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St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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1003-bespa | beste-conse | consi-drops | dross-foste | fouln-inexo | inexp-megal | melan-penit | pepuz-refut | regai-socra | sodom-truth | tu-zone

     Part, Question
3507 3, 74 | called Cataphrygae and Pepuziani, "are ~reputed to have made 3508 2, 141 | method, contentment." [*'Per-se-sufficientiam' which could be ~rendered ' 3509 2, 11 | that resist the truth, if peradventure God ~may give them repentance 3510 2, 143 | De Offic. i, 5): "Thou perceivest ~the form and the features, 3511 3, 66 | sulphurous vein, ~just as lye percolates through ashes. Therefore 3512 1, 77 | for sound is caused by ~percussion and commotion of air: and 3513 2, 62 | Dei i) [*Can. Quicumque ~percutit, caus. xxiii, qu. 8]: "A 3514 2, 86 | of pilgrimage (Cap. de ~Peregin., de Voto et Voti redempt.), 3515 2, 105 | not molest a ~stranger [peregrino]." Thirdly, when any foreigners 3516 2, 185 | It is our absolute and ~peremptory command addressed to all 3517 Suppl, 71| punishment, does not ~absolve the performer from his own debt of punishment, 3518 2, 18 | white thing: and, as ~to its perfume, under the species of sweet-smelling 3519 2, 108 | Prov. (27:9): "Ointment and perfumes rejoice the heart: and ~ 3520 2, 87 | oath ~with due reverence. Perjurers also are debarred from taking 3521 2, 75 | his losses; he lies and perjures himself over the price of 3522 2, 96 | as does ~Augustine (de Perjuriis. serm. clxxx): "For if he 3523 1, 101 | ii, 11): "Paradise was ~permeated with the all pervading brightness 3524 3, 62 | more subtle, so that it permeates into ~the very principles 3525 3, 77 | account to be hindered ~from permeating the whole, and not simply 3526 Suppl, 80| permeate another. But this permeation of the parts of a ~glorified 3527 2, 98 | Cap. Quaesitum, de rerum Permutat.; cap. Super, de Transact.]. ~ 3528 3, 80 | to do evil lest another ~perpetrate a greater evil." But the 3529 1, 113 | which are due thereto man perpetrates ~"through being deceived 3530 2, 108 | punishment by retaliation, and of persecuting one's enemies. But there ~ 3531 1, 29 | comes from sounding through [personando], since a ~greater volume 3532 2, 98 | that the angel spoke as ~personating the Lord.~Aquin.: SMT FS 3533 Suppl, 92| truth, but in so far as He personifies ~His spouse, namely the 3534 1, 12 | causes - viz. from the ~perspicuity of the intellect, and from 3535 2, 163 | not to consent to the ~persuader."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[165] 3536 1, 101 | permeated with the all pervading brightness of a temperate, 3537 3, 67 | Decretals (xxx, qu. ~1, Cap. Pervenit and Dictum est).~Aquin.: 3538 2, 88 | perverseness" [*The Latin ~'pervertere' means to overthrow, to 3539 2, 10 | ought to withstand the ~perverters of the truth of faith were 3540 2, 136 | being utterly tenacious." ~"Pervicacious" has the same meaning, for 3541 2, 92 | because both are species of pestiferous superstition.~Aquin.: SMT 3542 3, 82 | of the Arians and other ~pestilential persons, if they seem to 3543 3, 64 | against Petilian (Cont. Litt. Petil ii). Therefore it ~seems 3544 2, 81 | Secondly, on the part of the ~petitioner, who ought to approach the 3545 2, 170 | with the opinion of Plato [*Phaed. xxvii; Civit. vi], who 3546 2, 169 | to take their name from ~{phanos}, "apparition," because 3547 3, 55 | and solid body, and not phantastic or rarefied, like ~the air. 3548 2, 87 | curse, as though he pledged Pharao's health ~to God; or by 3549 Suppl, 21| thee the ~keys"): "It is a pharisaical severity to reckon as really 3550 2, 11 | opinions relating to Judaism or Pharisaism, so also heresies among ~ 3551 Suppl, 92| where it is stated that "Pharoa, the king of Egypt, ~took 3552 2, 169 | vates' is from the Greek {phates}, and may be rendered 'soothsayer'] ~( 3553 3, 44 | object: How is it such a phenomenal occurrence is not related 3554 2, 130 | evil, but especially in philanthropy, i.e. mercy. And yet this 3555 2, 31 | a "becoming" as Plato [*Phileb. 32,33] maintained, but 3556 2, 11 | For the ~Apostle says (Philem. 20): "Yea, brother, may 3557 2, 30 | and the Apostle says to Philemon (verse 7): "The bowels of ~ 3558 2, 60 | 7) calls "friendship" [*{philia}], and may be rendered " 3559 2, 93 | single combat with ~the Philistine (1 Kgs. 17:32, sqq.). Therefore 3560 2, 127 | magnanimous ~man is not {philokindynos}, that is, a lover of danger. 