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St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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1003-bespa | beste-conse | consi-drops | dross-foste | fouln-inexo | inexp-megal | melan-penit | pepuz-refut | regai-socra | sodom-truth | tu-zone

     Part, Question
4507 2, 114 | punishments, as appears from the Sodomites, Gn. 19. Hence temporal 4508 2, 136 | those who are passively ~sodomitical are said to be effeminate, 4509 1, 109 | workman employs fire to soften iron.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[110] 4510 2, 163 | this part of the body is softest to the touch: and on these 4511 2, 27 | 119:5: "Woe is me that my sojourning is prolonged!" ~Therefore 4512 2, 97 | he shall pay nine hundred soldi": and ~again further on ( 4513 2, 56 | of a barbarism or make a solecism: and the ~case is the same 4514 2, 145 | in the Corpus Juris, Cap. Solent, dist. 1, De ~Consecratione] 4515 Suppl, 86| things of the world and are solicitously ~thoughtful of the things 4516 2, 73 | whereas the fornicator who solicits the woman intends not to 4517 Suppl, 1 | state of continuity and ~solidity in his mind, therefore it 4518 2, 14 | what ~he had said in his Soliloquies i, 1, "God Who didst wish 4519 1, 31 | exclusive word "alone" [solus] is not to ~be added to 4520 Suppl, 4 | Victor, De Pot. Lig. et ~Solv. 3,5,13] that "when God 4521 1, 88 | that, The difficulty in solving this question arises from 4522 1, 32 | things, as Macrobius relates (Som. Scip. iv). They did not, 4523 | somewhere 4524 3, 78 | where he says: "In good sooth it can be said that ~Christ 4525 Suppl, 82| nature disturb the ~sight but soothes it: wherefore this clarity 4526 2, 50 | in matters of action, by soothing ~the pre-existing anxiety 4527 2, 169 | phates}, and may be rendered 'soothsayer'] ~(Etym. viii, 7).~Aquin.: 4528 2, 2 | Philosopher remarks (De Soph. Elench. i, 2) that "it ~ 4529 2, 7 | except only the art of sophistry." Therefore the theologian 4530 1, 14 | because he is the son of Sophroniscus, or because ~of something 4531 2, 102 | made use of them in their ~sorceries: while the Egyptians (among 4532 Suppl, 94| whatever is ignoble and sordid being ~cast down for the 4533 2, 34 | v, 46): "When the foul sore of ~envy corrupts the vanquished 4534 2, 187 | namely ~religious, "are sorely smitten by thy poisonous 4535 3, 80 | for instance, ~when he has sorrowed over his sin, but is not 4536 2, 181 | purity of virgins, the ~sorrowings of penitents."~Aquin.: SMT 4537 2, 183 | kleros} ~denotes the Latin 'sors.' Hence clerics are so called 4538 2, 93 | Decretals (XXVI, qu. v, can. ~Sortes): "We decree that the casting 4539 2, 93 | however, the result of sortilegious acts must ~needs be ascribed 4540 2, 166 | however, one man is more soul-wearied than ~another, according 4541 2, 140 | First, because the more sound-minded a man is, the more ~grievous 4542 2, 11 | rebuked that they may think soundly and ~rightly, offer a stubborn 4543 3, 74 | from wine which is turning sour, just as from bread turning ~ 4544 3, 57 | of His Divine Nature, and sovereignly glorified in respect of 4545 2, 85 | ministers of the altar and sowers of spiritual things among 4546 3, 75 | through all intermediary spaces, which cannot be ~said here. 4547 2, 102 | use the shoulder-blade [spatula], and the ~breast-bone of 4548 2, 93 | of an animal is called ~"spatulamancy."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[95] A[ 4549 2, 102 | divination which is known as "spatulamantia," so called because it was ~ 4550 3, 80 | do ~with women, thou that speakest familiarly with God at the 4551 2, 120 | so far as ~this precept specializes the time as a sign representing 4552 2, 81 | Porphyry says (Praedic., ~De Specie) that "by sharing the same 4553 2, 173 | and ~not by sight" [*'Per speciem,' i.e. by an intelligible 4554 3, 41 | into the mind under some specious pretext: then they come 4555 2, 40 | eyes on another [ex alio spectare], in so far as ~the apprehensive 4556 2, 172 | of Moses, since they are spectators of a fuller ~revelation, 4557 2, 178 | not from a watch-tower [specula]." Now to see a thing in 4558 2, 178 | But we . . . beholding ~[speculantes] the glory of the Lord with 4559 2, 76 | at his risk the merchant ~speculates with it, or the craftsman 4560 2, 170 | succeeding to grasp the speculations of science. Much more therefore ~ 4561 2, 178 | denotes "seeing in a mirror ~[speculo], not from a watch-tower [ 4562 Suppl, 71| are offered obtains a more speedy but not a more complete ~ 4563 Suppl, 92| Literally "of the reality: ~non spei . . . sed rei"] which is 4564 2, 115 | spending of money refers to the spender, and ~consequently is not 4565 3, 88 | Fratres odit, apostata fit, spernitque, fateri,~Poenituisse piget, 4566 2, 40 | it ~is contrary to hope [spes].