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St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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     Part, Question
3006 2, 37 | sorrow become a prey to melancholy or madness.~ 3007 2, 89 | ways according to various melodies of sound, as the Philosopher ~ 3008 2, 165 | seeketh objects beautiful, ~melodious, fragrant, savory, soft; 3009 2, 28 | of dissolution. But love melts that in ~which it is: for 3010 Suppl, 58| a virgin, the ~hymeneal membrane may be broken by a medical 3011 Suppl, 47| merchandise overboard if menaced with ~shipwreck. Therefore 3012 2, 185 | penalty on able-bodied ~mendicants who beg from motives neither 3013 2, 46 | which is ~derived from {menein} [to dwell]. Thirdly, on 3014 2, 142 | instance when he ~performs a menial occupation. Therefore it 3015 1, 78 | this is taken the word "mens" [mind]. Lastly, ~to "understand" 3016 1, 116 | tarnish from the look of a "menstruata," as Aristotle says (De 3017 Suppl, 64| to a natural issue of the menstruum, she can ~conceive; moreover, 3018 Suppl, 18| For Jerome [*Cf. Can. 86, Mensuram, De Poenit. Dist. i] says: ~" 3019 1, 78 | to "judge" or "measure" ~[mensurare] is an act of the intellect, 3020 Suppl, 71| recalls the mind [monens mentem], as Augustine observes ( 3021 2, 75 | of the arrival of other merchants, ~which was not foreseen 3022 3, 52 | the lost are shut up in merciless prisons. Therefore Christ 3023 2, 187 | teaches the mind by the merest touch." ~Again it is written ( 3024 Suppl, 80| observe that when two bodies merge into one, each ~loses its 3025 3, 19 | like reason, the soul that meriteth, the same shall be ~recompensed. 3026 2, 148 | Aurel. ~Episc. Ep. xxii), "Meseems, such things are cured not 3027 3, 73 | moreover, it is called {Metalepsis}, i.e. "Assumption," ~because, 3028 1, 11 | convertible with ~being is a metaphysical entity and does not depend 3029 2, 59 | and with what measure you mete, it shall be measured to 3030 2, 109 | that everlasting life is meter to good ~works; but the 3031 2, 166 | movement and behavior; and "methodicalness" [bona ordinatio] which ~ 3032 1, 78 | mind) "is derived from" ~metiendo [measuring]. "And therefore 3033 3, 78 | First, as a figure ~of metonymy; because the container is 3034 2, 159 | same as what they called ~{metriotes}, i.e. measure or moderation." 3035 Suppl, 47| jurists (i, ff. de eo quod vi metusve) as the "force of a ~stronger 3036 Suppl, 23| Sacris: De his quae vi, metuve, ~etc.) declares that "not 3037 2, 66 | which discerns between "meum" and "tuum": whereas justice 3038 2, 86 | Contra Jovin.: Comment. in Micheam vi, ~viii: Comment. in Jerem. 3039 2, 2 | to man who is called the microcosm (Phys. viii, 2), as perfect 3040 2, 33 | harassed by sloth towards mid-day, when they begin to ~feel 3041 1, 107 | place between these, as the ~middle-class [populus honorabilis]. In 3042 2, 127 | magnanimous ~man is not {mikrokindynos}, i.e. endangering himself 3043 2, 89 | singing in the Church of ~Milan, a Augustine relates (Confess. 3044 Appen1, 2| punishment of the damned would be milder after the resurrection than ~ 3045 2, 96 | whosoever will force thee one mile, go with him ~other two."~ 3046 3, 36 | where they were; like the milestones that point out the way but ~ 3047 3, 72 | Again, he says (Hom. de Militia Spirit.): "In ~God's eyes 3048 2, 41 | were better for him that a mill-stone ~should be hanged about 3049 Suppl, 74| were called "chiliasts" or "millenarians." ~Hence Augustine says ( 3050 1, 8 | supposition; as a grain of millet would be everywhere, supposing ~ 3051 2, 105 | the nether nor the upper millstone to pledge; for he ~hath 3052 3, 64 | OBJ 2: The intention of mimicry or fun excludes the first 3053 2, 81 | among others in a letter to ~Minerius, on the Resurrection of 3054 Suppl, 69| of the departed ~do not mingle in the affairs of the living. 3055 2, 145 | something from concupiscence by ~minimizing the number of meals. Therefore 3056 3, 47 | Christ to be crucified by his minions. Therefore the sin of Judas 3057 Suppl, 38| archdeacon is as it were minister-in-chief, all ~things pertaining 3058 2, 169 | prophecy failing him, caused a minstrel to be brought to him, that 3059 2, 60 | stands for 'loss,' and 'minus' for 'less.' Aristotle ~ 3060 Suppl, 1 | parts are crushed [tritae] ~minutely. Wherefore, in spiritual 3061 2, 103 | he did sin by excessive minuteness in the observance of the ~ 3062 Suppl, 39| canonical statutes [*Cap. ~Miror; cap. Clericum; cap. De 3063 2, 93 | if the Divine oracles be misapplied to earthly business. Hence ~ 3064 2, 62 | woman ~with child, and she miscarry indeed . . . if her death 3065 2, 150 | through being wounded by mischance. Physicians, too, sometimes ~ 3066 2, 111 | because there are seven mischiefs in his heart." Now it ~belongs 3067 2, 10 | they are guilty of some ~misdemeanor, and are condemned by the 3068 2, 30 | eleein} even as the Latin "miseratio" is. And since ~mercy is 3069 1, 23 | the "purpose to take pity [miserendi]" [*See ~Q[22], A[3]]. Therefore 3070 1, 23 | never was ~any unhappiness (miseria); for predestination, as 3071 2, 20 | misericordia] regards unhappiness [miseriam] which is contrary to glory. ~ 3072 1, 21 | is said to be merciful [misericors], as ~being, so to speak, 3073 Suppl, 71| thus: There have been ~some misguided persons who were baptized 3074 3, 83 | by preventing any such mishaps from occurring: ~secondly, 3075 Suppl, 11| persuade to desist from misleading the people; or, in like ~ 3076 3, 60 | tongue, and if he so far ~mispronounce the words as to deprive 3077 3, 60 | been said about the various mispronunciations of words, either ~at the 3078 2, 8 | infected with heretical misrepresentations: and this cleanness is the ~ 3079 3, 83 | Extra, De Celebratione missae, chap. Ex parte), ~it is 3080 Suppl, 95| imperfect, and that ~they missed its highest degree of perfection 3081 2, 49 | therein appear distorted and misshapen. Now ~that the cognitive 3082 2, 184 | beginning of his Morals [*Epist. Missoria, ad ~Leand. Episc. i] compares 3083 3, 52 | dark and ~covered with the mist of death." Now there is 3084 2, 1 | end, ~which intention they mistakenly seek in other things.~Aquin.: 3085 2, 19 | a man's reason, errs in ~mistaking another for his wife, and 3086 2, 102 | Or again, that we must mistrust our first efforts, on account 3087 2, 95 | its obscurity it lead to misunderstanding; framed for ~no private 3088 2, 20 | Reply OBJ 1: Just as hope is misused in speaking of evils, and 3089 2, 165 | does not prevent a man from misusing the knowledge ~of truth 3090 Suppl, 40| of the Old Testament had ~mitres, which are a sign of dignity. 3091 3, 83 | because the priest ~sends [mittit] his prayers up to God through 3092 3, 74 | sacrament, he would sin who mixes any other than natural and 3093 2, 105 | such as the Ammonites and Moabites) were ~never to be admitted 3094 3, 46 | their servants and from the mob, according to Ps. 2:1,2: ~" 3095 1, 9 | all ~things active [Vulg.'mobilior']" (Wis. 7:24). But God 3096 Suppl, 81| mobile and ~living." But mobility can only signify agility 3097 2, 73 | 30:17): ~"The eye that mocketh at his father, and that 3098 Suppl, 66| faith of ancients ~and of moderns is one, so is the Church 3099 1, 4 | universal and ~receptive of all modification. Therefore God is imperfect.~ 3100 2, 81 | of St. Victor states [*De Modo Orandi ii].~Aquin.: SMT 3101 2, 102 | this is signified by the moistening ~of the right foot and hand). 3102 3, 66 | correspond. For by reason of its moistness it cleanses; and ~hence 3103 3, 51 | mystery ~whereby those are molded who "are buried together 3104 1, 33 | as for instance when a mole is called blind. In a ~third 3105 2, 102 | thus certain animals, like moles and mice and such ~like, 3106 Suppl, 58| the demons in all their ~molestations of the body, if God will 3107 2, 136 | opposed to perseverance? [*Mollities, literally ~'softness']~ 3108 2, 98 | carried a tabernacle for your Moloch, and the image of your idols, ~ 3109 2, 182 | God; others call them ~{monachoi}" [*i.e. solitaries; whence 3110 2, 182 | XVI, qu. i, can. Si ~quis monachus) from a decree of Pope Gelasius, 3111 2, 28 | it becomes/The throned monarch better than his crown." ~ 3112 2, 95 | Polit. iii, 10) ~one is "monarchy," i.e. when the state is 3113 2, 30 | from the property of his monaster, in accordance with the 3114 2, 184 | St. ~Augustine wrote not 'monasterio' but 'martyrio' - to 'martyrdom'; 3115 2, 184 | through the desire of ~money-getting, fall into many sins, according 3116 2, 85 | to occupy themselves in money-making trades, ~according to 2 3117 2, 98 | accepting from a layman moneys ~not belonging to the goods 3118 2, 93 | fighting with the fists, or "monomachy," i.e. single ~combat as 3119 2, 75 | instance, the birth of a monster is due to the corruption 3120 2, 49 | a sure judgment on such monstrosities, and yet this ~is possible 3121 3, 5 | My soul hateth your new ~moons and your solemnities." But, 3122 2, 102 | tallies with the coot or ~moorhen: though of course he is 3123 3, 2 | Nestorius ~and Theodore of Mopsuestia, who separated the persons. 3124 2, 1 | contrary, Augustine says (De Mor. Eccl. et Manich. ii, 13): ~" 3125 2, 74 | morose [*From the Latin ~'mora' - delay] through taking 3126 2, 109 | quotation is from St. Gregory's Moralia, Bk ~XVIII.] Therefore since 3127 2, 58 | circumcised after the manner (morem) of Moses, you cannot ~be 3128 Suppl, 67| is said to have ~manners [morigeratus] because he has good manners; 3129 2, 58 | maketh men of one manner [moris] to dwell in a ~house." 