3561 Suppl, 72| from without" [*Cf. Sent. Philosop. ex Arist. collect. lit. 3562 3, 44 | someone of the ~name of Phlegon "relates in his chronicles 3563 2, 185 | 16:1): "I commend to you Phoebe ~our Sister," and further 3564 2, 75 | against the Lord by the sin of Phogor?" Therefore something ~external 3565 3, 28 | really was His father, as the Photinians ~pretended: but that he 3566 2, 185 | Constantinople [*Pseudosynod held by Photius in the year 879]: ~"The 3567 2, 154 | wherefore it is likened to phthisis or any chronic disease, ~ 3568 2, 88 | although the act be ~continuous physically. If, however, the will be 3569 3, 72 | contests fitness of age, physique and rank are required; and 3570 2, 37 | Pope Urban II [*Council of Piacenza, cap. x; cf. Can. ~Ordinationes, 3571 3, 72 | of the councils. Others (Pierre de Tarentaise, ~Sent. iv, 3572 3, 88 | spernitque, fateri,~Poenituisse piget, pristina culpa redit."~ 3573 2, 167 | with the aid of yellow pigments, ~black powders or rouge, 3574 2, 46 | angered; some he calls {pikroi} ~[bitter], because they 3575 2, 38 | the flock, but also the pillager and the oppressor ~who work 3576 2, 182 | calm end in the storm he piloted himself to safety." This 3577 2, 57 | to be prudent officers or pilots, but not simply ~prudent: 3578 3, 46 | flesh was torn with iron pincers. Therefore it seems that 3579 2, 34 | self-inflicted pain wounds the pining spirit, which is racked 3580 2, 93 | under the law, through being pinned ~down thereby, against his 3581 3, 64 | healthy or sickly; or that a pipe, ~through which water passes, 3582 2, 178 | last long at its highest pitch. Now the ~highest point 3583 Suppl, 16| expiating the evil, or of placating God for the ~offense committed. 3584 2, 80 | xii) [*Orat. funebr. de ~Placilla Imp.] that "just as laughter 3585 1, 107 | Archangels." Each of these placings may claim authority from 3586 2, 185 | Nicea (cf. XVI, qu. i, ~can. Placuit) it is laid down as follows: " 3587 3, 66 | take away the purity and plainness of ~the water. Therefore 3588 3, 39 | Lastly, the dove has a plaintive song. This ~refers to the 3589 3, 37 | both these animals, by the plaintiveness ~of their song, represented 3590 2, 167 | modesty and sobriety, not with plaited hair, or gold, or pearls, 3591 2, 167 | let it not be the outward plaiting of the hair, or the wearing 3592 2, 93 | law, in so far as they are planned by Divine ~Wisdom. In reference 3593 2, 105 | builder of a new house, the planter of a vineyard, the ~newly 3594 2, 85 | at his own charge? Who ~planteth a vineyard and eateth not 3595 1, 101 | the third day, while the planting of the trees of ~paradise 3596 1, 18 | said in De Vegetab. i [*De Plantis ~i, 1] that in animals life 3597 3, 84 | applied externally, such as plasters and ~drugs, while others 3598 2, 166 | unless by chance ~some play-actor were in extreme need, in 3599 2, 166 | what ~happened to those who played: 'The people sat down to 3600 2, 143 | Trusting in thy beauty thou playest the harlot because ~of thy 3601 2, 105 | as many grapes as ~thou pleasest." Therefore the Old Law 3602 1, 107 | subjection, such as that of plebeians, and from tyrannical oppression," ~ 3603 2, 95 | Decrees of the ~commonalty" [Plebiscita]. There is also tyrannical 3604 Suppl, 43| contract of fellowship by pledging their faith ~to one another 3605 2, 29 | goodness first and most ~plentifully on the substances which 3606 Suppl, 43| marriage, by which they plighted their mutual consent under ~ 3607 Suppl, 43| called "a betrothal from plighting one's troth," as Isidore ~ 3608 2, 31 | for instance, when a man plots secretly to betray his ~ 3609 2, 102 | blood" ~(Ps. 13:3). The plover [*Here, again, the Douay 3610 2, 102 | the generic name for all ~plovers.], which is a garrulous 3611 2, 41 | would be injurious to the plunderers ~themselves, who would remain 3612 2, 38 | and end in ~slaying or plundering. In olden times warlike 3613 2, 44 | is no sin. Secondly, by ~plunging his sense into earthly things, 3614 2, 59 | is the sum of the lesser plus its ~half: whereas the equality 3615 2, 102 | fruit-stones or seeds encased in a pod are ~sown: since it would 3616 2, 25 | that poets love their own poems): and the reason is that ~ 3617 Suppl, 2 | holds to his ~punishment [*"Poenitens," i.e. "poenam tenens"]. 3618 3, 88 | fit, spernitque, fateri,~Poenituisse piget, pristina culpa redit."~ 3619 2, 101 | human reason fails to grasp poetical expressions on ~account 3620 2, 166 | our behavior, this is the polish becoming to every action."