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St. Teresa of Avila
Interior Castle

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(Hapax - words occurring once)


105-couns | count-hid | hiero-polis | pons-thirt | thorn-zimme

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     Part, Chapter                                        grey = Comment text
1501 0, 5 | introducción, etc., por el P. Jaime Pons, Barcelona, 1908. ~ 1502 0, 38 | asserting that she wrote a portion of it while in this condition.12 1503 0, 23 | the soul is completely possessed by God. ~ 1504 1, 4 | stout chain, made fast to a post and dying of hunger, not 1505 2, 1 | ill-health forced me to postpone continuing it until a more 1506 0, 36 | the preoccupations of a practical kind with which the Mother 1507 0, 30(8) | editio princeps, which is practically identical with that of the 1508 4, 7 | ways, and involving it in practices which, so he gives it to 1509 5, 6 | do with many saintly and prayerful people, I know of a number 1510 1, 14 | very long time?155 If she prays, she might as well not be 1511 4, 14 | being unable to teach and preach like the Apostles, you do 1512 1, 4 | suffers more than in the preceding Mansions; for there it was 1513 1, 4 | to us and calls us in the precise way which I shall describe 1514 2, 7 | incidents arise, though not precisely of this kind, which give 1515 0, 14 | sometimes fails to maintain its precision of method, and falls into 1516 1, 7(68) | interpretation in the text seems preferable.] ~ 1517 2, 18 | did not then amend, the prelate would have to be told: to 1518 1, 7 | nature and from the state of preparedness we are in;86 but nevertheless, 1519 1, 2 | advantage of so doing might be presented to us, until we reached 1520 0, 32 | have been well worthy of preservation. ~ 1521 1, 2 | trouble little about carefully preserving the soul's beauty. All our 1522 2, 9(97) | means to squeeze, crush or press hard, or to extract something 1523 2, 5 | sovereign Marriage, which presupposes the entrance of His Majesty 1524 1, 4 | of the world -- and they pretend that earthly pleasures are 1525 1, 1(17) | Aposentos -- a rather more pretentious word than the English "room": 1526 2, 11 | contains riches of great price, and any who can elude the 1527 1, 6 | end of the last psalm at Prime. The last words of the verse 1528 0, 41 | should ever be decided to print her writings, he would polish 1529 0, 9(3) | The letter [printed, in Spanish, by P. Silverio, 1530 8, 9 | I strongly recommend to prioresses. ~ 1531 4, 8 | this, however. You enter a private apartment in the palace 1532 1, 4 | is that, as the soul now prizes the honour and glory of 1533 2, 2 | and yield no fruit if it proceeded not thence, for the spring 1534 1, 4 | God plays a part in the process (and in everything I say 1535 2, 4 | which no human means can procure. Although occasionally the 1536 3, 1 | which leaves seed for the production of more silkworms and then 1537 1, 7(154) | forty years since she had professed at the Incarnation.] ~ 1538 0, 41 | calligraphy rivals that of any professional monastic copyist of the 1539 3, 3 | more effectively and more profitably than in the creatures, to 1540 1, 4 | not, so that they may be profited. The fourth is that, as 1541 4, 13 | time) because, when this profound suspension lifts a little, 1542 2, 7 | be done.74 If we have not progressed as far as this, then, as 1543 8, 1 | that the farther a soul progresses the closer becomes its companionship 1544 0, 35 | said, Ribera had himself projected a collected edition of St. 1545 0, 41 | of the Middle Ages. The prologue and the epilogue are omitted, 1546 7, 11 | can. By meditation I mean prolonged reasoning with the understanding, 1547 1, 6 | a certain instinct118 to prompt them. As God uses them to 1548 9, 6(201) | 41. [The abrupt change of pronoun is reproduced exactly from 1549 0, 27 | she could not presume to pronounce upon the secret judgments 1550 3, 17 | do this, in my view, by pronouncing his words very clearly, 1551 1, 4 | God grants still greater proofs of His love. I am sure that, 1552 2, 3 | would it be if we knew the properties of everything? It will be 1553 3, 9 | recall what happened to the prophet Jonas, when he feared that 1554 1, 6 | us must of necessity be proportionate with the love which we bear 1555 7, 6 | spoken about this,187 I propose to speak to you about it 1556 0, 46 | attempt this task alhough the prospect seems to cause my physical 1557 1, 5 | we once knew to be very prosperous are now beneath the ground, 1558 11, 8 | and yet produced complete prostration. On that occasion, as a 1559 4, 20 | Church, in which I live, and protest and promise that I will 1560 3, 2(138) | is very emphatic: Harto provecho, harto -- "exceedingly great 1561 1, 1(19) | Proverbs viii, 31. ~ 1562 2 | ourselves; and of how the Lord proves those who are in these Mansions.