3130 2, 88 | it is a venial sin. Now moroseness is a circumstance. Therefore 3131 2, 76 | for a price: as when a man mortgages his land ~or the house wherein 3132 3, 42 | grain of wheat ~that must be mortified by the unbelief of the Jews, 3133 2, 37 | and (Prov. 25:20): ~"As a moth doth by a garment, and a 3134 2, 185 | whether his behavior is motivated by contempt of ~excessive 3135 1, 20 | appetite is the proximate motive-force of our bodies. ~Some bodily 3136 Suppl, 62| separation from bed cannot be ~motived by those sins. Neither therefore 3137 2, 82 | Orient" (Zach. 6:12). Who mounteth above the heaven of heavens 3138 2, 23 | flames." ~Now fire ever mounts upward so long as it lasts. 3139 2, 9 | Knowledge ~befits the mourner, who has discovered that 3140 3, 83 | denotes spiritual joy; or in mournful offices the "Tract", ~expressive 3141 2, 35 | the ~mere fact that man mourns for his sins, or for the 3142 3, 68 | justice, nor with their own mouths confess unto salvation . . . 3143 2, 171 | Wherefore some [*Rabbi ~Moyses, Doct. Perplex. II, xxxvi] 3144 3, 66 | water of a river has ~become muddy by being mixed with particles 3145 3, 74 | as of pomegranates, or of mulberries; since vines do not grow 3146 Suppl, 52| that the father, wherefore mules born ~of a mare and an ass 3147 3, 28 | this passage, the word "'mulier,' is ~here used instead 3148 Suppl, 39| even in the Decretals (cap. Mulieres dist. 32; cap. Diaconissam, ~ 3149 2, 86 | Sovereign Pontiff [*Cap. ~Ex multa].~ 3150 2, 85 | Apostolic ~See [*Cap. Ex multiplici, Ex parte, and Ad audientiam, 3151 3, 44 | on Jn. 6:1-14: "Whence He multiplieth a few ~grains into harvests, 3152 1, 8 | perfect body" (Coel. et ~Mund. i). But the whole universe 3153 2, 99 | is called "ceremony" [the munia, i.e. gifts] of Ceres (who 3154 Suppl, 44| the women; or into "matrem muniens," because it provides the ~ 3155 2, 185 | churches have received from the munificence of princes or of any of 3156 Suppl, 44| be resolved into "matris munium" [*i.e. munus], i.e. a ~ 3157 Suppl, 44| into "matris munium" [*i.e. munus], i.e. a ~mother's duty, 3158 Suppl, 60| marriage to the man who has ~murdered his wife.~Aquin.: SMT XP 3159 3, 46 | for slaying Christ as for ~murdering God Himself; as is proved 3160 1, 78 | incite to good, and to ~murmur at evil, inasmuch as through 3161 2, 83 | diseases, such as leprosy and murrain and the ~like, are said 3162 2, 17 | executes movement is in the muscles and ~nerves." But both powers 3163 2, 178 | presseth down the mind that museth upon many things." ~Hence 3164 3, 74 | sweetness [*"Aut dulcis musti Vulcano ~decoquit humorem"; 3165 3, 66 | combine, of whom one were mute, ~and unable to utter the 3166 2, 92 | idols; such as ~homicides, mutilations, and so forth. Nevertheless 3167 2, 93 | pythons and of diviners, who mutter in their enchantments," 3168 2, 94 | gazing ~certain shapes, and muttering certain strange words, and 3169 2, 102 | thick trees'], i.e. the myrtle, which is fragrant, "and 3170 3, 74 | says in De Officiis (De Mysteriis ix): ~"Before the blessing 3171 2, 169 | in another way by a most mysterious ~instinct to "which the 3172 2, 92 | was said to ~belong to "mythical theology" which was wont 3173 2, 100 | cares: thus the ~servants of Naaman said to him (4 Kgs. 5:13): " 3174 2, 68 | witnesses, for we read ~that Naboth was unjustly condemned on 3175 3, 31 | through Nathan, through whose namesake, the prophet, God expiated ~ 3176 Suppl, 67| restrict these causes within narrower limits, saying with ~sufficient 3177 3, 2 | natura" meaning, as it were, "nascitura." Afterwards this word " 3178 2, 70 | something tasty; and in a ~nasty medicine, nowise for its 3179 Suppl, 52| gloss.: cap. Inducens, De natis ex libero ventre) as also 3180 Suppl, 44| or into "matre" and ~"nato," as Isidore says (Etym. 3181 3, 83 | might be rejected from ~nausea. Some persons go further, 3182 3, 46 | in the book of Jesus ~Ben Nave." But Jesus was to be crucified 3183 2, 184 | contrary, In the Old Law the Nazareans were consecrated by vow ~ 3184 3, 35 | that ~"He shall be called a Nazarene"; which is taken from Is. 3185 3, 53 | drawing to its close, and nearing to darkness, in order to 3186 2, 113 | leaves the term "whence" and nears the ~term "whereto." Hence 3187 2, 52 | one who fails to choose [nec eligens]": and the right ~ 3188 2, 53 | the summer, he would be needlessly forestalling the solicitude 3189 2, 92 | For some, by means of a nefarious art, constructed images 3190 2, 12 | errs in either way, since ~negatives are proved by affirmatives, 3191 Suppl, 93| accidental reward in Christ is a negligible quantity in ~comparison 3192 2, 93 | Etym. viii) in Greek, {nekron} "means dead and ~{manteia} 3193 2, 102 | as stated in Heb. 4. The Neomenia, which is the beginning 3194 2, 187 | Dist. xlviii, can. Sicut neophytus). Therefore ~it would seem 3195 Suppl, 54| uncle than an aunt with her ~nephew: because a daughter is more 3196 2, 10 | household," ~referring to Nero, who was an unbeliever. 