who . . . ~inhabiteth light inaccessible."~Aquin.: 2530 2, 67 | juramento calumniae, cap. Inhaerentes): ~and this would not be 2531 2, 113 | all the time previous sin inhered.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[113] A[ 2532 Suppl, 54| order to avoid confusion of inheritances: ~because at that time the 2533 3, 82 | this ~sin is specially inhibited to priests by the Church, 2534 Suppl, 45| clandestine marriages (cap. Cum inhibitio, De ~clandest. despons.). 2535 2, 143 | that are our ~uncomely [inhonesta] parts, have more abundant 2536 2, 104 | De ~Benef. vi), "it were inhuman to desire this in one from 2537 2, 18 | variable imitation of ~the Inimitable" - that is, because, so 2538 2, 160 | 118:51, "The proud did iniquitously," ~says: "The greatest sin 2539 2, 78 | which a man takes on his own initiative, though not ~against the 2540 2, 18 | because it is a beginning ~[initium]. Since, however, both servile 2541 2, 84 | Condict. ob. ~turp. vel iniust. caus. 4] "the whore's is 2542 2, 73 | extenuate the sin of the injurer.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[73] A[ 2543 3, 42 | to be "written not with ink, but with the Spirit of 2544 3, 62 | of life and searches the inner-most recesses of the ~heart."~ 2545 1, 8 | God is in all things, ~and innermostly.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[8] A[1] 2546 2, 187 | those who presume on their innocency. It is to the ~former that 2547 2, 10 | 45) that "presumptuous innovations arise from vainglory."~Aquin.: 2548 2, 17 | genital members is sometimes inopportune and not desired; ~sometimes 2549 2, 91 | eternal happiness ~which is inproportionate to man's natural faculty, 2550 1, 83 | 3/5~The former of these inquiries will be threefold: (1) How 2551 2, 145 | For Augustine says (Ad inquis. Januar., ~Ep. lv) that " 2552 2, 93 | Hence ~Augustine says (ad inquisit. Januar. ii; Ep. lv): "Those 2553 3, 83 | after the ~consecration, the insect should be caught carefully 2554 2, 130 | enters secretly, and robs us insensibly of all our inward possessions." ~ 2555 2, 63 | definition of the latter virtue inserts the words, "which God works ~ 2556 2, 57 | mean. Now this seems to be insignificant and should be ~accounted 2557 3, 41 | Because vices begin by insinuating ~themselves into the mind 2558 2, 81 | and then they call it "insinuation." The ~third condition is 2559 Suppl, 64| admonitions; yet not so insistently as possibly to afford him 2560 1, 19 | perform a work, either by insisting upon it as ~necessary by 2561 2, 105 | if they were altogether insolvent, there was ~the same reason 2562 2, 93 | from ~watching birds [avium inspectione]. These are chiefly wont 2563 2, 87 | Holy Ghost, Who is ~the inspirer of good purposes), yet he 2564 2, 46 | Philosopher states (Polit. i, ~3), instancing a miser with regard to riches. 2565 2, 81 | to Whom we pray, and Who instigates us to pray. Wherefore Augustine ~ 2566 3, 50 | overthrew death, He might instill into us the hope of rising 2567 2, 22 | power of the agent, who instills the form, wherefore it is 2568 2, 3 | possessed of certain particular ~instincts in respect of works similar 2569 2, 33 | Instit. Monast. x, [*De ~Institutione Caeobiorum]): "The monk 2570 Suppl, 61| longed to possess (cap. Institutum, caus. xxvi, qu. ii).~Aquin.: 2571 2, 47 | 4: Silence provokes the insulter to anger when he thinks 2572 2, 2 | seem to ~be sufficiently insured by its natural endowments. 2573 3, 83 | difference, since unity of faith insures the happy issue of the ~ 2574 2, 21 | moral virtues, for ~sake of insuring a greater stability, especially 2575 Suppl, 2 | play on the words ~here - 'integer' (whole) and 'in suis terminis' ( 2576 Suppl, 70| they in the separated soul ~intellectively: but not that they are in 2577 2, 171 | spiritual - for ~instance, the intenseness of the prophets' contemplation; 2578 3, 46 | weight of the suspended ~body intensifies the agony. and besides this 2579 1, 14 | discerner of thoughts and intents of the heart; neither ~is 2580 2, 184 | towards God, and though it be intercepted for the ~moment, it is easily 2581 2, 56 | exercised in voluntary ~interchanges of things, such as buying 2582 3, 73 | Sacrifice"; and the faithful intercommunicate through all ~the sacraments, 2583 Suppl, 60| caus. xxxiii, qu. ii, can. Interfectores) ~says: "The slayers of 2584 3, 35 | there, no officious women interfered. She was both mother ~and 2585 2, 58 | the spiritual authority interferes in those temporal matters 2586 2, 95 | who tempts God, says the interlinear gloss, "prays for what God 2587 1, 91 | relations are debarred from intermarriage, as is written (Lev. ~18: 2588 Suppl, 59| be an impediment to their intermarrying. They are not, ~however, 2589 2, 39 | 6): "The lips of a fool ~intermeddle with strife." Now folly 2590 1, 22 | second, there are certain intermediaries of God's ~providence; for 2591 1, 110 | xii, 12): "One spirit by ~intermingling with another can communicate 2592 2, 162 | lit. iii, 18). Alcuin [*Interrog. et Resp. in ~Gen. lxxix], 2593 1, 29 | 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, the interrogation "What?" refers to essence. 