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St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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1003-bespa | beste-conse | consi-drops | dross-foste | fouln-inexo | inexp-megal | melan-penit | pepuz-refut | regai-socra | sodom-truth | tu-zone

     Part, Question
4007 1, 96 | sins." Hence he would have regained his ~immortality; which 4008 Appen1, 2| voluntary for the sake of regaining health. Hence a ~punishment 4009 3, 84 | Further, in this sacrament man regains the Holy Ghost Whom he had ~ 4010 2, 102 | Prov. ~11:10): "The just regardeth the lives of his beasts: 4011 3, 78 | contact with His flesh the regenerative ~power entered not only 4012 2, 186 | Gubbio, or Constantinople, or Reggio, he has the same excellence, 4013 3, 25 | sinner peace."~[*Hymn Vexilla Regis: translation of Father Aylward, 4014 3, 72 | contrary, Gregory says (Registr. iv): "Let no priest dare 4015 2, 46 | foresight," "regnative ~[*Regnativa]," "military," "political" 4016 2, 48 | Polit. iii, 5) a kingdom ~[regnum] is one of six species of 4017 3, 88 | this a man acts when he regrets ~having done penance. Secondly, 4018 2, 182 | Aurel.): "It would be most ~regrettable, were we to exalt monks 4019 2, 13 | Blessed Benedict says (Regula lxviii) that if the superior 4020 2, 105 | threefold remedy against the ~regularity of possessions. The first 4021 3, 83 | this sacrament is offered ~regularly every day in the Church. 4022 Suppl, 92| according to the Rule [*Liber regularum] of Tyconius, on account 4023 2, 105 | ruined through want of ~regulations in the matter of possessions, 4024 2, 96 | regulated is subject to the regulator: ~and, in this way, whoever 4025 Suppl, 14| satisfaction requires the reinstatement of ~friendship and the restoration 4026 Suppl, 58| with the same ~person, she reinstates the former marriage and 4027 3, 75 | hard saying'": to whom He rejoined: "It is ~the spirit that 4028 2, 166 | a wise man sometimes to relax the high ~pressure of his 4029 Suppl, 71| another's debt human justice releases the latter alone. ~Therefore 4030 2, 79 | as it were, reads again [relegit], the things which pertain 4031 2, 68 | probability of the other. Now the ~reliability of a person's evidence is 4032 3, 26 | that St. Thomas had any ~reliable information about the movement* 4033 2, 161 | 1~Reply OBJ 3: The man's reliance on God's mercy did not reach 4034 3, 89 | man marry a ~widow or the relict of another, he must not 4035 2, 161 | because ~while sinning he relied on God's mercy [*Cf. Q[21], 4036 2, 184 | thereby we are bound [religamur] to the one almighty God," 4037 2, 184 | name from "our ~returning [religimus] to God Whom we had lost 4038 2, 79 | said to be religious from 'religio,' because he often ponders 4039 2, 116 | if he gives ~with great reluctance, he is said to be {kyminopristes} [ 4040 3, 21 | prayed thus "as man," ~being reluctant to die according to His 4041 3, 65 | Extreme Unction, against the remainders of ~sins - of those sins, 4042 Suppl, 72| they shall perish but Thou remainest." Now the higher heavens ~ 4043 3, 31 | not forbid his widow to ~remarry, Melchi, who traced his 4044 Suppl, 30| whereas this ~unction is remedial. Hence the comparison fails.~ 4045 3, 80 | Augustine says in his book De Remedio Penitentiae (cf. Tract. 4046 3, 36 | worthy of condemnation" (Remig., Hom. in Matth. ii, 1).~ 4047 2, 31 | name, wherefore they are ~reminders of forgotten faults rather 4048 1, 77 | must add the cognitive and reminiscitive ~to the estimative and memorative 4049 2, 88 | or ignorance, which are remissible. Therefore ~mortal and venial 4050 Suppl, 14| same thing, so that the remissions of various ~sins are connected 4051 2, 104 | Thy mercy, whereby Thou remittest sins to those that turn 4052 2, 25 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The remover of an obstacle is not a 4053 3, 79 | Hence Augustine says to Renatus (De Anima et ~ejus origine 4054 2, 156 | the soul, it mangles and rends it by its riot"; and ~Cassian 4055 2, 184 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 6: The renouncement of one's own wealth is compared 4056 2, 76 | its use, as ~happens in renting and letting a house.