3197 2, 69 | he should strain every nerve to avoid vice." In like 3198 2, 166 | they be unduly ~soft and nerveless, or coarse and boorish. 3199 3, 46 | because they are pierced in nervous and highly sensitive ~parts - 3200 2, 76 | anything, can be said to be nescient about it: in which sense ~ 3201 2, 34 | them, envy them, and be nettled when ~they are praised." 3202 3, 8 | appear, you shall receive a never-fading ~crown of glory"; nor the 3203 2, 100 | of justice: for it is a never-failing principle ~that "justice 3204 2, 105 | dwell in their land ~as newcomers. And in both these respects 3205 3, 83 | corrupt, or that they are nibbled by mice, or lost in any 3206 2, 127 | certain men (2 Macc. 15:18): ~"Nicanor hearing of the valor of 3207 2, 146 | seeks food prepared too nicely - i.e. "daintily"; and as ~ 3208 2, 1 | after the symbol of the Nicene council had been read ~through, 3209 2, 136 | softness ~[Douay: 'niceness']." Thus delicacy is a kind 3210 1, 116 | said in the narrative ~of Nicetas to Peter, that Simon Magus, 3211 3, 36 | watching, and keeping the ~night-watches over their flock . . . And 3212 2, 145 | fasting before ~chastity, or night-watchings before the well-being of 3213 2, 68 | understanding, while it runs ~nimbly, deviate from the right 3214 2, 186 | et Canon. Reg. [*Cap. Ne Nimia, de Relig. Dom.]. Therefore ~ 3215 2, 92 | been originated either by ~Nimrod, who is related to have 3216 | ninety 3217 1, 20 | penance, more than ~upon ninety-nine just who need not penance" ( 3218 2, 169 | 4, "Yet forty days, ~and Nineveh shall be destroyed," that 3219 3, 83 | A[5] R.O. 3 Para. 9/10~Ninthly, the resurrection on the 3220 2, 92 | men to worship fire, or by Ninus, ~who caused the statue 3221 2, 174 | Sancti Spiritus adsit nobis gratia' ascribed ~to King 3222 2, 59 | words ~of Aulus Gellius [*Noct. Attic. xix, 1], quoted 3223 2, 109 | such sort that whilst the noise of ~correction is outwardly 3224 2, 130 | whereby a man quarrels noisily with another. Fourthly as 3225 1, 14 | Reply OBJ 3: The ancient Nominalists said that it was the same 3226 2, 28 | chapter iv of De ~Divinis Nominibus.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[28] A[ 3227 2, 77 | of act, and in this sense non-action is a kind of ~action, as 3228 1, 12 | largely ~as opposed to "non-attainment"; for he who attains to 3229 Suppl, 43| was responsible for ~the non-completion of the marriage, this responsibility 3230 Suppl, 58| form of dispensations of non-consummated marriages." Cf. Catholic ~ 3231 2, 10 | any good whatever, is a non-good, consequently, that ~good 3232 2, 10 | good, can be ~regarded as non-goods: and from this point of 3233 1, 31 | term "no one" [*Nemo = non-homo, i.e. no man] is not the 3234 2, 113 | miraculous works are greater than non-miraculous. ~Now the justification 3235 2, 74 | Whether morose delectation or non-morose delectation be subjected 3236 Suppl, 65| binding force to permit the non-observance of the law in ~those cases 3237 3, 3 | this likeness, so by the non-participated and personal ~union of the 3238 3, 75 | food ~is converted into non-pre-existing man, the form of the man 3239 2, 18 | required is that it be a non-resistant subject of ~that mover, 3240 Suppl, 63| contracted through a second and ~non-sacramental union, such as fornication. 3241 2, 111 | opposed as sanctifying and non-sanctifying grace.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 3242 2, 18 | this evil that consists in non-subjection to ~God, and is possible 3243 1, 25 | power, it would cause a non-temporal movement. And he shows that ~ 3244 3, 45 | just as the color, of a non-transparent ~body is seen on its surface, 3245 2, 6 | the will: but ~it causes "non-voluntariness," since that which is unknown 3246 2, 35 | thing, e.g. ~"white" and "non-white"; while there is fittingness 3247 2, 87 | think thus, it must be said: Nonsense! the ~Scriptures were made 3248 Suppl, 52| conjug. servorum, cap. Ad nostram) ~that "error regarding 3249 2, 94 | magic arts, amulets and nostrums ~condemned by the medical 3250 3, 34 | but He was ~made holy from not-holy as man, not indeed by privation, 3251 1, 17 | not-being, for instance ~not-seeing or not-sitting. But privation 3252 1, 17 | instance ~not-seeing or not-sitting. But privation asserts nothing, 3253 1, 9 | subject "man" can exist with "not-whiteness" and can ~therefore be changed 3254 2, 10 | good that ~the will cannot not-will it: and this is Happiness. 