~ 1563 0, 9 | be more accurate to say, providentially) she fell in with an old 1564 4, 5 | showed him no small mercy in providing someone to kill him. ~ 1565 2, 15 | through His death, and of proving what love He had for His 1566 0, 21 | others, it has acquired prudence and discretion and orders 1567 0, 23 | She also describes the psychological conditions of this state, 1568 0, 29 | maxims or a treatise on psychology. She intended it for the 1569 3, 15 | often go about, like the Publican, without daring to lift 1570 1, 5 | whatsoever. But to find itself publicly and unmeritedly described 1571 0, 45(*) | appended by Intratext Publisher~ 1572 2, 12 | in worldly pleasure and puffed up with worldly honours 1573 5, 9 | gun when the trigger is pulled, there begins within the 1574 11, 4 | long as it continues, the pulse is as feeble as though the 1575 2, 6 | human metal, but of the purest gold of Divine wisdom. In 1576 11, 6 | especially if the soul can be purified by suffering and enabled 1577 1, 11 | yourselves great harm by pursuing your necessary occupations. 1578 2, 10 | the slough of cowardice, pusillanimity and fear. We shall always 1579 10, 4 | anything whatever by merely putting up with insults! Let us 1580 0, 29 | been a dearth of persons qualified to guide souls to the highest 1581 1, 2 | possess souls. As to what good qualities there may be in our souls, 1582 8, 5 | greatness and the precious quality of this favour are best 1583 11, 8 | occasion it lasted only for a quarter of an hour and yet produced 1584 1, 6(118) | the Spanish is un no sé qué, an expression corresponding 1585 11, 5 | a kind that nothing can quench, nor does she desire it 1586 11, 5 | does she desire it to be quenched, except with that water 1587 0, 14 | ineffable communion with the questing soul, the soul must be free 1588 10, 5 | who asked Our Lord so many questions, and at the time of His 1589 1, 4 | it in mind: Beatus vir, qui timet Dominum.64~And now 1590 9, 12 | worry him, because it would quicken his devotion, and so he 1591 2, 9 | though it has never been quieter or more at rest in its life! 1592 5, 3 | at that stage gently and quietly -- I mean without any movement. 1593 1, 6(118) | the French un je ne sais quoi.] ~ 1594 2, 5 | verse which I have already quoted, Dilatasti cor meum,95 speaks 1595 0, 42 | study from which the editor quotes. ~ 1596 4, 9 | of Him, we shall run our race, with our eyes fixed upon 1597 2, 5 | that sun which sheds its radiance on our works. She says that 1598 0, 38 | Communion. She was very radiant and wrote with great rapidity, 1599 9, 4 | thing could be woven. This raiment looks like the finest cambric. 1600 1, 8 | are farther on, that it rains manna; once there, the soul 1601 0, 38 | radiant and wrote with great rapidity, and as a rule she was so 1602 2, 11(35) | Ratero: creeping, flying low, content 1603 3, 2 | though they do not actually re-enter it, because the habits they 1604 4, 2(163) | that, if St. Teresa had re-read her work, the phrase would 1605 2, 7 | that is to the point. The reader must have patience with 1606 0, 0(1) | author's own words, and begs readers to respect "the words and 1607 2, 10 | our will become nobler and readier to embrace all that is good: 1608 4, 12 | are not diminished by His readiness to give. ~ 1609 0, 35 | and restored the original readings, adding to the first page 1610 5, 9 | itself, it finds that it has reaped very great advantages and 1611 8, 8 | side, will console you and reassure you, and will continue to 1612 1, 8 | torture. When the confessor reassures the soul, it becomes calm, 1613 3, 13 | your physical powers may rebel. If the opportunity presents 1614 1, 6(67) | the margin. [No doubt she recalled the reference to St. Matthew 1615 4, 8 | hand that the devil can recapture it without much labour. 1616 4, 18 | do not harmonize with the reception of this great favour, the 1617 1, 3(62) | language. The original is: Recia obediencia ha sido! Lit.: " 1618 4, 5 | and be crucified. We never recite the Office on his festival, 1619 3, 3(101) | should be distinguished from recogimiento, a word often used by St. 1620 3, 10 | counterfeits, however, will be recognizable because they will not produce 1621 2, 8 | who receives such a grace recognizes it for what it is, Our Lord 1622 0, 9 | which they spent the day "as recollectedly as if they had been in their 1623 8, 9 | such caution I strongly recommend to prioresses. ~ 1624 2, 10 | the Lord does not fail to recompense us with just measure, and 1625 0, 9 | in the course of this she recounted to him the story of how 1626 1, 1 | will ever come to an end of recounting His mercies and wonders? 