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Gregory I
Gregory I Second Dialogue

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501 31 | cords which did pinion the innocent man's arms, did plainly 502 36 | know further, he may in the institution of that rule understand 503 11 | serpent thought he should have insulted over Bennet, and greatly 504 11 | old enemy appeared in an insulting manner, telling him, that 505 37 | which he foretold them, had intelligence of the same thing. Buried 506 3 | your own conditions, for I intend not now to stay any longer 507 17 | merit of life, was very intrinsical and familiar with him. This 508 16 | judgments, and his ways investigable?" [Rom. 11:33] ~And again, 509 23 | which stood now before the invisible judgment of God? ~GREGORY: 510 3 | expectation of the people of the Jews. [Acts 12:11] ~GREGORY: 511 16 | and so in that they be joined with him, they know the 512 33 | this denial of her brother, joining her hands together, laid 513 8 | promised to give the sign of Jonas to his enemies [Matt. 12: 514 23 | earth: and that flesh might judge of spiritual things, God, 515 16 | were dead, and he saw his juniors preferred before him to 516 8 | but yet almighty God of justice did severely punish [Florentius'] 517 8 | seeing that he could not kill the body of the master, 518 15 | of his reign, he lost his kingdom together with his life. ~ 519 21 | and hath not told me." [4 Kings 4:27] Which thing almighty 520 32 | came with his monks, he kneeled down and lay upon the body 521 4 | for when the other monks knelt down to serve God, his manner 522 31 | unloose with his eyes those knots and cords which did pinion 523 5 | giving him to understand, how laborious it was for them daily to 524 8 | the body of the master, laboureth now what he can, to destroy 525 6 | The Goth as he was there labouring, by chance the head of the 526 9 | finding that their own labours could do nothing, they sent 527 21 | grieved in your minds for lack of bread? Indeed, today 528 7 | water, to which the young lad was carried by force thereof, 529 16 | all this, in that they are laden with the burthen of their 530 8 | was passing sorrowful, and lamented much: both because his enemy 531 37 | with an infinite number of lamps, at the top whereof a man, 532 8 | containeth, as it were in the lap thereof, the foresaid town, 533 3 | walls, but sought for a larger field where he might more 534 Prol| General of his order; and lastly of Honoratus, who is now 535 12 | refresh themselves. And being late before they came back to 536 38 | now to rehearse fell out lately. A certain woman falling 537 Prol| years had the charge of the Lateran Abbey; of Simplicius, who 538 34 | great glory, with hymns and lauds gave thanks to almighty 539 18 | Exhilaratus our monk, a lay-brother, whom you know, was sent 540 13 | made mention before, was a layman, but devout and religious: 541 1 | with a resolute mind to lead his life in the wilderness: 542 18 | down, a snake straightways leaped forth. Then Exhilaratus 543 Prol| saw many by reason of such learning to fall to dissolute and 544 35 | and earth drawn into any lesser room than they be of themselves, 545 31 | again, he gave him a good lesson, admonishing him not to 546 Prol| set forth into the world, lest, entering too far in acquaintance 547 2 | given by Moses that the Levites from five-and-twenty years 548 35 | founded by the noble man Liberius in the country of Campania, 549 21 | withdrawing it, he doth both lift up the prophets minds on 550 13 | time in his journey, he lighted into the company of another 551 8 | the true light, which doth lighten every man coming into this 552 15 | so shaken with tempests, lightnings, whirlwinds, and earthquakes, 553 34 | departed from her body), in the likeness of a dove to ascend into 554 11 | had not only broken his limbs, but also his very bones. 