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Maulana Jalalu-'d-din Muhammad Rumi
Masnavi I Ma'navi

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0n-bount | bower-disma | disor-grazi | greas-loyal | lram-poure | pours-sette | setti-unask | unatt-zd

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1501 3, 3 | procured a skin full of fat, greased his beard and lips with 1502 1, 9 | place!~Highest heaven is greatness itself revealed;~But what 1503 6, 2 | himself to blame for his greediness in eating the food which 1504 1, 17 | and nutriment;~When its greenness has gone and it becomes 1505 4, 7 | the contrary, omitted to greet him when he met him, and 1506 6, 9 | Qazi, pretending to have a grievance; and when she saw the Qazi 1507 3, 7 | imaginations,~Nor would he be grieved by the reproaches of his 1508 5, 10 | most miserable plight, some grievously wounded, and others dying. 1509 2, 15 | s work,~His face becomes grimed by the smoke fumes;~Then 1510 1, 5 | The notion of fatalism is groundless in this place.~Ye have feet 1511 2, 16 | delinquent excused himself on the grounds that the mean is relative, 1512 3, 7 | on a straight path,~Not grovelling on his face or creeping." 1~ 1513 3, 11 | to gain paradise with its groves and founts.~His avoidance 1514 3, 14 | was at first inclined to grumble at this stroke of ill-luck; 1515 6, 1 | and Ayaz. The courtiers grumbled because Ayaz received the 1516 6, 4 | tribulation; for, instead of grumbling at his lot, he replied, " 1517 2, 8 | became his faithful slave, guarding him from everything that 1518 5, 13 | hearers. The wise man is as a guest-house, and he admits all the thoughts 1519 4, 2 | acknowledge your ignorance and guilt,~That the Heavenly Master 1520 2, 2 | slew a hundred thousand guiltless babes~That the ordinance 1521 1, 14 | you ever plucked a rose (Gul) from Gaf and Lam?~You name 1522 1 (6) | to its votaries. Sa'di (Gulistan, Book II. Story XI.) says: " 1523 5, 13 | estranged by life on earth. Like Habib, the carpenter of Antioch, 1524 2, 3 | esteem by the King.~To Bishr Hafi the doctrine, was announced,~ 1525 1 (2) | considered a sign of hypocrisy (Hafiz, Ode 5). ~ 1526 6, 4 | anecdote of an ugly old hag who painted her face to 1527 5, 13 | warfares have their Rustams and Haidars.~They are not to be fought 1528 1, 3 | roses might learn of garlic.~Hair-splitters and all their disciples~ 1529 6, Prol| offer yourself sooner to half-blind old women.~What is there 1530 4, 4 | strike a deadly blow, ~Their half-knowledge held their hands back; ~ 1531 5, 13 | said to his wife, "If this half-man is all cat, where is the 1532 4, 2 | Prophet, how he was suckled by Halima, a woman of the Bani Sa' 1533 6, Prol| admittance to the divine hall of audience.~What is "ascension" 1534 2, 1 | at the place where they halted for the night, they sold 1535 6, 6 | bread will choke you like a halter.~This same garment which 1536 4, 5 | boundless desert,~Sometimes halting and despairing, sometimes 1537 3, 2 | in joy and delight to the halting-place,~So did they run upon their 1538 3, 12 | shows great as small, and halts in its praises. ~Or if the 1539 5 (7) | descent of the Deity into man (Halul), or incarnation, is rejected 1540 4, 6 | To sever itself into two halves in the sky. 7 ~Or like the 1541 3 (5) | d-Din Amili, in his Nan wa Halwa, chap. iv., compares lust 1542 4 (26)| Jacobi, quoted in Sir W. Hamilton's Lectures on Metaphysics, 1543 3, 13 | advice?~How long shall we hammer cold iron in vain?~How long 1544 2 (3) | inspiration is likened to a light handed on from one to another. ~ 1545 3, 12 | judgment. 4~O man whose only handiwork is crime and sin; ~Thy secret 1546 1, 1 | STORY I. The Prince and the Handmaid.~A prince, while engaged 1547 2, 3 | two slaves, one extremely handsome, and the other very ugly. 1548 5, 5 | Abraham, the orthodox" (Hanifun). 8~ 1549 1, 1 | s mysteries.~A lover may hanker after this love or that 1550 5, 10 | had all the time a carnal hankering after the pleasant grazing-ground 1551 6, Prol| attracted to the Beloved!~But haply leave may be given me hereafter~ 1552 2, 4 | in a drop of blood.~Joy harbors in the kidneys and pain 1553 6, 6 | stronger and stronger;~And the harder he drew his bow,~The further 1554 2, 6 | be a lord.~Love endures hardships at the hands of the Beloved.~ 1555 4, 8 | the other ladies of his harem did not approve of the match, 1556 5, 9 | will say, "I embraced the harlot."~Eye will say, "I looked 1557 6, 7 | absolutely bad.