2594 2, 81 | certain fixed times, ~though interruptedly; or by reason of the effect, 2595 3, 60 | different ~order or with interruptions. ~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[60] A[ 2596 Suppl, 57| father if the latter die intestate, nor ~can his father legally 2597 2, 17 | Sometimes, however, the reason intimates something to a man ~by moving 2598 Suppl, 69| for man's instruction and intimidation they be permitted ~to appear 2599 3, 83 | then the "Alleluia" is intoned, and ~this denotes spiritual 2600 3, 83 | and therefore the priest ~intones the "Creed" and the "Gloria 2601 2, 147 | Just as the material wine intoxicates a man as to his body, ~so 2602 3, 14 | in original sin, ~[*See introductory note to Q[27]] and therefore 2603 Suppl, 64| because afterwards she rashly intruded into the divine service 2604 2, 8 | understand] is the same as "intus legere" [to read ~inwardly]. 2605 Suppl, 12| and concupiscence from invading another's marriage ~right, 2606 Suppl, 52| follows that the validity or ~invalidity of a marriage is not affected 2607 Suppl, 55| Wherefore it is not every invasion or penetration of ~the hymen 2608 2, 64 | Dig. xiv, 5, can. Si ~quid invenisti).~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[66] A[ 2609 2, 167 | their art, except perhaps by inventing means ~that are superfluous 2610 2, 93 | who was said to be the inventor of divination." Sometimes 2611 3, 42 | Christ. No wonder that ~the inventors were deceived by the painters: 2612 2, 97 | XVII, qu. iv, can. Quisquis inventus, can. 21): ~"Whoever is 2613 1, 83 | clear that ~knowledge is in inverse ratio of materiality. And 2614 2, 105 | the calf was a means of ~investigating the hidden murder. This 2615 3, 13 | Yet it would have been invidious not to ~welcome such as 2616 1, 86 | ix, 6): "We gaze on the inviolable truth whence we can as perfectly 2617 2, 98 | I, qu. i [*Can. Quidquid invisibilis]): ~"It is absolutely forbidden 2618 2, 102 | was set up; to denote His invisibility. But there was something 2619 2, 94 | include certain explicit invocations and trickery, wherefore 2620 1, 81 | the ~irascible part from "irasci" [to be angry]. But there 2621 2, 32 | the contrary, painful and irksome. And ~in this sense, leisure 2622 1, 19 | that God made ~all things irrationally?" But to a voluntary agent, 2623 3, 6 | dignity, but because of the irremediableness of ~their fall, which cannot 2624 2, 87 | of the sin, ~but to its irremissibility, as stated above (A[3]).~ 2625 3, 76 | all ~other consecrations irremovable so long as the consecrated 2626 2, 88 | it can be repaired. ~Now irreparability belongs to sin committed 2627 2, 72 | nature of his ~sin, falls irreparably, and therefore is said to 2628 2, 72 | as Porphyry ~declares [*Isagog.; cf. Arist. Metaph. i]. 2629 2, 42 | cases has {ex holes tes ischyos}, which the Douay ~renders " 2630 2, 136 | Ethic. vii, ~9) calls {ischyrognomones}, that is "head-strong," 2631 2, 76 | the ten men who said to Ismahel (Jer. 41:8): "Kill us not: 2632 2, 65 | perfect" as a virtue, "if isolated from the others: for there ~ 2633 2, 50 | we read in the Greek [*{isos hexin} (Categor. viii)]. 2634 2, 62 | priest Phinees slew ~the Israelite who went in to the woman 2635 2, 105 | stated: for it is written ~(Iss 56:3): "Let not the son 2636 3, 69 | that which is called the Italian band, a ~religious man and 2637 2, 71 | Take care not to have ~an itching tongue, nor tingling ears, 2638 3, 83 | of the mass, by saying: "Ite, missa est," that is, the 2639 3, 83 | Therefore, if the various items ~mentioned above are suitably 2640 1, 116 | 1~OBJ 2: Further, in the Itinerary of Clement it is said in 2641 2, 110 | if a man wishes to throw [jactare] a ~thing far away, he lifts 2642 2, 80 | it is likewise written (Jam. 4:7): "Be subject . . . 2643 2, 102 | deities which they call "Janae."