555 11 | he made him sound, and as lively as ever he was before; and 556 3 | unlawful sort, and were loath to leave their former conversation, 557 21 | remained no more than five loaves for dinner. The venerable 558 35 | Servandus the Deacon was lodged, so that one pair of stairs 559 35 | they might at least, with longing and fervent desire, taste 560 11 | warning, wishing them to look unto themselves, because 561 35 | when it is so exalted and looketh downward, then doth it comprehend 562 23 | whose place of binding and loosing those have at this time, 563 24 | young boy that was a monk, loving his parents more than reason 564 1 | amongst the steep hills, the low valleys and hollow pits, 565 3 | house do abound with bread? [Luke 15] ~If then, before he 566 8 | inflame their minds to sinful lust: which damnable sight the 567 30 | Sapphira to death for their lying. For we read not, that in 568 11 | the young boy, mangled and maimed as he was, which they did, 569 23 | ignobility of mind, and maketh them in conversation to 570 8 | In conclusion so much did malicious envy blind him, and so far 571 27 | that did notably spite and malign him, whose damnable hatred 572 11 | unto him the young boy, mangled and maimed as he was, which 573 3 | them, saying that their manners were divers from his, and 574 8 | built the oratory of St. Martin, and where the altar of 575 35 | the day. Upon this sight a marvellous strange thing followed, 576 23 | church: and when solemn mass was celebrated in the same 577 35 | early up before the time of matins (his monks being yet at 578 | meantime 579 30 | large dose of veterinary medicine]. ~The venerable father 580 3 | enforced with old minds to meditate and think upon new things: 581 13 | the monk, of whom I made mention before, was a layman, but 582 27 | mouth of his own scholars, mentioned before in the beginning 583 3 | them: "Almighty God have mercy upon you, and forgive you: 584 7 | attribute this to his own merits, but to the obedience of 585 2 | bird, commonly called a merle or an ousel, began to fly 586 35 | Bishop: which being done, the messenger found that reverent Prelate 587 2 | representation of her did so mightily inflame with concupiscence 588 3 | therefore rising up, with a mild countenance and quiet mind, 589 1 | conversation, and as he could, did minister and serve him. ~The man 590 27 | HOW BENNET FOUND MONEY MIRACULOUSLY TO RELIEVE A POOR MAN. ~ 591 1 | Bennet, desiring rather the miseries of the world than the praises 592 21 | of people tasted of the misery: and all the wheat of Bennet' 593 38 | wandered at random, yet she missed not the right way: for she 594 29 | more at large admonish that mistrusting and disobedient monk, that 595 14 | presuming to go about to mock so worthy a man, and all 596 21 | monks sad, both rebuked them modestly for their pusillanimity, 597 22 | then, Abacuck could in a moment with his body go so far, 598 31 | King Totilas, did with such monstrous cruelty persecute religious 599 38 | night, and rising up in the morning, she departed as sound in 600 30 | in his hand an horn and a mortar. And when he demanded whither 601 38 | down, day and night, in mountains and valleys, in woods and 602 9 | could not so much as once move it: wherefore, finding that 603 1 | his nurse so lamenting, moved with compassion, took away 604 30 | enemy of mankind upon a mule, like a physician, met him, 605 8 | that very time, the mad multitude of infidels did offer most 606 7 | contention proceeding of mutual humility, the young youth 607 33 | spiritual and heavenly talk did mutually comfort one another: and 608 | myself 609 8 | love: by reason of which mystery it cometh to pass that, 610 8 | before their eyes seven naked young women, which did there 611 | namely 612 35 | continue on your former narration. ~ 613 13 | servant, as also to visit his natural brother, to travel from 614 22 | soul is of a more noble nature than the body. And by authority 615 14 | they durst not approach any nearer to his presence: but returned 616 31 | down his cruel and stiff neck to the holy man's feet, 617 16 | before him to holy orders, he neglected the words of the man of 618 6 | confessing his own fault and negligence: Maurus forthwith went to 619 1 | wheat, which being left negligently upon the table, by chance 620 1 | his nurse borrowed of the neighbours a sieve to make clean wheat, 621 2 | seeing many thick briers and nettle bushes to grow hard by, 622 19 | CHAPTER NINETEEN: HOW THE MAN OF GOD KNEW 623 23 | outward business. But as nobility of family doth in some breed 624 27 | who had an enemy that did notably spite and malign