~Each is harmful or beneficial according 1558 3, 14 | slaughtered cattle~If a wolf has harried your flocks;"~For that calamity 1559 5, 13 | he told an anecdote of a harsh-voiced Mu'azzin who went into a 1560 5, 10 | He ought to have become harsher,~If He really be, as He 1561 3, 13 | relieved and lose their harshless. ~Oftentimes hope succeeds 1562 2, 10 | favorite at the court of Harunu-'r-Rashid, and of the people 1563 6, 4 | The mentor says, "O raw hastener, through patient waiting,~ 1564 1, 12 | confesses his own defects~Is hastening in the way that leads to 1565 3, 18 | And its knowledge again hastes on towards certainty,~Because 1566 6, 7 | the prince not to be over hasty in punishing him, but to 1567 3, 2 | Go! for do I not know a hatchet from a ploughshare? ~O plotter, 1568 5, 8 | stone becomes a ruby it hates itself~For till it becomes 1569 3, 18 | and live. Some said it was haunted by malevolent fairies; others, 1570 3, 18 | from my garden and meadow haunts."~Then Solomon replied, " 1571 3, 2 | Saying, "Cut out a large head-dress," ~And failure in the test 1572 6, 7 | his wit~Save to be hurled head-foremost into hell for infidelity?~ 1573 2, 14 | brought me are weariness and headaches, and I know not where to 1574 5, 13 | you by the throat like a headsman.~Know that even in this 1575 2, 5 | hidden is equally fierce and headstrong.~We are the captured game; 1576 3, 2 | with his breath he might heal their ailments.~As soon 1577 4, 3 | made whole at once by the Healer of broken hearts. ~Divine 1578 1, Prol| sweet madness!~Thou who healest all our infirmities!~Who 1579 4, 3 | look onward to Him that heals the broken; ~'Twould look 1580 6, 5 | storehouse?~Thy body is a heap of roses, thy thought rosewater;~' 1581 6, 9 | God, saying,~"O Thou that hearest prayer and relievest pain,~ 1582 5 (4) | i.e., are based on hearsay. ~ 1583 6, 9 | Though he is wailing with heartfelt cry of 'O Aider!'~Bid him 1584 1, 10 | Though he slay a young man, heave not a sigh.~God declares 1585 6, 5 | foam, see the ocean that heaves it!~Ah! look till you see 1586 3, 13 | our bonds are made thereby heavier every moment. ~If our sickness 1587 6, 6 | Khirqani and the Prophet Hud or Heber.~God rules men by alternations 1588 2 (2) | There is a Hedis: "The Prophet loved perfumes 1589 3, 12 | for love of that Moon, ~Heedless of the way, absorbed in 1590 2, 10 | you have labored to make hellish lusts, ~And the 'fire of 1591 1, 15 | eight heavens and the seven hells, and the destinies of all 1592 1, 9 | did not shine as bright helmets,~How could the fruits display 1593 4, 2 | kingdom?~How men and demons helped Solomon in building the 1594 6, 5 | The Sufi said, "The Great Helper is able~To procure for us 1595 2, 16 | How can the fly lend a helping hand to me?~Whoso has in 1596 5, 13 | thy shoes, and kiss the hem of thy robe!"~No one equaled 1597 2, 18 | were brought up under a Hen.~Although a domestic fowl 1598 2 (2) | The doctrine of Heraclitus, that opposite states generate 1599 5, 11 | the slaves of the Chief of Herat, and cried to Heaven, "Ah! 1600 1, 17 | camel, now beware of that herb!~The Word is become foul 1601 4, 2 | channels. Thus physicians and herbalists have derived their knowledge 1602 4, 6 | reflection that like always herds with like, and so Pharaoh 1603 | hereby 1604 1, 9 | Though the secret moral hereof is a bait and snare,~Hear 1605 1, 13 | All the seventy and two heresies lurk in you;~Have a care 1606 4, 4 | externals. ~Therefore these heretics, who regard only externals, ~ 1607 3, 13 | harmony which we enjoyed heretofore ~Have been rent in pieces 1608 3, 13 | fowl. ~The prison is the hermitage of the wicked thief,~For 1609 1 (1) | Compare the story of Zopyrus, Herodotus, iii. 155. ~ 1610 5, 6 | within you,~Whereof the heroes ignore these questions of 1611 | hers 1612 4, 6 | there is no help for it;~Hesitate not to pull it down; do 1613 3, 2 | family with him. The townsman hesitated long before accepting his 1614 5, 6 | grapes and other produce of hi garden. In recognition of 1615 6, 4 | him of the Jew. After much higgling and attempts at cheating 1616 5, 13 | on which he praised them highly and gave them presents. 1617 2, 3 | of genius.~Fazil from a highway robber became a sage of 1618 3 (3) | tenth day of the month Zul Hijja. It is also called "The 1619 2, 1 | of that ecstatic singing~Hindered his wits from grasping the 1620 1, 9 | that review;~Whoso, like a Hindoo, is black (with sin),~The 1621 3, 5 | Elephant in a Dark Room.~Some Hindoos were exhibiting an elephant 1622 1, 9 | help, and at other times a hindrance.