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[102] 2644 2, 70 | no man, except perhaps by jarring of the ear, as when a person 2645 2, 129 | written (2 Macc. 4:7) that "Jason ~ambitiously sought the 2646 Suppl, 82| clarity is compared to the ~jasper-stone (Apoc. 21:11).~Aquin.: SMT 2647 2, 44 | lip, too, ~and the lower jaw tremble, through their connection 2648 2, 184 | slew many foes with the jaw-bone of an ass. For those ~fathers, 2649 2, 10 | authority and ~ought to be jealously observed in all things, 2650 2, 145 | natural fasting [jejunium jejunii] [*Literally ~the 'fast 2651 2, 148 | Ambrose says [*De Elia et de Jejunio v] that "there would be 2652 2, 145 | called natural fasting [jejunium jejunii] [*Literally ~the ' 2653 2, 86 | Micheam vi, ~viii: Comment. in Jerem. vii. The quotation is from 2654 2, 171 | from the ~senses - thus Jeremiah saw the "boiling caldron . . . 2655 2, 85 | going down from Jerusalem to Jericho ~(Lk. 10:30), i.e. to the 2656 2, 109 | not from the idolatry of Jeroboam (4 Kgs. 10:29,31). And yet 2657 2, 2 | that ~David was the son of Jesse, and so forth.~Aquin.: SMT 2658 2, 166 | sat not in the assembly of jesters," and (Tobias ~3:17): "Never 2659 2, 1 | Reply OBJ 1: Actions done jestingly are not directed to any 2660 Suppl, 59| but not if ~she were a Jewess, unless she promised to 2661 2, 170 | four hundred, who eat at Jezebel's table." Now these were 2662 2, 105 | of the Lord was" in them (Jgs 3:9,10,15). Hence the Lord ~ 2663 1, 36 | an example from Maunder, "Jhesu Criste was the worde ~and 2664 3, 8 | sinneth from the beginning" (1 Jnn 3:8), is ~held out to all 2665 2, 24 | hate one's ~friends: hence Joab upbraided David by saying ( 2666 3, 31 | says that there were two ~Joachims - that is, Jechonias, father 2667 Suppl, 53| as jurists ~assert (cap. Joannes et seqq., De cler. conjug.), 2668 3, 31 | was succeeded by his son ~Joathan. But Matthew says that Joram 2669 1, 109 | from the design of the ~[joiner's] art. Therefore the substantial 2670 2, 142 | information to many, such as jokers and ~fable-tellers." But 2671 2, 93 | lots, found that his son Jonathan had eaten honey (1 ~Kgs. 2672 2, 107 | to say (Mt. 5:18): "One jot or one tittle ~shall not 2673 2, 120 | Elias (3 ~Kgs. 19), who journeyed for forty days unto the 2674 2, 145 | according to Jerome [*Contra Jov. ii.] "Venus ~is cold when 2675 Suppl, 41| Ep. ad Ageruch.: Contra Jovini, 18) that in the ~marriage 2676 2, 112 | with the sad ~nor with the joyless. Therefore, a certain natural 2677 1, 32 | Likewise, when it is said that joyous possession of ~good requires 2678 3, 51 | Hence Chrysostom says (Cont. Jud. et ~Gent. quod 'Christus 2679 3, 12 | and again His return to ~Judaea from Egypt."~Aquin.: SMT 2680 Suppl, 59| Decretals, XXVIII, qu. 1, can. ~Judaei). Therefore a believer is 2681 1, 94 | in a homily (Serm. contra Judaeos): ~"The prince of sin overcame 2682 2, 58 | judge as such. Now ~a judge [judex] is so called because he 2683 Suppl, 86| superior, as in the case of a ~judge-delegate. Hence it is not unfitting 2684 Suppl, 64| the Leonine edition reads "judicare."] her ~disaffection, lest 2685 2, 67 | Decretals (II, qu. vi, cap. A judicibus) it is unlawful to appeal 2686 Suppl, 49| according to ~Augustine (Contra Jul. ii, 10; De Decem Chord. 2687 2, 95 | authors: thus we have the "Lex Julia" about adultery, the "Lex ~ 2688 2, 186 | the contrary, Prosper [*Julianus Pomerius, among the works 2689 2, 145 | reasons. For they fasted in July, ~which is the fourth month 2690 Suppl, 55| attest.; ~cap. Literas, De juram. calumn.).~Aquin.: SMT XP 2691 2, 67 | calumnious allegations (Extra, De juramento calumniae, cap. Inhaerentes): ~ 2692 2, 87 | seqq.: Cap. Si vero, de ~Jurejurando]. Therefore it would seem 2693 Suppl, 55| as witnesses; that ~the juridical order is not perfectly observed, 2694 2, 65 | to reject that ~evidence juridically, he must, as stated above, 2695 2, 145 | to be found in the Corpus Juris, Cap. Solent, dist. 1, De ~ 2696 Suppl, 51| Si per errorem, ff. De ~jurisdic. omn. judic.): "What is 2697 Suppl, 84| behooves both judge and jury to know the merits of a 2698 2, 152 | others. ~Thus the Emperor Justinian says [*Cod. i, iii de Episc. 2699 Suppl, 41| animals" [*Digest. I, i, de justitia et ~jure, 1]. But in other 2700 2, 111 | to God's justification [justitiae] by a ~movement of our free-will. 2701 2, 152 | uncleanness know" [*Translation W. K. Blount].