1627 4, 17 | opportunities you have of recreation and how insufficient in 1628 0, 41 | work is beautifully done in red and black ink and nowhere 1629 3, 13 | cost Him, when, in order to redeem us from death, He died such 1630 2, 4 | O souls redeemed by the blood of Jesus Christ! 1631 2, 15 | satisfaction of seeing our redemption achieved through His death, 1632 11, 2 | our nature that is earthly reduced to powder. During the time 1633 0, 27 | that it is needless to give references. She does not, of course, 1634 2, 15 | die than suffer it. And, I reflected, if a soul which has so 1635 8, 5 | efforts that it might make to regain His companionship are of 1636 4, 5 | describe them; although after regaining possession of their senses 1637 3, 1 | soul, on the other hand, regains its lost control. ~ 1638 1, 3 | and express the deepest regret that (as they put it) she 1639 0, 32 | June and July 1580. It is regrettable that Gracián should not 1640 7, 16 | and I have never ceased regretting that there was once a time 1641 7, 5 | reflections must have been a regular martyrdom for Saint Peter 1642 7, 11 | in the Garden and go on rehearsing the events that follow until 1643 1, 7 | them be very careful not to reject it for the sake of finishing 1644 0, 44 | Luis de León's (1588), rejects Gracián's emendations and 1645 2, 15 | God has granted favours to relapse through their faults into 1646 0, 22 | gifts of the Spirit and relapses are still possible. ~ 1647 2, 9 | longer bound by ties of relationship, friendship or property. 1648 4, 17 | down here it was with great reluctance, as I said at the beginning, 1649 1, 7 | us70 (I write this word reluctantly, but it is the truth,71 1650 0, 12 | and on the next morning remarked to me: 'How I forgot myself 1651 5, 6 | There are several other remarks on this subject which I 1652 3, 10 | lost their fate is less remediable. You, sisters, so far as 1653 3, 6 | thing in God's eyes is our remembering His honour and glory and 1654 1, 5 | things come to an end, and reminds it that those who have derived 1655 4, 2(163) | clarified. Freely it might be rendered: "wonderful as you see it 1656 6, 12 | have so many reasons for rendering Him? ~ 1657 3, 19 | governing that Castle and renders Him the greatest devotion 1658 2, 12 | take every opportunity of repairing to His Majesty, and to make 1659 1, 7 | fortunate in being able to repay Him something of what we 1660 11, 12 | end, before they die, He repays them for everything at once, 1661 1, 1 | impossible for me to avoid repeating a great deal of this, because 1662 1, 7 | by heart through constant repetition, I do not call that prayer 1663 8, 3 | what His face was like. She replied that she did not know, that 1664 0, 38 | writing the book and is reported as asserting that she wrote 1665 4, 2 | it has not yet found true reposed.146 You will often have 1666 3, 12(144)| sullen". Here a less reprehensible meaning seems indicated.] ~ 1667 4, 2(163) | either of these translations represents the author's meaning and 1668 7, 10(195)| Venice in 1512 and often reprinted in Spain during the sixteenth 1669 1, 4(115) | edition but Gracián did not reproduce it in either the text or 1670 2, 6 | way or lose some of their reputation. God often grants them grace 1671 10, 6 | we must not desire to be reputed better than we are and in 1672 3, 19 | He who was able, at the request of Josue (I think it was), 1673 1, 5 | from which the Lord always rescues them, to their great profit, 1674 3, 10 | effects of these locutions resemble those of a dream. It may 1675 1, 10 | upon us, as if they were resentful of the war made upon them 1676 3, 5 | to have been pleased to reserve action to Himself. There 1677 3, 5 | things in which He has not so reserved it, such as penances, works 1678 4, 18 | into the Mansion which He reserves as His own and which you 1679 3, 6 | disregarding its own advantage and resigning itself as much as it possibly 1680 1, 6 | works; what He needs is the resoluteness of our will. ~ 1681 1, 7 | sees that he has firmly resolved to lose his life and his 1682 0, 46 | impossible, my will very gladly resolves to attempt this task alhough 1683 9, 13 | is it, then, always to be respectful when we see a crucifix or 1684 1, 11 | of the other as are the respective joys that the Lord is pleased 1685 2, 1 | castle, so beautiful and resplendent this Orient pearl, this 