him, whose 625 2 | quenched that fire which, being nourished before with the fuel of 626 | nowhere 627 37 | shining with an infinite number of lamps, at the top whereof 628 2 | keepers of the holy vessels. [Numbers 8:24-26] ~PETER: Somewhat 629 34 | venerable woman returned to her Nunnery, and the man of God to his 630 Prol| born in the province of Nursia, of honourable parentage, 631 8 | said that he was willing to obey, and yet could not do what 632 13 | blessing. Then the holy man objected against him what he had 633 8 | his will, did he give him occasion of many notable victories. ~ 634 3 | order, especially if other occasions be offered of doing God 635 13 | absent, that yet he did offend in the sight of that venerable 636 8 | multitude of infidels did offer most wicked sacrifice. The 637 23 | to give unto our Lord an offering for them, beheld them at 638 22 | them where each place and office was to be builded. And when 639 27 | Neither is that to be omitted, which one of his disciples 640 37 | order to have his sepulchre opened, and forthwith falling into 641 8 | find it." Then the crow, opening his mouth, and lifting up 642 8 | had for those abbeys and oratories which he had there built 643 2 | fifty, that they should be ordained keepers of the holy vessels. [ 644 35 | country of Campania, used ordinarily to come and visit the man 645 22 | manner of man he was in his ordinary talk and conversation. ~ 646 8 | those see that which they ought to worship and love: by 647 2 | commonly called a merle or an ousel, began to fly about his 648 8 | holy father, and with great outcries complained that he had offered 649 29 | the oil likewise ceased to overflow the barrel. Then he did 650 27 | twelve shillings which he did owe him. To whom the venerable 651 7 | lake, and putting down his pail carelessly, fell in himself 652 5 | a mountain, so that very painful it was for the monks to 653 35 | was lodged, so that one pair of stairs went to them both: 654 32 | it in strange manner to pant and shake. Then he took 655 12 | wickedly: who straightways pardoned them for that fault, persuading 656 24 | that was a monk, loving his parents more than reason would, 657 12 | heard him recount so in particular, both where they had stayed, 658 22 | Abbot and the Prior, and particularly described unto them where 659 8 | secular life, and subdued the passions of their soul, under the 660 3 | unlawful acts decline from the path of holy conversation, either 661 38 | is the reason that in the patronage of martyrs we often times 662 29 | began to run over upon the pavement, which so soon as the servant 663 8 | and therefore he gave him penance, for that, sending such 664 16 | do not as yet perfectly penetrate his secret mysteries, they 665 27 | of his disciples called Peregrinus used to tell: for he said 666 3 | with silence) those that be perfect carry always this mind, 667 | perhaps 668 1 | that the townsmen, for a perpetual memory, did hang it up at 669 8 | this was done only for the persecuting of himself, he gave place 670 16 | what they receive: such persons both know these things and 671 13 | the first nor second time persuade you: but yet he did at the 672 12 | pardoned them for that fault, persuading himself that they would 673 33 | joys of heaven. But by no persuasion would he agree unto that, 674 3 | Christ, and to die is gain [Phil. 1:21]: and who not only 675 30 | mankind upon a mule, like a physician, met him, carrying in his 676 3 | man of God, like unto a piece of ground well tilled and 677 31 | day, set upon rapine and pillage, pitifully tormented a poor 678 31 | knots and cords which did pinion the innocent man's arms, 679 31 | The country fellow, thus pinioned and running before him, 680 1 | the low valleys and hollow pits, and at length found him 681 3 | governors, and in each of them placed twelve monks, and a few 682 22 | way, and according to that platform which you then saw, build 683 8 | there take hands together, play and dance a long time before 684 32 | all such things as they please, and obtain at God's hands 685 3 | of virtue brought forth plentiful store of fruit: and by reason 686 5 | abundantly, that it doth plentifully, even to this day, spring 687 6 | and to cleanse a certain plot of ground