~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[40] A[ 4567 2, 13 | various animals, such as bees, spiders, and dogs. For a hound in ~ 4568 3, 75 | they who crucify Me are ~to spill. It is a mystery that I 4569 Suppl, 8 | grievous the sin. Now for spilling the blood of Christ in the 4570 3, 80 | handled, it might easily be spilt. And because the multitude ~ 4571 1, 89 | act of God, to breathe [spirare], is the same ~as to "make 4572 1, 36 | Spirit as being breathed [spiratus].~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[36] A[ 4573 Suppl, 80| rise a spiritual," i.e. a spirit-like, "body." But the ~subtlety 4574 2, 40 | arduous; wherefore youths are spirited and hopeful. ~Likewise they 4575 1, 97 | man will be like an angel, spiritualized in soul and body. ~Wherefore 4576 3, 66 | by the specific ~gravity [spissitudine]. If, however, from the 4577 2, 105 | from his ~foot, and" did "spit in his face" (Dt. 25:9). 4578 Suppl, 45| is known as a betrothal ~[sponsalia].~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[45] A[ 4579 Suppl, 43| called from the promise [sponsione] in the first sense, because 4580 Suppl, 45| marriage, but a promise ~[sponsionem] of marriage, and this promise 4581 Suppl, 43| and ~providing sureties [sponsores]". Now a person is said 4582 3, 46 | not the true one. For the spots ~where the condemned are 4583 2, 164 | employs the term "studious" ({spoudaios}) in ~this sense (Ethic. 4584 Suppl, 43| either of the ~affianced spouses contracts with another party 4585 Suppl, 28| imposes his hand on them, sprinkles ~them with holy water, puts 4586 Suppl, 72| which rot and die and then sprout and rise again ~as it were": 4587 3, 2 | which is called "birth" or "sprouting forth," the word ~"natura" 4588 2, 150 | if a ~magnificent man has squandered all his wealth he does not 4589 2, 51 | and of "effeminacy" or "squeamishness" in unpleasant ~matters, 4590 3, 74 | as soon as it has been squeezed from the grape, since this 4591 2, 72 | strangling, stoning, and stabbing come under the one ~species 4592 2, 181 | 15:48, "Be ye steadfast [stabiles] and immovable"; wherefore ~ 4593 3, 72 | the heavenly combats, the Stadium is open equally to all, 4594 3, 80 | Reconciliation is not to be denied to stage-players ~or actors, or others of 4595 2, 85 | instance of whoredom or stage-playing, and the like. ~Such things 4596 3, 12 | confirmed them that ~were staggering." Therefore Christ was taught 4597 1, 4 | Though our lips can ~only stammer, we yet chant the high things 4598 3, 60 | else unlettered men and ~stammerers, in conferring sacraments, 4599 1, 1 | bears, as it were, the stamp of the divine science which 4600 2, 150 | sentry duty, others are ~standard-bearers, and others fight with the 4601 3, 46 | crucified there, that the standards of martyrdom ~might be uplifted 4602 3, 74 | the sacrament. And because starch comes of corrupted ~wheat, 4603 2, 60 | and to ~have less than you started with is called 'loss.'] 4604 2, 107 | to diverse ends: thus a state-law ordained to democratic ~ 4605 3, 44 | caught by Peter, who found a stater ~in it (Mt. 17:26). As to 4606 1, 107 | For the human hierarchy is stationed beneath the lowest heavenly ~ 4607 Suppl, 25| Blessed Gregory for the Roman Stations.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[25] A[ 4608 2, 187 | permission (XIX, qu. iii; cap. ~Statuimus).~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[189] 4609 2, 66 | See ~Lesson in the Mass Statuit (Dominican Missal)], since 4610 2, 181 | said to have stability ~[statum] in reference to its own 4611 2, 105 | so should there be the staunchest fidelity. But this is impossible ~ 4612 3, 36 | the teachers spoke and ~stayed where they were; like the 4613 2, 68 | heard . . ~. counsel . . . stays us from acting rashly . . . 4614 2, 40 | they think that ~they will steadily obtain that which they hope 4615 2, 64 | text continues: "For he stealeth to fill his hungry ~soul." 4616 2, 121 | brave in face of dangers, steeled against pleasures, unyielding ~ 4617 3, 64 | He heareth." Therefore it stems that a man ~obtains a greater 4618 2, 102 | and as a ~remedy for the stenches arising from the shedding 4619 2, 178 | but should ~make them the stepping-stone to things unperishable and 4620 3, 69 | that "the sinner's soul, sterilized ~by drought, is made fruitful 4621 Suppl, 93| carnal ~pleasures which stifle the spirit. This may be 4622 2, 180 | life requires a certain stillness of ~mind, according to Ps. 4623 2, 180 | further on, "often . . ~. love stimulates slothful souls to work, 4624 Suppl, 83| regards its natural action ~of stimulating or injuring the organ, but 4625 2, 48 | that ~is inflamed with the stings of its own anger beats quick, 4626 2, 185 | forbids the rich to be so stingy that some are compelled 4627 2, 41 | those spiritual goods by stirring up scandal. This is the " 4628 2, 187 | urges His disciples ~to stoop to the service of children. 