1686 1, 4 | even though you have not responded immediately to the Lord' 1687 4, 5 | s rest, nor can he have rested by night, since it was then 1688 4, 6 | little one should think about resting, and how little one should 1689 1, 2(59) | yet fell," but Ribera restores St. Teresa's reading. ~ 1690 0, 39 | related, to P. Ribera, he retained it for long after St. Teresa' 1691 6, 11 | great King. Other saints retire to desert places, where 1692 3, 3 | that they are gradually retiring101 within themselves; anyone 1693 4, 7 | then, as soon as I leave my retreat and some occasion presents 1694 0, 4 | introductions by the Very Rev. Benedict Zimmerman, O.C.D., 1695 5, 7 | the body; and some of the revelations are communicated to it without 1696 9, 15 | to be greatly prized and reverenced, there are certain reasons 1697 8, 4 | devil, it would be just the reverse. As it is a thing which 1698 0, 41 | writings, he would polish and revise them. ~ 1699 4, 20 | to read, if, after being revised by learned men, it is ever 1700 1, 10 | movement of the heavens, revolving as they do with such speed, 1701 1, 6 | although by nature they are so richly endowed as to have the power 1702 1, 1 | sisters, the soul of the righteous man is nothing but a paradise, 1703 2, 11 | reward, as well as on the righteousness and truth which are in our 1704 2, 8 | which has many outer rinds surrounding the savoury 1705 0, 41 | indeed, the calligraphy rivals that of any professional 1706 2, 8 | snow and floods and bad roads, to take a year over it? 1707 3, 8 | it desires, and thus it roams about all over the place, 1708 2, 9 | not of such a kind as to rob the soul of its peace and 1709 6, 11 | mind of Saint Francis, when robbers met him as he was going 1710 0, 39 | confessor of her own, P. Rodrigo Alvarez. "Read him the last 1711 3, 10 | neighbour unless it had its roots in the love of God. Since 1712 0, 35 | University of Salamanca, the Royal Academy of History and elsewhere 1713 3, 11 | wasting their time at it and ruining their health. ~ 1714 2, 16 | way that in the end she ruins her health and is unable 1715 4, 6 | and so often approach the Sacraments? For you are enjoying the 1716 4, 4 | be able to run into them safely, as it is after the betrothal 1717 8, 10 | judgments on the virtues. The saintliest will be she who serves Our 1718 1, 6(118) | corresponding to the French un je ne sais quoi.] ~ 1719 1, 6 | be turned into pillars of salt for not looking within themselves, 1720 2, 7 | occurred to me that this salutation of the Lord must mean much 1721 11, 5 | which Our Lord spoke to the Samaritan woman,206 and that is not 1722 0, 39 | for a time to M. María de San José, Prioress of the Sevilian 1723 1, 8 | edifice. If it is begun upon sand, it will all collapse:45 1724 3, 1(159) | A. Francisco de Santo Tomás, O.C.D., in his Médula 1725 2, 2 | desire. It is much more satisfying to a soul than is the delectable 1726 3, 10 | neighbours in the hope of saving just one soul. If our later 1727 7 | Humanity of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, His most sacred 1728 2, 8 | outer rinds surrounding the savoury part within, all of which 1729 1, 6 | now desires to remove the scales from the eyes of the soul,216 1730 1, 4 | that it is better not to scandalize the weak. But less harm 1731 1, 3 | no reason for you to be scandalized at my unworthiness. Imitate 1732 0, 37 | the Order and that stormy scene at the Incarnation when 1733 0, 14 | in their construction. A scholastic writer, or, for that matter, 1734 1, 3 | lives in this way: and they scoff at the poor creature and 1735 10, 8 | opinion, there is little scope here either for the devil 1736 1, 11(92) | Gracián scores out this sentence in the 1737 3, 14 | many things there are in Scripture which describe this peace 1738 1, 8 | to do with a confessor so scrupulous and inexperienced that he 1739 0, 30 | submitted to the closest scrutiny by himself and a Dominican 1740 1, 6(118) | something": the Spanish is un no qué, an expression corresponding 1741 2, 13 | the soul shall go thence sealed with His seal. In reality, 1742 7, 16 | flying round and round in search of a resting-place and losing 1743 0, 19 | sin -- and need a long and searching discipline before they can 1744 1, 1(41) | The word (guisar: "season", "dress") is a homely one: " 1745 1, 15 | according to the times and seasons. The poor soul may not be 1746 4, 12 | Mary give Him anything, seated as she is at His feet, unless 1747 0, 38 | condition.12 This, however, is second-hand evidence, though it tends 1748 0, 34 | was also the committee's secretary: that is to say, when the 1749 7, 7 | they are able to remain securely in the other Mansions. For 1750 3, 14 | soul! My God, since Thou seest how needful it is for us, 1751 1, 5 | reflect that their bodies are seething with worms -- of these and 1752 0, 34 | being the critic at these Segovian sessions, was also the committee' 1753 2, 13 | circumspection; they should select a man who is completely 1754 2, 10 | Secondly, if we turn from self towards God, our understanding 1755 3, 2 | First, there is a self-forgetfulness which is so complete that 1756 0, 28 | would be as invidious as self-indulgent to quote any of them here. 1757 0, 21 | It has not made a full self-oblation, a total self-surrender. 