~ 3621 2, 184 | Further, Augustine says (Ad Pollent., de Adult. Conjug. i, 14): ~" 3622 2, 86 | laws ~[*Dig. L. xii, de pollicitat., i] a simple promise made 3623 2, 102 | adultery, or incest. ~From such pollutions men were purified by certain 3624 2, 186 | contrary, Prosper [*Julianus Pomerius, among the works of ~Prosper] 3625 2, 152 | Further, Cyprian says (Ad Pompon, de Virgin., Ep. lxii), " 3626 2, 184 | referring to the Latin 'ponderatio' in the Vulgate, which the 3627 2, 184 | are measured by weight [*'Pondere,' ~referring to the Latin ' 3628 3, 27 | Mary kept all these ~words, pondering them in her heart." But 3629 2, 79 | religio,' because he often ponders over, and, ~as it were, 3630 1, 18 | dead, as in cisterns and ponds. This is merely a ~similitude, 3631 Suppl, 26| Pope has the plenitude of pontifical power, being ~like a king 3632 3, 8 | during the time of his Pontificate, ~and with reference to 3633 3, 46 | hast ~anointed, Herod, and Pontius Pilate, with the Gentiles 3634 3, 5 | because by making use of the poorest . ~. . lay and commonest 3635 2, 105 | secretly, wishing to ~avoid popularity: and because the kindness 3636 1, 107 | these, as the ~middle-class [populus honorabilis]. In the same 3637 3, 68 | eight months enter ~the porch of the church with the catechumens; 3638 3, 83 | because as the wood is porous, the consecrated blood would ~ 3639 3, 77 | A[2], ad 3), so likewise porousness remains, and in ~consequence 3640 2, 102 | life. The coot ~[*Douay: 'porphyrion.' St. Thomas' description 3641 2, 176 | signs," "wonders" or ~"portents," and "virtues." [*Cf. 2 3642 3, 32 | the sense in which the ~portrait of a man is called a man, 3643 2, 38 | imitate in deed what they portray in their ministry. For this ~ 3644 Suppl, 34| Hence, that He might be portrayed in His ~works, not only 3645 2, 116 | needy man's money ~that thou possessest, hence thou despoilest as 3646 1, 86 | is called ~"possible" [*Possibilis - elsewhere in this translation 3647 Suppl, 55| his qui matrim. accus. ~possunt.) which runs as follows: " 3648 3, 70 | Remission of all sins" (Post-Communion, Tuesday in Whitweek).~Aquin.: 3649 2, 49 | puts "to have" among the "post-predicaments," so called ~because they 3650 1, 2 | called a ~demonstration "a posteriori"; this is to argue from 3651 3, 29 | away privately, i.e. to postpone the wedding," as ~Remigius [* 3652 Suppl, 14| however merit a diminution or postponement of temporal ~punishment, 3653 3, 59 | therefore there ~is no need for postponing judgment as to the reward 3654 2, 13 | men are chosen for certain posts, whether secular or ~ecclesiastical, 3655 2, 186 | according to Extra, De Postul., cap. Ex parte; and De 3656 2, 187 | Wherefore ~they must try the postulant whether he be moved by the 3657 1, 2 | Therefore we cannot but postulate ~the existence of some being 3658 1, 15 | created; and therefore he postulated not an idea of matter but 3659 1, 25 | wisdom includes the whole potency of the ~divine power. Yet 3660 2, 11 | something else, e.g. a bitter potion for the sake of health, ~ 3661 2, 87 | medical man ~prescribes bitter potions to his patients, that he 3662 3, 38 | washings of cups and of pots, ~and of brazen vessels, 3663 2, 59 | no fruit, such as money, pottery, etc.; but if not even ~ 3664 2, 63 | nor the widow when she poureth out ~her complaint." Now 3665 2, 167 | yellow pigments, ~black powders or rouge, or by applying 3666 3, 66 | mystery of Baptism is not practicable."~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[66] A[ 3667 2, 66 | virtues, because they are practised in matters pertaining to 3668 2, 37 | holds the same faith, and practises the same worship, as ~others, 3669 2, 98 | Qu. iii, can. Si quis praebendas].~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[100] 3670 2, 99 | with the ~Commandments (praecepta) in the ordinary acceptance 3671 Suppl, 23| according to the law (Can. Praecipue, seqq., caus. xi) a ~man 3672 1, 16 | the Philosopher teaches (Praedicam. iii). Therefore truth ~ 3673 2, 116 | so forth, as stated in De Praedicamentis), ~consequently the term " 3674 2, 152 | Decretals (XXII, qu. i, can. ~Praedicandum): "They should know that 3675 2, 98 | beginning of his Morals (Praef. ~chap. i), "the angel who 3676 2, 99 | cases. Wherefore Jerome (Praefat. in Comment. super Marc.) 3677 2, 102 | away the uncircumcision [*'Praeputia,' which Douay ~version renders ' 3678 2, 187 | Decretals (XX, qu. iii, cap. ~Praesens). Secondly, if one person 3679 2, 93 | s eyes are ~blindfolded [praestringuntur]. Sometimes they make use 3680 2, 68 | Decret. II, qu. iv, can. Praesul.): "A ~bishop shall not 3681 2, 68 | appear" [*Cap. Dudum, de Praesumpt.]. Now it pertains to a 3682 2, 130 | discord, and eccentricity [*Praesumptio novitatum, literally 'presumption ~ 3683 2, 66 | Decret. II, ~qu. vii, can. Praesumunt.]. Otherwise, provided they 3684 Suppl, 43| them the ~Decretal (cap. Praeterea, De spons. et matr.) which 3685 2, 95 | powerful men; and then we have "Praetorian," also ~called "Honorary," 3686 2, 129 | the hall of audience" [*'Praetorium.' ~The Vulgate has 'auditorium,' 3687 2, 89 | by the mouth of him that praiseth." But God is not incited ~ 3688 2, 125 | armed men ~[*Vulg.: 'he pranceth boldly, he goeth forth to 3689 2, 7 | the act is, [*hen ois e ~praxis]" as stated in Ethic. iii, 3690 2, 81 | forgiven to thee when thou prayest."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[83] A[ 3691 1, 90 | fact that "all things are ~pre-contained" in Him, not as component 3692 1, 24 | is not the same thing as ~pre-destination. For it is said, "All things 3693 2, 110 | good of the thing, but ~pre-supposes it either in part or wholly. 