4629 3, 1 | on deserting God, had ~stooped to corporeal things, it 4630 2, 180 | mind, ~and less so when it stoops to bodily things." Wherefore 4631 2, 94 | like the deaf asp that stoppeth ~her ears, which will not 4632 2, 85 | tithes into My [Vulg.: 'the'] store-house that there may be meat in 4633 2, 55 | mighty to drink wine, and stout men at drunkenness." Therefore 4634 2, 85 | the Glossa ~Ordinaria of Strabo] expounds the passage. Therefore 4635 Suppl, 8 | one's own priest does not ~straiten the way of salvation, but 4636 2, 72 | the one ~same end: thus strangling, stoning, and stabbing come 4637 2, 53 | OBJ 2: To do anything by stratagem seems to be due to ~pusillanimity: 4638 2, 38 | the Book on Strategy ~[*Stratagematum i, 1] by Frontinus. Such 4639 2, 38 | as stated in the Book on Strategy ~[*Stratagematum i, 1] by 4640 1, 77 | a bird ~gathers together straws, not because they are pleasant 4641 3, 51 | with ~such as have wrought strenuously, their deeds shine forth 4642 2, 86 | plough yet, nevertheless he stretches out his hand for the purpose 4643 2, 60 | gather where ~I have not strewed." Therefore it is just that 4644 Suppl, 65| take natural right in its strictest sense, those things which 4645 3, 47 | exhausted ~nature, and this is strikingly apparent in the crucified: 4646 2, 89 | psaltery, the instrument of ten strings. Sing ~to Him a new canticle." 4647 2, 38 | their will. For when we are stripping a man of the ~lawlessness 4648 2, 182 | 9:25), "Everyone that striveth for the mastery refraineth 4649 2, 18 | imagination, as when a man strokes his beard, or moves his ~ 4650 2, 62 | the minister of the judge struggling ~with robbers, although 4651 2, 39 | Prov. 17:19): "He that studieth discords, ~soweth [Vulg.: ' 4652 2, 44 | Para. 1/2~I answer that, Stultitia [Folly] seems to take its 4653 2, 41 | obstacle, it may happen to ~stumble against it, and be disposed 4654 2, 140 | especially in dangers of death, stun ~the human mind, but not 4655 2, 37 | a man becomes completely stupefied.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[37] A[ 4656 3, 44 | Himself, or by terrifying ~or stupefying them, which pertains to 4657 2, 44 | one ~who through dullness [stuporem] remains unmoved." And folly 4658 2, 152 | not found in adultery [stupro]."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[154] 4659 2, 152 | v, 26) that "seduction [stuprum], or ~rape, properly speaking, 4660 2, 97 | Gratian, on can. Si quis ~suadente]): "They are guilty of sacrilege 4661 3, 83 | when the ~Lectors and Sub-deacons read aloud in the church 4662 3, 19 | Further, as being belongs to a sub-operated there is one ~operation. 4663 2, 152 | different genera that are not ~subalternated to one another. Now sacrilege 4664 3, 46 | reason in Christ, but ~merely subjectively, as was stated above.~Aquin.: 4665 3, 48 | treachery deceived and ~subjugated to himself man, who is God' 4666 2, 101 | surpassing excellence; and for ~subjugating men's minds to God. Hence 4667 2, 182 | of souls ~which they have subordinately; but as regards the obligation 4668 2, 185 | to be supported by the subscriptions ~of the synagogues and of 4669 2, 46 | of anger that arises and subsides intermittently"; while according ~ 4670 Suppl, 72| world as Averroes says (De Subst. ~Orbis.). But generation 4671 1, 29 | composed of matter and form substands in ~relation to accident 4672 3, 82 | conceal his guilt by any subterfuge.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[82] A[ 4673 3, 13 | ruled in ~a fixed way by the subtler and stronger bodies; so 4674 1, 7 | finite line, from which he subtracts ~whatever he finds necessary; 4675 2, 53 | is less solicitude when success is ~assured. Accordingly 4676 3, 60 | and may the Blessed Virgin succour thee, the ~baptism would 4677 2, 20 | but a yielding up of the succours from thought.']." ~Therefore 4678 2, 80 | under the ~necessity of succumbing to the devil. Therefore 4679 2, 98 | the losers by his ~sin: in suchwise, however, that, as far as 4680 1, 98 | more apt to cry than to suckle."~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[99] A[ 4681 1, 98 | state of infancy, such ~as suckling, and the like.~Aquin.: SMT 4682 3, 54 | 24:41: "The thirsty earth sucks in the ~water, and the sun' 4683 2, 152 | ad can. Lex illa], and sue the seducer for ~damages. 4684 3, 46 | pain and sadness. In other sufferers the interior ~sadness is 4685 2, 102 | eat animals that had been suffocated or strangled: ~because the 4686 2, 57 | committed some injustice. Now suicides were formerly punished according ~ 4687 Suppl, 62| husband is the prosecutor by suing his wife for the offense 4688 Suppl, 2 | integer' (whole) and 'in suis terminis' (to its own ground)]. 