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Gregory I
Gregory I Second Dialogue

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     Chapter
1 3 | abound with bread? [Luke 15] ~If then, before he were 2 16 | spirit with him?" [1 Cor. 6:17] ~PETER: If he that cleaveth 3 23 | the heavens?" [Matt. 16:19] whose place of binding 4 16 | by his spirit." [1 Cor. 2:9-12] ~PETER: If, then, 5 3 | to die is gain [Phil. 1:21]: and who not only desired 6 2 | holy vessels. [Numbers 8:24-26] ~PETER: Somewhat I understand 7 3 | privily let down. [Acts 9:25] What then? shall we say 8 2 | holy vessels. [Numbers 8:24-26] ~PETER: Somewhat I understand 9 21 | not told me." [4 Kings 4:27] Which thing almighty God 10 21 | breatheth where he will" [John 3:8], so we are also to know 11 16 | investigable?" [Rom. 11:33] ~And again, whiles I am 12 16 | his counsellor?" [Rom. 11:34], for it seemeth very inconvenient 13 8 | to his enemies [Matt. 12:40]: so that he vouchsafed 14 16 | spirit with him?" [1 Cor. 6:17] ~PETER: If he that cleaveth 15 38 | come unto you," [John 16:7]: for, seeing certain it 16 8 | answer, then would he fall a-reviling and railing at him: for 17 31 | quickly loosed, fell straight a-trembling, and prostrating himself 18 1 | whereupon she fell pitifully a-weeping, because she had borrowed 19 11 | to his monks, that were a-working: whereof the man of God, 20 2 | Many after this began to abandon the world, and to become 21 4 | old custom, and would not abide within at the time of prayer: 22 3 | in my father's house do abound with bread? [Luke 15] ~If 23 23 | TWENTY-THREE: OF CERTAIN NUNS ABSOLVED AFTER THEIR DEATH. ~GREGORY: 24 16 | your way, and hereafter abstain from eating of flesh, and 25 1 | not that you should keep abstinence, and besides I am sent to 26 5 | and water flowed out so abundantly, that it doth plentifully, 27 14 | that brave apparel, and accompanied with many courtiers, came 28 4 | was amiss, which he did accordingly: and it fell so out, that 29 3 | fell into a great rage, accusing themselves that ever they 30 27 | thought it his best way to acquaint the man of God with his 31 Prol| lest, entering too far in acquaintance therewith, he likewise might 32 1 | beast: but after they were acquainted with the servant of God, 33 3 | always considering his own actions, always examining himself, 34 5 | water: and therefore they added, that it was very necessary 35 28 | told him that he had not, adding that if he had given it 36 16 | that do with their soul adhere unto him, and cleaving unto 37 24 | well, and do wonderfully admire it. ~ 38 29 | Then he did more at large admonish that mistrusting and disobedient 39 4 | been often by his Abbot admonished of this fault without any 40 31 | gave him a good lesson, admonishing him not to use any more 41 25 | often times gave him good admonitions: but yet, for all this, 42 8 | it." At length, with much ado, the crow took it up, and 43 37 | even up to heaven, hung and adorned with tapestry, and shining 44 15 | and seeing him sitting afar off, he durst not come near, 45 3 | wandering about other men's affairs, little considering and 46 38 | never will you learn to affect me with true spiritual love. ~ 47 32 | before you said, for what you affirmed in words, you have now verified 48 16 | the reason that St. Paul affirmeth the judgments of God to 49 7 | s garment upon his head, affirming that it was he that had 50 1 | servant in such a place is afflicted with hunger": who, hearing 51 38 | times find, that they do not afford so great benefit by their 52 28 | certain sub-deacon called Agapitus came unto him, instantly 53 3 | taking counsel together, they agreed to poison his wine: which 54 37 | forthwith falling into an ague, he began with burning heat 55 33 | that she drew the clear air to a watery sky, so that 56 8 | and received his usual allowance from the man of God. ~But 57 4 | he was so freed from all allurement of the little black boy, 58 3 | contemplation rapt him up aloft, out of all question he 59 | already 60 | although 61 23 | only threatened if they amended not themselves. ~But they, 62 4 | of this fault without any amendment, at length he was sent to 63 4 | himself, and reform what was amiss, which he did accordingly: 64 | Among 65 8 | this place there was an ancient chapel in which the foolish 66 3 | persecution, but did also animate and encourage others to 67 26 | relation of the honourable man, Anthony, who said that his father' 68 32 | work, but for the blessed Apostles: why will you lay such a 69 14 | shoes to be put, and to be apparelled with his other princely 70 31 | he that sitting still did appease the fury of that cruel Goth, 71 14 | up again, they durst not approach any nearer to his presence: 72 16 | served in the church of Aquinum, was possessed: whom the 73 31 | there was called Galla, an Arian heretic, who, in the time 74 37 | the oratory, where he did arm himself with receiving the 75 7 | far as one may shoot an arrow. The man of God, being in 76 2 | forthwith the holy man was assaulted with such a terrible temptation 77 3 | God, so that by Christ's assistance he built there twelve Abbeys; 78 2 | wilderness. But, suddenly assisted with God's grace, he came 79 23 | doubtfully or uncertainly, but assuredly pronounced and given sentence. ~ 80 Prol| some place, where he might attain to the desire of his holy 81 16 | for whensoever you shall attempt any such thing, the devil 82 14 | device, he sent three to attend upon him, who especially 83 14 | worthy a man, and all his attendants and servitors fell down 84 35 | the venerable father stood attentively beholding the brightness 85 37 | whereof a man, reverently attired, stood and demanded if they 86 7 | the venerable man did not attribute this to his own merits, 87 8 | the holy man's virtues, to back-bite his manner of living, and 88 8 | man of God again and again bade him, saying: "Take it up 89 1 | upon which also with a band he tied a little bell, that 90 35 | forth, he saw a light, which banished away the darkness of the 91 37 | the oratory of St. John Baptist which himself built, when 92 35 | which before in former baseness it could not comprehend. 93 3 | Damascus, got a rope and a basket to pass over the wall, and 94 35 | were together under one beam of the sun, was presented 95 32 | me, as my weakness cannot bear?" But the poor man, whom 96 1 | thought that it had been some beast: but after they were acquainted 97 1 | means converted from their beastly life to grace, piety, and 98 8 | man of God coming thither, beat in pieces the idol, overthrew 99 15 | him all that which should befall him, saying: "Much wickedness 100 | beginning 101 2 | prosecute, I pray, as you have begun, the rest of the holy man' 102 14 | should be next about him, and behave themselves in such sort 103 19 | and was sorry that he had behaved himself so indiscreetly: 104 14 | by such dutiful kind of behaviour, as also by his purple robes, 105 | behind 106 3 | willingly have filled his hungry belly with the husks which they 107 37 | quoth he, "by which the beloved servant of God, Bennet, 108 Prol| name, for he was called "Benedictus" or Bennet: who, from his 109 38 | they do not afford so great benefit by their bodies, as they 110 8 | perceiving the Priest so wickedly bent against his life, was far 111 24 | feet, and with many tears beseeched him that he would vouchsafe 112 8 | report of his sanctity, did betake themselves to a better state 113 4 | come in which the monks betook themselves to prayer, the 114 37 | his weak body holden up betwixt the hands of his disciples, 115 13 | journey." Which kind words bewitching his ears, and the pleasant 116 23 | Whatsoever thou shalt bind upon earth, it shall be 117 17 | found him weeping very bitterly. And having expected a good 118 13 | MONK, WHOM THE MAN OF GOD BLAMED FOR EATING IN HIS JOURNEY. ~ 119 8 | much did malicious envy blind him, and so far did he wade 120 14 | Vultericus, Rudericus, and Blindinus; charging them that in the 121 4 | standing idle, whom for the blindness of his heart he strake with 122 37 | with receiving the body and blood of our Saviour Christ; and 123 11 | limbs, but also his very bones. Being in that manner brought 124 23 | man to anger; who having borne with them a long time, at 125 18 | to carry him two wooden bottles, commonly called flagons, 126 23 | upon earth, it shall be bound also in the heavens: and 127 18 | but first be careful to bow it down, and thou shalt 128 10 | monks found there an idol of brass, which