~Aquin.: SMT SS 2702 2, 68 | virtue [*{arete heroike kai theia}]," in respect of 2703 3, 35 | winter, eight days before the Kalends ~of January, it seems that 2704 2, 7 | particular things [*{ta kath' ekasta}], i.e. the ~particular 2705 2, 116 | hungry man's bread that thou keepest ~back, the naked man's cloak 2706 2, 94 | friends walking together; kicking ~the door-post when anyone 2707 2, 64 | 1, Super Joan.), ~and of kidnaping which is stealing a man, 2708 2, 102 | idols prepared the ~flesh of kids in this manner, for the 2709 2, 116 | kyminopristes}], misers [*{kimbikes}], who do illiberal deeds," 2710 2, 115 | also called liberality or ~kind-heartedness." Therefore liberality pertains 2711 1, 110 | the devil is called the kindler of thoughts, inasmuch ~as 2712 2, 102 | They) have worshipped the kine of Bethaven." And in detestation ~ 2713 3, 80 | lips ~wherewith thou hast kissed the daughter of a harlot? " 2714 2, 101 | glory" is the ~same as {kleria}, wherefore a gloss of Augustine 2715 2, 183 | Nepotian.): "The Greek {kleros} ~denotes the Latin 'sors.' 2716 2, 116 | is ~a fool rather than a knave."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] 2717 2, 102 | Jer. ~7:18): "The women knead the dough, to make cakes 2718 2, 60 | according ~to Mt. 25:26, "Thou knewest that I reap where I sow 2719 2, 102 | worshippers of idols used to ~knive themselves to the shedding 2720 2, 81 | whereas to pray much is to knock at ~the door of Him we pray, 2721 2, 140 | which Aristotle ~refers to {kolazo} to punish, so that its 2722 2, 109 | denoting falsehood, and ~{krisis}, judgment."~Aquin.: SMT 2723 Suppl, 54| Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, Laban said to Jacob (Gn. 29:14): " 2724 2, 160 | find no sin that is not labelled ~pride"; and Prosper says ( 2725 2, 90 | from hurting the foot ~[laedere pedem], but this is not 2726 2, 34 | sin. For Jerome says to Laeta ~about the education of 2727 2, 187 | as Augustine says (Ep. ad Laetum ccxliii), is nothing less 2728 2, 178 | again; others go forwards or lag behind many times; others ~ 2729 Suppl, 40| wayward, the weak, and the laggard."~The "ring" signifies the 2730 2, 30 | these, for blindness and ~lameness are kinds of sickness, so 2731 2, 185 | is not to teach but to ~lament." Again Pope Leo [*Leo I, 2732 3, 85 | for an only son, a bitter ~lamentation." Therefore penance is not 2733 2, 28 | cannot, bears ~with it and laments it."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[28] 2734 Suppl, 64| without the ~consent of his landlord whose land he has leased. 2735 2, 28 | a ~hurt in the one that languishes. But love causes languor: 2736 2, 93 | Lots are cast into the lap, but they are disposed of 2737 2, 61 | substitutes a pebble [*'Lapillus' or 'calculus' ~whence the 2738 2, 100 | relating to peculations and larceny. To the eighth ~commandment, 2739 1, 12 | comprehension" is taken more largely ~as opposed to "non-attainment"; 2740 1, 90 | smell. For man ~needs the largest brain as compared to the 2741 2, 115 | called ~open-handedness [largitas], because that which is 2742 3, 46 | and ~spittle; and from the lashes over His entire body. Moreover, 2743 Suppl, 42| institution; ~and. as regards the last-mentioned institution, that it is 2744 1, 78 | species unchangeably and lastingly, ~whether it receive them 2745 2, 49 | habit" ~implies a certain lastingness: while the word "disposition" 2746 2, 174 | Spiritus.' Cf. Migne, Patr. Lat. tom. CXLI]: "On this day 2747 2, 31 | as if one were to say "latitia"; "exultation" is ~derived 2748 2, 33 | I answer that, Breadth [latitudo] is a dimension of bodily 2749 2, 1 | A.D. 451, known as the "Latrocinium" and ~condemned by the Pope.] 2750 3, 50 | Eusebius says (Orat. de Laud. Constant. xv), "if, after 2751 2, 129 | in so far as a good is laudably desired.~Aquin.: SMT SS 2752 3, 2 | the Circumcision, Ant. ii, Lauds]. Therefore in Christ ~there 2753 2, 152 | she ~make thee become a laughing-stock to thy enemies." Therefore 2754 Suppl, 70| as, in Baptism, it is by laving the body that water ~sanctifies 2755 2, 30 | give abundantly is to give lavishly. Therefore alms should not 2756 3, 22 | our Judge, the Lord is our law-giver, the Lord is our King: He ~ 2757 2, 44 | occasioned by heat; hence laxative ~medicines are generally 2758 3, 89 | declares (Hom. de Divite et Lazaro, 41 in Evang.) that "unless ~ 2759 2, 60 | shameful thought of the lazy servant, who deemed that 2760 2, 131 | proud, had he undertaken the leadership of a numerous ~people without 2761 1, 102 | flower of the plant, the leaf of the tree, ~hath God endowed 2762 2, 184 | Morals [*Epist. Missoria, ad ~Leand. Episc. i] compares the 2763 3, 66 | Gregory wrote to the Bishop Leander: "It cannot be in ~any way 2764 2, 16 | speak now, ~attains God by leaning on His help in order to 2765 2, 49 | sometimes a habit, and so are leanness and ~beauty. But these do 2766 2, 67 | declineth from evil, the fool leapeth over and is confident." 