from briers, for 688 33 | petition? Concerning which point also I must needs tell you, 689 3 | together, they agreed to poison his wine: which being done, 690 3 | Gospel, prodigally spent that portion which he received of his 691 23 | faith and virtuous life possess the place of holy government: 692 1 | to serve him by all the possible means he could. ~At length 693 1 | then living, but also their posterity might understand, how greatly 694 33 | her head upon her hands, poured forth such a flood of tears 695 19 | send some of his monks to preach unto them, for the good 696 3 | this cause, that notable preacher of the word, who was desirous 697 8 | John: and by his continual preaching, he brought the people dwelling 698 16 | and he saw his juniors preferred before him to holy orders, 699 35 | messenger found that reverent Prelate departed this life, and 700 12 | observed, according to the prescription of their rule, upon a certain 701 14 | was very much afraid, for presuming to go about to mock so worthy 702 33 | found that a miracle did prevent his desire, which, by the 703 33 | to be delivered from the prick of the flesh, and obtained 704 20 | inwardly he swelled with pride, and what he spake against 705 14 | apparelled with his other princely robes, commanding him to 706 19 | your bosom for your own private use?" The monk, hearing 707 5 | and so, none of them being privy to that he had done, he 708 27 | him, whose damnable hatred proceeded so far that he poisoned 709 21 | From hence likewise it proceedeth that, when Eliseus saw the 710 7 | the friendly contention proceeding of mutual humility, the 711 8 | not hinder his virtuous proceedings, but that, on the contrary, 712 3 | as we read in the Gospel, prodigally spent that portion which 713 25 | after he continued in his profession: for by the prayers of the 714 Prol| PROLOGUE (spoken by GREGORY): ~There 715 23 | uncertainly, but assuredly pronounced and given sentence. ~For 716 30 | Tabitha to life. And for proof of this, I will now tell 717 15 | FIFTEEN: HOW VENERABLE BENNET PROPHESIED TO KING TOTILAS, AND ALSO 718 37 | HOW VENERABLE BENNET DID PROPHESY TO HIS MONKS THE TIME OF 719 31 | straight a-trembling, and prostrating himself upon the earth bowed 720 17 | heard, but we see them to be proved most true, who know that 721 Prol| thereof. He was born in the province of Nursia, of honourable 722 23 | their indiscreet speech provoke the foresaid religious man 723 4 | that when the singing of psalms was ended, and the hour 724 8 | of justice did severely punish [Florentius'] wickedness. 725 26 | father's boy was so pitifully punished with a leprosy, that all 726 16 | safe and sound, and because punishment fresh in memory useth to 727 38 | such as seek them with a pure mind. But for as much as 728 14 | behaviour, as also by his purple robes, he might verily be 729 21 | them modestly for their pusillanimity, and again did comfort them 730 2 | burning of extreme smart, quenched that fire which, being nourished 731 10 | kitchen on fire; for the quenching whereof, the monks by casting 732 16 | GREGORY: To both these questions I have already briefly answered, 733 31 | did plainly shew by the quickness of the miracle, that he 734 3 | with a mild countenance and quiet mind, he called the monks 735 19 | was much amazed for he had quite forgotten what he had put 736 3 | they fell into a great rage, accusing themselves that 737 31 | back to Galla that came raging after, he said: "This is 738 8 | would he fall a-reviling and railing at him: for when he cried 739 38 | that albeit she wandered at random, yet she missed not the 740 31 | a certain day, set upon rapine and pillage, pitifully tormented 741 Prol| of Constantinus, a most rare and reverent man, who was 742 35 | light which was in his soul ravished the mind of the beholder 743 3 | that may be holpen, and reap commodity. But where there 744 3 | themselves; the one when he recollected himself, and forsook his 745 12 | cups?" When they heard him recount so in particular, both where 746 8 | who, by the grace of our redemption, hath filled the hearts 747 1 | charity of the one and the refection of the other, seeing a loaf 748 22 | should be made, and where the refectory should stand, and all the 749 4 | would come himself, and reform what was amiss, which he 750 4 | CHAPTER FOUR: HOW BENNET REFORMED A MONK THAT WOULD NOT STAY 751 13 | then likewise he utterly refused, because he meant to go 752 3 | Abbey, he took order that regular life should be observed, 753 38 | thing which I mean now to rehearse fell out lately. A certain 754 8 | such news, he presumed to rejoice at his enemy's death. ~PETER: 755 8 | for that one of his monks rejoiced thereat; and therefore he 756 34 | ascend into heaven: who rejoicing much to see her great glory, 757 12 | what was to happen, and to relate unto them that were present, 758 38 | they do by other of their relics: and do there work greater 759 27 | FOUND MONEY MIRACULOUSLY TO RELIEVE A POOR MAN. ~Neither is 760 22 | meat the prophet Daniel was relieved: and presently after was 761 16 | proceed, if anything yet remaineth to be told of his virtue 762 1 | place called Enside and remaining there in the church of St. 763 23 | less humility, because they remember still what superiority they 764 23 | could not tarry within, she remembered what message the man of 765 21 | else that cometh to your remembrance. ~ 766 35 | anything else, but a little remnant of the light, but wondering 767 9 | devil, who hindered the removing of that stone. The holy 768 1 | with him upon his first renouncing of the world. The sieve 769 14 | were a prophet, as it was reported, or no. A certain man of 770 20 | over his waiting, and to repose himself: who being demanded 771 2 | into his mind, and by the representation of her did so mightily inflame 772 35 | HOW HE SAW THE WHOLE WORLD REPRESENTED BEFORE HIS EYES; AND ALSO 773 23 | and told him with what reproachful words they entreated him: 774 8 | fain he would have had the reputation of his virtuous conversation. ~ 775 27 | to be given to him that required but twelve, both to discharge 776 11 | higher, because that was requisite, the man of God in the meantime 777 3 | done by great labour, he reserved himself to further labour, 778 28 | Lord's servant, that was resolved to give away all upon earth 779 33 | he could not: for if we respect the venerable man's mind, 780 38 | in woods and fields, and rested only in that place where 781 33 | door: for the holy Nun, resting her head upon her hands, 782 1 | the feast of our Lord's Resurrection, and therefore meet it is 783 17 | yet not one man could they retain there, and so almighty God 784 3 | because he kept himself, and retired his cogitations within the 785 16 | scripture, or to secret revelations, acknowledge what they receive: 786 24 | Go, and lay with great reverence this our Lord's body upon 787 37 | at the top whereof a man, reverently attired, stood and demanded 788 11 | ELEVEN: HOW VENERABLE BENNET REVIVED A BOY, CRUSHED TO DEATH 789 16 | saying: "O the depth of the riches of the wisdom and knowledge 790 3 | to devise, how they might rid him out of the way: and 791 31 | not to use any more such rigour and cruel dealing. His proud 792 1 | little bell, that by the ringing thereof the man of God might 793 22 | And when they were both risen, they conferred together 794 8 | foresaid town, and afterward so riseth in height the space of three 795 1 | forward, cometh to be a river. As he was travelling to 796 5 | them were situated upon the rocks of a mountain, so that very 797 22 | all the other necessary rooms: and so they, taking his 798 15 | overthrown, and buildings rotten with old age we behold daily 799 28 | an huge downfall, full of rough and craggy stones upon which 800 8 | worshipped the god Apollo. Round about it likewise upon all 801 14 | king: to wit, Vultericus, Rudericus, and Blindinus; charging 802 11 | CRUSHED TO DEATH WITH THE RUIN OF A WALL. ~Again, as the 803 11 | any otherwise than in a sack: for the stones of the wall 804 21 | bushels of meal was found in sacks before his cell door, which 805 8 | infidels did offer most wicked sacrifice. The man of God coming thither, 806 15 | long after he went to Rome, sailed over into Sicily, and, in 807 38 | prosecute the miracles of other Saints, we may through silence 808 8 | upon the very report of his sanctity, did betake themselves to 809 14 | which time the man of God sat a little way off, and when 810 2 | words have given me