4689 Suppl, 49| faith [fides] signifies the suiting of deed ~to word [fiant 4690 2, 156 | Philosopher ascribes to ~"sullenness"; while he describes "rancour" 4691 3, 1 | dignity, lest we should sully it with sin; hence Augustine 4692 3, 66 | which has filtered through a sulphurous vein, ~just as lye percolates 4693 2, 151 | Alexander of Hales, Summ. Theol. ii, cxvli]. But 4694 2, 1 | gather together a clear summary ~from the sayings of Holy 4695 2, 152 | of Christian teaching is ~summed up in mercy and godliness: 4696 Suppl, 72| higher than the mountain summits (Gn. ~7:20). Therefore the 4697 2, 38 | a private ~individual to summon together the people, which 4698 Suppl, 73| Mt 25:6], as of a crier summoning to judgment; sometimes ~ 4699 Suppl, 22| tribunal, for they cannot summons them in contentious cases. 4700 2, 132 | and magnificence regard ~sumptuary operations as related to 4701 2, 169 | Hence Eliseus said of the Sunamite woman (4 Kgs. 4:27): "Her 4702 2, 156 | v, 45) that "when anger sunders the ~tranquil surface of 4703 2, 76 | alienation whereby it is ~sunk in exchange. Hence it is 4704 2, 67 | opposed to the ~perfection of sunlight, since they do not regard 4705 2, 182 | compare things in the point of super-eminence, we ~look not at that in 4706 2, 111 | himself, but as implying a super-eminent ~certitude of faith, whereby 4707 1, 12 | and contains in ~itself super-eminently whatever can be signified 4708 3, 9 | Hence, together with this ~super-exceeding form, there is nothing to 4709 2, 114 | power God should by His ~super-excellent power work still higher 4710 1, 12 | existing; but He is rather super-existence, as ~Dionysius says (Div. 4711 2, 61 | called not human, but ~"super-human" or godlike virtues.~Aquin.: 4712 3, 12 | see that even ~Jesus - the super-substantial substance of supercelestial ~ 4713 2, 48 | the heart may sometimes superabound to ~the extend that the 4714 2, 160 | Bernard ~[*De Grad. Humil. et Superb. x, seqq.] also reckons 4715 1, 107 | know ~the Divine secrets supereminently; and the "Seraphim" excel 4716 1, 12 | His part, but because He ~superexceeds them all.~Aquin.: SMT FP 4717 2, 104 | OBJ 1: Just as religion is superexcelling piety, so is it ~excelling 4718 2, 160 | First, as ~overpassing [supergreditur] the rule of reason, and 4719 Suppl, 40| pontiff wore the ephod ~[*Superhumerale, i.e. over-the-shoulders], 4720 2, 17 | intelligible, or rather ~superintelligible.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[18] A[ 4721 2, 183 | episkopein} by the Latin ~'superintendere' [to watch over]: thus a 4722 2, 113 | mark, to the prize of the supernal vocation." But whoever is 4723 2, 90 | children might survive ~[superstites] them." But this may be 4724 2, 120 | But there are many wicked ~superstitions besides idolatry, as stated 4725 2, 94 | in your ~clothes, to fear superstitiously a future evil rather than 4726 Suppl, 62| 1~I answer that, Nothing supervenient to marriage can dissolve 4727 Suppl, 36| spiritual, but also for the supervision of temporalities. But ~sometimes 4728 2, 108 | i.e. the Gentiles, ~should supplant the first-born, i.e. the 4729 Suppl, 9 | have been introduced as supplementary to this.~Aquin.: SMT XP 4730 2, 181 | charity, "by what every joint ~supplieth," namely by one man serving 4731 3, 2 | suppositum, because he underlies [supponitur] whatever belongs to ~man 4732 2, 159 | while the chief reason for ~suppressing presumptuous hope is based 4733 2, 160 | man thereby aims ~higher [supra] than he is; wherefore Isidore 4734 2, 173 | third heaven may signify a supra-mundane vision. Such ~a vision may 4735 2, 173 | heaven would ~indicate a supramundane bodily vision, conveyed 4736 Suppl, 29| have a sure effect. But sureness of effect is not ~expressed 4737 1, 89 | advance was made, and some surmised the existence ~of something 4738 2, 140 | greater the difficulty to be surmounted, the less is ~a man to be 4739 2, 5 | arrive at the top without surmounting the middle. Since, ~therefore, 4740 2, 8 | actions are concerned are not ~surpassingly exalted considered in themselves, 4741 2, 47 | prepare against all the surprises of chance, so as ~to suffer 4742 Suppl, 93| in blessed ~Cecilia who survived for three days, and many 4743 2, 151 | we praise the good of ~Susanna's conjugal chastity, yet 4744 2, 17 | or dissent, or at least suspend its assent or dissent, on 4745 3, 64 | degrading, excommunicating, or ~suspending him, does not tolerate him 4746 2, 77 | things which do not afford ~sustentation or pleasure in respect of 4747 2, 72 | 1/1 - OF TALE-BEARING [*'Susurratio,' i.e. whispering] (TWO 4748 2, 72 | Isidore says (Etym. x): "The susurro [tale-bearer] takes his ~ 4749 3, 51 | act was denoted that "he swathes Jesus in clean ~linen, who 4750 3, 1 | frail ~body of a babe in swathing bands, in comparison with 4751 2, 87 | Ecclus. 23:12): "A man that sweareth ~much shall be filled with 4752 2, 89 | quick by the voices of Thy sweet-attuned Church."