1758 2, 10 | miseries. Without complete self-renunciation, the state is very arduous 1759 0, 21 | full self-oblation, a total self-surrender. Its love is still governed 1760 2, 7 | renounce our self-love and self-will, and our attachment to earthly 1761 4, 8 | their freedom. Then He can sell them as slaves to the whole 1762 1, 10 | bring good, just as a man selling an antidote will drink poison 1763 3, 13 | produce in it any exterior sensation. Be advised, then, and, 1764 6, 13 | should we want to be more sensible than she? What can give 1765 1, 6 | explain what proceeds from sensuality and what from our own nature. 1766 2, 4 | which it will find no way of separating itself, or as if in a room 1767 0, 9(3) | Silverio, II, 490-505] is dated September 4, 1588. The anecdote is 1768 1, 10 | and when He left the sepulchre without removing the stone. 1769 0, 36 | we may well marvel at the serenity of mind which in so short 1770 0, 26 | excluding others. Each of the series of moradas (the use of the 1771 3, 12 | devotional image or hear a sermon, it is almost as if we had 1772 2, 8 | there is also the danger of serpents. Oh, what a lot I could 1773 4, 21 | thousand five hundred and seventy seven, on the vigil of Saint 1774 2, 10 | order later to wage a far severer war upon it. ~ 1775 3, 6 | years and to suffer the severest trials, if by so doing they 1776 6, 3 | this by the obstacle of sex and very envious of those 1777 2, 2 | planted. It would give no shade and yield no fruit if it 1778 11, 8 | they only seem to her like shadows -- as all other earthly 1779 0, 10 | crystal globe, made in the shape of a castle, and containing 1780 0, 40 | Silverio, however, does not share their opinion.] ~ 1781 0, 40 | remainder of the work being shared by the other three. The 1782 6, 8 | anything as beneficial as shedding tears may I not be deceived 1783 0, 13(5) | edited by E. Allison Peers; Sheed and Ward, p. 334). ~ 1784 0, 30 | she wrote on a separate sheet and they have unfortunately 1785 2, 5 | about like silly little shepherd-boys, thinking we are learning 1786 2, 3 | although the sun may be shining upon it, its brightness 1787 2, 14 | lessons from the persons who shock us. Our outward comportment 1788 2, 14 | ordered lives are apt to be shocked at everything and we might 1789 4, 3 | because it is over in the very shortest time. All giving and taking 1790 1, 10 | going through great trials, shortly after God had granted her 1791 3, 13 | presents itself, too, try to shoulder some trial in order to relieve 1792 1, 8 | your Spouse bore upon His shoulders and realize that this Cross 1793 3, 3(101) | encogimiento, the noun used, means "shrinkage", "contraction"; it should 1794 3, 3(101) | conscious of a gentle interior shrinking": encogimiento, the noun 1795 0, 22 | hindered its progress; it shrinks from no trials and attaches 1796 2, 8(32) | The palmito is a shrub, common in the south and 1797 2, 8(33) | Oh, but if it is (Uh, que si es) in (the room of) self-knowledge!" 1798 4, 17(174)| to deceive, but because sic they are deceived themselves." 1799 1, 4 | us. Or they come through sicknesses and trials, or by means 1800 1, 3(62) | is: Recia obediencia ha sido! Lit.: "Rigorous obedience ( 1801 11, 1 | many years, she is still sighing and weeping, and each of 1802 11, 2 | yearnings and tears and sighs, together with the strong 1803 0, 33 | has any great doctrinal significance. It is a striking thing 1804 3, 3(102) | VI, Chap. IV) uses this simile of the hedgehog in much 1805 3, 1(159) | spiritual, the species, or similitudes, under which it is apprehended 1806 1, 7 | Majesty with humility and simplicity of heart, and praise Him 1807 0, 46 | from obedience has a way of simplifying things which seem impossible, 1808 11, 8(208) | at Salamanca in 1571. The singer was M. Isabel de Jesús. 