~O Lord, grant, in answer 1623 1, 7 | away, explaining that the Hindustani parrot had only feigned 1624 4, 6 | taken your house on lease or hired it;~'Tis not your own property 1625 6 (14)| of Position."Khulasat ul Hisab, Book iv. ~ 1626 1, 14 | traditions and scriptures and histories,~In the fount of the water 1627 3, 1 | better than a hundred 'Come hithers' and ejaculations. ~Ah! 1628 6, 9 | the King before was that hitherto he had lacked the "inner 1629 6, 7 | only the blindness of the holder.~All your outcry and pompous 1630 3, 2 | covetousness, and lust?~Thou holdest thyself out as a lover of 1631 5, 5 | thinkest thou of him who holdeth back a servant of God when 1632 6, 7 | his arms, whereby he dug holes through the walls of houses 1633 3, 8 | boys wished to obtain a holiday, and the sharpest of them 1634 1, 9 | glory of our praises and homage~For the vain babble (of 1635 3, 17 | because they were steps in his homeward course. When he reached 1636 6, 7 | which Reason warns him that homogeneity lies in spirit, not in outward 1637 3, 15 | wasps.~The faithful yield honeycombs like bees,~The infidels 1638 4, 2 | arguments, saying,~"I used to be honorable; Thou hast disgraced me.~ 1639 6, 4 | afterwards promoted to the honourable post of the Prophet's Mu' 1640 2, 2 | Divine decree to change,~And hoped to turn his destiny from 1641 3, 13 | Oftentimes hope succeeds to hopelessness, ~Many times does sunlight 1642 4, 2 | of God. 9~The wailing of horn and the thunder of drum~ 1643 4, 4 | disciples all became mad with horror, ~And struck with their 1644 2, 8 | prophethood.~I brought the host out of the Red Sea before 1645 1, 5 | with the divine decree, O hot-headed one,~Lest that decree enter 1646 4, 2 | The fire of love burns hotter under stimulus of music,~ 1647 2, 6 | love the Devil becomes a Houri.~Through love hard stones 1648 3, 13 | owls,~Whereby a hundred households are annihilated.~When Noah 1649 4, 2 | searched for camels on a housetop?"~They said, "We follow 1650 3, 7 | vital truth.~The others, hovering between two opinions,~Fly 1651 5, 11 | when the mighty phoenix hovers over your head, 8~Causing 1652 1, 8 | wisdom in the Creator's si ht,~Whereas from our point 1653 1, 7 | shame on his lord by petty huckstering.~He who is admitted to the 1654 4, 4 | the Prophet appointing an Hudhaili youth to be captain of a 1655 6, 4 | gourd, your bright green hue soon turns yellow.~For it 1656 5, 8 | he has spun himself The hug's conduct in this did not 1657 1, 9 | spake the two words, "O Humaira!" 3~Though water prevails 1658 6, 9 | himself, and repented and humbled himself with deep contrition. 1659 6, 9 | of God. 5~Seek Him with humbleness and self-abasement,~For 1660 3, 13 | and arrogant, ~Hell and humbling are the "small gate" for 1661 3, 4 | that snake in the frost of humiliation,~Draw it not forth into 1662 6, 9 | was only Yusuf;~Was she an hungred, when she pronounced his 1663 1, 11 | STORY XI. The Lion who Hunted with the Wolf and the Fox.~ 1664 5, 3 | being constantly pursued by hunters, whom he had no strength 1665 6, Prol| unmatched in form,~If he hunts mice he is contemptible 1666 6, Prol| pictures though fair as Huris,~And offer yourself sooner 1667 6, 7 | from his wit~Save to be hurled head-foremost into hell 1668 6, 4 | kneaded by slow degrees.~Not hurrying on like you, O raw one,~ 1669 1, 7 | man of heart," he takes no hurt,~Even though he should eat 1670 6, 3 | the martyrdom of Hasan and Husain. Once, while they were thus 1671 6, 9 | of my love,~Quit the mere husk and form of the wheat.~When 1672 2 (11)| this title to Hasan and Hussain. ~ 1673 4, 9 | wonderful figures,~Like hyacinths and lilies and roses.'~The 1674 1 (12)| But the Infinite Deity ex hypothesi includes all things; so 1675 1, 16 | convert a hundred fresh Iblises into Mosalmans."~Adam answered, " 1676 3 (3) | The Id ul Azha, or the Feast of 1677 2 (2) | Muhammad, whom the Sufis identify with the Primal Soul. ~ 1678 4, 1 | Ghazi" applied to a noble idler.~If such titles as these 1679 3, 4 | to Baghdad. There all the idlers of the city flocked together 1680 4, 5 | give counsel to a sleepy ignoramus~Is to sow seeds upon salt 1681 6, 5 | Twere strange if rosewater ignored the rose-heap!"~ 1682 4, 3 | cook and on the messenger, ignoring the fact that the folly 1683 4 (8) | Dahriyun, Tabayiun, and Ilahiyun. Schmolders, Ecoles Philosophiques, 1684 2, 8 | Water became blood for my ill-conditioned enemy.~The staff became 1685 2, 17 | Thou hast run after form, O ill-informed one,~Wherefore thou lackest 1686 3, 14 | grumble at this stroke of ill-luck; but when he saw the viper 1687 2, 2 | some other man bears him ill-will;~Saying this one is my enemy, 1688 2, 15 | black,~Both the writings are illegible and senseless.