~Aquin.: SMT SS 4753 2, 43 | sapientia] may be described as ~"sweet-tasting science [sapida scientia]," 4754 3, 66 | Baptism, like a mystic river, swelled the course of ~every stream, 4755 3, 1 | morals ~would have been swept away from the earth.~Aquin.: 4756 2, 68 | mind; lest piety, while it swerves from the right line, may ~ 4757 1, 90 | keener smell, and birds a swifter flight. ~Therefore man's 4758 2, 102 | it has a ~webbed foot for swimming, and a cloven foot for walking: 4759 2, 178 | great height, at another swoop down to ~earth, and they 4760 2, 46 | xxi.] that anger is "the sword-bearer ~of desire," inasmuch, to 4761 1, 77 | also ~"reminiscence" by syllogistically, as it were, seeking for 4762 1, 83 | Consequently, if a man syllogizes while asleep, when he wakes ~ 4763 2, 106 | him (4 Kgs. 2); and ~Pope Sylverius excommunicated those who 4764 2, 1 | Leo [*Rufinus, Comm. in Sym. Apost.] observes.~Aquin.: 4765 2, 1 | the symbol [*The Greek {symballein}] takes its name.~Aquin.: 4766 2, 178 | hierarchies under certain ~symbolic figures, and by its power 4767 3, 72 | that the former unction may symbolize the descent ~of the Holy 4768 3, 72 | oil, by reason of which it symbolizes ~the Holy Ghost, are to 4769 2, 38 | consoled when their friends sympathize with them.~Aquin.: SMT FS 4770 2, 94 | man is preceded by certain symptoms, which ~the physician observes. 4771 1, 87 | what is actually visible ~synchronizes with the reception of light 4772 1, 78 | opposition of sensuality to "syneresis" ~is an opposition of acts, 4773 2, 49 | common ~law) are said to be {synetoi}, i.e. "persons of sense," 4774 3, 18 | Godhead, as is plain from the synodical letter of ~Pope Agatho [* 4775 Suppl, 40| depose clerics, celebrate ~synods, consecrate chrism, bless 4776 2, 97 | laws: for Isidore says ~(Synon. ii, 16): "Let custom yield 4777 2, 108 | promises: for Isidore says (Synonym. ~ii): "Break your faith 4778 1, 13 | 1/1~On the contrary, All synonyms united with each other are 4779 2, 14 | process is ~not analytic, but synthetic: because to proceed from 4780 2, 14 | to effect is ~to proceed synthetically, since causes are more simple 4781 3, 80 | varies according to different systems ~of reckoning (for some 4782 3, 28 | V., Ant. ~ad Benedictus, T. P.)], wherein He had formed 4783 2, 7 | circumstances particular things [*{ta kath' ekasta}], i.e. the ~ 4784 Suppl, 40| Gospel, as Bede observes (De Tabernac. iii). Now this is especially ~ 4785 Suppl, 93| A gloss [*Ven. Bede, De Tabernaculis i, 6] on Ex. ~25:24,25, " 4786 2, 100 | words that He wrote in two ~tablets of stone."~Aquin.: SMT FS 4787 Suppl, 72| stars, will throw out ~fiery tails like comets; on the "eighth" 4788 2, 105 | also recognized the "lex talionis," ~by prescribing (Ex. 21: 4789 2, 81 | God in prayer, when thou talkest with Christ, when thou ~ 4790 2, 110 | oneself above oneself [*Or 'tall-talking' as we ~should say in English]. 4791 Suppl, 40| reached down to the ankles [talos], ~which denote the end 4792 2, 31 | Dist. xxiv, qu. 3, Can. Tam Sacerdotes): ~"Both priests 4793 2, 102 | were allowed to eat the tamer kinds, such ~as hens, partridges, 4794 Suppl, 24| fifth is the case of one who tampers with the ~letters of the 4795 Suppl, 68| Cap. Conquestus; Cap. Tanta), namely when a man marries 4796 3, 28 | 5~Fourthly, it would be tantamount to an imputation of extreme 4797 2, 98 | divine ~law" [*Cap. Cum tanto, de Consuetud.; cf. FS, 4798 3, 72 | councils. Others (Pierre de Tarentaise, ~Sent. iv, D, 7) held that 4799 Suppl, 22| uprooted together with the tares ~and cockle.~Aquin.: SMT 4800 1, 116 | clear mirror contracts a tarnish from the look of a "menstruata," 4801 3, 1 | Christ." But charity does not tarry in bringing ~assistance 4802 2, 70 | end, but as in something tasty; and in a ~nasty medicine, 4803 2, 35 | first was pleasant becomes tedious. But these two ~things cannot 4804 3, 55 | text, instead of proof has {tekmerion}, ~i.e. "an evident sign 4805 2, 34 | is the ~genitive - {tou telous}; and the Greek reads "He" ( 4806 2, 63 | pity, another for living temperately, another for some ~other 4807 2, 158 | OBJ 2: Some things need tempering on account of their strength, ~ 4808 2, 181 | both in ~spirituals and in temporals. Now there can be no certain 4809 Appen1, 2| pains, those who were their tempters in sin." Now the demons 4810 1, 12 | opinion, however, is not tenable. For as the ~ultimate beatitude 4811 2, 105 | there is no need for the tenant to pay his ~rent as soon 4812 3, 15 | by His bodily sufferings ~tended to beatitude as regards 4813 2, 108 | what those to whom it is tendered understand it to signify."