~Aquin.: 4057 2, 186 | found stated in Extra, De Renuntiatione, cap. Nisi cum pridem; and 4058 3, 56 | life, is the ~cause of the repairing of our life. But Christ' 4059 3, 69 | reverse order at first repairs what regards the person, 4060 2, 88 | is irremissible: whereas reparability belongs to sins ~committed 4061 2, 104 | of the ~giver and of the repayer, then it is possible for 4062 3, 45 | God speaketh once, and repeateth not the selfsame thing the ~ 4063 3, 84 | unsearchable . . . (and Thou repentest) for ~the evil brought upon 4064 1, 19 | Lord says ~(Gn. 6:7): "It repenteth Me that I have made man." 4065 1, 96 | suffice for growth, but only ~replaces what is lost. Last of all, 4066 2, 60 | or does not withstand or ~reprehend him is not always bound 4067 3, 74 | wine. Hence Pope ~Julius I reprehends some who "keep throughout 4068 2, 172 | Hence they spoke as ~God's representatives, saying to the people: " 4069 3, 63 | man has been set free and reprimanded? is it ~not rather acknowledged 4070 2, 164 | give an answer to him that ~reproacheth." Now study, which is commended 4071 1, 23 | men by predestinating and reprobating, unless ~through the foreknowledge 4072 1, 4 | principle of animal life reproduced ~through seed, has previous 4073 1, 83 | kind of messenger, for ~reproducing within itself what is announced 4074 2, 130 | s; thus it is written in reproval of certain ~people (Jn. 4075 2, 30 | to the ~intention of the reprover, who wishes to free a man 4076 2, 78 | his words" ~[*Cicero, De Repub. iv, De Offic. i, 7], is 4077 2, 77 | movement of the will in repudiating evil, as the very term " 4078 2, 156 | Chrysostom is alluding to the repulsiveness of the outward ~gestures 4079 2, 167 | for anyone hailing ~from a reputable place to be without them." 4080 3, 59 | the truth, good or evil reputations linger ~on. In another way 4081 3, 80 | is said: "Although he who reputes himself unworthy of the ~ 4082 2, 5 | of the man ~"to whom God reputeth justice without works." 4083 3, 2 | gratuitously doing something or reputing anything as well-pleasing 4084 3, 47 | even though he ~(Saul) had requested it, as related 2 Kgs. 1: 4085 3, 83 | altar-table to hand, and the other requisites belonging to the sacred ~ 4086 2, 96 | requirements of the law, on the requisition of a ~third person: he does 4087 Suppl, 65| cannot suffice to satisfy the requisitions of ~several wives, and again 4088 3, 59 | the end (of the world) to requite man with reward or ~punishment 4089 Suppl, 59| because a ~betrothal can be rescinded on account of a subsequent 4090 Suppl, 47| perpetuity, since its ~complete rescission can be demanded. Wherefore 4091 Suppl, 45| law (cap. Ex Tenore, ~De Rescrip., cap. Si Vir, De cognat. 4092 3, 68 | more reason is ~there for rescuing the children of unbelievers 4093 Suppl, 93| ways, ~according as we find resemblances to the various properties 4094 2, 39 | strife, because, when a man resents another being preferred ~ 4095 2, 10 | we permit it without any reservation." Now to ~sit at table with 4096 2, 145 | which results from the ~residuum of nourishment. Wherefore 4097 2, 113 | in the ~matter there is a resistant which has some disproportion 4098 1, 12 | residing in ~matter, still it resolves the composite into both 4099 2, 93 | life." Fourthly, if anyone ~resort to the drawing of lots in 4100 Suppl, 23| But, since ~the Church resorts to excommunication to repair 4101 2, 109 | correction is outwardly resounding and punishing, God by hidden ~ 4102 Suppl, 68| which require a certain respectability in those ~who perform them. 4103 2, 85 | that the ~latter might live respectably; and also because some, 4104 2, 159 | and fear: for fearing and respectful persons are especially wont ~ 4105 2, 31 | can reprove privately and respectfully. Hence the ~Apostle in writing 4106 3, 27 | air which we ~breathe out [respiratus]. Or it may be said that 4107 Suppl, 82| their nature aglow with the resplendence of the sun, or ~from some 4108 3, 73 | is what ~Augustine says (Respons. ad Januar. i): "In order 4109 2, 95 | Authoritative legal opinions" [Responsa Prudentum] and "Decrees 4110 3, 25 | that the throne of God, the resting-place of ~the Lord of Heaven, 4111 2, 60 | thing which reverts to the ~restorer by being restored. Now if 4112 3, 47 | laying down His life and of resuming it again. "From ~which," 4113 Suppl, 90| Therefore their joy after the resumption of the body will ~not be 4114 3, 54 | Augustine says (Ad Consent., De Resur. ~Carn.), "there will be 4115 3, 57 | as Pope Leo says (De ~Resurrec., Serm. ii). But Christ' 4116 Suppl, 81| Augustine says (QQ. ~De Resurrectione, Ep. cii, qu. 1) that "the 4117 Suppl, 74| 20), ~although some were resuscitated before Christ's resurrection, 4118 2, 75 | price with the purpose of retailing at a higher price?" and 4119 2, 64 | not because he burdens the retainer, and ~so he is not bound 4120 2, 46 | never rest until they have ~retaliated [*Cf. SS, Q[158], A[5]].~ 4121 2, 61 | also to those who have ~retired from public life on account 4122 1, 12 | Augustine says (Retract. i), retracting ~what he had said before: " 4123 2, 145 | by fasting something is retrenched therefrom: else those who 4124 2, 187 | of the verse, and taking 'retributio,' which Douay renders 'reward,' 4125 2, 64 | are medicinal rather than ~retributive. For retribution is reserved 4126 Suppl, 96| goeth," namely to sin, ~"and returneth not by his own power" (Ps. 4127 1, 108 | compared to the ~angelic revealers, can be called an enlightenment, 4128 2, 70 | mildness; to drunkenness and revellings, contingency."