being for a little 129 14 | Riggo, furnished with that brave apparel, and accompanied 130 24 | our Lord's body upon his breast, and so bury him": which 131 21 | also to know that he doth breathe likewise for what cause, 132 21 | the Holy Ghost that "he breatheth where he will" [John 3:8], 133 23 | nobility of family doth in some breed ignobility of mind, and 134 23 | keep them under with the bridle of their habit: for often 135 16 | questions I have already briefly answered, when I said that 136 3 | lost, that is bestowed in bringing of such to good order, especially 137 1 | whereof doth first in a broad place make a lake, and afterward 138 15 | churches overthrown, and buildings rotten with old age we behold 139 24 | OF A BOY THAT AFTER HIS BURIAL WAS CAST OUT OF HIS GRAVE. ~ 140 2 | cogitations, did inwardly burn in his soul: and by this 141 10 | FANTASTICAL FIRE, WHICH BURNT THE KITCHEN. ~Then the man 142 24 | upon his breast, and so bury him": which when they had 143 4 | there with wandering mind to busy himself about some earthly 144 8 | hear; for first he would call him by his name, and because 145 1 | such a candle, set upon a candlestick, might shine and give light 146 3 | should have had the less care of himself, and so haply 147 18 | in the bush: but first be careful to bow it down, and thou 148 3 | himself circumspectly and carefully in the sight of his Creator, 149 7 | and putting down his pail carelessly, fell in himself after it, 150 10 | quenching whereof, the monks by casting on of water made such a 151 31 | persecute religious men of the Catholic church, that what priest 152 38 | and except you give over [cease] to love my carnal presence, 153 29 | prayers, and the oil likewise ceased to overflow the barrel. 154 23 | and when solemn mass was celebrated in the same church, and 155 35 | perfectly feed upon the celestial food of heaven, yet, by 156 9 | monks were building up the cells of the same Abbey, there 157 7 | that great danger. ~PETER: Certainly they be wonderful things 158 22 | and was suddenly set in Chaldea; by which meat the prophet 159 23 | But they, for all this, changed their conditions nothing 160 8 | GREGORY: The holy man, changing his place, did not for all 161 8 | place there was an ancient chapel in which the foolish and 162 27 | and also to defray his own charges. ~But now will I return 163 14 | Rudericus, and Blindinus; charging them that in the presence 164 1 | Thou hast provided good cheer for thyself, and my servant 165 27 | found suddenly upon the chest of the Abbey, which was 166 3 | him, and committed their children to be brought up under him, 167 15 | shaken, houses ruined, and churches overthrown, and buildings 168 3 | because carrying himself circumspectly and carefully in the sight 169 3 | father, was glad to serve a citizen, to keep his hogs, and would 170 1 | neighbours a sieve to make clean wheat, which being left 171 6 | commanded to take a bill, and to cleanse a certain plot of ground 172 16 | soul adhere unto him, and cleaving unto the sayings of the 173 12 | drink anything out of their cloister: and this being diligently 174 1 | purpose, he both kept it close, furthered him what he might, 175 3 | his cogitations within the closet of his own soul: for when 176 33 | sky was so clear that no cloud was to be seen. The Nun, 177 3 | began to be his master's coadjutor; but Placidus, as yet, was 178 8 | burning more and more with the coals of envy, he became far worse; 179 2 | heat of the body waxeth cold, and the souls of faithful 180 14 | and to give the better colour to this device, he sent 181 27 | much money, yet giving him comfortable words, he said: "Go your 182 28 | Then the man of God did command it to be taken up again, 183 14 | his other princely robes, commanding him to go as it were himself 184 16 | secrets of God, who kept the commandments of God: when as the scripture 185 8 | desired not to imitate his commendable life, yet fain he would 186 1 | exalted with transitory commendation: fled privily from his nurse, 187 15 | wickedness do you daily commit, and many great sins have 188 Prol| freely have enjoyed such commodities as it yieldeth, yet did 189 3 | may be holpen, and reap commodity. But where there be none 190 23 | THEIR DEATH. ~GREGORY: His common talk, Peter, was usually 191 3 | conscience be tolerated in that community, where there be some good 192 33 | began to be heavy and to complain of his sister, saying: " 193 21 | is in grief, and God hath concealed it from me, and hath not 194 35 | thing, so neither can I conceive by what means the whole 195 8 | virtuous conversation. ~In conclusion so much did malicious envy 196 2 | so mightily inflame with concupiscence the soul of God's servant, 197 35 | often together spiritual conference, to the end that, albeit 198 22 | they were both risen, they conferred together what either of 199 12 | trembling at his feet, and confessed that they had done wickedly: 200 3 | of St. Paul alleged doth confirm it. But I beseech you to 201 18 | poor man, thus pitifully confounded by the man of God, went 202 3 | those monks, who had all conspired against him, and were far 203 Prol| his disciples: to wit, of Constantinus, a most rare and reverent 204 16 | whom the venerable man Constantius, Bishop of the same city, 205 8 | an high mountain, which containeth, as it were in the lap thereof, 206 8 | obedience of the crow, I contemplate Elias; and in lamenting 207 8 | cast their eyes upon the contempt of his death, the humble 208 7 | he did. But the friendly contention proceeding of mutual humility, 209 3 | increased in virtue, and became continually more famous for miracles, 210 8 | the whole house besides continuing safe and sound) that chamber 211 8 | of his death, the humble contrariwise, against death, lay hold 212 23 | of virtue: for his heart conversed to above in heaven, that 213 1 | fountain springing forth cool and clear water; the abundance 214 27 | Abbey, which was full of corn, thirteen shillings: which 215 22 | about corporal meat went corporally, so Bennet should go spiritually 216 3 | being wearied daily with correcting of their faults, he should 217 16 | with the burthen of their corruptible flesh, they be not with 218 26 | body swelled, and filthy corruption did openly come forth. Who 219 16 | Lord, or who hath been his counsellor?" [Rom. 11:34], for it seemeth 220 3 | therefore rising up, with a mild countenance and quiet mind, he called 221 11 | was the son of a certain courtier. At which pitiful chance 222 14 | and accompanied with many courtiers, came unto the Abbey: at 223 28 | downfall, full of rough and craggy stones upon which the glass 224 35 | all things seem that be created: for by means of that supernatural 225 35 | speak: to wit, that all creatures be as it were nothing to 226 27 | how he was troubled by his creditor for twelve shillings which 227 3 | their Abbot, seeing their crooked conditions could not endure 228 28 | CHAPTER TWENTY-EIGHT: HOW A CRUET OF GLASS WAS THROWN UPON 229 11 | VENERABLE BENNET REVIVED A BOY, CRUSHED TO DEATH WITH THE RUIN OF 230 12 | meat, and drink so many cups?" When they heard him recount 231 36 | conversation, if any be curious to know further, he may 232 35 | this life, and enquiring curiously the time, he understood 233 8 | turn his tune, and say: "Cursed Bennet, and not blessed: 234 31 | all his substance to the custody of Bennet, the servant of 235 3 | himself in persecution at Damascus, got a rope and a basket 236 8 | hands together, play and dance a long time before them, 237 Prol| might have fallen into that dangerous and godless gulf: wherefore, 238 22 | by which meat the prophet Daniel was relieved: and presently 239 31 | great fury, thinking to deal as terribly with him as 240 31 | more such rigour and cruel dealing. His proud mind thus taken 241 15 | of God, whom the holy man dearly loved for his virtuous life. 242 15 | earthquakes, that it will fall to decay of itself." The mysteries 243 3 | used, through unlawful acts decline from the path of holy conversation, 244 33 | sister called Scholastica, dedicated from her infancy to our 245 15 | reprehended him for his wicked deeds, and in few words told him 246 27 | discharge his debt, and also to defray his own charges. ~But now 247 35 | of those joys and divine delights. When it was time to go 248 10 | perceived that they were deluded with fantastical fire, and 249 31 | away he went, but durst not demand after that anything of the 250 33 | The Nun, receiving this denial of her brother, joining 