3694 Suppl, 46| fraud [*According to the ~pre-Tridentine legislation] (De sponsal. 3695 1, 107 | leaders; as in singing, the precentors; and in war, generals and ~ 3696 2, 49 | the contrary, Prudence is preceptive, according to Ethic. vi, 3697 2, 47 | teachers, who are also called ~"preceptors." Therefore docility is 3698 2, 84 | which are offered within the precincts of the Holy Church: because 3699 2, 51 | Now a thing is said to be ~precipitated as regards bodily movement, 3700 2, 156 | impetuosity, whereby it precipitates the mind into all kinds 3701 2, 75 | fixed with ~mathematical precision, but depends on a kind of 3702 2, 172 | properly speaking, denotes precognition of ~future events in themselves, 3703 1, 23 | act, accordingly as it ~preconceives the idea of what is to be 3704 1, 16 | stone, ~according to the preconception in the divine intellect. 3705 3, 38 | consistent with his office of ~precursor, as he had preceded our 3706 2, 65 | and hope as such are the ~precursors of charity, as stated above ( 3707 3, 46 | God's foreknowledge ~and predetermination, according to which it was 3708 3, 76 | quantity having position" (Predic. iv). But it belongs to 3709 1, 13 | these relatives are called predicamental [secundum esse]. ~But others 3710 3, 57 | according to the nature of this predominating element the human body is ~ 3711 2, 29 | closely united ~to us, but preferably to strangers and to those 3712 2, 56 | the moral virtue; and the preferential ~choice of that which is 3713 3, 73 | such ~sacraments as were prefigurative of the Lord's Passion.~Aquin.: 3714 3, 29 | lying, since ~a woman's pregnancy is the reward of marriage 3715 2, 87 | little intent on them without prejudicing the ~order to the last end: 3716 Suppl, 52| positive law, ~cannot be prejudicious to those things that are 3717 Suppl, 64| are taken up with carnal preoccupations by ~reason of the very newness 3718 1, 93 | intelligible things by being ~preoccupied with sensible things; in 3719 1, 115 | affairs, is reduced to a preordaining cause, ~which is Divine 3720 2, 106 | 8). Now that which is ~preponderant in the law of the New Testament, 3721 1, 77 | or other of the ~elements preponderate, as water, air, or the like. 3722 Suppl, 79| body by some external body ~preponderating in some one of the active 3723 2, 187 | A[6]) the holy orders prerequire ~holiness, whereas the religious 3724 Suppl, 35| and ~reordained (Extra De Presbyt. non Bapt., cap. Si quis; 3725 Suppl, 39| the Church; and priestess [presbytera] means a ~widow, for the 3726 2, 182 | Greek {episkopos} and ~{presbyteros} from which the English ' 3727 2, 74 | inordinate ~movements, if he be presentient to them, for instance by 3728 Suppl, 71| would grieve if he had a presentiment that something ~untoward 3729 2, 102 | their household gods as a preservative against this ~corruption. 3730 1, 103 | that ~reason are called preservatives; just as salt preserves 3731 1, 103 | preserved depends on the preserver in such a way that it cannot ~ 3732 2, 93 | this species is called "prestigiation" because man's eyes are ~ 3733 3, 46 | man; they inflicted their presumptions upon ~God. For suppose a 3734 Suppl, 54| dangerous because through the prevalence of concupiscence and ~neglect 3735 2, 66 | This belongs to collusion ~[prevaricatio] for "he that is guilty 3736 2, 110 | truth rightly deserts the prevaricator of the law, ~and those who 3737 3, 36 | according to Wis. ~6:14: "She preventeth them that covet her, so 3738 2, 102 | according to the Divine prevision, ~that place were chosen 3739 Suppl, 71| Praepositivus [*Gilbert Prevostin, Chancellor of the See of 3740 2, 105 | degenerating into tyrants who preyed on their ~subjects. This 3741 2, 116 | despoiling the dead, or by preying on one's friends, as gamblers 3742 3, 46 | instance, when the eye is pricked, or is disaffected by ~heat.~ 3743 2, 156 | The ~heart goaded by the pricks of anger is convulsed, the 3744 Suppl, 39| homilies in the Church; and priestess [presbytera] means a ~widow, 3745 Suppl, 39| made of deaconesses and priestesses. But deaconess ~there denotes 3746 2, 83 | do not raise ~temples and priesthoods to the martyrs, because 3747 2, 14 | is in respect of ~certain primals and extremes, as stated 3748 2, 16 | as Augustine states (In primam canon. Joan. Tract. ix), 3749 Suppl, 8 | to canon law (Can. Nullus primas ix, Q[2]; ~Can. Si quis 3750 Suppl, 40| all bow the head, and ~the primates of the world are obedient 3751 2, 84 | Cap. ~Decimam, de Decim. Primit. et Oblat.]: "According 3752 2, 90 | Lib. i, ~ff., De Const. Prin. leg. i): "Whatsoever pleaseth 3753 1, 78 | Ezech. 