3255 2, 11 | Decret. (xxiv, qu. iii, can. Notandum), "to be ~excommunicated 3256 Suppl, 67| dissuaded by the counsel of the notaries to refrain from his purpose 3257 3, 44 | tree." This is the more noteworthy in a fig-tree which, as 3258 2, 142 | greater, so ~that when a man notices something disgraceful in 3259 Suppl, 57| would ~be related to his nourishers, tutors and masters, which 3260 2, 47 | intuition; ~Aristotle's word is {nous}]~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[49] A[ 3261 2, 37 | quoted vii, qu. 1, ~can. Novatianus): "He who observes neither 3262 3, 50 | Augustine explains it (De Gratia Novi Test.).~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[ 3263 3, 67 | instructing one who is yet a novice in ~the Faith, concerning 3264 3, 67 | because little children and novices ~need more than ordinary 3265 2, 186 | be ~deterred by the hard noviciate of the desert, and such 3266 2, 130 | eccentricity [*Praesumptio novitatum, literally 'presumption ~ 3267 2, 85 | from the clergy" ~[*Cap. Novum genus, de Decimis, etc.].~ 3268 Suppl, 62| suspicion, or "nudas cum nuda."~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[62] A[ 3269 Suppl, 62| open to suspicion, or "nudas cum nuda."~Aquin.: SMT XP 3270 2, 102 | sparrow was offered up against numbness; and scarlet, which has 3271 1, 7 | on; and as an infinitely numerable multitude is not ~all at 3272 2, 97 | instance, the violation of a nun by blows or by ~copulation.~ 3273 2, 102 | because blood and fat are not ~nutritious, which is the cause assigned 3274 3, 72 | instance, ~oil made from nuts, and from anything else. 3275 1, 77 | 4/4~Thus the first two objectives are hereby solved.~Aquin.: 3276 2, 84 | Decimam, de Decim. Primit. et Oblat.]: "According to the tradition 3277 2, 187 | civil law [*Cod. IV, x, de Oblig. et Action, ~12] money lays 3278 Suppl, 54| consanguinity cannot lapse into ~oblivion, wherefore God threatened ( 3279 Suppl, 25| man if he gave him an ~"obol."~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[25] A[ 3280 2, 1 | expression, and sometimes obscurely, so that, in ~order to gather 3281 1, 30 | confusing the mind and obscuring the ~truth; and this ought 3282 2, 174 | understand and ~explain any obscurities of speech arising either 3283 2, 81 | pertains "supplication" ~[obsecratio] which means a pleading 3284 2, 183 | more, or those by whose ~obsequiousness they have been cajoled or 3285 Suppl, 8 | law" [*Cap. Consilium, De observ. jejun.; De reg. ~jur. ( 3286 2, 138 | reason of any greatness observable in them, but on ~account 3287 3, 44 | deliver those who were obsessed by demons.~Aquin.: SMT TP 3288 1, 7 | opposed to each other do not obstruct each ~other. But supposing 3289 2, 39 | movement of hatred or vengeance obtrude ~itself, or if he does not 3290 2, 14 | called dull through being ~obtuse and unable to pierce. Now 3291 2, 45 | that "young people ~are not obviously prudent." Yet many young 3292 3, 89 | those who commit ~such sins occultly and confess them secretly 3293 3, 37 | Gregory of Nyssa says (De Occursu Dom.): "It seems that ~this 3294 2, 162 | Bernard, Serm. in Dom. inf. oct. Assum. B. V. M.], ~because 3295 2, 145 | seventh month ~which we call October, Godolias was slain, and 3296 3, 88 | following verse:~"Fratres odit, apostata fit, spernitque, 3297 3, 27 | this takes place when the ~off-spring conceived is animated. Wherefore 3298 2, 87 | with dissimulation, "he offendeth ~double," [because, to wit, " 3299 3, 83 | praise in singing the "offertory," expressing the joy of 3300 2, 185 | of ~another's need is not officiousness but charity.~Aquin.: SMT 3301 2, 32 | Gregory, ~Moral. iv.] that "oftentimes in joy we call to mind sad 3302 2, 15 | beauty perfects youth" [*oion tois akmaiois he hora}-- 3303 2, 7 | which the act is, [*hen ois e ~praxis]" as stated in 3304 3, 72 | other ~oil. In fact, the olive-tree itself, through being an 3305 2, 38 | written (xxiii, qu. 8, can. Omni timore) that if "a ~man 3306 1, 10 | Therefore eternity is not ~omni-simultaneous.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[10] A[ 3307 2, 148 | Decretals (Dist. xxxv, can. Ante omnia): ~"Drunkenness, more than 3308 2, 42 | virtue tua" (Mk.), and "ex omnibus tuis" (Lk.), although the ~ 3309 2, 67 | laid down (II, qu. vi, can. Omnino puniendus): "Without doubt ~ 3310 Suppl, 72| the Persians resisted me one-and-twenty days." But the angel ~who 3311 2, 85 | eleven tribes should give ~one-tenth part of their revenues to 3312 2, 29 | because of the ~godliness of Onias the high-priest, and the 3313 2, 122 | Conf. ii): ~"The crowd of onlookers wondered to see an unearthly 3314 2, 144 | strength for overcoming the onslaughts of ~gluttony, which increase 3315 3, 38 | author on Mk. 1 (inter ~op. Hier.)] that "by the baptism 3316 Suppl, 79| The sun's ray dispels this opacity so that no image ~can appear 3317 2, 115 | liberality is also called ~open-handedness [largitas], because that 3318 3, 54 | Reply OBJ 2: Although those openings of the wounds break the 3319 Suppl, 71| of the ~agent [*"Ex opere operante" and "ex opere operato"] 3320 1, 92 | Gregory of Nyssa (De Homin. ~Opificio xvi) also asserts that, 3321 2, 2 | the ~other, as in one who "opines." But this act "to believe," 3322 2, 87 | peace, when the wicked man oppresseth [Vulg.: 'devoureth'], ~the 3323 2, 38 | also the pillager and the oppressor ~who work bodily harm; not, 3324 2, 67 | II, qu. vi, can. Omnis oppressus): "All those who are oppressed 3325 2, 74 | we employ the verb in the optative mood.