~Aquin.: SMT 4129 2, 150 | Ethic. ii, 2), ~that "he who revels in every pleasure, and abstains 4130 2, 76 | house, and, besides this, ~revendicate the house from the person 4131 2, 70 | submitting to be reviled a man revenges himself, according to Chrysostom ~( 4132 2, 97 | the sacrilegious man, who reverences not sacred things, is not ~ 4133 3, 1 | not lessen the reason for reverencing Him, which is ~increased 4134 3, 83 | ought to ~be devout and reverent. Consequently, in the celebration 4135 Suppl, 52| same applies if the case be reversed. And if both ~be of servile 4136 2, 117 | giving. But to one that ~reviews the passage correctly, it 4137 2, 70 | Whether one ought to check revilers?~(4) Of the origin of reviling.~ 4138 2, 70 | not only taunts but also reviles him. Thirdly, a man ~reproaches 4139 3, 89 | Whether works deadened by sin revive through Penance?~(6) Whether 4140 2, 60 | undue cause procures its revocation, it is the same ~as though 4141 3, 82 | species, ~lest they beget revulsion in the communicants. Therefore 4142 1, 28 | later at the council of Rheims. For he said ~that the divine 4143 3, 54 | when He rose, "why not the rheum?" that is, the ~phlegm; " 4144 2, 102 | garments, putting in them ribands of blue . . . they may ~ 4145 2, 39 | derived from the snarling [rictu] of a dog, because the ~ 4146 2, 95 | Judges ~14:12) proposed a riddle to the Philistines in order 4147 2, 16 | the use of a horse is to ride, and the use of a stick 4148 2, 66 | collusion is like one who rides ~astraddle [varicator], 4149 1, 96 | which the ~Philosopher ridicules (Metaph. iii, Did. ii, 4).~ 4150 2, 45 | instance, habits ~directed to riding, soldiering, and civic life, 4151 1, 90 | inferior part that by which it rids itself of the surplus.~Aquin.: 4152 2, 102 | because the south ~is the right-hand side of the world, while 4153 2, 25 | sake of Him ~in Whom is the rightest end of thy love, let no 4154 Suppl, 40| which those who ~fought rightfully were wont to receive.~Aquin.: 4155 2, 113 | mind by depriving it of the rigidity of truth and renders it 4156 3, 89 | pardon, ~but to preserve the rigor of discipline; else we should 4157 2, 65 | him, ~so that he can more rigorously sift the evidence brought 4158 3, 83 | is received in order to rinse the mouth after receiving ~ 4159 3, 80 | wine wherewith the mouth is rinsed, provided they be not ~swallowed 4160 2, 146 | from habit, but the random riotous joy ~which is described 4161 2, 117 | wasted his substance living ~riotously." Therefore it seems that 4162 2, 68 | it matters not since he risked ~the danger of his own accord: 4163 Suppl, 21| begins with ~lighter and less risky remedies, therefore excommunication 4164 Suppl, 92| 1: Dig. xxiii, ~2, De rit. nup.). Now all the beatific 4165 3, 72 | of a man. For some have rivaled men in the ~courage with 4166 1, 112 | one guarded?~(8) Whether rivalry exists among the angels 4167 2, 98 | the opposition of one's ~rivals, before acquiring the right 4168 2, 98 | the ship-builder himself rivets the planks together, ~but 4169 2, 39 | Etym. x) that the word "rixosus ~[quarrelsome] is derived 4170 2, 102 | them to depart"; and to eat roast meat, ~for this took less 4171 3, 25 | nothing else than to adore a robed King. And in ~this sense 4172 2, 66 | Accusatorum) that "the role of accuser must never be 4173 2, 102 | the fat of the ~ram, one roll of bread, and the right 4174 2, 89 | dist. xcii., cap. In sancta Romana Ecclesia). ~Therefore singing 4175 1, 23 | the ~definite number of rooms which he wishes to make 4176 Suppl, 77| and thus ~it is called "ros," namely the humidity that 4177 2, 169 | Commentator [*Averroes or Ibn Roshd, 1120-1198] says (De Anima 4178 2, 167 | paints in order to have ~a rosier or a paler complexion is 4179 2, 187 | Epist. ii, Victricio ~Epo. Rotomag., cap. 14; Cf. can. Viduas: 4180 2, 102 | clothes, because leprosy rots the hair, infects the ~clothes, 4181 2, 103 | of the adulterous woman rotted, when she had drunk the 4182 2, 167 | pigments, ~black powders or rouge, or by applying any dye 4183 2, 102 | precious stones set in four rows, on ~which also were graven 4184 3, 58 | and that unchangeably and royally. But this belongs to the 4185 Suppl, 38| acolyte. ~[*"Bacili." The rubric has "aquamanili." Some texts 4186 2, 104 | granted without grace, and are rudely, slowly and grudgingly ~ 4187 3, 1 | Augustine says (De Catech. ~Rudib. iv): "What greater cause 4188 Suppl, 36| negligence,"* as Cato declares ~(Rudiment.). [*"Legere et non intelligere 4189 2, 1 | Church," as Pope Leo [*Rufinus, Comm. in Sym. Apost.] observes.~ 4190 2, 102 | however, ~allowed to eat ruminants and animals with a divided 4191 2, 182 | free, as in the case of a ~runaway slave; but properly speaking 4192 2, 102 | rejected "if he have a ~rupture" or hernia; through baseness 4193 2, 91 | he becomes a subject of rural or of ~mercantile legislation.