2767 3, 27 | sanctification in the womb. For ~the leaping of John in the womb "might," 2768 Suppl, 64| landlord whose land he has leased. And yet the wife is not ~ 2769 3, 40 | garment of camel's hair and ~a leathern girdle about his loins: 2770 2, 151 | act 1, sc. 1), speaking of lecherous love: "This ~thing admits 2771 Suppl, 66| stated in the gloss on can. Lector, dist. ~34.~Aquin.: SMT 2772 3, 83 | dispositively," when the ~Lectors and Sub-deacons read aloud 2773 2, 185 | church, ~or give public lectures in the schools. Hence he 2774 3, 80 | such things on account of lecturing ~or debating; and if it 2775 3, 52 | that ~are settled on their lees."~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[52] A[ 2776 2, 102 | while the north is the left-hand ~side, as stated in De Coelo 2777 Suppl, 57| intestate, nor ~can his father legally deprive him of a fourth 2778 2, 90 | jurists say ~(Cod. 1, tit. De lege et constit. leg. vii). But 2779 2, 187 | business" ~(Dist. liii, can. Legem.). Therefore seemingly much 2780 1, 36 | Son; for it is said in the legend of St. Andrew: ~"Peace be 2781 2, 187 | qu. ii, cap. Duce ~sunt leges.): "If a man, while governing 2782 2, 96 | tit. iii, ~art. ii; De legibus, etc.) that "laws should 2783 2, 93 | latter replied: "My name is Legion, for we are many" (Mk. 5: 2784 1, 25 | presently more than twelve legions of angels?" (Mt. ~26:53). 2785 2, 10 | and a canon [*Can. Uxor legitima, and Idololatria, qu. i] 2786 Suppl, 55| nor can it in any way legitimize a ~marriage which could 2787 2, 185 | borrower is servant to him that lendeth." This is contrary to ~religion, 2788 2, 58 | the ~enemy, like lions [*Leonum more, i.e. as lions are 2789 1, 83 | hindered, as in the ~case of lethargy, we see that a man is hindered 2790 3, 79 | When ~we desire it, He lets us feel Him, and eat Him, 2791 1, 4 | namely, the Pythagoreans and Leucippus, did not predicate ~"best" 2792 3, 41 | to ~bear bravely insults leveled at ourselves, but not to 2793 Suppl, 86| written concerning Behemoth or Leviathan, whereby ~the devil is signified ( 2794 3, 31 | Further, "in Abraham tithe was levied on that which needed ~healing," 2795 2, 120 | Sabbath than to be dancing lewdly all day in their feasts 2796 2, 147 | Facciolati and Forcellini's Lexicon]. Now ~we ought to be guided 2797 2, 101 | and the sacrifices and libations thereof, as the ceremonies ~ 2798 2, 69 | pertains ~to the virtue of liberality--and by a gift, so that, 2799 2, 115 | of a thing he frees it [liberat], so to ~speak, from his 2800 Suppl, 52| agreement with this (cap. Liberi, 32, qu. iv, in ~gloss.: 2801 3, 84 | to do penance, who take liberties with Christ: for ~if they 2802 2, 76 | madman, a maiden with a libertine, ~or food with a glutton. 2803 1, 82 | that, Although free-will [*Liberum arbitrium - i.e. free ~judgment] 2804 2, 94 | XXVI, qu. v, ~cap. Non liceat Christianis): "In blending 2805 3, 72 | nor can it ever be either licitly or ~validly performed by 2806 2, 136 | nor the effeminate, nor liers ~with mankind," expounds 2807 2, 111 | Serm. xxix): "If thou ~liest on account of humility, 2808 2, 160 | it into the hands of its lieutenants the seven ~principal vices, 2809 1, 22 | acts towards the end of ~life--or in regard to others subject 2810 1, 101 | fruit was endowed with a life-preserving power as above stated (Q[ 2811 Suppl, 4 | Richard of St. Victor, De Pot. Lig. et ~Solv. 3,5,13] that " 2812 2, 90 | law] is derived from ~"ligare" [to bind], because it binds 2813 2, 182 | priests is illuminative and ~light-giving, that of the ministers is 2814 2, 50 | been attained: thus the sun lightens the ~air even after it is 2815 2, 186 | said (Lk. 11:33): "No man lighteth a candle and ~putteth it 2816 2, 172 | Thomas apparently read 'ligna' ('wood')] is wont to be 2817 Suppl, 18| and impose as much as he liked of a penance, he would have 2818 2, 172 | him, and as the flax [*'Lina.' St. ~Thomas apparently 2819 3, 26 | Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln (1253), William of Ware ( 2820 Suppl, 55| and from a line ~moved lineally, there proceeds not a line 2821 2, 73 | is to human acts what a linear rule is in corporeal things. ~ 2822 3, 83 | penance; and let the altar linens which ~the drop touched 2823 3, 59 | good or evil reputations linger ~on. In another way in a 2824 3, 47 | crucified were tormented ~with a lingering death." But this did not 2825 3, 50 | the soul were the medium linking them together. But it is 2826 Suppl, 89| it was a defect in Pope Linus that he did not ~attain 2827 2, 44 | near the heart. The lower lip, too, ~and the lower jaw 2828 2, 28 | powers in fire, ~one of liquefaction, the other of rarefaction: 2829 2, 28 | though fire by ~heating, both liquefies and rarefies, there are 2830 2, 31 | Lord warns us not to be listless in regard of one another' 2831 Suppl, 72| prayers of the saints in the Litany.