full satisfaction: wherefore, seeing you have 811 22 | confess that your words have satisfied my doubtful mind. But I 812 7 | young youth himself that was saved from drowning did determine: 813 16 | him, and cleaving unto the sayings of the holy scripture, or 814 1 | having now given over the school, with a resolute mind to 815 15 | you enter, and over the sea shall you pass: nine years 816 16 | Why should he not know the secrets of God, who kept the commandments 817 8 | and many gave over the secular life, and subdued the passions 818 3 | tilled and weeded, of the seed of virtue brought forth 819 | seem 820 | seemed 821 35 | and the soul of him that seeth in this manner, is also 822 37 | concerning him one and the self-same vision: for they saw all 823 3 | Maurus, and Tertullius the Senator brought Placidus, being 824 19 | town, to whom he did often send some of his monks to preach 825 16 | many years, when all his seniors were dead, and he saw his 826 37 | he gave order to have his sepulchre opened, and forthwith falling 827 19 | very many men had, by the sermons of Bennet, been converted 828 11 | of whose death the old serpent thought he should have insulted 829 16 | certain clergyman, that served in the church of Aquinum, 830 14 | should do unto him all other services, to the end that both by 831 14 | and all his attendants and servitors fell down likewise to the 832 17 | CHAPTER SEVENTEEN: HOW THE MAN OF GOD, BENNET, 833 8 | almighty God of justice did severely punish [Florentius'] wickedness. 834 32 | strange manner to pant and shake. Then he took it by the 835 25 | none, but finding him there shaking and trembling, they brought 836 30 | raise up Tabitha; and by his sharp reprehension did sentence 837 19 | Abbey, the man of God very sharply rebuked, saying: "How cometh 838 28 | broken nor any of the oil shed. Then the man of God did 839 1 | same time likewise, certain shepherds found him in that same cave: 840 35 | to supernal things, and shewed him how small all earthly 841 37 | adorned with tapestry, and shining with an infinite number 842 17 | imitated St. Paul: whose ship though it lost all the goods, 843 14 | upon whom he caused his own shoes to be put, and to be apparelled 844 7 | the land so far as one may shoot an arrow. The man of God, 845 29 | venerable father had by miracle shown the power of almighty God, 846 11 | putting them all forth, he shut the door, and fell more 847 15 | to Rome, sailed over into Sicily, and, in the tenth year 848 37 | wax faint, and when as the sickness daily increased, upon the 849 8 | about it likewise upon all sides, there were woods for the 850 23 | sorrow, the whole matter was signified to the man of God, who straightways 851 8 | it was he that gave the signs of miracles to his servants, 852 14 | Peter, for a little while be silent, that you may know matters 853 Prol| of the Lateran Abbey; of Simplicius, who was the third General 854 4 | fell so out, that when the singing of psalms was ended, and 855 31 | to him, saying: "Rise up, sirrah, rise up, and deliver me 856 9 | that the devil himself did sit upon it, seeing so may men' 857 5 | parts, three of them were situated upon the rocks of a mountain, 858 16 | CHAPTER SIXTEEN: OF A CERTAIN CLERGYMAN, 859 37 | daily increased, upon the sixth day he commanded his monks 860 27 | not, yet did it change his skin in such sort that it was 861 1 | saw his apparel made of skins, they verily thought that 862 4 | black boy drawn out by the skirt of his garment; upon which 863 8 | that did persecute him was slain; which thing when Bennet 864 11 | building, and with the fall slew a little young child, a 865 6 | chance the head of the bill slipped off, and fell into the water, 866 35 | seeing, by reason of my slow capacity, you have delivered 867 2 | outward burning of extreme smart, quenched that fire which, 868 18 | he was bowing it down, a snake straightways leaped forth. 