~ 4194 Suppl, 53| according to a Decretal (cap. Rursus, De his qui ~cler. vel vovent.) " 4195 2, 51 | order, whereas if a man is rushed ~into action by the impulse 4196 2, 185 | Jerome says (Ep. ~cxxv ad Rustico Monach.): "Let your somber 4197 2, 156 | and nothing uglier than a ruthless* face, and most ~of all 4198 3, 64 | of the angels [*See Acta S.S., September 29]. ~But if 4199 3, 37 | generation" ~[*Athanasius, De Sabb. et Circumcis.]: from the 4200 3, 40 | in the ~Law that on the Sabbath-days the priests in the Temple 4201 1, 28 | understanding; and this is the Sabellian heresy.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[ 4202 2, 182 | says in his Dialogue (De Sacerdot. ~vi): "Take for example 4203 2, 185 | who "was clothed with sack-cloth," and Achab (3 Kgs. 21:27) 4204 Suppl, 28| these ~penitents clothed in sackcloth, with bare feet, their faces 4205 Suppl, 49| its rectitude. Hence its ~sacramentality, if I may use the term, 4206 3, 76 | says in a sermon (Gregory, Sacramentarium): ~"Each receives Christ 4207 3, 60 | derived from "sacring" [sacrando]; just as medicament, from ~" 4208 3, 47 | to death" owing ~to the sacredness of the feast-day, which 4209 3, 82 | son, for him to receive sacrilegiously the consecrated Communion ~ 4210 3, 60 | appears to be derived from "sacring" [sacrando]; just as medicament, 4211 Suppl, 23| a certain decretal (Cap. Sacris: De his quae vi, metuve, ~ 4212 3, 60 | was said to be holy or ~sacrosanct, such as the city walls, 4213 2, 83 | something sacred [facit sacrum]. On the other hand an " 4214 2, 112 | reason should oblige ~him to sadden them for their good.~Aquin.: 4215 2, 64 | which is due to them for the safe-guarding of the common good, even 4216 2, 23 | relation to the infusion and safekeeping of ~charity, as the sun 4217 2, 107 | Law by prescribing the ~safest way of complying with the 4218 2, 13 | animals are called prudent or sagacious; and not because they reason 4219 2, 170 | life is spent. For example, sailors compare their enemies to ~ 4220 2, 60 | thieves prosper, because their salary is given to them ~in payment 4221 2, 58 | slaying Zambri the son of Salu ~(Num. 25:7-14), and "it 4222 2, 23 | The quotation is ~from De Salutaribus Documentis ad quemdam comitem, 4223 2, 183 | in the synagogues, and salutations in the market-place, and 4224 2, 101 | for ~instance by bowing, saluting, and so forth, or by external 4225 2, 98 | written (I, qu. iii [*Can. ~Salvator]), that "Simon the magician 4226 2, 101 | the same as the Latin ~"salve." But all the precepts of 4227 3, 42 | individual Gentiles, such as the Samaritan woman (Jn. 4) ~and the Chananaean 4228 2, 159 | principal virtue by reason of a ~sameness, not of subject or matter, 4229 2, 79 | thing is said to ~be sacred [sancitum] when it is ratified by 4230 2, 174 | reputed author of the 'Veni Sancte ~Spiritus.' Cf. Migne, Patr. 4231 3, 65 | the Church ~there are many sanctifications by sensible signs, such 4232 3, 34 | humanity is both sanctified and sanctifier.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[34] A[ 4233 3, 34 | Heb. 2:11: "Both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified 4234 1, 23 | of drops of rain and the sands of the sea are certain to 4235 3, 68 | have fallen from a state of sanity into a state ~of insanity. 4236 2, 173 | himself." Now the prodigal son sank into the depths by ~his 4237 2, 44 | A[1] Body Para. 2/2~For "sapiens" [wise] as Isidore says ( 4238 2, 44 | Etym. x) "is so named from sapor ~[savor], because just as 4239 2, 43 | denotes a certain ~sweetness [saporem]. Hence the Reply to the 4240 2, 108 | Abraham "when he said that ~Sara was his sister, he wished 4241 2, 184 | it is stated that "the Sarabaitae are the worst class of ~ 4242 2, 38 | frequently come from the Saracen side, some said ~that the 4243 2, 38 | the hymn of Ambrose [*Cf. Sarum Breviary: First ~Sunday 4244 Appen1, 2| cleansed, both that they may be sated with their pains, and that 4245 Suppl, 96| as a gloss says. [*"Ad satietatem visionis," which St. Thomas 4246 2, 84 | any sin whatever, and of sating his ~desire for any sin 4247 2, 17 | Nemesius, De Nat. Hom. xxii.] sats ~that "the nutritive and 4248 3, 25 | Christ, and from its ~being saturated with His blood. Wherefore 4249 Suppl, 41| at the beginning men were savages and ~then no man knew his 4250 2, 1 | nearer they ~were to Our Savior's coming, the more fully 4251 3, 37 | instance, because they were saviours ~in a particular and temporal 4252 2, 102 | because all ~corruption savored of uncleanness, as stated 4253 2, 102 | them to do certain ~things savoring of cruelty to animals. Hence 4254 2, 4 | saw be ~well fitted for sawing. Now, in a power of the 4255 2, 4 | be sawn well, unless the sawyer possess the art, and the 4256 2, 102 | if he have a continued scab," i.e. ~lustfulness of the 4257 2, 42 | who are ~already on the scaffold, are not afraid," seeing 4258 2, 7 | he give ~him a chill, or scald him; heal him or harm him, 4259 2, 132 | it exceeds liberality in scale." Therefore it ~is only 4260 2, 41 | there is no stumbling-block [scandalum]."