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[72] A[ 2832 2, 99 | Augustine proves (De Spiritu et Litera xiv), even the ~letter of 2833 Suppl, 55| test. et attest.; ~cap. Literas, De juram. calumn.).~Aquin.: 2834 2, 104 | affairs ~to regulate not only litigious matters, but also voluntary 2835 3, 64 | against Petilian (Cont. Litt. Petil ii). Therefore it ~ 2836 2, 41 | all: If ~thou being a Jew, livest after the manner of the 2837 Suppl, 87| stated (Dan. 7:13,14): "Lo, one like the ~Son of man 2838 2, 116 | himself, the covetous ~man loads himself with an excess of 2839 3, 80 | If any ~man be hungry and loath to await the rest, let him 2840 3, 82 | sometimes, on account of loathsomeness, as is ~evident in the case 2841 3, 74 | maize, from which in some ~localities bread is made for the use 2842 1, 8 | giving it ~existence and locative power. Again, things placed 2843 2, 156 | displeasure, which he holds ~locked in his breast; and as he 2844 Suppl, 20| opens one lock, opens all locks of ~the same pattern. Now 2845 Suppl, 47| Decretal says (cap. Cum locum, De sponsal. et ~matrim.): " 2846 3, 89 | you the years, which ~the locust . . . hath eaten," a gloss 2847 3, 40 | loins: and his meat was locusts and wild ~honey"; on which 2848 Suppl, 55| swear that the information lodged by him came to ~his knowledge 2849 Suppl, 55| made, so that if he who lodges ~information against persons 2850 2, 99 | sciences, we notice that the loftier the science, the higher 2851 2, 171 | like Jeremias who hid his ~loin-cloth in the Euphrates (Jer. 13: 2852 2, 102 | were prescribed the use of loin-cloths for the sake ~of decency: 2853 2, 38 | Charles went to war with ~the Lombards at the instance and entreaty 2854 2, 120 | promise, "That thou ~mayest be long-lived upon earth."~Aquin.: SMT 2855 2, 70 | Apostle: for patience and long-suffering seem to imply a painful 2856 2, 2 | instance, by the ~elephant in longevity, by the lion in strength, 2857 2, 42 | all the circumstances, ~longlastingness, or even everlastingness, 2858 3, 44 | the world were ~not on the look-out for one, and that they ascribed 2859 2, 87 | and (Hab. 1:13): "Why lookest ~Thou upon the contemptuous [ 2860 1, 92 | sees a man reflected in a looking-glass he may be said to be turned ~ 2861 2, 31 | not indeed by being on the lookout for something to denounce, 2862 2, 17 | unless command be taken loosely for motion.~Aquin.: SMT 2863 2, 187 | thee, cut off rather than ~loosen the rope that holds the 2864 2, 44 | indeed the result is a loosening of the bowels, and urinary 2865 2, 183 | that a "canonical election loosens a monk from the yoke imposed ~ 2866 3, 37 | the ~turtle dove, being a loquacious bird, represents the preaching 2867 Suppl, 34| for ~slavery consists in lording over others and employing 2868 Suppl, 95| to the distrustful that loseth wisdom [Vulg.: ~'patience']." 2869 2, 150 | insensible as a country lout. But a virgin does not refrain 2870 2, 150 | who refrains from all is loutish and insensible." ~Therefore 2871 2, 30 | it is an act of mercy and lovingkindness, according to Prov. 27:6: ~" 2872 2, 60 | undo its effect, ~viz. the lowering of the other man's personal 2873 2, 76 | delay in being paid, and lowers his price that ~he may be 2874 2, 31 | lion feel pleasure in the lowing of an ox, but in devouring ~ 2875 2, 185 | to devote oneself to the lowliest service is an ~exercise 2876 3, 13 | of life by the ~rational, loyal, and righteous spirit of 2877 3, 4 | literally, but are to ~be loyally explained, wherever they 2878 2, 12 | their oath those who through loyalty or through the sacred ~bond 2879 3, 43 | Cyril says (Comment. in Lucam) that ~"He did not receive 2880 3, 68 | during the interval ~of lucidity they manifest no desire 2881 Suppl, 13| observes (Lib. i, Ep. i, ad Lucilium) loss of time is a very 2882 2, 98 | Urban II, Ep. xvii ad Lucium] says: ~"Whoever grants 2883 Suppl, 66| 2~On the contrary, Pope Lucius granted a dispensation to 2884 2, 148 | this is caused by ~drinking lukewarm water: wherefore this is 2885 2, 2 | evident that naught can lull man's will, save the ~universal 2886 2, 82 | or from a lesion in the lung or liver; while one ~specific 2887 2, 102 | a continued scab," i.e. ~lustfulness of the flesh: also, if he 2888 3, 31 | Nov. Test. [*Part i, qu. lvi; ~part 2, qu. vi] to the 2889 2, 23 | Augustine says (Tract. lxxiv in Joan.) [*Cf. Ep. ~clxxxv.] 