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[76] 3326 3, 27 | Thus Basil says (Ep. ad Optim.) that "the Blessed Virgin 3327 2, 108 | counsel is left to the ~option of the one to whom it is 3328 Suppl, 72| Jerome [*St. Peter Damian, Opuscul. xlix; he quotes St. Jerome, ~ 3329 2, 184 | a precept, whether given orally by a superior, or ~expressed 3330 2, 81 | Victor states [*De Modo Orandi ii].~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[83] 3331 3, 80 | in the First Council of Orange, (Canon 13); and ~the same 3332 Suppl, 89| such is the likeness of an orange-colored or ~yellowish object in 3333 3, 82 | Ambrose says in one of his Orations (xxxiii): "It is a ~grave 3334 2, 7 | strength to his argument." But ~oratorical arguments are derived principally 3335 2, 7 | belongs to the ~orator. But oratory is not a part of theology. 3336 Suppl, 94| surface of the earth [*"De orbe terrarum," which might be ~ 3337 3, 36 | birth of any ~man, left its orbit and made its way to him 3338 2, 88 | Accordingly when either of these orderings is confirmed by ~something 3339 2, 102 | Ornabantur.' Some editions have ~'ordinabantur' - 'were ordained': the 3340 3, 89 | expressed (Extra, De ~Qual. Ordinand.): "If the aforesaid crimes 3341 1, 22 | reads: 'Quae a Deo ~sunt, ordinata sunt.']" (Rm. 13:1). Since, 3342 1, 22 | Quae autem sunt, a Deo ordinatae sunt.' ~St. Thomas often 3343 2, 20 | difference, by excluding its ordinateness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[21] A[ 3344 2, 166 | and "methodicalness" [bona ordinatio] which ~regards what is 3345 2, 10 | thus Augustine says ~(De Ordine ii, 4): "If you do away 3346 2, 102 | on dung, feeds on foetid ordure, and whose song is ~like 3347 3, 15 | exterior goods minister "organically" to beatitude.~Aquin.: SMT 3348 2, 186 | 1/1~OBJ 5: Further, the organization of the Church should be 3349 1, 89 | contrary, Augustine (De Orig. Animae iii, 15) mentions 3350 3, 79 | Renatus (De Anima et ~ejus origine i): "Who may offer Christ' 3351 1, 28 | belong to the processions ~or origins themselves, and not to the 3352 2, 102 | secondly, they were adorned [*'Ornabantur.' Some editions have ~'ordinabantur' - ' 3353 Suppl, 40| Para. 3/4~Bishops have nine ornaments besides those which the 3354 2, 166 | movements: namely "taste" [ornatus] which regards what is becoming 3355 2, 161 | Augustine, who says (Ad ~Oros [*Dial. QQ. lxv, qu. 4]) 3356 2, 63 | Now the widow and the orphan are not connected with other ~ 3357 3, 26 | Nicolas of St. Albans (1175), Osbert of Clare (1170), ~Robert 3358 2, 102 | men is prohibited. The ~osprey, which feeds on very small 3359 2, 123 | ordained by heretics, has an ~ostensible excuse."~Aquin.: SMT SS 3360 Suppl, 40| since even the bishop of Ostia ~consecrates the Pope. Therefore 3361 2, 45 | are the principles of the {ou ~heneka}" [*Literally, ' 3362 1, 36 | Psalter, A.D. 1325), and "Oure ~wrestlynge is . . . against 3363 Suppl, 92| present and to hold Him within ourself ~[*Cf. FS, Q[4], A[3]]; 3364 2, 167 | deformity in ~a most lawless outbreak."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[169] 3365 Suppl, 71| knew themselves to be so outcast as to be a care to no one; 3366 2, 34 | the mind with their wild outcry." Now envy ~is seemingly 3367 1, 9 | its likeness even to the outermost of things; for nothing can ~ 3368 1, 89 | But in the end the soul outlasts the body. Therefore in the 3369 2, 104 | should be shown by the ~outpourings of the heart, not only in 3370 2, 73 | by destroying faith, by outraging holy things, which are most ~ 3371 2, 159 | and you will see that sin ~outrunning justice wins not by its 3372 2, 44 | seized with fear, leave the outskirts, and, as far as possible, 3373 3, 15 | 2: It is the anger which outsteps the bounds of reason that 3374 3, 46 | the cross "He dies with ~outstretched hands in order to draw with 3375 2, 69 | Nevertheless this unbecomingness is outweighed by ~necessity: and for this 3376 2, 116 | neighbor, ~since one man cannot over-abound in external riches, without 3377 2, 102 | savors of delicate and ~over-careful living. For the soil gives 3378 2, 27 | full to perfection - indeed over-full, since they will obtain 3379 3, 80 | which sometimes arise ~from over-indulging in food, as the Apostle 3380 2, 45 | over-solicitous about them: for over-much ~fear and distrust are the 3381 2, 136 | anger. But pertinacity is ~over-persistence in something. Therefore 3382 2, 172 | was that then