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[43] 4261 3, 55 | side'; afterwards when they scanned the spot where the Lord' 4262 2, 186 | practice of ~manual labor, scantiness of clothes, or the like.~ 4263 2, 102 | declares (Heb. 13:12). The ~scape-goat may denote either Christ' 4264 2, 32 | instance things that are scarce. Also, ~representations 4265 3, 54 | will appear ~in the places scarred by the wounds.~Aquin.: SMT 4266 Suppl, 82| the organ of sight, and by scattering the spirits* asunder. [*" 4267 2, 102 | this ~was the feast of "Scenopegia" or of "Tents," which was 4268 3, 35 | fulfilled (Gn. 49:10): "The sceptre ~shall not be taken away 4269 3, 82 | above (AA[5],7), heretical, schismatical, ~excommunicate, or even 4270 2, 183 | the more. Thus when the ~scholar has become a professor it 4271 2, 185 | to the common good: thus scholars ~may seek alms that they 4272 2, 86 | from Peter Comestor, Hist. ~Scholast.]: "In vowing he was foolish, 4273 2, 187 | religious state is a ~spiritual schooling for the attainment of the 4274 1, 1 | gave him the knowledge [scientiam] of holy things" (Wis. 10: 4275 2, 183 | says (cf. VII, qu. i, can. Sciscitaris).~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[185] 4276 2, 12 | Apoc. 16:9): "The men were scorched with ~great heat, and they 4277 2, 88 | tread upon ~serpents and scorpions, and upon all the power 4278 3, 26 | was the master of Duns Scotus (1308)]. No doubt he knew 4279 2, 97 | entrust the government to scoundrels and ~criminals; then the 4280 Suppl, 96| purgatory, which he calls a scourging. ~Or, if he speaks of the 4281 2, 187 | the rich man began to scratch his ~head; and that our 4282 2, 1 | one's ~foot or hand, or scratches one's beard, while intent 4283 2, 102 | to prey on the poor. The screech-owl, which ~seeks its food by 4284 Suppl, 89| abundance of light - "which screens God ~is impervious to all 4285 2, 186 | money in your purses, nor script for your journey." By these 4286 2, 66 | II, qu. viii, can. Per scripta) ~that "no man may accuse 4287 2, 93 | mathematicians, I consulted without scruple; because they ~seemed to 4288 2, 102 | also, if he have "a dry scurf," which covers ~the body 4289 2, 93 | themselves into futile searchings of the future, in order 4290 2, 184 | those ~fathers, had it been seasonable to observe continence and 4291 2, 10 | faithful. Thus the Blessed Sebastian encouraged those ~whom he 4292 2, 11 | its being a cutting off [secando], as Isidore states (Etym. ~ 4293 2, 144 | mind from its peaceful ~seclusion." Likewise he says (Pastor. 4294 1, 88 | acquire a certain aptitude in seconding the action of the intellect 4295 3, 89 | Distinction, Gregory writing to ~Secundinus (Regist. vii) says: "We 4296 Suppl, 92| reality: ~non spei . . . sed rei"] which is in heaven.~ 4297 2, 166 | impure, or on the other ~hand sedate, steady, pure, and free 4298 2, 120 | farm than spent his time seditiously in ~the theatre: and their 4299 2, 160 | Tim. 3:13): "Evil men and seducers ~shall grow worse and worse"; 4300 1, 88 | contrary ~when a false argument seduces anyone from the knowledge 4301 2, 152 | rape, or of ~abducting or seducing women, should not have those 4302 2, 142 | support of what is honest, ~a seeker after the beautiful." Therefore 4303 2, 127 | magnanimous if thou neither ~seekest dangers like a rash man, 4304 2, 102 | Rm. ~8:3), was not to be seethed, i.e. slain, by the Jews, " 4305 2, 68 | those ~celestial spirits, a seething torrent of sevenfold heavenly 4306 2, 34 | by madness. For paleness seizes the ~complexion, the eyes 4307 Suppl, 96| people's property, for after seizing on many things, they ~nevertheless 4308 3, 74 | the instance ~of specially selected grain. Therefore it does 4309 2, 97 | sacrilegious because he selects," i.e. steals, "sacred things."~ 4310 3, 84 | Augustine asserts (Ep. cclxv, ad Seleuc.). But with regard to His ~ 4311 3, 38 | 2: As Augustine says to Seleucianus (Ep. cclxv), "we deem that ~ 4312 2, 159 | notion of a praiseworthy self-abasement to the lowest place. ~Now 4313 Suppl, 9 | Thirdly, it culminates in ~self-abjection, and in this respect it 4314 Suppl, 7 | the sinner's sacramental ~self-accusation through shame for what he 4315 1, 27 | possesses but one mode of ~self-communication; because operations derive 4316 2, 115 | liberality, since "the good is ~self-communicative," according to Dionysius ( 4317 2, 130 | Tract. lviii in Joan.): "Self-complacency is ~fraught with danger 4318 1, 93 | and in a presumption of self-conceit."