251 3 | their Abbey: long time he denied them, saying that their 252 2 | souls. ~PETER: I cannot deny, but that your words have 253 23 | he told them that he did deprive them of the communion, unless 254 30 | severe rebuke, St. Peter deprived of life: and by prayer restored 255 16 | beforehand, saying: "O the depth of the riches of the wisdom 256 23 | Creator of heaven and earth descended from heaven to earth: and 257 22 | Prior, and particularly described unto them where each place 258 1 | his nurse, and went into a desert place called Sublacum, distant 259 19 | any cause why he should deserve that reprehension: whereupon 260 32 | faith of this man, that desireth to have his son raised to 261 21 | grace: and at other times, destitute of the same Spirit, may 262 8 | laboureth now what he can, to destroy the souls of his disciples; 263 15 | he, "shall not be utterly destroyed by strangers: but shall 264 15 | taking of Rome, and the destruction of that city, said: "This 265 7 | saved from drowning did determine: for he said that he saw 266 14 | the better colour to this device, he sent three to attend 267 8 | woods for the service of the devils, in which even to that very 268 3 | conditions, some of them began to devise, how they might rid him 269 10 | which the devil had falsely devised. ~ 270 25 | mouth, which being about to devour him, he began in great fear 271 16 | Lord. For all such, as do devoutly follow our Lord, be also 272 8 | sub-deacon, possessed with diabolical malice, began to envy the 273 16 | utter, which I knew thou didst speak, for those things 274 35 | rapt in God, might without difficulty see that which is under 275 35 | man of God, Bennet, being diligent in watching, rose early 276 3 | perhaps he should have diminished his own devotion, and somewhat 277 1 | up, brother, and let us dine, because today is the feast 278 1 | meat, and after they had dined, and bestowed some time 279 5 | mountain according to his direction, which they found as it 280 27 | required but twelve, both to discharge his debt, and also to defray 281 8 | accident the holy man's disciple Maurus understanding, straightways 282 36 | all his manner of life and discipline: for the holy man could 283 35 | by means of such sweet discourses, they might at least, with 284 33 | that they might spend it in discoursing of the joys of heaven. But 285 36 | monks, both excellent for discretion and also eloquent for the 286 8 | after three hours, having dispatched the loaf, he returned back 287 8 | Jesus Christ, and their fame dispersed far and near, and many gave 288 21 | almighty God of great piety so disposeth: for giving at some times 289 14 | CHAPTER FOURTEEN: HOW THE DISSIMULATION OF KING TOTILAS WAS DISCOVERED 290 Prol| such learning to fall to dissolute and lewd life, he drew back 291 3 | who was desirous to be dissolved, and to be with Christ, 292 38 | though she had never been distracted in her whole life, and so 293 35 | taste of those joys and divine delights. When it was time 294 36 | sufficiently learned in divinity: for he wrote a rule for 295 2 | because they then are made the doctors of men's souls. ~PETER: 296 35 | was a man full of heavenly doctrine: and so they two had often 297 3 | occasions be offered of doing God presently better service 298 30 | a drench" [i.e. a large dose of veterinary medicine]. ~ 299 22 | words have satisfied my doubtful mind. But I would know what 300 23 | forcible, as though he had not doubtfully or uncertainly, but assuredly 301 34 | body), in the likeness of a dove to ascend into heaven: who 302 28 | which there was an huge downfall, full of rough and craggy 303 35 | is so exalted and looketh downward, then doth it comprehend 304 31 | fast with strong cords, drave him before his horse, to 305 4 | not see who it is, that draweth this monk from his prayers?" 