1:6); Basil [*Hom. in princ. ~Proverb.], the "natural 3754 1, 107 | subject to them. To preside [principari] as Gregory ~says (Hom. 3755 1, 2 | cause, and is called "a priori," and this is to argue from 3756 3, 88 | fateri,~Poenituisse piget, pristina culpa redit."~For the more 3757 2, 26 | De Morib. Eccl. viii): "Prithee, tell me ~which is the mode 3758 2, 18 | privation "in process" ~[privari]: thus sickness is privation 3759 2, 18 | privation "as a result" ~[privatum esse], and this leaves nothing, 3760 3, 66 | De Sacram. i): thus are prize-fighters wont to besmear ~themselves 3761 3, 46 | such in Christ, but only ~"pro-passions"; as Jerome remarks on Mt. 3762 3, 18 | thinking or cogitation, and {proairesis}, i.e. choice, "cannot possibly ~ 3763 2, 81 | Augustine ~too says the same to Proba (ad Probam, de orando Deum, 3764 2, 46 | premises, sometimes from probabilities, and sometimes from conjectures.~ 3765 2, 95 | God with the ~intention of probing God's knowledge, power or 3766 3, 7 | Whose Divine nature He ~proceedeth."~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[7] A[ 3767 2, 65 | connected with judicial proceedings, and (2) injurious words ~ 3768 1, 36 | Gost of Storms" [spiritus procellarum], and in the latter "Trubled ~ 3769 1, 32 | paternal, the filial, and the processional." Therefore we must ~admit 3770 2, 31 | 4 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: Proclamations made in the chapter of religious 3771 Suppl, 58| sufficient calidity to ~procreate, they have sufficient to 3772 2, 98 | lawful for him to receive "procurations," ~when he visits his subjects, 3773 1, 113 | because, if he work real prodigies, they will lead ~those into 3774 2, 176 | the name of "wonder" or ~"prodigy," as showing something from 3775 1, 9 | mutable, inasmuch as they are ~producible from nothing by Him, and 3776 Suppl, 11| For, as Bernard ~says (De Proecep. et Dispens. ii), "that 3777 2, 169 | prophets" may be ~described as "proefatores [foretellers], because they 3778 2, 183 | state, as the school to the ~professorial chair, and as disposition 3779 1, 98 | Further, inability to secure a proffered pleasure causes ~affliction. 3780 Suppl, 37| ministry directed to the proffering of the sacramental ~matter, 3781 2, 8 | sometimes withdraws itself profitably, for, at ~times, "when the 3782 1, 84 | that some understand more profoundly ~than do others; as one 3783 2, 182 | compare the toils of this project, namely of the ~monastic 3784 2, 120 | his parents deserves the prolongation ~of his life, because he 3785 2, 92 | Isidore (Etym. viii, 11), Prometheus was the first ~to set up 3786 Suppl, 92| bride (Cod. v, 11, De dot. promiss., 1: Dig. xxiii, ~2, De 3787 3, 26 | it, ~but the names of its promoters would have weighed little 3788 Suppl, 36| therefore a bishop sins in promoting the unworthy, he is bound 3789 2, 98 | sometimes after making a law, he promulgates it through ~others. Thus 3790 Suppl, 86| a way the executors and ~promulgators. On the other hand, the 3791 2, 81 | nature, by helping it to propagate itself. Hence the soul is ~ 3792 2, 156 | is not time, but a man's propensity to anger, or his ~pertinacity 3793 2, 175 | 4:4), and ~of Holda the prophetess, the wife of Sellum (4 Kgs. 3794 3, 83 | Look down upon them with a ~propitious," etc. Fifthly, he begs 3795 2, 100 | says that "Moses, after propounding the ten precepts, ~set them 3796 2, 86 | one is said to do a thing "proprio voto" [by one's own vow] ~ 3797 2, 172 | science based on direct [*"Propter quid"] proofs is more excellent ~ 3798 2, 100 | witness, it was necessary to proscribe, not sins of thought, but ~ 3799 2, 107 | perjury, while the ~New Law proscribed even swearing: the Old Law 3800 1, 36 | gost is sacrifice of God" (Prose Psalter, A.D. 1325), and " 3801 2, 31 | various ~signs, we ought to prosecute the matter, according to 3802 2, 187 | and the land to make one proselyte, and when he is ~made you 3803 Suppl, 14| justice; thus Anselm says (Proslog. x) that "God is just ~when 3804 1, 21 | either view where he says (Prosolog. ~10): "When Thou dost punish 3805 1, 29 | masks the Greeks called {prosopa}, as they were placed on ~ 3806 2, 108 | movements in respect of any prospective action, viz. ~volition of 3807 2, 99 | common weal of the people prospered under the Law as ~long as 3808 2, 34 | deservedly set ~up, and when he prospers, we dread lest many suffer 3809 2, 83 | much greater honor, ~by prostrating before them, and offering 3810 2, 11 | Leo says in a letter ~to Proterius, Bishop of Alexandria: " 3811 3, 72 | All the sacraments are protestations of faith. Therefore ~just 3812 2, 102 | old became partakers ~by protesting their faith in the Redeemer, 3813 3, 35 | the birth of our Saviour [*Protevangelium ~Jacobi xix, xx] it is related 3814 3, 25 | an image reaches to the prototype," i.e. the ~exemplar. But 3815 1, 10 | true of being. Now the ~protraction of duration seems to belong 3816 1, 90 | mouth. Thus he would ~have a protruding mouth, with thick and hard 3817 1, 78 | Basil [*Hom. in princ. ~Proverb.], the "natural power of 3818 Suppl, 70| in his commentary on the Proverbs, and again the Philosopher ~( 3819 2, 130 | 1 Thess. 