869 31 | that what priest or monk soever came in his presence, he 870 3 | and therefore the valiant soldier of Christ would not be kept 871 23 | in the church: and when solemn mass was celebrated in the 872 1 | not that it was the great solemnity of Easter). But the reverent 873 32 | monks upon compassion to solicit the poor man's suit, with 874 3 | venerable Bennet in that solitary wilderness dwelt with himself, 875 | something 876 25 | bad him depart; who was no sooner out of the Abbey gate, but 877 22 | returned back unto him very sorrowfully, saying: "We expected, father, 878 5 | and after they had with a spade made an hollow place, it 879 17 | God to have their lives spared, that should then live in 880 33 | all night, that they might spend it in discoursing of the 881 22 | corporally, so Bennet should go spiritually about the dispatch of spiritual 882 27 | an enemy that did notably spite and malign him, whose damnable 883 5 | plentifully, even to this day, spring out and run down from the 884 1 | which there was a fountain springing forth cool and clear water; 885 5 | FIVE: OF A FOUNTAIN THAT SPRUNG FORTH IN THE TOP OF A MOUNTAIN, 886 35 | lodged, so that one pair of stairs went to them both: before 887 22 | where the refectory should stand, and all the other necessary 888 8 | which is called Cassino, standeth upon the side of an high 889 1 | and very virtuously did steal certain hours, and likewise 890 31 | bowed down his cruel and stiff neck to the holy man's feet, 891 3 | brought forth plentiful store of fruit: and by reason 892 33 | end of her devotions, that storm of rain followed: and her 893 1 | place, lived there in a strait cave, where he continued 894 4 | blindness of his heart he strake with a little wand, and 895 31 | eyes to his bands, very strangely they fell from his arms, 896 15 | be utterly destroyed by strangers: but shall be so shaken 897 23 | itself, from whence the strength of God was weakened under 898 31 | binding his arms fast with strong cords, drave him before 899 4 | monk, but himself had been strooken. ~ 900 Prol| brought up at Rome in the study of humanity. But for as 901 36 | and also eloquent for the style. Of whose life and conversation, 902 1 | into a desert place called Sublacum, distant almost forty miles 903 31 | he had committed all his substance to the custody of Bennet, 904 3 | where more fruit and better success might be expected: and therefore 905 35 | Standing there, all on a sudden in the dead of the night, 906 36 | famous in the world, was also sufficiently learned in divinity: for 907 4 | that he durst not any more suggest any such cogitations: as 908 3 | ye out some other father suitable to your own conditions, 909 35 | together under one beam of the sun, was presented before his 910 35 | world, as it were under one sunbeam, was presented before his 911 3 | be taught, as he did in sundry other places raise up from 912 23 | they remember still what superiority they had above others: even 913 35 | mind of the beholder to supernal things, and shewed him how 914 35 | created: for by means of that supernatural light, the capacity of the 915 33 | it was almost night they supped together, and as they were 916 17 | that very Abbey to be now suppressed by the Lombards. For not 917 17 | BENNET, DID FORETELL THE SUPPRESSION OF ONE OF HIS OWN ABBEYS. ~ 918 31 | might at least for a while surcease from his horrible cruelty. ~ 919 5 | which they found as it were sweating drops of water, and after 920 32 | give over his petition, but swore that he would never depart, 921 37 | heaven, hung and adorned with tapestry, and shining with an infinite 922 33 | being not able to go forth, tarried there against his will, 923 35 | longing and fervent desire, taste of those joys and divine 924 21 | that all kind of people tasted of the misery: and all the 925 36 | man could not otherwise teach, than himself lived. ~ 926 3 | you say, and plain reason teacheth it, and the example of St. 927 23 | they had not yet learned to temper their tongues, and keep 928 33 | there fell suddenly such a tempest of lightning and thundering, 929 15 | shall be so shaken with tempests, lightnings, whirlwinds, 930 2 | certain day being alone, the tempter was at hand: for a little 931 3 | as yet, was but a boy of tender years. ~ 932 1 | his nurse alone, which did tenderly love him, would not by any 933 19 | man spake to him in plain terms, and said: "Was not I present 934 2 | was assaulted with such a terrible temptation of the flesh, 935 31 | fury, thinking to deal as terribly with him as he had with 936 4 | for the old enemy was