306 30 | spirit found an old monk drawing of water, into whom he entered, 307 8 | did not privily or in a dream, but in open sight present 308 30 | quoth he, "to give them a drench" [i.e. a large dose of veterinary 309 18 | son," quoth he, "that thou drinkest not of that flagon which 310 3 | THE HOLY CROSS, BRAKE A DRINKING-GLASS IN PIECES. ~GREGORY: When 311 5 | found as it were sweating drops of water, and after they 312 7 | himself that was saved from drowning did determine: for he said 313 12 | and how often they had drunk, and perceived well that 314 14 | the end that both by such dutiful kind of behaviour, as also 315 3 | that this venerable man did dwell with himself, because carrying 316 37 | that cave in which he first dwelled, even to this very time, 317 38 | always after, even to her dying day. ~PETER: What is the 318 16 | that eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, nor it hath ascended 319 35 | diligent in watching, rose early up before the time of matins ( 320 15 | lightnings, whirlwinds, and earthquakes, that it will fall to decay 321 37 | man's cell, towards the east even up to heaven, hung 322 3 | rapt by the Angel into an ecstasy, was in truth out of himself, 323 7 | such as may serve for the edification of many : for mine own part, 324 30 | ways: so that sometime they effect wonderful things by their 325 23 | speech in that case was so effectual and forcible, as though 326 8 | CHAPTER EIGHT: HOW A LOAF WAS POISONED, 327 18 | CHAPTER EIGHTEEN: HOW BLESSED BENNET KNEW 328 11 | CHAPTER ELEVEN: HOW VENERABLE BENNET REVIVED 329 8 | the crow, I contemplate Elias; and in lamenting the death 330 36 | for discretion and also eloquent for the style. Of whose 331 | elsewhere 332 8 | dwelling in those parts to embrace the faith of Christ. ~The 333 9 | stone which they meant to employ about that business: and 334 3 | but did also animate and encourage others to suffer the same; 335 8 | enemy. For afterward he endured so much the more grievous 336 8 | the sign of Jonas to his enemies [Matt. 12:40]: so that he 337 1 | God's hands as this day to enjoy your company" (for by reason 338 Prol| world, and might freely have enjoyed such commodities as it yieldeth, 339 35 | departed this life, and enquiring curiously the time, he understood 340 1 | therefore, to a place called Enside and remaining there in the 341 8 | danger which thereby might ensue to his younger monks, and 342 36 | because I make haste to entreat also of the acts of other 343 1 | the old enemy of mankind, envying at the charity of the one 344 1 | at the first, when they espied him through the bushes, 345 Prol| yieldeth, yet did he nothing esteem it, nor the vanities thereof. 346 13 | coming afterward in the evening to the Abbey, they brought 347 3 | In mine opinion, Peter, evil men may with good conscience 348 3 | service of God. Then also Evitius delivered him Maurus, and 349 3 | his own actions, always examining himself, never did he turn 350 32 | you have now verified by examples and works. But tell me, 351 11 | all were passing sorry and exceedingly grieved, not so much for 352 36 | rule for his monks, both excellent for discretion and also 353 32 | But the poor man, whom excessive grief enforced, would not 354 23 | you"; which sentence of excommunication notwithstanding, he did 355 19 | he had made an end of his exhortation, by the entreaty of the 356 2 | virtue: for which cause, in Exodus, commandment is given by 357 3 | Herod, and from all the expectation of the people of the Jews. [ 358 25 | found a dragon in the way expecting him with open mouth, which 359 35 | that in myself I never had experience of any such thing, so neither 360 35 | delivered so notable an exposition. But now, because you have 361 2 | wherefore, seeing you have now expounded the meaning of the former 362 35 | enlarged, and is in God so extended, that it is far above the 363 31 | was: who, overcome with extremity of pain, said that he had 364 16 | cause, again he saith: "that eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, 365 2 | began to fly about his face, and that so near as the 366 8 | his commendable life, yet fain he would have had the reputation 367 33 | would have had the same fair weather to have continued 368 10 | flames, which the devil had falsely devised. ~ 369 23 | business. But as nobility of family doth in some breed ignobility 370 13 | because he meant to go through fasting as he was. His companion 371 3 | with correcting of their faults, he should have had the 372 8 | beholding out of his cell, and fearing the danger which thereby 373 35 | they could not perfectly feed upon the celestial food 374 35 | least, with longing and