2:4, "God, Who proveth our hearts," says: "Unless 3820 1, 22 | by Gregory of Nyssa (De Provid. viii, 3), is ~exploded. 3821 2, 53 | called from foreseeing [providendo], as stated above ~(Q[47], 3822 2, 19 | authority: for ~instance, if a provincial governor command something 3823 2, 105 | Law did not make suitable provisions ~for man's peace.~Aquin.: 3824 Suppl, 65| be understood with the ~proviso that there be equal proportion. 3825 2, 156 | Douay: 'passionate'] ~man provoketh quarrels," says: "Anger 3826 2, 181 | he must do so, not by a proxy, but in his own person"; 3827 2, 45 | to ~devise ingeniously [prudenter] all that there may be need 3828 2, 95 | legal opinions" [Responsa Prudentum] and "Decrees of the ~Senate" [ 3829 2, 142 | shamelessness and inordinate prudery. ~Therefore shamefacedness 3830 3, 86 | some men who, ~when they prune some vices, become much 3831 3, 64 | and if anything ~needed pruning, the sickle of his passion 3832 2, 169 | him through the praise of psalmody, and fill his mind with ~ 3833 2, 89 | instruments such as harps and psalteries, in the divine praises, 3834 2, 89 | harp, sing to Him with the psaltery, the instrument of ten strings. 3835 2, 110 | Reply OBJ 3: As Boethius [*Pseudo-Bede, Sent. Phil. ex Artist] 3836 3, 78 | Further, Eusebius Emissenus (Pseudo-Hieron: Ep. xxix; ~Pseudo-Isid.: 3837 3, 78 | Pseudo-Hieron: Ep. xxix; ~Pseudo-Isid.: Hom. iv) says: "The invisible 3838 2, 185 | synod of Constantinople [*Pseudosynod held by Photius in the year 3839 2, 187 | Decret. ~XXII, qu. v, cap. Pueri and cap. Honestum.). Therefore 3840 2, 39 | which makes a man boast and puff himself up.~Aquin.: SMT 3841 2, 102 | and purify the stains of a puffed-up and ~proud spirit in the 3842 2, 39 | Reply OBJ 2: Boasting and puffing up of self which are the 3843 2, 156 | mortal sin, for instance by pulling a child ~slightly by the 3844 2, 69 | against itself . . . one part pulls this way, another that"; 3845 Suppl, 73| Even so a sound by ~the pulsation of the air arouses the sleeper, 3846 3, 74 | blood drawn ~from tiny punctures over the entire body, and 3847 2, 102 | by honey, surpasses the pungency which ~salt represents; 3848 2, 67 | II, qu. vi, can. Omnino puniendus): "Without doubt ~a man 3849 Suppl, 94| substance, but as to its ~punitive effect on bodies and, still 3850 1, 102 | imparts knowledge to his pupils, but gives also the ~faculty 3851 Suppl, 83| principles (for instance fever, purblindness, and so ~forth) will be 3852 1, 87 | with the mind. Hence ~the purer the intellect is, so much 3853 2, 61 | are perfect ~[*Virtutes purgati animi: literally, virtues 3854 3, 80 | the Decretals (Extra, De Purgationibus, Ch. Ex ~tuarum). Because 3855 3, 80 | Baptism and Penance are as purgative medicines, given to take ~ 3856 2, 61 | perfecting virtues [*Virtutes purgatoriae: ~literally meaning, cleansing 3857 3, 84 | for nothing else but the purging of sins. ~Therefore if one 3858 2, 94 | ordered the Jews to borrow and purloin the vessels of the Egyptians ( 3859 2, 98 | false pretenses stealthily ~purloins rather than buys human praise: 3860 Suppl, 47| wicked man seeth when no man pursueth" (Prov. ~28:1).~Aquin.: 3861 2, 20 | But if the ox was wont to push with his horn yesterday 3862 2, 131 | greatness of soul, so the pusillanimous man ~shrinks from great 3863 3, 51 | preserved Christ's body ~from putrefying, just as it raised it up 3864 2, 93 | aeromancy," if in fire "pyromancy," if in the entrails of ~ 3865 2, 152 | demented. Hence Sixtus the Pythagorean says ~in his Maxims: He 3866 2, 93 | pythons are so called from Pythius ~Apollo, who was said to 3867 3, 27 | virtue: but not the ~"sine qua non" of perfection: and 3868 3, 41 | Pope Leo ~says (Serm. 1, De Quadrag. 3).~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[41] 3869 1, 7 | figures, such as trilateral, ~quadrilateral and so on; and as an infinitely 3870 3, 15 | Further, Tully (De Tusc. Quaes. iii) says that the soul' 3871 2, 98 | laid down ~by law [*Cap. Quaesitum, de rerum Permutat.; cap. 3872 3, 44 | rending of the veil, the quaking of the earth," etc. - "took 3873 3, 89 | is expressed (Extra, De ~Qual. Ordinand.): "If the aforesaid 3874 Suppl, 44| employs the word "such" [quale] ~when he says (Cap. De 3875 2, 52 | things affected by them ~[qualia] are said to be more or 3876 Suppl, 44| when he says (Cap. De Qualitate) that "quality is that whereby 3877 2, 31 | decided in the Decretal ~(Cap. Qualiter, xiv, De Accusationibus) 3878 2, 66 | way, if the accusation be ~quashed by the sovereign to whom 3879 2, 78 | derivation: {eugnomosyne} ~quasi 'bona {gnome}.'] These two 3880 2, 62 | theological virtues are quasi-Divine virtues. But the ~Divine 3881 2, 67 | Now the species are the quasi-formal element of the intellectual ~ 3882 Suppl, 73| indwelling Godhead is the quasi-instrumental cause of our resurrection: ~ 3883 Suppl, 8 | through lack* of a priest, is ~quasi-sacramental, although it is not a perfect 3884 Suppl, 55| calumny,' since it is a ~quasi-spiritual lawsuit; that relatives 3885 2, 76 | things, but established a quasi-usufruct," namely by permitting ~ 3886 2, 156 | out with time, and can be quelled ~only by revenge.