1809 9, 10 | and confusion, and then sink into that blessed state 1810 3, 15 | be like an overladen ship sinking to the bottom of the sea. ~ 1811 1, 12 | for certain is that it has sinned. ~ 1812 7, 10(195)| reprinted in Spain during the sixteenth century. A passage very 1813 9, 12 | say that the devil is a skilful painter, and that, if he 1814 9, 10 | storm and tumult in the sky, just so, in this interior 1815 2, 18 | advantage and start habits of slander; these matters must be discussed, 1816 1, 2 | aside their arms even when sleeping or eating, and are always 1817 6, 4 | glory. Remember not the slightness of her merits and the baseness 1818 2, 7 | after it and nobody ever slights us. It is true that these 1819 7, 2 | sins are like the river's slimy bed; they are always fresh 1820 2, 9 | be content to crawl along slowly when it is able to fly? 1821 3, 10 | senses are in such a state of slumber that they are like a person 1822 2, 10 | These comparisons make me smile and I do not like them at 1823 2, 6 | dwells, but the fragrant smoke and the heat penetrate the 1824 11, 2 | other, for they are like a smouldering fire, the heat of which 1825 2, 8 | always serving God at a snail's pace! As long as we do 1826 1, 3 | is a delectable death, a snatching of the soul from all the 1827 2, 8 | with all the winds and snow and floods and bad roads, 1828 0, 9 | On the next day it was snowing so hard that no one could 1829 2, 8 | from self-knowledge and soar aloft in meditation upon 1830 2, 1 | They often cause fits of sobbing; I have heard, indeed, that 1831 1, 3 | His greatness upon anyone soever? Sometimes He will do this 1832 2, 13 | impress: that is, it is soft -- and it does not even 1833 2, 13 | and it does not even soften itself so as to be prepared; 1834 4, 8 | world, as He Himself was sold, and if He does this He 1835 2, 13 | fortitude is not built upon solid ground like that of souls 1836 4, 7 | enter it, and no desert so solitary that he cannot visit it. 1837 3, 3 | The real solution is to see that such people 1838 0, 49 | of Carmel need someone to solve their difficulties concerning 1839 2, 6 | the trouble they have is somebody else's fault and represent 1840 11, 8(208) | M. Isabel de Jesús. The song begins: ~Let mine eyes behold 1841 11, 12 | answering you as He answered the sons of Zebedee: "Can you drink 1842 2, 15 | intolerable that she would far sooner die than suffer it. And, 1843 7, 4 | none; they are sometimes sorely oppressed by the thought 1844 1, 6 | backs upon Him and go away sorrowfully, like the young man in the 1845 2, 8(32) | is a shrub, common in the south and east of Spain, with 1846 2, 8 | must always think of it as spacious, ample and lofty; and this 1847 2, 4 | still has enough and to spare. If he begins to get restless 1848 7, 12 | love, for they are living sparks which will enkindle the 1849 6, 12 | it! Sometimes it makes me specially glad when we are together 1850 8, 7 | to it that the devil is speedily disillusioned. ~ 1851 3, 6 | then, for trying to cast a spell over them -- they must be 1852 1, 10 | misused the time that we are spending in the presence of God. 1853 1, 7 | could not stop until I had a splitting headache; and the same thing 1854 3, 6 | efforts, which would only spoil everything. God gave us 1855 0, 14 | for St. Teresa's natural spontaneity: it is difficult, indeed, 1856 1, 13 | sometimes seem to be making sport of the soul, do not cause 1857 2, 6 | depths -- it proceeds to spread within us and cause an interior 1858 0, 33 | mystics of all kinds were springing up continually and when 1859 9, 24 | I have said, they never spur themselves to greater efforts 1860 1, 6 | accepted; and if they do not squander their talents, but are true 1861 4, 10 | did, through streets and squares?171 Oh, what a mockery is 1862 2, 9 | the soul of its peace and stability -- at least, not as a rule. 1863 0, 3 | translation of the Benedictines of Stanbrook (London, 1919-24, 4 vols.). ~ 1864 11, 12 | these souls in every way and stands up for them if they are 1865 1, 8 | that is a very poor way of starting to build such a large and 1866 0, 29 | guide souls to the highest states of prayer: the Interior 1867 0, 36 | Toledo, where she had been staying for nearly a year, but in 1868 2, 9 | have advanced only a few steps, and we should believe that 1869 3, 10 | The conflict, then, is sterner for such souls than for 1870 2, 4 | governors and butlers and stewards -- how blind they are and 1871 3, 5 | the soul to do when it has stilled the understanding; if it 1872 6, 6 | to feel like this, will stimulate the feeling as much as possible. 