fervent desire, taste of those joys 375 5 | labour which you take in fetching it so far." Away they went, 376 25 | there was so inconstant and fickle of mind, that he would needs 377 38 | and valleys, in woods and fields, and rested only in that 378 15 | CHAPTER FIFTEEN: HOW VENERABLE BENNET PROPHESIED 379 8 | master of all wickedness fighting openly against him. For 380 26 | off, his body swelled, and filthy corruption did openly come 381 2 | Moses that the Levites from five-and-twenty years and upward should 382 38 | presence. ~But he whose mind is fixed in God, hath so much the 383 18 | bottles, commonly called flagons, full of wine: who in the 384 10 | and not those fantastical flames, which the devil had falsely 385 8 | with his fiery mouth and flaming eyes, he would have torn 386 13 | and the pleasant place flattering his eyes, content he was 387 1 | transitory commendation: fled privily from his nurse, 388 33 | hands, poured forth such a flood of tears upon the table, 389 5 | straightways filled, and water flowed out so abundantly, that 390 2 | merle or an ousel, began to fly about his face, and that 391 24 | put in, and again, the day following, they found it as before. 392 4 | much rebuke him for his folly; yet notwithstanding, returning 393 8 | ancient chapel in which the foolish and simple country people, 394 21 | and yet afterward utterly forbad it. From hence likewise 395 13 | to whom he answered: "God forbid: for eat I will not by any 396 7 | young lad was carried by force thereof, thinking that he 397 23 | case was so effectual and forcible, as though he had not doubtfully 398 37 | absent, by the token which he foretold them, had intelligence of 399 31 | THE MAN OF GOD, WAS LOOSED FORM HIS BANDS. ~A certain Goth 400 25 | that he would never more forsake the monastery, and so ever 401 2 | he was of mind to have forsaken the wilderness. But, suddenly 402 | forty 403 35 | which in times past was founded by the noble man Liberius 404 14 | CHAPTER FOURTEEN: HOW THE DISSIMULATION OF 405 13 | confessing the fault of his frailty; was grieved, and so much 406 16 | and because punishment fresh in memory useth to terrify 407 7 | time what he did. But the friendly contention proceeding of 408 3 | perceive their labour to be fruitless in one place, to remove 409 2 | nourished before with the fuel of carnal cogitations, did 410 17 | there, and so almighty God fulfilled what he promised to his 411 2 | the meaning thereof more fully. ~GREGORY: It is plain, 412 8 | find it written: "Of his fulness we have all received," [ 413 1 | he both kept it close, furthered him what he might, vested 414 3 | is Christ, and to die is gain [Phil. 1:21]: and who not 415 6 | briers, for the making of a garden, which ground was by the 416 Prol| Simplicius, who was the third General of his order; and lastly 417 6 | there was no hope ever to get it again. The poor Goth, 418 13 | present with his servant Giezi, being then absent from 419 21 | in humility: that by the gift of the Spirit, they may 420 35 | for though it see but a glimpse of that light which is in 421 35 | darkness of the night, and glittered with such brightness, that 422 35 | beholding the brightness of that glittering light, he saw the soul of 423 Prol| into that dangerous and godless gulf: wherefore, giving 424 1 | such provision as God's goodness hath sent us." Whereupon 425 3 | he had, as we read in the Gospel, prodigally spent that portion 426 3 | persecution at Damascus, got a rope and a basket to pass 427 14 | For in the time of the Goths, when Totilas, their king, 428 18 | Exhilaratus perceiving what was gotten into the wine, began to 429 8 | of a church hardby, and grandfather to Florentius our sub-deacon, 430 33 | and he hath vouchsafed to grant my petition: wherefore if 431 23 | time to rise out of their graves, and to depart the church. 