2890 3, 46 | as Chrysostom says (Hom. lxxxi in Matth.): but that the 2891 3, 46 | Chrysostom remarks (Hom. ~lxxxvii in Matth.) that they crucified 2892 Suppl, 71| done to certain martyrs at Lyons in Gaul (Eusebius, Eccl. ~ 2893 2, 60 | Augustine says (Ep. ad Maced. cxliii): "Unless a man ~ 2894 2, 120 | body. For this reason the Machabees did not profane the ~Sabbath 2895 2, 186 | Hence it is said of Judas Machabeus (1 Macc. 3:2,3) that "he [ 2896 3, 83 | reconciled: ~because some machination of the enemy is apparent 2897 2, 93 | apparition formed by the machinations of the devil, and ~styled 2898 2, 2 | creatures which is called the macrocosm, is compared to man who 2899 2, 173 | of his Confessions: "Thou madest us, ~Lord, for Thyself, 2900 2, 62 | went in to the woman of Madian (Num. 25), Samuel killed ~ 2901 3, 41 | earliest printed editions has ~'magis,' which has much to commend 2902 2, 55 | speak of "military," or "magisterial," or ~"priestly" right, 2903 Suppl, 57| with the ~authority of a magistrate: and one who is thus adopted 2904 1, 88 | Aristotle, Ethic. v, 8: Magn. ~Moral. i, 34).~Aquin.: 2905 1, 23 | predestination is the calling and magnification; according to the Apostle ~( 2906 2, 133 | doing mean things, just as "magnificentia" is doing great things.]~ 2907 2, 66 | Ethic. iv, 3. Therefore it magnifies even justice. Therefore 2908 2, 127 | greatness of ~courage [animi magnitudinem] with which they fought 2909 2, 12 | to worship at the tomb of Mahomet, he would be deemed an apostate. ~ 2910 2, 105 | ill-treat their servants ~and maidservants are severely punished: and 2911 2, 63 | for a man is ~accursed who maims himself, since they are 2912 2, 151 | acts, ~pertaining in the main to speech; wherein there 2913 2, 167 | produce necessaries and mainstays of life." In the ~case of 2914 3, 67 | decreed in the Council of Mainz, although an unbaptized 2915 3, 41 | All the codices read 'majus.' One of the earliest printed 2916 2, 58 | prudence, even as things ~makeable are the matter of art. Now 2917 2, 167 | true it would seem that the makers ~of these means of adornment 2918 2, 75 | medicinally against certain maladies. Moreover real gold can 2919 2, 74 | wherefore ~tellers of evil [maledici] are sometimes called backbiters. 2920 2, 62 | princes may lawfully slay malefactors.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[64] A[ 2921 2, 104 | also. It is the height of malevolence to refuse to recognize a ~ 2922 2, 20 | these two goodnesses or malices, of the ~internal and external 2923 2, 78 | Alluding to the derivation of "malitia" (malice) from ~"malum" ( 2924 Suppl, 14| not another, as ~when a mall curbs his lust and perseveres 2925 Appen1, 2| himself differently, De Malo, Q[7], A[2], ~ad 9,17: " 2926 3, 54 | to have flowed ~from some maltreated image of Christ.~Aquin.: 2927 Suppl, 39| is written (Dt. 23:2): "A mamzer, that is to say, ~one born 2928 3, 37 | received seed, shall bear a man-child, she shall be unclean seven 2929 Suppl, 58| marriage ~before one is able to manage one's own affairs in other 2930 2, 48 | written (Prov. 24:6): "War is managed by due ~ordering, and there 2931 2, 187 | Decretals (XIX, qu. ~iii, can. Mandamus): "We ordain and without 2932 2, 99 | The "commandments" (mandata) spoken of ~here and in 2933 2, 99 | commandments" which He enjoined [mandavit] through others, as the 2934 2, 156 | surface of the soul, it mangles and rends it by its riot"; 2935 2, 102 | of the ~offerers, and any mangling of the animals slain.~Aquin.: 2936 2, 11 | decayed flesh, expel the mangy sheep from the fold, lest 2937 2, 152 | neither are the actions of a maniac or an imbecile.~Aquin.: 2938 1, 89 | supposition, also, the ~Manichaeans, thinking that God was corporeal 2939 3, 36 | 6) Of the order of these manifestations;~(7) Of the star by means 2940 3, 83 | according to 2 Cor. 2:14: ~"He manifesteth the odor of his knowledge 2941 3, 3 | way, i.e. understanding manifoldly and separately what in God 2942 2, 31 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether a mann is bound to correct his 2943 2, 185 | where the lords of ~the manor have come after renouncing 2944 Suppl, 85| But God judges now of mans' every ~work, by assigning 2945 2, 105 | on the Sabbath day "thy ~manservant and thy maidservant" should " 2946 2, 93 | nekron} "means dead and ~{manteia} divination, because after 2947 Suppl, 38| texts of the Summa have ~"mantili" ("maniple"), but the archdeacon 2948 3, 89 | Expos. in Luc. vii), is the "mantle of wisdom," from which all ~ 2949 Suppl, 52| beginning of the Digests (Manumissiones, ff. de just. et ~jure.) 2950 3, 57 | not being in the original manuscript.]