~Or if, in 1689 1, 1 | real cause of the maiden's illness was her love for a certain 1690 6, Prol| its six parts,~That it may illuminate him who is not illuminated!~ 1691 6, 8 | stars He made torches to illumine the sky,~And of the four 1692 2, 3 | When his two sons were illumined by this light,~They became 1693 2, 17 | followed by another anecdote illustrative of the same thesis that 1694 4, 9 | Towards their noble and illustrious teachers.~The disciple's 1695 6 (2) | or "form," means picture, image, outward appearance as opposed 1696 1, 7 | sickness,~But if a saint imbibe infidelity it becomes faith.~ 1697 5, 6 | parrot is speaking, and imitates all that is said by the 1698 5, 6 | Your ignorant and mere imitative weeping is totally unlike 1699 2, 1 | that Sufi guest;~They are immersed in his affairs neck deep.~ 1700 4, 6 | persisted in remaining, at the imminent peril of its life, despite 1701 4, 7 | this mortal is the guide to immortality,~As the cries of revellers 1702 2 (12)| Hallaj, the celebrated Sufi impaled at Bagdad. Shah or King 1703 1, 6 | word 'compulsion' makes me impatient for love's sake;~'Tis he 1704 1, 10 | hands.' 3~The hand of God impels him and gives him life;~ 1705 4, 5 | it, and thus escaped the impending danger. The half wise fish 1706 5, 9 | head; but, in spite of her imperative commands, he refused to 1707 2, 10 | They proceed not from His imperfection, but His skill, ~That the 1708 4, 4 | reason, ~And he spoke more impiously than before. ~"Within my 1709 1, 13 | and want of faith~Which implant in himself this vain fancy 1710 4, 1 | not possess the qualities implied, 'tis wrong;~'Twould be 1711 6, 7 | Now, therefore, I will implore his grace for myself,~For 1712 5 (2) | a state of probation as implying trial and danger" (Analogy, 1713 2, 5 | procrastination in this important matter.~"It was not ye who 1714 1, 1 | strayed from his physician,~Importune me not, for I am beside 1715 1, 1 | Shamsu-'d-Din of Tabriz importunes Jalalu-'d-Din~to compose 1716 4, 9 | parents."~As he continued importuning him, Gabriel displayed~His 1717 3, 18 | life; ~This trial is not imposed on you to distress you. ~ 1718 6, 5 | fruits~Has been, like Mary, impregnated by the Unseen King.~Though 1719 2, 18 | alike on sea and land;~For impress on thy mind, "We have carried 1720 2, 14 | thus corrected his false impressions. He took the needle with 1721 5, 1 | O skilful Fair-writer!~Imprinting every moment on Not-being 1722 3, 18 | reminding him that not improbably Satan was tempting him to 1723 1, 9 | boasting of yours is very improper,~So shall my mercy be shown 1724 3, 18 | exposed to trials for their improvement, as potherbs are boiled 1725 4, 1 | a seer,~Or a name like "impudent" for a modest man,~Or "beautiful" 1726 5, 10 | yield leaves and fruit?~He impudently preaches to others to walk 1727 5, 1 | purify the impure from their impurities. 7~Thus acts and words are 1728 1, 8 | both veiled and hidden,~Impute it not as a fault if I call 1729 2, 17 | Arab said he would buy "inab," while the Turk and the 1730 2, 13 | from nervous debility, from inability to walk, and so on; and 1731 6, 9 | illustrations are weak and inappropriate,~But no fitter ones are 1732 1, 1 | the point,~And is clearly inapt and wide of the mark.~What 1733 6, 9 | Yea, the perfume of the incense of sinners' groans~Mounts 1734 3, 17 | life-giving smiles. ~Thy inclining thine ear to my supplications ~ 1735 1 (5) | phenomenal existences (man included) are but "veils" obscuring 1736 1 (12)| Infinite Deity ex hypothesi includes all things; so there is 1737 5, 11 | not its writing," are not inconsistent with the existence of freewill 1738 3, 18 | main object herein is to inculcate resignation, ~O Mosalman! 1739 3, 5 | Acquiescence in God's ordinance ~Is incumbent on all true believers.' ~ 1740 2, 17 | of His descriptions, yet indescribable.~Every one who seeks names, 1741 6, 5 | expression only by way of indication.~But keep silence till the 1742 2, 7 | accepted."~Religious forms indifferent.~A voice came from God to 1743 3, 17 | itself the stream. ~Its individuality is lost, but its essence 1744 1, 1 | the light of life.~Shadows induce slumber, like evening talks,~ 1745 5, 13 | tribulation,~But hell-fire follows indulgence in lust." 12~O Ayaz, who 1746 3, 12 | father, affectionate and indulgent;~For this cause, that you 1747 5, 13 | the real "I" of the Deity indwells in the human soul; but as 1748 1, 10 | Shares its proximity to the ineffable Presence.