~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[94] A[ 4319 2, 130 | man presumptuous and too self-confident: ~and so it gradually disposes 4320 Suppl, 43| yet ~possessed of complete self-control; it results rather from 4321 1, 5 | subsist, and are. But ~to be self-giving implies the aspect of an 4322 2, 34 | of the envious man ~that "self-inflicted pain wounds the pining spirit, 4323 1, 93 | substances by means of its self-knowledge, as we ~have shown above; 4324 1, 2 | back to an immovable ~and self-necessary first principle, as was 4325 2, 136 | idiognomones}, ~that is "self-opinionated," because they abide by 4326 2, 161 | power, and a certain proud self-presumption." This does ~not mean that 4327 2, 94 | any way for the purpose of self-protection. Therefore it is equally ~ 4328 3, 40 | men acquire the power of ~self-restraint, so also Christ, in Himself 4329 3, 41 | use of what is needful for self-support is not the ~sin of gluttony; 4330 1, 116 | himself, he ~cannot be called self-taught, or be said to have his 4331 2, 25 | anger; since the movement of self-vindication, that ~results from sadness, 4332 2, 140 | his own will, becomes more self-willed: ~hence it is written (Ecclus. 4333 2, 95 | premises, e.g. just buyings and sellings, ~and the like, without 4334 2, 175 | prophetess, the wife of Sellum (4 Kgs. 22:14), and of the ~ 4335 1, 114 | name of "seminal ~virtues" [seminales rationes] to all those active 4336 1, 16 | future being was in the ~sempiternal cause; and God alone is 4337 2, 95 | decrees of the commonalty, ~senatorial decrees," and the like which 4338 2, 185 | unseemly that in a life wherein senators ~become laborers, laborers 4339 2, 95 | Decrees of the ~Senate" [Senatus consulta]. Another form 4340 2, 58 | Digest. i, 3; De leg. senatusque consult. 25]: "By no reason 4341 1, 98 | result from birth; but not senile defects ~leading to corruption.~ 4342 1, 114 | Part. Animal. ii, 7: ~De Sens. et Sensato ii: De Somn. 4343 1, 77 | in his book De sensu et sensibilibus (viii). So there is no ~ 4344 3, 46 | Christ's sense of touch, the ~sensitiveness of which is the reason for 4345 Suppl, 70| because by ~them the soul sensitizes the body for seeing, hearing, 4346 Suppl, 32| is not the heart, but the sensory ~organs, except in so far 4347 2, 77 | moved by a passion of the senstive appetite?~Aquin.: SMT FS 4348 2, 102 | uncleanness of a mind that is ~sensualized by pleasure. Speaking generally, 4349 2, 79 | Dionysius Cato, Breves Sententiae], "Worship thy parents." 4350 2, 15 | is, to speak, "ad aliud sentire" ~[to feel towards something]; 4351 2, 15 | Wis. 1:1): ~"Think of [Sentite] the Lord in goodness." 4352 2, 100 | men should keep watch ~as sentries in case of siege, some might 4353 2, 150 | too in an army, some take sentry duty, others are ~standard-bearers, 4354 3, 70 | Ex. 4:25) we read that "Sephora took a very sharp ~stone 4355 Suppl, 64| place, TP, ~Q[30]), from Septuagesima until the octave day of 4356 2, 186 | Coll. x, ~3) that the Abbot Serapion through simplicity fell 4357 2, 185 | renouncing their ease, the serfs should live in ~comfort."~ 4358 2, 164 | belongs to the virtue of ~seriousness. Wherefore it is reckoned 4359 2, 182 | to Ambrose in one of his sermons (xxx de ~Tempore). Now there 4360 3, 18 | But there was nothing ~serpent-like in Christ; for He had the 4361 Suppl, 52| Decretal says (De conjug. servorum, cap. Ad nostram) ~that " 4362 2, 1 | of the Son in order to ~settle this point. In like manner 4363 Suppl, 25| would have no authority in settling questions of faith.~Aquin.: 4364 Appen1, 2| same proportion between severer punishment and graver fault, ~ 4365 2, 156 | all than a cruel soul." [*'Severo'. The correct text is 'Si 4366 3, 19 | 10] quotes the words of Severus ~the heretic, who said: " 4367 2, 113 | 13:18, "Woe to them that sew cushions ~under every elbow," 4368 Suppl, 6 | Decretals (Cap. Omnis utriusque sexus: De ~Poenit. et Remiss.). 4369 2, 185 | by unwonted squalor and shabbiness, ~since he acts thus voluntarily 4370 2, 73 | be covered with several shades, than if it were covered 4371 2, 37 | provided there is a hope of shaking it off: otherwise no movement 4372 2, 73 | from reviling, as being shamed differs from being dishonored: 4373 2, 108 | a sin deceives himself ~shamefully, since he deems himself 4374 2, 167 | but to do so ~excessively, shamelessly, and immodestly.