1873 4, 11 | which is introduced into the stomach gives strength to the head 1874 9, 24 | show forth His greatness by stooping to commune with such miserable 1875 0, 29 | less as a literary work, a storehouse of spiritual maxims or a 1876 1, 3 | illustrating what they say by stories of some who ruined their 1877 0, 37 | that of the Order and that stormy scene at the Incarnation 1878 1, 4 | behind him, bound with a stout chain, made fast to a post 1879 2, 5 | done, she betook herself straightway to its Source, realizing 1880 0, 46 | feeling a great physical strain. May He Who has helped me 1881 2, 3 | I am straining every nerve,158 sisters, 1882 2, 10 | little butterfly feels a stranger to things of the earth, 1883 3, 2 | have been consorting with strangers, to whom all the good things 1884 3, 1 | lead a careless life and stray from the road to Heaven -- 1885 4, 12 | Without realizing it, I have strayed far from my theme. Forgive 1886 1, 1 | understand the words "unless he strays from the path on which he 1887 2, 4 | through which the light streamed in: it enters in different 1888 2, 4 | heavens. Or it is as if a tiny streamlet enters the sea, from which 1889 2, 2 | darkness. For, just as all the streamlets that flow from a clear spring 1890 4, 4 | favours are given us to strengthen our weakness, as I have 1891 11, 9 | true Comforter comforts and strengthens her so that she can wish 1892 1, 11 | cannot be begun by making strenuous efforts, but must come gently, 1893 4, 8 | can hardly lay too much stress on it. Fix your eyes on 1894 2, 18 | devil, it should be strongly stressed that no sister must discuss 1895 6, 4 | suffer them is her desire. Stretch out Thy mighty arm, O Lord, 1896 2, 9 | reasons why they should not be striven for. The first is because 1897 1, 2(61) | are crossed out with two strokes. But Ribera has written 1898 9, 5 | by a person who lived and strove to imagine it for a thousand 1899 1, 10 | we must not abandon the struggle, as the devil tries to make 1900 2, 15 | castle are we free from struggles with devils. It is true 1901 0, 29 | difficult for any conscientious student who practised what it taught 1902 2, 13 | that they should be most studious to render ready obedience. 1903 0, 31 | which could cause anyone to stumble.~ 1904 1, 3 | be a miracle if we escape stumbling over them and falling) -- 1905 2, 9 | all this caution, we find stumbling-blocks everywhere; for we are afraid 1906 0, 30 | best. The titles of these sub-divisions she wrote on a separate 1907 0, 30 | margins, she was able to subdivide each of the seven parts 1908 0, 30 | Mansions", and not to make any subdivision of these into chapters. 1909 4, 7 | prayer, she must learn to subdue her own will and in these 1910 2, 13 | great love has so completely subdued it that it neither knows 1911 2, 8 | little or much, should be subjected to undue constraint or limitation. 1912 2, 3 | that is in Heaven, in a sublimer manner than is possible 1913 2, 11 | their trials are of such sublimity and come from so noble a 1914 4, 20 | understanding, for in all things I submit to what is held by the Holy 1915 0, 30 | on its completion, was submitted to the closest scrutiny 1916 4, 5 | imaginary visions, it is able subsequently to describe these, for they 1917 3, 1(159) | successive, formal and substantial. ~ 1918 5, 1 | I call it, which, though substantially the same, is felt within 1919 2, 5(227) | St. Teresa's interlinear substitution for something deleted. ~ 1920 4, 5 | notwithstanding, the devil, with great subtlety and craft, has won back 1921 3, 19 | May He grant that I have succeeded in explaining what I have 1922 1, 10(47) | however, read casas and succeeding editors have followed him. ~ 1923 1, 3 | I thought I could do so successfully. I do not mind if I write 1924 3, 1(159) | XXVI-XXX), are of three kinds: successive, formal and substantial. ~ 1925 3, 1(159) | Trat. VI, Cap. i), has a succinct description of the three 1926 4, 11 | the Castle, and, indeed, succours the body itself. Often the 1927 2, 8(32) | layers of leaves enclosing a succulent edible kernel. ~ 1928 3, 10 | like a child beginning to suck the breast. If it be taken 1929 2, 15 | of that grief would have sufficed to put an end to any number 1930 7, 11 | understand the matter myself sufficiently to be able to explain it; 1931 2, 7 | more than the mere words suggest, as must also His telling 1932 8, 2 | so remarkable that they suggested it came from Him. She had 1933 0, 9 | report of this narrative may suitably be given in the words of 1934 4, 3 | to whether or no they are suited to each other and are both 1935 9, 5 | are accompanied by their suites, or heralds proclaim them. ~ 1936 3, 12(144)| word can mean "frowning", "sullen". Here a less reprehensible 1937 0, 40 | table of chapters and the summary of the contents of each 