~Aquin.: 3887 2, 48 | vengeance, and ~that vengeance quells his anger. Therefore on 3888 2, 23 | Salutaribus Documentis ad quemdam comitem, vii., among the 3889 2, 23 | charity in Peter was not quenched, but cooled." ~But Peter 3890 2, 107 | he says in reply to the queries of Januarius (Ep. lv) that, " 3891 2, 184 | livelihood, such as labor, questing, and so on, they are ~to 3892 3, 58 | the supplication of the ~questioners; since more than others 3893 2, 172 | science based on indirect [*"Quia"] premises or than opinion, ~ 3894 3, 42 | deprive the Jews of ground for quibbling. Hence on ~Mt. 10:5, "Go 3895 2, 7 | verse:~"Quis, quid, ubi, quibus auxiliis, cur, quomodo, 3896 2, 186 | De ~Regular., cap. Licet quibusdam. Therefore it would seem 3897 2, 46 | the humors, the bile moves quickest; for ~it is like fire. Consequently 3898 2, 62 | says (De Civ. Dei i) [*Can. Quicumque ~percutit, caus. xxiii, 3899 2, 183 | Extra, de Renunt. cap. Quidam). Therefore apparently it 3900 2, 98 | stated (I, qu. i [*Can. Quidquid invisibilis]): ~"It is absolutely 3901 2, 64 | thing such as a needle or a quill. Therefore theft ~is not 3902 Suppl, 79| peripatetic philosophers as the quintessence, of which ~they held heavenly 3903 3, 77 | form, nor of existence [quo est] and ~essence [quod 3904 2, 7 | ubi, quibus auxiliis, cur, quomodo, quando - ~Who, what, where, 3905 Suppl, 56| prohibition [*Can. Omnes quos, and seqq., Caus. xxx] was 3906 2, 102 | foliage" [*Douay and A. V. and R. V. read: 'Boughs of ~thick 3907 1, 112 | account of the words of ~Rabsaces, as related Is. 37:2 seqq.: 3908 2, 180 | occupied with externals. Hence Rachael, by whom the ~contemplative 3909 2, 34 | pining spirit, which is racked by ~the prosperity of another." 3910 3, 44 | the Cross, or bestow its ~radiancy on the impious blasphemers." 3911 1, 93 | which he perceived ~by the radiation of the first truth, whether 3912 3, 57 | being beyond the containing radius ~of the heavenly bodies, 3913 3, 46 | Why have the Gentiles raged, and the people devised 3914 3, 31 | with her father-in-law; Rahab who was a whore; Ruth ~who 3915 2, 70 | to which it ~pertains to rail well, according to the Philosopher ( 3916 2, 74 | 10, "Nor cursers [Douay: 'railers'], nor extortioners shall 3917 2, 73 | honor of ~the person he rails, the backbiter to depreciate 3918 2, 93 | signifies ~the effect (thus a rainbow is sometimes a sign of fair 3919 2, 172 | glory like to thee? Who raisedst ~up a dead man from below." 3920 2, 123 | heart, but that he can ~rally and take courage." Therefore 3921 2, 61 | nothing hinders one from ranking ~before another, even in 3922 2, 186 | another to visiting or ~ransoming captives. Secondly, there 3923 3, 48 | the price, ~by which he ransoms himself or someone else 3924 1, 111 | he said, ~"I am the angel Raphael, one of the seven who stand 3925 2, 152 | v ad Caesarium; Cf. can. Raptores xxxvi, qu. 2], "We abhor ~ 3926 2, 173 | overflow in ~those who are raptured, as stated (A[3], OBJ[2], 3927 2, 28 | heating, both liquefies and rarefies, there are not two powers 3928 Suppl, 43| giving of sureties are a ~ratification of the promise, wherefore 3929 1, 14 | can be taken as the proper ration of each thing according 3930 2, 93 | said to be reasonable ~[rationalis]: though regarded in itself 3931 2, 65 | to the law [*Cap. Licet ratione, de Foro ~Comp.] a man is 3932 2, 102 | thou set down the reason ~[rationem] thereof on the earth?" 3933 2, 94 | when going forth; when the rats have gnawed a hole in your ~ 3934 2, 157 | and sweet savor, so when raw they have a disagreeable 3935 2, 157 | its name from "cruditas" ~[rawness]. Now just as things when 3936 3, 63 | likeness of the ~creating and re-creating Trinity, and distinguishing 3937 2, 187 | religare" [to bind] or from "re-eligere" [to choose again], as Augustine ~ 3938 3, 13 | Incarnation, which is "to re-establish all things that are in ~ 3939 2, 60 | since ~thereby equality is re-established; and for this it is enough 3940 3, 82 | the Church, they are not re-ordained, but are ~received in their 3941 2, 1 | multiplication of acts of the will reacting on itself, ~is accidental 3942 2, 31 | save by reason of a certain reaction of the ~superior appetite 3943 3, 29 | Jerome says: "When thou readest 'husband' suspect not a 3944 2, 87 | words in ~brackets show the readings of the Vulgate]; and (Hab. 3945 2, 56 | The common good of the realm and the particular good 3946 Suppl, 71| reap." Now if one person reaped fruit from the suffrages 3947 2, 73 | man who excels in anything reaps disadvantage, not from ~ 3948 3, 68 | Baptism, in order that being reared from childhood in ~things 3949 3, 50 | that the whole ~man was reassumed - that is, as to all his 3950 3, 67 | there would be no need of rebaptism: as we have said in regard 3951 3, 67 | liable to be ~punished as a rebaptizer. If, however, they were 3952 3, 67 | improper manner, but not for ~rebaptizing: because each would intend 3953 Suppl, 83| no affliction should be rebated. But this ~would seem unreasonable. 