~ 4814 2, 121 | which makes a man ~good, and tenders his work good. Now man's 4815 Suppl, 2 | Poenitens," i.e. "poenam tenens"]. Therefore he is not ~ 4816 2, 97 | But in the other arts, the tenets of former times give ~place 4817 2, 187 | ad Relig., cap. Sicut tenor]. The same applies to children 4818 Suppl, 45| according to the law (cap. Ex Tenore, ~De Rescrip., cap. Si Vir, 4819 3, 83 | feast-days, at the hour of Terce, when He was ~crucified 4820 2, 66 | accusation. This is evasion ~[tergiversatio] for by desisting from what 4821 2, 66 | seems to turn ~his back [tergum vertere].~Aquin.: SMT SS 4822 1, 84 | figures, which are the ~terminations of quantity, can be considered 4823 Suppl, 2 | integer' (whole) and 'in suis terminis' (to its own ground)]. But ~ 4824 Suppl, 94| of the earth [*"De orbe terrarum," which might be ~rendered " 4825 3, 44 | drawing men to Himself, or by terrifying ~or stupefying them, which 4826 3, 83 | be confined within the ~territories of the Jewish people, but 4827 2, 106 | Gospel, ought not to be terrorized by means of punishment, 4828 Suppl, 58| ascribe to the ~demon the terrors which a man conjures from 4829 2, 29 | felt so much as the heat of tertian fever; because ~the heat 4830 2, 42 | three cases has {ex holes tes ischyos}, which the Douay ~ 4831 3, 78 | testament the death of the testator must of necessity come in." 4832 2, 44 | contraction ~of the abdomen and testicles, as the Philosopher says ( 4833 Suppl, 36| promoted, at least from the testification of others. This is the ~ 4834 2, 102 | precepts for the purpose of ~testing man's obedience, having 4835 2, 102 | allusion to Col. ~2:11 (Textus Receptus)]. The turtledove 4836 Suppl, 81| Alexander of Hales, Sum. Th. III, Q[23], mem. 3] say 4837 2, 104 | Hence thanksgiving is less thankful when compelled, as ~Seneca 4838 2, 96 | written (1 Pt. 2:19): "This is thankworthy, if ~the conscience . . . 4839 3, 19 | Dionysius places in Christ a theandric, i.e. a God-manlike ~or 4840 3, 19 | which is written in Greek ~{theandrike}, i.e. God-manlike. Hence 4841 2, 89 | Blessed Processions of the Thearchy," i.e. of the Godhead, " 4842 1, 13 | consuming all malice; ~or from {theasthai}, which means to consider 4843 2, 101 | the actions performed in theatres were done to represent ~ 4844 2, 89 | the church resound with ~theatrical measures and airs." Therefore 4845 2, 89 | reproves ~those who sing theatrically in church not in order to 4846 2, 184 | ad ~Paulin.): "The famous Theban, Crates, once a very wealthy 4847 1, 13 | is so called from the ~{theein} [which means to care of] 4848 2, 68 | virtue [*{arete heroike kai theia}]," in respect of which 4849 1, 78 | the soul to the sun, as Themistius says in his commentary on ~ 4850 3, 27 | granted ~to the Blessed Virgin thence-forward never to sin either mortally 4851 2, 185 | Leo [*Leo I, Ep. cxx ad Theodoret., 6, cf. XVI, qu. ~i, can. 4852 2, 145 | Capitularies (Cap. 39) of Theodulf, bishop of Orleans (760- 4853 1, 83 | as Dionysius says (Myst. Theolog. i). Therefore the ~soul 4854 3, 5 | we read the saying of St. Theophilus: "Just as ~the best workmen 4855 Suppl, 41| the philosophers. Hence Theophrastus proves that it is not ~advisable 4856 2, 76 | such as the geometrical theorems, and contingent particulars, 4857 1, 13 | Fide Orth. 1) that "God {Theos} is so called from the ~{ 4858 2, 79 | Greek is {Eusebeia} or {Theosebeia}, as Augustine ~states ( 4859 2, 184 | Ep. xxxi ad Paulin. et Theras.) that "we are ~more firmly 4860 Suppl, 59| time of Constantine and ~thereabouts. Wherefore it was not safe 4861 1, 13 | to you" (Ex. ~3:13,14). Therefor this name HE WHO IS most 4862 2, 64 | II, i, 39: Cod. X, xv, De Thesauris]. ~Hence in the parable 4863 Suppl, 72| things will occur. Elias ~the Thesbite will appear, the Jews will 4864 2, 94 | is in no way cleansed by theurgic inventions," i.e. the ~operations " 4865 2, 23 | Bernard [*William of St. Thierry, De Nat. et Dig. Amoris. 4866 2, 36 | presence of a particular thin be ~the object of pleasure, 4867 1, 19 | it would be true that the thinker would ~understand the premisses 4868 2, 137 | justice. Now hungering and thirsting after justice pertain to ~ 4869 3, 21 | unwilling, hungers ~and thirsts. But He" (i.e. Christ) " 4870 3, 43 | place in the thirtieth or thirty-first year of His age. Therefore 4871 2, 2 | care, nor can it avoid the thorny path of ~anxiety": and further 4872 1, 88 | life there is no change so thorough as ~death. Therefore it 4873 3, 1 | order to free man from the thraldom of sin, which, as Augustine 4874 2, 94 | instance that the casket be three-cornered, or the ~like, having no 4875 2, 52 | numbers, as two-cubits-long, three-cubits-long, and of ~relations of quantity, 4876 2, 54 | enters into another, as a three-sided in a four-sided figure. 