~Do thou seek to 1749 5, 4 | Shi'as; but the prince was inexorable, and refused to alter the 1750 5, 10 | practice, a story is told of an infamous fellow who used to carry 1751 1, 12 | fancying thyself perfect~Can infect thy soul, O arrogant misguided 1752 3, 16 | self-evident and mere matters of inference, and between knowing a thing 1753 5, 1 | within,~From these two deduce inferences as to the thoughts.~When 1754 2, 14 | human knowledge, and its inferiority to the divine knowledge 1755 5, 13 | hence it may perhaps be inferred that this part of the poem 1756 6, 7 | directly,~Not mere talk, inferring the fire from the smoke.~ 1757 6, 7 | breath whence a physician infers.~If these be your only proofs, 1758 4, 1 | When my eye is red owing to inflammation,~I know 'tis so from the 1759 6, 9 | to incur the punishment inflected on the tribe of 'Ad for 1760 3, 17 | lord might be pleased to inflict upon him. His friends did 1761 1, 7 | coquetry His glances~Are still inflicting fresh wounds on my heart.~ 1762 3, 17 | these principles and causes ~Inflicts every moment a fresh pang 1763 4, 2 | faithful hold that the sweet influences of heaven~Can make even 1764 4, 6 | staff is shown to you, ~And informs you of that of other inanimate 1765 2, 10 | instead of a terror. ~He will infuse into your soul a new soul, ~ 1766 4, 2 | better than false pride.~O ingenuous one, learn of our father 1767 4, 2 | forty camels laden with ingots of gold; but Solomon would 1768 5, 4 | After the city was taken the inhabitants came out, and proceeded 1769 3, 2 | you are self-convicted of inhumanity, for you must have recognized 1770 1, 7 | laugh at these pretended injuries.~Do me justice, O Thou who 1771 6, 5 | accomplish good without injury to any.~He who extracts 1772 5, 13 | turned her house into an inn. Let grief as well as joy 1773 3, 8 | of the Sunnis, that the innate capacities of men vary very 1774 4, 6 | Therefore, bite not the innocent with your teeth; ~Bear in 1775 1, 13 | you too;~You may develop innumerable states of mind.~All the 1776 1, 4 | And again helpless and inoperative.~That Cause, which is a 1777 6, 7 | excessive speculation and inordinate science,~'Tis service of 1778 3, 5 | besides me".~Yesterday an inquirer questioned me, ~Since he 1779 5, 6 | their laughter;~Then he inquires what the laughter was about,~ 1780 2, 3 | face towards the desert of inquiry.~When Zu-1-Ntin became distraught 1781 5, 3 | his beak. At seeing this insane self-destruction the sage 1782 3, 16 | mansions she read her own name inscribed. And a voice from heaven 1783 1 (1) | The poet's insistence on the doctrine of God being 1784 2, 16 | Shaikh then admonished him, insisting on the obligation of keeping 1785 2, 2 | we are perishing by his insolence.~The dog is one, yet he 1786 6, 7 | not dragged down by that insolent mouse,~The frog would remain 1787 1, 14 | offered to tho Sultan's inspection, that painted by tho Chinese 1788 3, 13 | On every side stories inspiring anxiety, ~On every side 1789 5, 5 | free the people from their instability.~To the soul that is bent 1790 5, 10 | dispensations of Providence. He also instanced the case of the ass of a 1791 3, 18 | came swiftly, ~And the gnat instantly took flight. ~In like manner 1792 3 (5) | cxi.: Abu Labab, at the instigation of his wife, Omm Jahil, 1793 1, 13 | men's morbid imaginations~Instil many vain fancies into men' 1794 6, 6 | like a cuirass,~When God instils wrath into this mouthful 1795 5, 13 | we as hand and foot;~Soul instructs hand and foot to hold and 1796 2, 16 | relative.~The water which is insufficient for a camel~Is like an ocean 1797 1, 9 | in fact they agree in an integral unity.~In one aspect they 1798 3, 12 | praises it, ~In reality he is intending to praise the moon, ~Although, 1799 3, 12 | his object was this, ~To interchange a word with the favorites 1800 2, 11 | thief like you to guard my interests?" Iblis answered, "Remember 1801 4, 7 | bystanders were all afraid to interfere, with the exception of one 1802 5, 11 | the declarations of the interior consciousness, as those 1803 6, 7 | game of love with God's interlocutor;~The Christian has been 1804 4, 7 | with God he has no need of intermediaries. Prophets and apostles are 1805 6, 9 | not all shut off, rather intermitted for a wise end,~For the 1806 2, 3 | became so expert as he was in interpreting dreams.~When the staff drew 1807 1, Prol| and them that weep.