it was not over-ridden ~by other nations, but had 3383 2, 45 | distrust are the cause of over-solicitude, since fear makes us ~take 3384 Suppl, 40| ephod ~[*Superhumerale, i.e. over-the-shoulders], which signified the burden 3385 2, 86 | concupiscence be curbed without overburdening nature. on this ~condition 3386 3, 61 | necessary both on account of the overclouding of ~the natural law, and 3387 2, 112 | Apoc. 2:17): "To him that overcometh ~I will give the hidden 3388 1, 101 | does ~not pass vertically overhead, are extremely hot on account 3389 2, 152 | disintegrated ~either through overheating of the body or some other 3390 3, 76 | side, ~the greater will overlap the lesser. But the dimensive 3391 2, 102 | wood . . . and ~thou shalt overlay it with the purest gold."~ 3392 3, 46 | one: just as anyone else, overlooking a ~personal trespass, without 3393 2, 111 | may instruct others and overpower adversaries. Hence it is ~ 3394 Suppl, 49| such an intense pleasure ~overpowering the reason as in the aforesaid 3395 2, 156 | instrument of virtue, it overrule the mind, and go ~before 3396 2, 10 | and are subject to their overseers in everything: whereas the ~ 3397 3, 32 | High," i.e. ~Christ, "shall overshadow thee - that is to say, the 3398 1, 3 | power; by ~breadth, His overspreading all things, inasmuch as 3399 2, 39 | which Augustine is speaking, oversteps this rule, ~and therefore 3400 2, 25 | that threatens soon to overtake us, which pertains to daring; 3401 2, 99 | precepts of ~the Law they were overtaken by many calamities. But 3402 3, 46 | also a fitting means of overthrowing the pride of ~the devil, " 3403 2, 19 | greatest of sins because it overthrows the foundation of the ~spiritual 3404 2, 87 | affection" is due to sin ~as overturning the order of reason. Nevertheless 3405 Suppl, 69| disposition, or else they are so overwhelmed by ~their punishments that 3406 2, 71 | Append. Grat. ad can. Oves, caus. vi, qu. 1]: "Not ~ 3407 Suppl, 92| knowledge, and in this ~sense ovid employed the word "endowment" ( 3408 2, 76 | are the ~fruits of things owned by another man and consequently 3409 2, 31 | related that the Lord struck Oza for ~touching the ark. Now 3410 2, 185 | cap. Si quis semel, de Paenitentia): "To condescend to ~the 3411 2, 187 | converted ~to Judaism "from paganism, was merely misled; but 3412 3, 35 | 2:4: "If we search the ~page of ancient history, we shall 3413 2, 162 | die sooner, and some more painfully, than ~others. Therefore 3414 2, 162 | child-bearing would have been ~painless: for Augustine says (De 3415 3, 1 | fitting union if one were "to paint a ~figure in which the neck 3416 3, 42 | inventors were deceived by the painters: for as long as Christ lived ~ 3417 2, 167 | To dye oneself with paints in order to have ~a rosier 3418 3, 16 | Hence Pope Leo says (Ep. ad Palaest. ~cxxiv): "It is of no consequence 3419 2, 167 | order to have ~a rosier or a paler complexion is a lying counterfeit. 3420 Suppl, 66| dispensation to the bishop of ~Palermo who was a bigamist, as stated 3421 Suppl, 11| permission, this would ~seem to palliate the wickedness of bad priests, 3422 2, 102 | fragrant, "and the branches of ~palm-trees, and willows of the brook," 3423 3, 84 | as Peter said to the ~palsied man (Acts 9:34). Therefore 3424 Suppl, 72| Thou sayest in thy ~pamphlets, that while we live, we 3425 2, 37 | says (Epist. ad Victor. et Pancrat.), "denotes a ~division." 3426 3, 46 | and charity, by which the pang of contrition is ~intensified, 3427 3, 85 | and crieth out in ~her pangs, so ere we become," by penance, 3428 2, 45 | and evil; or "cunning," [*{panourgia}] which is directed only 3429 2, 186 | at naught carried their pantry ~about with them." Therefore 3430 Suppl, 40| episcopal is surpassed by the ~papal power as by a power of the 3431 2, 93 | which of several sheets of paper, with or without writing 3432 2, 166 | revealed to ~the Blessed Paphnutius that a certain jester would 3433 2, 73 | Cicero adopts in the ~book on Paradoxes (Paradox. iii), was that 3434 2, 81 | speaking of prayer [*This last ~paragraph refers to the Latin word ' 3435 3, 65 | chapter of the second Book of ~Paralipomenon (cf. 2 Paral 33:18): "Thou, 3436 Suppl, 43| subject (as epilepsy or paralysis), or causes a ~deformity ( 3437 3, 40 | when Christ commanded the paralytic ~to carry his bed on the 3438 2, 48 | goes yet farther, so as to paralyze ~the tongue and other outward 3439 2, 37 | movement of the body is paralyzed, so ~that a man becomes 3440 2, 39 | the soul: for such sorrow paralyzes the soul, and ~hinders it 3441 3, 80 | The text quoted is thus paraphrased by the gloss: "If any ~man 3442 2, 44 | but rather to cause a ~parching heat: a sign whereof is 3443 2, 105 | first shaved her hair, and pared her nails, ~and put off 3444 Suppl, 54| Decretal ~(cap. Porro; cap. Parenteloe, 