4877 2, 102 | eat of the grain ~while threshing the corn. Moreover certain 4878 2, 89 | play-actors, ease your ~throat and jaws with medicaments, 4879 2, 28 | mightiest: it becomes/The throned monarch better than his 4880 2, 69 | beatitudes propounded to the throng, ~assigns them to the cardinal 4881 1, 104 | to the stone, but to the ~thrower. Therefore, if God moves 4882 Suppl, 69| which is signified by thut bosom, there lives my Nebridius," 4883 3, 55 | seventh time was by the sea of Tiberias at the capture of the ~fishes; 4884 3, 44 | place during ~the reign of Tiberius Caesar, but he does not 4885 3, 15 | Hence, in the seven rules of Tichonius which Augustine quotes in ~ 4886 2, 116 | those who are "sparing, tight-fisted, skinflints ~[*{kyminopristes}], 4887 Suppl, 65| about those things which tighten ~the bond of human fellowship, 4888 2, 116 | sparing"; if nothing, he is "tightfisted": if he gives ~with great 4889 2, 162 | labor or punishment for the tiller of the soil, as ~Augustine 4890 2, 162 | obstacles encountered by the tillers ~of the soil, wherefore 4891 2, 185 | condition of life, from tilling the soil or ~working at 4892 3, 46 | immolated, was constructed of timbers, as is set forth Ex. ~27:, 4893 2, 48 | polity," also called "timocracy" [*Cf. Ethic. viii, 10], ~" 4894 2, 38 | xxiii, qu. 8, can. Omni timore) that if "a ~man die for 4895 2, 28 | times, as also feeble and timorous persons, are ~more inclined 4896 2, 79 | resolved into ~"sanguine tinctus, since, in olden times, 4897 2, 102 | of their right foot were ~tinged with the blood of the sacrificial 4898 2, 71 | an itching tongue, nor tingling ears, that is, neither detract 4899 2, 102 | water, because the purple tint was made ~from certain shells 4900 2, 33 | the bodily powers, which tire from protracted activity. ~ 4901 2, 179 | wearying, praised without tiring: such will be the occupation 4902 2, 85 | But church lands are not tithable, even though they be ~within 4903 2, 85 | Matth. can. xxiv): "The tithing of herbs, which ~was useful 4904 2, 107 | 5:18): "One jot or one tittle ~shall not pass of the Law 4905 3, 50 | carried, which ate, and toiled, and was nailed on the ~ 4906 2, 43 | things, in ~which there is no toiling under a load, since according 4907 2, 15 | beauty perfects youth" [*oion tois akmaiois he hora}--as youthful 4908 2, 186 | Secondly, in the sense of tolerating patiently the wrongs done ~ 4909 2, 174 | Cf. Migne, Patr. Lat. tom. CXLI]: "On this day Thou 4910 3, 80 | of sickness; ~because the tonic given to those who are recovering 4911 2, 16 | the builder, not to his tools. Hence it is evident that ~ 4912 2, 37 | tormented with a violent tooth-ache, I was not able to turn ~ 4913 1, 101 | people who have written about topography make no mention ~of it.~ 4914 2, 170 | they were kindled by the torches of perfect ~love." In this 4915 Suppl, 94| things which are capable of ~tormenting the soul. The natural situation 4916 1, 101 | mountains, or seas, or some torrid region, which cannot be ~ 4917 3, 48 | and to the devil as his torturer, according ~to Mt. 5:25: " 4918 2, 152 | marriage-bed [ad alienum torum]" [*Cf. Append. Gratian, 4919 2, 41 | sickness" - i.e. sorrow - "nor ~tossed about in transports of empty 4920 2, 34 | whereas it is the ~genitive - {tou telous}; and the Greek reads " 4921 1, 90 | weapons of some animals, and ~toughness of hide and quantity of 4922 2, 38 | exercises which take place ~in tournaments are forbidden by the Church, 4923 Suppl, 38| cruet with ~water, bowl* and towel, are given to the subdeacon 4924 2, 44 | speech, on ~account of the tracheal artery being near the heart. 4925 3, 54 | wills from the visible and tractable ~body, while allowing others 4926 3, 27 | But ~as Augustine, in his tractate on the Assumption of the 4927 2, 75 | unchanged, at a profit, is the trader who is cast out of God's 4928 Suppl, 44| communities, such as those of traders or ~soldiers, are established 4929 2, 85 | themselves in money-making trades, ~according to 2 Tim. 2: 4930 2, 62 | but ~this was the Jewish traditional commentary on Gn. 4:23], 4931 2, 167 | effeminacy to let one's cloak trail ~on the ground to avoid 4932 2, 99 | Heliod.): "Though thou trample upon thy father, though 4933 2, 156 | when anger sunders the ~tranquil surface of the soul, it 4934 2, 77 | steps [graditur] beyond [trans] a fixed ~boundary - and 4935 3, 55 | But Christ's Resurrection transcended common ~knowledge as to 4936 1, 3 | things; by height, the ~transcendence of His excelling power; 4937 1, 4 | different "genus," but as transcending every "genus," and as the ~ 4938 Suppl, 86| day the book of wisdom, transcribe, so to ~speak, in their 4939 2, 102 | again, the Douay translators transcribed ~from the Vulgate: 'charadrion'; ' 4940 3, 46 | to the ~error of a Greek transcriber: since the characters employed 4941 3, 45 | Damascene says (Orat. de Transfig.) and from the glory of 4942 3, 18 | heart, since He did not transfigure our weakness into His ~Divine 4943 2, 10 | Cor. 11:14 ~"Satan . . . transformeth himself into an angel of 4944 3, 58 | preposition "at," which is a transitive one, ~implies merely personal 4945 2, 183 | another ~bishopric [*Cap. Post translat., de Renunt.]