~Aquin.: 4375 Suppl, 9 | confessors, yet all his different shames ~together are not so great 4376 2, 115 | against the foe, but also to sharpen his sword and keep it in 4377 2, 85 | flexible, which can ~be sharpened so as to be useful for cutting, 4378 Suppl, 52| mares than those born of a she-ass and ~a horse. Therefore 4379 3, 22 | for the sin of a prince, a she-goat for the sin of some ~private 4380 2, 185 | They wandered about in ~sheep-skins in goat-skins," and a gloss 4381 2, 85 | year; or he may have his sheepfold in ~one parish, and graze 4382 2, 167 | They wandered about in sheepskins and in ~goatskins." Therefore 4383 3, 36 | be unreal, ~and, out of sheer spite, would have crucified 4384 2, 93 | observing ~which of several sheets of paper, with or without 4385 2, 25 | written (Gn. 2:24) that "a man shell leave ~father and mother" 4386 2, 102 | tint was made ~from certain shells found in the sea; violet, 4387 3, 40 | dwelling-place, and I am ~sheltered by a roof that is not Mine?" 4388 2, 60 | have hindered him, or by ~sheltering him after the deed. All 4389 3, 47 | 53:7). Thirdly, by not shielding Him from the Passion, but ~ 4390 2, 98 | subordinates: thus the ship-builder himself rivets the planks 4391 2, 8 | On the ~other hand, the ship-building art considers the means 4392 1, 18 | navigation, rules the ~art of ship-designing; and this in its turn rules 4393 2, 8 | belongs to the art of ~the shipwright. Therefore, since volition 4394 2, 167 | Matth.) ~that "even the shoemakers' and clothiers' arts stand 4395 2, 6 | along the road, so that he shoots an ~arrow and slays a passer-by. 4396 2, 187 | that holds the boat to the shore." Thirdly, we may ~consider 4397 2, 13 | Moses on account of the shortage of water and bread; and ~ 4398 2, 109 | since it is by his own shortcoming that he ~does not prepare 4399 3, 4 | Reply OBJ 3: In order to shorten the way, which every skilful 4400 3, 48 | hand of ~the Lord is not shortened that it cannot save." But " 4401 2, 123 | necessity, to all, yet the ~shortening of temporal life is an evil 4402 Suppl, 72| intensity what it loses in shortness of ~time.~Aquin.: SMT XP 4403 1, 2 | intelligence; as the arrow is shot ~to its mark by the archer. 4404 2, 102 | customary in divining to use the shoulder-blade [spatula], and the ~breast-bone 4405 2, 93 | signs appearing in the shoulder-blades of an animal is called ~" 4406 3, 27 | the fulness of grace was ~showered all at once."~Aquin.: SMT 4407 2, 74 | mentally ~deficient, and some shrewd-minded. Therefore no sin is in 4408 2, 127 | slow movement. Likewise shrill and ~rapid speaking is chiefly 4409 1, 110 | shine on us, otherwise than shrouded by the variety ~of the sacred 4410 Suppl, 72| were, and is recalled - the shrubs which ~lose their greenery, 4411 2, 150 | health that which makes one shudder to see: and a ~midwife has 4412 Suppl, 3 | future time, more than he ~shudders at the past evil: wherefore 4413 2, 93 | ways, seeking ~divination, shuffling arrows; he inquired of the 4414 2, 79 | the person who closed the shutters. On the other hand, God, 4415 Suppl, 11| and to prevent men being shy of going to confession. 4416 2, 187 | Gregory writes to the bishop Siagrius ~[*Regist. ix, Ep. 106], " 4417 2, 2 | my ~Redeemer liveth." The Sibyl too foretold certain things 4418 2, 170 | truth. Wherefore also the Sibyls foretold many true things ~ 4419 Suppl, 59| Decretals ~(XXVIII, qu. i, can. Sic enim.). Neither therefore 4420 2, 85 | bodily defect: thus some sicken and die through ~eating 4421 3, 46 | But even if His ~body had sickened and dissolved in the sight 4422 3, 1 | inhabitants of Tyre and Sidon would not believe when such ~ 4423 2, 102 | Gentiles, viz. the Tyrians and Sidonians.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[102] A[ 4424 3, 83 | expressive of spiritual sighing; for all these things ought 4425 Suppl, 72| but the ~principle of the sight-giving is above nature), and sometimes 4426 3, 14 | 53:2,3: "[There was no ~sightliness] that we should be desirous 4427 Suppl, 93| things whereby we are most signally conformed to Christ. For 4428 2, 62 | according ~to the jurists [*Cap. Significasti, De Homicid. volunt. vel 4429 2, 187 | De Regular., etc. cap. Significatum est.).~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 4430 3, 60 | must be used belongs to the signifier. Now it is ~God Who signifies 4431 2, 92 | that when Paul awaited Silas ~and Timothy at Athens, " 4432 2, 105 | of the prophet Ahias the Silonite (3 Kgs. 11:29, seqq.).~Aquin.: 4433 3, 83 | read in an Epistle of Pope Silvester, quoted in the ~same distinction: " 4434 1, 1 | rightly employs metaphors and similes?