~Further, there is no place 2951 3, 22 | wanting in the original ~manuscripts, but it may be gathered 2952 2, 172 | screened round about by the ~many-colored sacred veils." Now the prophetic 2953 2, 130 | Further, that which incites a mar to do good is apparently 2954 2, 38 | the centurion ~[*Ep. ad Marcel. cxxxviii]: "If the Christian 2955 2, 38 | Hence Augustine says (Ep. ad Marcellin. cxxxviii): "Those whom ~ 2956 2, 134 | Augustine says in a letter to Marcellinus (Ep. cxxxviii) that "the ~ 2957 1, 20 | just as a hundred pounds ~[marcoe] are a greater gift to a 2958 Suppl, 52| and an ass are more like mares than those born of a she-ass 2959 Suppl, 43| lacking." Some ~fix the margin at six months. but it is 2960 Suppl, 44| pertains to the husband [maritum]. ~It also indicates the 2961 2, 185 | occasion of disgraceful marketing whereby you lower yourselves 2962 Suppl, 67| When she is departed and marrieth another husband," ~etc. 2963 2, 102 | Moreover in the worship of Mars, women put on men's ~armor; 2964 2, 10 | OBJ 2: Further, the law of Martianus Augustus confirmed by the 2965 Suppl, 66| 2~Further, Pope Martin [*Martinus Bracarensis: cap. xliii] 2966 2, 184 | wrote not 'monasterio' but 'martyrio' - to 'martyrdom'; and St. ~ 2967 3, 25 | martyr,' i.e. the Greek {martys} is 'a witness'] they are: 2968 3, 5 | plain from Mt. 8:10). Now ~marveling cannot be without reason, 2969 3, 45 | a book entitled On the ~Marvels of Holy Scripture. It is 2970 1, 29 | through the cavity in the mask. These ~"persons" or masks 2971 1, 29 | mask. These ~"persons" or masks the Greeks called {prosopa}, 2972 3, 44 | and very dense clouds were massed ~together over Jerusalem 2973 Suppl, 94| darkness is caused by the massing together of the ~bodies 2974 3, 89 | Isidore wrote to the bishop Masso, ~and as we read in the 2975 2, 48 | the state one kind is a master-prudence ~and is called legislative; 2976 2, 58 | is in the sovereign as a master-virtue [*Cf. Q[58], ~A[6]], commanding 2977 3, 77 | 3: Further, breaking and mastication are seemingly of the same ~ 2978 2, 49 | material potentiality [potentia materiae] is ~determined to its substantial 2979 2, 62 | priests of Baal (3 Kgs. ~18), Mathathias killed the man who went 2980 1, 7 | considered in two ways; mathematically, in respect to its quantity ~ 2981 2, 93 | astrologers ~whom they call mathematicians, I consulted without scruple; 2982 Suppl, 44| and "materia"; or into "matre" and ~"nato," as Isidore 2983 Suppl, 49| SIX ARTICLES) [*"Bona matrimonii," variously rendered marriage 2984 2, 102 | to ~God, it seems that it mattered not how they were slain. 2985 1, 36 | we have an example from Maunder, "Jhesu Criste was the worde ~ 2986 | Maybe 2987 Suppl, 70| decreased by the death of ~a mayor who shared his authority.~ 2988 2, 182 | their bishop as wardens or mayors ~to the king; and for this 2989 2, 88 | we ~speak of the smiling meadows when they are decked with 2990 3, 80 | of it, or ~receive it at meal-time, as did those whom the Apostle 2991 3, 5 | lay down My soul [animam ~meam: Douay: 'My life']." But 2992 | meantime 2993 2, 99 | Divine law persuades men ~by meas of rewards or punishments 2994 2, 14 | but through certain ~other media, as, for instance, when 2995 1, 22 | ministers; through whose mediation he provides for his subjects. ~ 2996 Suppl, 83| fire." Galen also (De simp. medic.) says "that there ~is no 2997 2, 89 | your ~throat and jaws with medicaments, and make the church resound 2998 3, 60 | just as medicament, from ~"medicando" [healing]. But this seems 2999 3, 26 | are ~united in the mean [medio]. Now to unite men to God 3000 2, 145 | Corpus of Canon Law (Cap. Non mediocriter, De ~Consecrationibus, dist. 3001 2, 185 | says: "He is not ~idle who meditates only on God's word; nor 3002 2, 167 | Prov. 7:10, "Behold a woman meeteth him in harlot's ~attire, 3003 3, 25 | body and blood, should be meetly worshiped; as ~also His 3004 2, 127 | for small things, ~but {megalokindynos}, i.e. endangering himself 3005 2, 60 | there is "magnificence" [*{megaloprepeia}]. ~With regard to that


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