35, qu. v). Therefore consanguinity 3445 Suppl, 71| Chancellor of the See of Paris, A.D. ~1205-9] said that 3446 3, 74 | parish priest ~having few parishioners could not consecrate many 3447 3, 69 | on Charity (Ep. Joan. ad ~Parth. iii), "no man is born of 3448 3, 39 | extremes" (Aristotle, ~De Partib. Animal.). Since, therefore, 3449 1, 14 | specific nature, which is participable by infinite ~particulars; 3450 2, 145 | of supererogation, but ~particularizes in detail that which is 3451 1, 111 | in a ~multiple but in a partitive sense, to mean "thousands 3452 2, 102 | water, and walks like a partridge on land: it drinks ~only 3453 2, 102 | tamer kinds, such ~as hens, partridges, and the like. Another reason 3454 2, 133 | MEANNESS* (TWO ARTICLES) [*"Parvificentia," or doing mean things, 3455 2, 133 | man is said to be mean ~[parvificus] because he intends to do 3456 2, 87 | Caus. XXII, qu. 5, ~can. Parvuli], and are not called upon 3457 3, 66 | says (De Unico Baptismo Parvulorum iv): "The ~Blessed Cyprian 3458 2, 133 | to do something little [parvum]. Now ~according to the 3459 3, 35 | Preface of ~the Mass in Paschal-time], so by His pains He freed 3460 3, 4 | exist. But Innocent III ~[*Paschas. Diac., De Spiritu Sanct. 3461 2, 6 | shoots an ~arrow and slays a passer-by. Such ignorance causes involuntariness 3462 3, 16 | the Lord's Prayer) or 'passio ~dominica' (Our Lord's Passion), 3463 3, 46 | Leo observes (Serm. iv de Passione): "Two thieves were ~crucified, 3464 Appen1, 2| cognizant of actual suffering [passionis]: and where the sense of ~ 3465 3, 61 | for instance the word 'passurus' [going to ~suffer] differs 3466 3, 61 | to ~suffer] differs from 'passus' [having suffered]." Therefore 3467 2, 11 | whole house, ~the whole paste, the whole body, the whole 3468 2, 166 | have accounted our life a ~pastime." Against these Tully says ( 3469 2, 85 | flock is derived from the pasture, the tithe of the flock 3470 Suppl, 87| and go out, and shall find pastures, i.e. refreshment in His ~ 3471 3, 83 | mass to be said with glass patens; and subsequently Pope ~ 3472 3, 34 | the contrary, Augustine [*Paterius, Expos. Vet. et Nov. Test. 3473 3, 35 | impossible for ~several paternities to be in a man who is the 3474 2, 134 | praiseworthy manner ~by suffering [patiendo] things which hurt him here 3475 2, 22 | but also by suffering [patiens] them." ~But the sensitive 3476 2, 174 | Sancte ~Spiritus.' Cf. Migne, Patr. Lat. tom. CXLI]: "On this 3477 3, 60 | instance, if one were to say "patrias et ~filias." For although 3478 2, 85 | ecclesiastical, ~but sometimes also patrimonial: moreover they receive first-fruits, 3479 3, 60 | matris" instead of "in nomine Patris." If, however, ~the sense 3480 2, 152 | read in the ~Collationes Patrum (Coll. xxii, 6) of a man 3481 2, 101 | ceremonial precepts are patterns, i.e. ~rules, of salvation: 3482 2, 4 | For Augustine says (Ad Paulinam de Videndo Deum; [*Cf. Serm. 3483 1, 88 | Jerome says (Ep. liii, ad Paulinum), "Let us learn on ~earth 3484 2, 85 | tithes, viz. those ~that are payable on property acquired by 3485 3, 22 | of His flesh offering up payers," etc., as quoted above ( 3486 2, 86 | does not grow rich on our payments, but makes those who ~pay 3487 3, 48 | us with God through the peace-sacrifice ~might continue to be one 3488 2, 43 | Metaph. i, 2), wherefore ~peaceableness is fittingly ascribed to 3489 2, 43 | the peacemakers." Now a peacemaker is ~one who makes peace, 3490 2, 102 | also rejected if he had "a pearl in his eye," i.e. if he ~ 3491 2, 47 | angry if he be insulted by a peasant; a wise man, if by a ~fool; 3492 2, 61 | sometimes substitutes a pebble [*'Lapillus' or 'calculus' ~ 3493 1, 93 | instance the ~number of pebbles in a stream; and the like.~ 3494 2, 115 | possessions consisted entirely of 'pecora' [flocks]." And the ~Philosopher 3495 2, 64 | theft of a sacred thing, of peculation, which is ~theft of common 3496 2, 100 | prohibitions relating to peculations and larceny. To the eighth ~ 3497 2, 102 | one another.] has this peculiarity apart from other birds, 3498 2, 115 | owns, goes by the name of "'pecunia' [money], because in olden 3499 Suppl, 22| man ~has power over his peer.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[22] A[ 3500 2, 114 | for nobody, are said to be peevish and ~quarrelsome."~Aquin.: 3501 3, 70 | circumcision removed a carnal pellicule, so ~Baptism despoils man 3502 Suppl, 43| affianced bride would be penalized for the sin of her affianced ~ 3503 2, 89 | I confess to have sinned penally, and then had rather ~not 3504 3, 83 | He was ~sold, viz. thirty pence. And a double cross is added 3505 3, 80 | says in his book De Remedio Penitentiae (cf. Tract. in ~Joan. xxv, 3506 Suppl, 8 | or a bishop ~appoints his penitentiaries; and then the man thus delegated


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