3954 Suppl, 96| obtain that mercy which ~rebates somewhat their due punishment.~ 3955 1, 23 | and He heard him and made Rebecca to conceive" ~(Gn. 25:21). 3956 3, 80 | ought he by Baptism to be reborn ~spiritually but once, as 3957 3, 7 | of the Persians, would ~rebuild the temple of God, as is 3958 3, 83 | walls or beams, let it be rebuilt. If, ~however, it has been 3959 2, 31 | Thirdly, on account of the rebuker's pride; when, for instance, 3960 2, 31 | Demophilus (Ep. ~viii), for rebuking a priest with insolence, 3961 1, 23 | body. The Apostle, however, rebuts this opinion where he says ~( 3962 2, 103 | sabbath, which was a sign recalling the first creation, its ~ 3963 1, 101 | understood, they say, by way of recapitulation. Whence our text reads: ~" 3964 Suppl, 69| holds the souls in ~secret receptacles according as each one is 3965 1, 87 | passive intellect extends receptively; ~because, as is stated ( 3966 Suppl, 83| passiveness is a kind of ~receptiveness, there are two kinds of 3967 2, 51 | according to the latter's receptivity. Since then the ~agent, 3968 2, 102 | allusion to Col. ~2:11 (Textus Receptus)]. The turtledove and dove 3969 2, 111 | xxvi, 3) that "it is a ~reckless humility that entangles 3970 2, 98 | public or secret. Nor may he reclaim the money which he basely 3971 2, 181 | if he lie down, sit, or recline, but only when he stands 3972 2, 115 | Offic. i) that "justice reclines to severity, liberality 3973 Suppl, 65| fornication ~with Thamar, recoiled from telling a lie, saying ( 3974 2, 46 | either seeking this or recoiling from it. This is evident 3975 2, 78 | gratitude" which ~"consists in recollecting the friendship and kindliness 3976 2, 173 | remain in the soul which it ~recollects when it turns to the phantasms. 3977 3, 19 | meriteth, the same shall be ~recompensed. Therefore it is not possible 3978 Suppl, 38| is reconciled ~he is not reconsecrated. Therefore he did not lose 3979 2, 15 | God is ~one," precede the recording of the precepts.~Aquin.: 3980 3, 5 | things which the Evangelists recount ~of Him, did He do any in 3981 2, 166 | actions is ~directed to the recreation and rest of the soul, and 3982 2, 71 | his official ~duty to cor. rect the backbiter, or by reason 3983 2, 26 | to twice two, ~and as a rectilinear figure is to one composed 3984 Suppl, 76| the difference between the recurrence that ~occurs in generation 3985 3, 84 | knows not how to heal a recurring disease? ~For if a man ail 3986 Suppl, 94| likewise burning wood and red-hot iron; nor ~does it signify, 3987 2, 87 | to pay the ~right [jus reddere] of truth to God." Therefore 3988 3, 88 | Poenituisse piget, pristina culpa redit."~For the more grievous 3989 2, 183 | said (XII, qu. ii, can. de ~reditibus): "Of the Church's revenues 3990 Suppl, 89| apprehend sweet honey, for the ~redness of gall is more becoming 3991 2, 73 | movement ~of concupiscence is redoubled by the will tending unrestrainedly 3992 3, 69 | man who, having captured a redoubtable enemy, slays him ~not forthwith, 3993 2, 38 | because he can seek for redress of his rights from the ~ 3994 Suppl, 15| makes gold glisten and straw reek," so by the same scourges 3995 3, 46 | to the gibbet in a place reeking with the stench of corpses, ~" 3996 Suppl, 94| than thick and cloudy, and reeky as it were.~Aquin.: SMT 3997 2, 79 | Augustine plays on the ~words 'reeligere,' i.e. to choose over again, 3998 2, 60 | it back that equality is reestablished. If, however, it be ~taken 3999 Suppl, 74| gathering of the ashes, the ~refashioning of the body, the infusion 4000 3, 76 | as it is ordained ~to the refection of the faithful, which consists 4001 Suppl, 72| consuming the wicked and refining the good"; and a gloss on 4002 3, 90 | Baptism. The second is by reforming one's past ~life after it 4003 2, 182 | striveth for the mastery refraineth himself from ~all things": 4004 2, 60 | regard: rather ought they to refund the person who has ~made 4005 2, 41 | canst lend, and if ~thou refusest what is asked, thou must 4006 2, 36 | speech suitable for proof and refutation" - or whether it exceeds


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