~(10) Whether the Sacred 4435 2, 160 | For Anselm [*Eadmer, ~De Similit. xxii, seqq.] divides the 4436 1, 81 | Anselm says (Eadmer, De Similitudinibus). The reason is, ~because 4437 2, 53 | difference; thus we say that "simitas" is "a ~curvature of the 4438 2, 98 | he is not punished ~as a simoniac, by being obliged to resign, 4439 Suppl, 83| in fire." Galen also (De simp. medic.) says "that there ~ 4440 2, 177 | every mixture one of the simples ~predominates, so too in 4441 2, 93 | According to Augustine (Ad Simplic. ii, 3), "there is ~nothing 4442 3, 83 | because, as Augustine says (Ad Simplician. ii), ~"the images of things 4443 2, 109 | derived ~from the thing simulated, whether this be good or 4444 2, 109 | corresponding to the Latin 'simulator,' for whereas he is evil 4445 2, 53 | definition; for we say that a "simum" is a "snub-nose." ~Accordingly 4446 2, 10 | dist. xlv, ~can., Qui sincera] says, speaking of the Jews: " 4447 3, 27 | perfect virtue: but not the ~"sine qua non" of perfection: 4448 3, 31 | anyone else's body could be singled out and ~designated as the 4449 Suppl, 22| from being above another ~sinks below him through sin; while 4450 3, 5 | soul, ~either He knew its sinlessness, and trusted it did not 4451 2, 85 | be ~observed [*Cap. Cum sint, and Cap. Ad apostolicae, 4452 2, 98 | Hence (I, qu. iii, ~cap. Siquis objecerit) it is stated 4453 2, 62 | suicide, to avoid the lesser sir; ~of another. For she commits 4454 3, 14 | Secondly, because the de. sire of the Fathers would not 4455 Suppl, 40| throughout the world whilst thou ~sittest on thy throne."~Aquin.: 4456 1, 100 | the sensitive powers are situate in corporeal organs; and ~ 4457 3, 33 | is written (Jn. 2:20): "Six-and-forty ~years was this Temple in 4458 2, 93 | The quotation is from ~his sixteenth homily on the Book of Numbers]: " 4459 2, 84 | those who had least, one sixtieth, in lieu of ~first-fruits." 4460 2, 68 | Church, unless there be ~sixty-four witnesses. Nor a cardinal 4461 1, 102 | learned, nor favor to the skillful, but time and chance in 4462 2, 92 | uncultured man saw human images skillfully ~fashioned by the diligence 4463 2, 116 | said to be {kyminopristes} [skinflint], a ~cumin-seller, as it 4464 2, 116 | sparing, tight-fisted, skinflints ~[*{kyminopristes}], misers [*{ 4465 Suppl, 29| first, and then "to the ~skirt of his garment."~Aquin.: 4466 2, 183 | work and not honor: since {skopos} signifies ~'watching.' 4467 3, 53 | already begun to brighten the sky. Hence it is written (Mk. 4468 2, 166 | application of some pleasure, by slackening the tension of ~the reason' 4469 2, 35 | is intense at first, and slackens towards the end. Now ~the 4470 2, 23 | sometimes done with tepidity or slackness. Therefore ~it does not 4471 1, 96 | appease his hunger, drink to slake his thirst; and the tree 4472 2, 154 | where it is written: "Slanderers, incontinent, unmerciful," 4473 2, 66 | rendered unjust ~through being slanderous. ~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[68] A[ 4474 2, 112 | breathing ~our threatenings and slaughter against the disciples of 4475 2, 62 | better things ~than corporal slayings, namely with things pertaining 4476 3, 89 | of virtue, on ~account of sleepiness or some indisposition of 4477 3, 80 | possibly after ~passing a sleepless night receive the sacred 4478 2, 65 | understand, through being sleepy or unwell. In like manner ~ 4479 2, 167 | one to wear a cloak with sleeves and ~reaching to the ankles, 4480 1, 1 | human ~intelligence; yet the slenderest knowledge that may be obtained 4481 2, 87 | Dial. iv, 39), that certain slighter sins ~are remitted after 4482 2, 47 | do not seem to have acted slightingly."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[47] A[ 4483 2, 70 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: One man slights another by deeds in so far 4484 2, 34 | My steps had well nigh slipped, ~for I was envious of the 4485 2, 73 | man in ~running to slay, slips and hurts his foot. If, 4486 2, 9 | ahead, the desire follows sluggishly ~or not at all: we know 4487 1, 112 | 120:4: "He shall neither slumber nor ~sleep, that keepeth 4488 Suppl, 8 | 1 Tim. 1:5). Nor is any slur cast on the priest, for 4489 3, 41 | expounding Job 39:25, "He ~smelleth the battle afar off, the 4490 2, 187 | aged virgins . . . And she smiled at me with a persuasive 4491 2, 120 | gloss on Num 28 says that "smiths and like craftsmen ~rest 4492 2, 38 | guilty of strife, and ~of smiting with the fist. Much more, 4493 2, 187 | religious, "are sorely smitten by thy poisonous tongue, 4494 Appen2, 1| gold glistens and straw ~smokes, so in the same fire the 4495 3, 77 | is a hard body, having a smooth surface. Therefore the ~ 4496 2, 88 | 151.smtAquin.: SMT SS Q[90] Out. Para. 4497 2, 39 | quarrelsome] is derived from the snarling [rictu] of a dog, because 4498 2, 178 | sweetness of contemplation by snatches ~and for a short time only: 4499 2, 94 | to ~bed if you happen to sneeze while putting on your shoes; 4500 2, 93 | of any animals, or the sneezing of men, or the sudden movements 4501 1, 10 | heat they will pass from snowy waters" (Job 24:19). ~Hence 4502 2, 53 | say that a "simum" is a "snub-nose." ~Accordingly whatever 4503 2, 102 | does nothing but what is soaked in ~the water of his own 4504 2, 102 | being dissolved into vapor soared aloft, so it might denote 4505 Suppl, 69| either ~plunged into hell or soars to heaven, unless it be 4506 2, 58 | given, were based on ~the Socratic theory, and should be explained


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