~Each interprets my notes in harmony with 1808 4, 2 | he was doing, would not interrupt him, for he knew that the 1809 3, 18 | follows on certainty with no interval,~Just as reasoned knowledge 1810 5, 13 | Ayaz, which is continued at intervals till the end of the book. 1811 4, 7 | to the king when this man intervened. It was a moment when, according 1812 6, 1 | Next morning he had an interview with the girl and her mother, 1813 6, 9 | Yusuf."~When the soul is intimately united with God,~To name 1814 6, 9 | And slighted his matchless intimations.~Now we have all fallen 1815 6, 3 | that minstrel began his intoxicating song,~"O give me Thy cup, 1816 5, 9 | used to carry on shameful intrigues with some of the women who 1817 2, 17 | than its outward form. This introduces the story of the tree of 1818 2 (15)| In the introduction to the Nafahatu-'l Uns, 1819 4, 7 | with me,' 2 and this man intruded between us. I desired no 1820 3, 18 | no deep analysis or lofty investigation therein. ~Little boys can 1821 1, 9 | Practise abstinence, see how it invigorates thy soul!~Accept this counsel 1822 3, 2 | long before accepting his invitation, having doubts as to his 1823 4, 1 | only relative.~The lover invoked blessings on that rough 1824 6, 9 | revealed,~After we have been involved in these calamities."~"The 1825 1, Prol| hills to dance with joy!~O Iover, 'twas love that gave life 1826 3, 4 | forth into the sunshine of 'Iraq!~So long as that snake is 1827 3, 13 | parable-mongers attacked him with irony,~Saying, "In the desert, 1828 6, Prol| whereby Thou madest me thus irresolute,~Of Thy mercy deliver me 1829 6, Prol| mercy deliver me from this irresolution!~Thou triest me; O give 1830 5, 11 | with the fatalist plea of irresponsibility, to whom the owner of the 1831 6, 9 | these states~'Twould be irreverent to explain his state more 1832 5 (10)| the same as that of the Ishraqin (Platonists)." Dabistan 1833 6, Prol| Disport thyself on this island of the Masnavi!~Disport 1834 Note (1) | Haji Khalfa, v. 377. Ismai1 was a Darvesh of the Maulavi 1835 Note | appearance, put forth by Ismail Dadah, the commentator. 1836 3, 18 | cut your throat like an Ismailian's. ~I cut off your head, 1837 3, 18 | the devoted agents of the Ismailians, who were always ready to 1838 5, 7 | house,~Or the perfect plant issuing from the seed in the ground.~ 1839 5 (7) | doctrine of intimate union (Ittihad or Wahdat). ~ 1840 4 (8) | See "The Dervishes," by J.P. Brown, p. 197. ~ 1841 6, 8 | pension, even as the Imam Ja'far Sadiq was able to capture 1842 3, 7 | those of a Compulsionist (Jabri). Each says the other is 1843 4 (26)| proves him to exist? " (Jacobi, quoted in Sir W. Hamilton' 1844 3, 9 | is free from bonds, ~No jailer watches him, no chain binds 1845 4 (8) | of Darveshes, founded by Jalalu -d-Din Rumi. See "The Dervishes," 1846 2 (15)| to the Nafahatu-'l Uns, Jami says there are always 4000 1847 5, 3 | in the asses stable, and jeered at and maltreated by them. 1848 6, 9 | accomplished by the name of Jehovah,~Zulaikha attained through 1849 2 (2) | another, is discussed by Jelaludin in a passage quoted in Lumsden' 1850 5, 12 | from side to side like the jessamine. The prophets themselves 1851 4, 1 | tis wrong;~'Twould be jesting or mockery or madness.~" 1852 2, 2 | and mists and jokes and jests.~Sometimes thoughts of peace 1853 5, 1 | Sad of the eye,~And the Jim of the ear, to amaze reason 1854 5, 8 | because he was one of the Jinn, who are all created of 1855 2, 17 | entire ignorance, others joked him, and others gave him 1856 4, 9 | rent the garments of many Josephs,~You will rise from your 1857 6, 3 | midnight,~To me the dawn of joyful morn seems nigh.~To the 1858 2, 11 | For then the hard art of judging goods would be easy.~If 1859 3, 12 | dragged him before the judgment-seat of the prophet David. When 1860 1, 3 | of results is not simple jugglery,~Otherwise all these differences 1861 3, 10 | December is not as that of July;~Though they be dead or 1862 2, 3 | Shakik starting from that junction~Became a sun of wit and 1863 5, 5 | statement of the doctrine of the jurist Abu hanifa, to whose school 1864 2, 11 | answering, continued to justify himself, saying how hard 1865 5, 13 | secret, and though he might justly have resented the treachery 1866 4, 1 | As a negro may be called Kafu'r (white);~They are names 1867 5 (4) | has no director (Murshid i kamil) to instruct him in the 1868 4, 4 | one, like the assassins of Kardkoh, 2 ~Without fear aimed at 1869 2, 3 | the stake.~When Karkhi of Karkh became its keeper,~He became 1870 2, 3 | hastened to the stake.~When Karkhi of Karkh became its keeper,~ 1871 6, 8 | of a man buying bread at Kashan, of Sultan Khwarazm Shah 1872 2, 7 | burnt with fire are near to Kausar.' 