1938 0, 36 | herself tells us, on Trinity Sunday (June 2), 1577. She was 1939 2, 14 | enter a place flooded by sunlight with his eyes so full of 1940 2, 7 | sure to have to say many superfluous and even irrelevant things 1941 2, 14 | Majesty said at the Last Supper: "With desire have I desired."135 " 1942 2, 5(130) | that . . . my purpose" and supplies text and source in the margin. ~ 1943 0, 29 | are and to a great extent supply the need for more. ~ 1944 1, 4 | him this food to eat? And supposing you could loose his chains 1945 2, 7(75) | Lit.: "the Surgeon".] ~ 1946 3, 12 | souls, for His judgments surpass all that we can imagine 1947 11, 6 | which cannot, I believe, be surpassed by any such things on earth ( 1948 2, 7 | virtues, and make a complete surrender of our wills to God and 1949 2, 8 | which has many outer rinds surrounding the savoury part within, 1950 0, 26 | with spiritual progress are susceptible of numerous interpretations, 1951 3, 6(140) | de León altered to en lo susodicho, "in what is (said) above". [ 1952 1, 3 | to devise any method of suspending the thought. Even in loving, 1953 4 | Treats of occasions when God suspends the soul in prayer by means 1954 6, 5 | which remain after these suspensions or ecstasies; the desires 1955 7, 14 | described) I should consider it suspicious. Keep on with your meditation, 1956 2, 6 | stream of this water, to sustain those who in bodily matters 1957 2, 6 | life, and sustenance that sustaineth me!" and things of that 1958 2, 6 | it seems that God is ever sustaining the soul, flow streams of 1959 2, 2 | not thence, for the spring sustains it and prevents it from 1960 2, 6 | this tiny little spring is swallowed up, a stream of this water, 1961 7, 12 | covered with that terrible sweat, will suffice us, not merely 1962 1, 6 | whole body is poisoned and swells up; and so it is in this 1963 3, 2 | in obedience and in never swerving from the law of God; I am 1964 1, 5 | and eat the food of the swine!42 ~ 1965 11, 11 | seems as if the soul is swooning, and as if the very slightest 1966 3, 13 | the omission of a single syllable, as well as the phraseology 1967 2, 1 | produce similar disconcerting symptoms. About this I can say nothing, 1968 0, 14 | stupid creature and don't know what I am saying. There 1969 3, 13 | the soul delights in the tabernacle of God.242 Here the dove 1970 0, 40 | and the copy ends with the table of chapters and the summary 1971 1, 6 | they do not squander their talents, but are true servants of 1972 3, 4 | the better. After all, He talked a great deal with the Pharisees: 1973 4, 9 | Is this tantamount to an admission on my part 1974 1, 3 | sufficient to bring any kind of tarnish upon this sacred Order. ~ 1975 2, 7 | due course, even though He tarry, to heal us. ~ 1976 11, 2 | hears about death's long tarrying, deals it, as it were, a 1977 0, 46 | FEW tasks which I have been commanded 1978 1, 2 | from time to time really taste the things of Heaven can 1979 3, 9 | own condition; having now tasted the consolations of God, 1980 2, 12 | against its will, seems to tear it to pieces and grind it 1981 6, 1 | and so it frequently and tearfully begs God to take it out 1982 0, 12 | could possibly have the temerity to offend God. It was about 1983 4, 10 | incident to this sea of tempests. For, were it not that we 1984 1, 3 | he can when it is being tempted. The soul, too, would not 1985 3, 3 | proof in this way, they will tend to increase. Yet the soul 1986 3, 7 | blessings, or produce good works tending greatly to the honour and 1987 0, 38 | second-hand evidence, though it tends to confirm the direct evidence. 1988 0, 30 | these titles, which me so Teresan in style that their authenticity 1989 2, 2 | God, and elsewhere have termed the Prayer of Quiet, is 1990 9, 5 | fills the soul with a great terror. It is unnecessary to ask 1991 9, 4 | experienced this; and reason can testify only inadequately to things 1992 2, 2 | realize that this is a way of testing them, for they gain a clear 1993 2, 1 | His Majesty has sent them tests which have been by no means 1994 1, 9(123) | II, xx) she asked him for theological guidance about it just before 1995 0, 32 | side and weaker only on the theoretical, many of her comments must 1996 4, 5(247) | 1 Thessalonians ii, 9. ~ 1997 2, 1 | falls into a mortal sin. No thicker darkness exists, and there 1998 | Thine 1999 2, 6 | which he has authority. Thirdly, great advantages accrue 2000 1, 8 | lain beside the pool for thirty years:26 they are unfortunate 2001 1, 8(26) | Gracián corrects this to "thirty-eight years." St. John v, 5. ~


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