432 3 | his own soul: for when the greatness of contemplation rapt him 433 13 | Behold here is water, a green meadow, and a very sweet 434 30 | him upon the ground, and grievously tormented him. The man of 435 2 | briers and nettle bushes to grow hard by, off he cast his 436 3 | towardness: of which two, Maurus, growing to great virtue, began to 437 9 | immovable as though it had grown to the very earth: whereby 438 14 | no. A certain man of his guard he had, called Riggo, upon 439 Prol| that dangerous and godless gulf: wherefore, giving over 440 3 | care of himself, and so haply it might have fallen out, 441 12 | to foretell what was to happen, and to relate unto them 442 7 | and telling him what had happened, the venerable man did not 443 8 | Florentius, Priest of a church hardby, and grandfather to Florentius 444 27 | malign him, whose damnable hatred proceeded so far that he 445 17 | cause of that his so great heaviness, to whom he answered straightway, 446 18 | him this warning: "Take heed, my son," quoth he, "that 447 8 | and afterward so riseth in height the space of three miles, 448 | hence 449 | hereafter 450 21 | and when he pleaseth. And hereof it cometh, that when king 451 31 | was called Galla, an Arian heretic, who, in the time of King 452 3 | delivered me from the hand of Herod, and from all the expectation 453 | herself 454 18 | BLESSED BENNET KNEW THE HIDING AWAY OF A FLAGON OF WINE. ~ 455 1 | of God amongst the steep hills, the low valleys and hollow 456 8 | he saw that he could not hinder his virtuous proceedings, 457 9 | prayers against the devil, who hindered the removing of that stone. 458 3 | himself, he said: How many hired men in my father's house 459 3 | be some good that may be holpen, and reap commodity. But 460 32 | man of God was returning homeward from work with his monks: 461 27 | upon a certain day, an honest man, who was in debt, found 462 21 | might build a temple for the honour of God, the prophet Nathan 463 8 | lifting up his wings, began to hop up and down about the loaf, 464 30 | carrying in his hand an horn and a mortar. And when he 465 31 | while surcease from his horrible cruelty. ~Galla hearing 466 31 | cords, drave him before his horse, to bring him unto this 467 2 | temptation of the flesh is hot: but after fifty years the 468 15 | whirlwind the world shaken, houses ruined, and churches overthrown, 469 Prol| at Rome in the study of humanity. But for as much as he saw 470 37 | east even up to heaven, hung and adorned with tapestry, 471 1 | place is afflicted with hunger": who, hearing this forthwith 472 3 | willingly have filled his hungry belly with the husks which 473 3 | his hungry belly with the husks which they did eat: who 474 34 | see her great glory, with hymns and lauds gave thanks to 475 30 | to give them a drench" [i.e. a large dose of veterinary 476 4 | the foresaid monk standing idle, whom for the blindness 477 19 | Bennet, been converted from idolatry to the true faith of Christ. 478 23 | family doth in some breed ignobility of mind, and maketh them 479 Prol| instructed with learned ignorance, and furnished with unlearned 480 21 | prophecy doth not always illuminate the minds of the prophets; 481 8 | though he desired not to imitate his commendable life, yet 482 17 | thing I see that Bennet imitated St. Paul: whose ship though 483 16 | 118(119):13], he addeth immediately, "of thy mouth:" as though 484 9 | vain, for it remained so immovable as though it had grown to 485 34 | to almighty God, and did impart the news of this her death 486 14 | know matters yet far more important. For in the time of the 487 25 | a time, wearied with his importunity, in anger bad him depart; 488 25 | certain monk there was so inconstant and fickle of mind, that 489 16 | 34], for it seemeth very inconvenient to be ignorant of his sense, 490 23 | often did they by their indiscreet speech provoke the foresaid 491 19 | he had behaved himself so indiscreetly: forth he drew those napkins 492 33 | Scholastica, dedicated from her infancy to our Lord, used once a 493 27 | colours, as though he had been infected with a leprosy: but the 494 3 | them: for so often as by infectious motion we are carried too 495 Prol| old man; for his age was inferior to his virtue: all vain 496 28 | disobedient monk, both for his infidelity, and also for his proud 497 8 | time, the mad multitude of infidels did offer most wicked sacrifice. 498 22 | grace to go in spirit and to inform the souls of his brethren 499 1 | miracle was known to all the inhabitants thereabout, and so much 500 15 | that it will never be more inhabited." To whom the man of God


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