. On the other 4946 2, 81 | not need redemption [*Cf. ~Translator's note inserted before TP, 4947 2, 102 | Here, again, the Douay translators transcribed ~from the Vulgate: ' 4948 Suppl, 94| so that there will be no translucid ~body that can be the subject 4949 Suppl, 70| an evident consequence of transmigration which he held. ~And since 4950 3, 13 | Although every creature is transmutable by some other ~creature, 4951 Suppl, 79| text. 121). This reception transmutes the nature of ~the recipient, 4952 3, 7 | France what things were transpiring in ~Syria, it would be prophetical, 4953 Suppl, 29| everywhere, yet it can ~easily be transported from one place to another. 4954 2, 41 | nor ~tossed about in transports of empty joys." Wherefore 4955 3, 60 | the same though they be transposed" (Peri Herm. x).~ 4956 2, 90 | virtues are employed by transposition in an evil sense. Thus prudence ~ 4957 3, 46 | which remains over from the transverse beam ~upwards to the top, 4958 3, 46 | the beam, which is fixed transversely above; this appertains to ~ 4959 3, 67 | to ease the latter in her travail, there is need for a ~midwife; 4960 2, 120 | of God, Horeb, must ~have traveled on a Sabbath: the priests 4961 2, 22 | fellow citizens or fellow travellers, the former being based 4962 3, 43 | one . . . but in one word traversing an unspeakable sea of miracles." ~ 4963 3, 2 | the impiety of both these treasons, ~confesses a union of the 4964 3, 88 | impenitent ~heart, thou treasurest up to thyself wrath against 4965 2, 61 | purpose of strengthening treaties of peace: and this is more ~ 4966 2, 14 | doubt" [*Cicero, Topic. ad Trebat.]. ~Now, that something 4967 3, 83 | or else cast ~into the trenches beneath the flag-stones, 4968 2, 166 | Eutrapelia} is derived from {trepein} = 'to ~turn'].~Aquin.: 4969 2, 23 | and the ~words uttered in trepidation were washed away by the 4970 2, 81 | forgive those who ~have trespassed against him, wherefore his 4971 1, 101 | kept paradise ~against a trespasser; but he would have striven 4972 2, 152 | quotation is ~from Can. Tria. xxxvi, qu. 2] declares 4973 2, 52 | circle, are accordingly triangles and circles": to wit, because ~ 4974 1, 7 | magnitude, whether circular or triangular, and so on. Now what ~is 4975 2, 105 | order to avoid ~confusion of tribal possessions, as stated in 4976 Suppl, 22| comparison between the ~two tribunals. Nevertheless, even in the 4977 2, 105 | the sons, and make them tribunes and centurions; and may ~ 4978 3, 35 | whole world, as it were, tributary ~to Augustus, was being 4979 2, 100 | of their superiors, and tributes, which are a repayment of 4980 2, 87 | God's name ~in vain, and tricks his neighbor by guile." 4981 1, 7 | nature of a bicubical or ~tricubical magnitude, whether circular 4982 1, 113 | 3): "The ~Lord your God trieth you, that it may appear 4983 1, 7 | species of figures, such as trilateral, ~quadrilateral and so on; 4984 1, 1 | the inferior laborers who trim the wood ~and make ready 4985 1, 31 | according as trinity may ~mean trine-unity. But in the strict meaning 4986 1, 92 | together. But each of these trinities falls short of the Divine 4987 2, 167 | with gold and pearls and trinkets have forfeited the ~adornments 4988 2, 94 | to return home ~if you trip when going forth; when the 4989 Suppl, 1 | all the parts are crushed [tritae] ~minutely. Wherefore, in 4990 3, 25 | confidently, in open show, triumphing over them in ~Himself." 4991 2, 83 | thanks to God for their triumphs, and urge ourselves ~to 4992 2, 48 | taste" (Iliad, xviii, 109 ~[trl. Pope]).~Aquin.: SMT FS 4993 3, 54 | inasmuch as ~they are the trophies of His power; and a special 4994 3, 54 | wear them as an everlasting trophy of His ~victory." Hence 4995 2, 64 | the land, if the treasure trove be in ~the land of another 4996 3, 13 | spirit ~of life, and the truant and sinful rational spirit 4997 1, 36 | procellarum], and in the latter "Trubled ~gost is sacrifice of God" ( 4998 2, 51 | and likewise to peace and truce."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[53] A[ 4999 3, 74 | read in the Sixth ~Council (Trull., Can. 28): "We have learned 5000 2, 84 | the sixth council [*Can. Trullan, xxiii], quoted ~I, qu. 5001 2, 183 | goods as dispensers or ~trustees. For Augustine says (Ep. 5002 2, 45 | about many things, and is trustful in matters where he ~ought 5003 3, 1 | man ~might journey more trustfully toward the truth, the Truth 5004 3, 5 | the Old ~Testament, the trustworthiness of the Gospel story is undermined. 5005 2, 121 | steadfast from the unstaid, the trusty from the ~untrustworthy, 5006 2, 127 | him to be magnanimous, truth-loving, and far removed from deception." ~


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