3~Whoso is in prison and 1873 2, 3 | Karkhi of Karkh became its keeper,~He became lord of love 1874 5, 7 | saying, "O dog, begone to thy kennel!"~Then the prisoner will 1875 5, 10 | of the dust.~You see the kettles of thought boiling over,~ 1876 6, 8 | four elements locks with keys (of reason).~Ah! many are 1877 5, 4 | claiming descent from the first Khahif Abu Bakr. After the city 1878 2, 11 | the first of the Ommiad Khalifas, was one day lying asleep 1879 5 (16)| to 1210. De Slane's Ibn Khallikan, ii. 652. ~ 1880 5, 4 | was defeated by Chingiz Khan a year or two later. In 1881 2, 1 | man, and of Shaikh Ahmad Khizrawiya buying sweetmeats for his 1882 5, 5 | Read " Wais and Ramin" and "Khosrau and Shirin"~To see what 1883 5, 10 | musk-deer, feeds on saffron of Khoten~Must not eat grass and oats 1884 6 (14)| The Rule of Position."Khulasat ul Hisab, Book iv. ~ 1885 2, 1 | in spite of the blows and kicks that were showered on him, 1886 2, 4 | blood.~Joy harbors in the kidneys and pain in the liver,~The 1887 3, 12 | Better than a mother, and kinder than a father.~The Prophet 1888 2, 5 | kindles the flame; who is this kindler?~At one time He makes the 1889 3, 5 | ask you a question in all kindliness, ~Did this bruise proceed 1890 4, 9 | them it has the power of kindling fire.~Flint and steel are 1891 1, 9 | obscure, still causes testify;~Kindred, for instance, shows that 1892 4, 2 | kings~Will receive a hundred kingdoms not of this world;~But the 1893 1, 2 | mortifying the flesh.~The kingly soul lays waste the body,~ 1894 2, 16 | kinsman. ~Superiority and kinsmanship are both mere assertions, ~ 1895 1, 7 | any message to send to his kinsmen in that country, and the 1896 6, 9 | presence of the King and kissed his feet. The King, like 1897 4, 9 | the slaughter-house~That kitchen will bestow upon him a new 1898 2, 11 | who says all is false is a knave.~:~ 1899 1, 9 | of review will sound the knell of his disgrace.~Since he 1900 6, 7 | wrong; and so if you put the knight in the king's,~The law prescribes 1901 2, 11 | Auf, and of the mosque at Kuba, near Medina, and a treacherous 1902 3, 17 | and remained concealed in Kuhistan and the desert for the space 1903 4 (3) | Aql i Kull, Universal Reason, or the 1904 4, 2 | who attacked a blind man (Kur) in the street, rather than 1905 2, 2 | in Persian, Arabic, and Kurdish that he was a pauper. When 1906 6, 6 | cases of the saint Abu-'l-Hasan Khirqani and the Prophet 1907 2 (2) | crieth unto me." (Koran ii. l82). ~ 1908 3 (5) | See Koran cxi.: Abu Labab, at the instigation of his 1909 1 (2) | Laborare est orare." ~ 1910 2, 3 | fruit resulting from his labors. He added that the world 1911 4, 2 | he had gained by worldly labour before this miracle had 1912 2, 1 | saying, 'The ass is gone, my lad!'~Along with the others 1913 4, 8 | But his wife and the other ladies of his harem did not approve 1914 1, 7 | in my breast,~The spheres lag behind me in revolutions!~ 1915 5, 4 | from precious mines~To that laggard in the faith,~Saying, "Take 1916 3, 9 | the back of the wife of Bu Lahab, ~And she, the bearer of 1917 6, 5 | world~Does not grieve and lament over his death,~But grieves 1918 3, 17 | Thus, even though two lamp-dishes be not joined, ~Yet their 1919 5, 10 | faith.~Till the foam has landed on the shore and dry land,~ 1920 5, 10 | monk (Diogenes) who took a lantern and searched all through 1921 2, 8 | patience, and seizing the largest stone he could find, dashed 1922 4, 2 | have found the kingdom that lasts forever, ~Thou cleavest 1923 6, 5 | undue power to the idols Lat and 'Uzza and Manat, in 1924 6, 9 | goodness to him with his latest breath.~The death of the 1925 3, 13 | breath in blowing into a lattice?~Men are moved by God's 1926 2, 13 | produce bad acts.~Fools laud and magnify the mosque,~ 1927 2, 17 | him as follows:~The Shaikh laughed, and said to him, "O friend,~ 1928 1, 13 | same time he is the Devil's laughing-stock.~If thou hast not seen the 1929 1, 2 | who for love of God~Has lavished family, wealth, and goods!~ 1930 5, 1 | you."~Each of these men lavishes his wealth or pains,~What 1931 3 (7) | and obedience to divine laws. ~ 1932 1, 10 | heart,~Nor yet sluggish and lax as water and mud;~But if 1933 2, 15 | God quit him,~Rust five layers deep settles on his mirror,~ 1934 2, 10 | fasting,~It is treacherously laying a snare for you.'~You must 1935 5, 1 | as 'Isa had regenerated Lazarus. The Prophet was satisfied 1936 2, 7 | impurity,~I need not the laziness or alacrity of my people.~ 1937 2, 11 | of the tribe of Bani Amru lbn Auf, and of the mosque at 1938 6, 4 | resistance or combat?