so terrified, that he durst not any more 937 16 | fresh in memory useth to terrify the mind, he observed for 938 3 | delivered him Maurus, and Tertullius the Senator brought Placidus, 939 2 | the meaning of the former text alleged, prosecute, I pray, 940 18 | Bennet: who took it very thankfully, and, when the man was going 941 | thence 942 1 | under the rule of Abbot Theodacus, and very virtuously did 943 1 | known to all the inhabitants thereabout, and so much admired, that 944 8 | one of his monks rejoiced thereat; and therefore he gave him 945 | thereby 946 2 | himself; and seeing many thick briers and nettle bushes 947 | thine 948 3 | old minds to meditate and think upon new things: and because 949 30 | CHAPTER THIRTY: HOW BENNET DELIVERED A 950 38 | CHAPTER THIRTY-EIGHT: HOW A MAD WOMAN WAS CURED 951 35 | CHAPTER THIRTY-FIVE: HOW HE SAW THE WHOLE WORLD 952 34 | CHAPTER THIRTY-FOUR: HOW BENNET SAW THE SOUL 953 31 | CHAPTER THIRTY-ONE: OF A COUNTRY FELLOW, THAT, 954 37 | CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVEN: HOW VENERABLE BENNET DID 955 36 | CHAPTER THIRTY-SIX: HOW HOLY BENNET WROTE A 956 33 | CHAPTER THIRTY-THREE: OF A MIRACLE WROUGHT BY 957 32 | CHAPTER THIRTY-TWO: HOW BY PRAYER VENERABLE 958 23 | pronounce against them, but only threatened if they amended not themselves. ~ 959 23 | to be done, but only in a threatening manner, his speech in that 960 35 | because you have made me thrughly to understand these things, 961 33 | tempest of lightning and thundering, and such abundance of rain, 962 1 | provided good cheer for thyself, and my servant in such 963 1 | which also with a band he tied a little bell, that by the 964 3 | unto a piece of ground well tilled and weeded, of the seed 965 1 | assure him, saying: "Verily, to-day is the feast of our Lord' 966 3 | with good conscience be tolerated in that community, where 967 21 | some want there is, but tomorrow you shall have plenty": 968 16 | and never gave over to torment him, until he had separated 969 31 | did, to the end that his tormentor, giving credit to his words, 970 8 | the top thereof seemeth to touch the very heavens: in this 971 27 | health: for so soon as he touched him, forthwith all that 972 3 | their sons of great hope and towardness: of which two, Maurus, growing 973 1 | so much admired, that the townsmen, for a perpetual memory, 974 13 | his natural brother, to travel from his own house to the 975 13 | hour. But afterward, having travelled a little further again he 976 32 | the child's body began to tremble in such sort that all which 977 11 | over Bennet, and greatly triumphed. ~ 978 21 | to his servant that did trouble her: "Let her alone, for 979 1 | after, even to these very troubles of the Lombards, where it 980 8 | straightways he would turn his tune, and say: "Cursed Bennet, 981 20 | CHAPTER TWENTY: HOW HOLY BENNET KNEW THE 982 28 | CHAPTER TWENTY-EIGHT: HOW A CRUET OF GLASS WAS 983 25 | CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE: HOW A MONK, FORSAKING THE 984 24 | CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR: OF A BOY THAT AFTER HIS 985 29 | CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE: HOW AN EMPTY BARREL WAS 986 21 | CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE: OF TWO HUNDRED BUSHELS 987 27 | CHAPTER TWENTY-SEVEN: HOW BENNET FOUND MONEY 988 26 | CHAPTER TWENTY-SIX: HOW HOLY BENNET CURED A 989 23 | CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE: OF CERTAIN NUNS ABSOLVED 990 22 | CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO: HOW, BY VISION, VENERABLE 991 23 | he had not doubtfully or uncertainly, but assuredly pronounced 992 3 | wandering of his mind and unclean thoughts, fell under himself: 993 31 | with any haste could have undone them. Galla, seeing him 994 16 | sense, to whom being so united he is made one thing. ~GREGORY: 995 Prol| ignorance, and furnished with unlearned wisdom. All the notable 996 | unlike 997 31 | of that cruel Goth, and unloose with his eyes those knots 998 12 | you," quoth he, "tell an untruth? for did you not go into 999 35 | who, troubled at such an unusual crying out of the man of 1000 3 | in one place, that were unwilling to be taught, as he did


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