~You have leant on trees or on walls,~And 1939 1, 4 | strike steel on flint fire leaps forth;~But 'tis by God's 1940 5, 13 | d-Din Razi 16 discoursed learnedly on this point, saying much 1941 4, 7 | other."~God said, "From whom learnest thou this knowledge~Whereby 1942 4 (3) | All these legends are derived from Koran xxi., 1943 1, 3 | were divided into twelve legions, and at the head of each 1944 5, 10 | proved false by thy dirty legs!"~So, when stubborn Pharaoh 1945 1, 10 | Simurgh soaring on high.~He lends aid to the slaves of the 1946 6, 5 | Qazi that by his ill-timed leniency to the Faqir he had brought 1947 4, 2 | Men and Jinns came and lent their aid to the work,~Some 1948 3, 17 | exhalations. ~The fiery sign (Leo) sends forth the heat of 1949 3, 8 | the boys to begin their lessons; but they assured him that 1950 1, 15 | tis the time of the sky's levee,~The stars that were hidden 1951 5, 11 | action and evil to the same level, but good actions will always 1952 2, 7 | moment,~As tax and tithe are levied on a ruined village.~If 1953 2, 11 | from every one,~And every lewd fellow flatters you with 1954 3, 13 | noble to make them repay liberally. ~Inasmuch as the base are 1955 1, 7 | If the king grants him license to kiss his hand,~He would 1956 5, 8 | shalt see those who have lied of God with their faces 1957 5, 3 | existence remained not~In lien thereof God gave you a better 1958 1, 3 | That it may be a light to lighten mankind.~If thou neglectest 1959 3 (8) | Seest thou not to what God likeneth a good word? To a good tree, 1960 4, 2 | friends are weeds~When a liking for bad friends grows up 1961 1, 9 | to foot a perfect rose or lily,~To him spring brings rejoicing.~ 1962 3, 9 | they see the snare and the limed twig,~And yet fall into 1963 5, 6 | extravagance. There is no limit to the divine bounty, because 1964 2, 7 | foam, and the heart the limitless ocean. Afterwards comes 1965 5, 13 | showed himself a man of the lineage of the prophets.~Grant that 1966 2, 2 | household goods and fine linen,~Sometimes thoughts of carpets, 1967 4, 7 | and apostles are needed as links to connect ordinary men 1968 1, 7 | art the throne, and I the lintel of Thy door!~But, in sober 1969 1, 10 | Yet confide not in thy lion-like valour,~But seek refuge 1970 1, 5 | It fills its cells with liquid sweets,~For God opens the 1971 5, 6 | friend,~The deaf man who listens laughs twice over;~The first 1972 2, 1 | carefully and give him plenty of litter and fodder. The servant 1973 5, 1 | mind the text, "As thou livest, O Muhammad, they were bewildered 1974 5, 3 | war would be impossible.~lladst thou no lust, obedience 1975 2, 14 | not where to look for a loaf of bread." The Arab said, " 1976 5, 1 | again, "Lend God a liberal loan;" 4 and again, "God only 1977 3, 13 | here.~God has placed a 'lock upon our hearts,' 3~And 1978 5, 8 | to a secret chamber, and locking himself in, and that they 1979 5, 1 | infidels begged food and lodging of the Prophet. The Prophet 1980 6, 9 | things of the spirit. The logician denies the possibility of 1981 5 (13)| is here applied to the Logos-the channel through whom God 1982 1, 12 | evidence of the tailor's art.~Logs of wood would not be duly 1983 5, 7 | Gabriel accordingly girded his loins and proceeded to the Earth 1984 3, 13 | but not himself, and the long-robed naked man is he who fears 1985 4, 1 | garden, where he found his long-sought mistress. This occasioned 1986 5, 9 | holy man, imitating the long-suffering of the "Veiler of sins" 1987 3, 6 | the water which I have longed for before me, and yet you 1988 1, 9 | is fair and enlightened longs for that review;~Whoso, 1989 3, 17 | The moment their feet are loosed from the others, ~'The bird 1990 3, 7 | wing;~Opinion is weak and lopsided in its flight.~The bird 1991 1, 3 | neither lording it nor lorded over.~At night prisoners 1992 1, 3 | cage,~And set free, neither lording it nor lorded over.~At night 1993 4, 2 | avoidance of the hawk, ~To the lordly hawk mercy and self-control; ~ 1994 5, 6 | into truth.~His stock of lore, which is the salve of his 1995 6, 2 | he began to wail and cry loudly,~So that the very fowler 1996 6, 9 | Or, "The king sings his love-strain;"~Or if she said, "Ah! what 1997 4, 2 | this cause, O thou that lovest gold,~On the last day God 1998 5, 4 | brought him down to the lowest of the low, saving those 1999 5, 8 | to remind himself of his lowly origin, and to prevent himself 2000 4, 8 | shows its teeth at him.~Be loyal to this father and renounce 2001 3, 17 | cold-hearted and void of loyalty, ~Who from fear for your


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