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ample 1
amputations 1
amulets 1
an 173
analogy 1
analysing 1
ancestors 1
Frequency    [«  »]
191 has
188 may
185 us
173 an
173 do
173 more
173 there
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

an

    Book, Chapter
1 pref, 0| move my finger to point out an object, it is out of my 2 pref, 0| the centurion, although an angel announced to him that 3 pref, 0| not sent by the apostle to an angel, nor was it an angel 4 pref, 0| to an angel, nor was it an angel who explained to him 5 pref, 0| father-in-law, a man of an alien race, for ruling and 6 pref, 0| He who reads to an audience pronounces aloud 7 pref, 0| the man who explains to an audience the passages of 8 pref, 0| lay down, if he meet with an obscure passage in the books 9 pref, 0| he reads, will not need an interpreter to lay open 10 1, 4 | proper object of desire; for an unlawful use ought rather 11 1, 4 | ought rather to be called an abuse. Suppose, then, we 12 1, 4 | wandering, and wishing to put an end to our misery, determined 13 1, 5 | who enjoy Him, if He is an object, and not rather the 14 1, 7 | thought takes the form of an endeavour to reach the conception 15 1, 7 | other hand, who endeavour by an effort of the intelligence 16 1, 13 | have in our hearts becomes an outward sound and is called 17 1, 14 | cloth to a round wound, or an oblong cloth to an oblong 18 1, 14 | wound, or an oblong cloth to an oblong wound, and does not 19 1, 22 | beasts. And so it becomes an important question, whether 20 1, 22 | suggest itself to us as an object worthy of love is 21 1, 23 | to God, such as a man or an angel, or are so related 22 1, 24 | so it is not no body, but an uncorrupted and very light 23 1, 24 | this life we must make it an object to have the carnal 24 1, 24 | the ill founded peace of an evil habit, and to bring 25 1, 27 | and holy life who forms an unprejudiced estimate of 26 1, 29 | who love Him may obtain an eternal reward, even Himself 27 1, 30 | not a Christian or were an enemy, to commit adultery 28 1, 33 | are using it, and it is an abuse of language to say 29 1, 34 | Father also, because through an equal an equal is known; 30 1, 34 | because through an equal an equal is known; and the 31 1, 35 | Scripture, is the love of an object which is to be enjoyed, 32 1, 35 | enjoyed, and the love of an object which can enjoy that 33 1, 36 | part of them, but puts such an interpretation upon them 34 1, 36 | every man who lies commits an injustice; and if any man 35 1, 38 | resting-place in eternity: an eternal object, on the other 36 1, 38 | possession than while it is still an object of desire, for no 37 1, 39 | may be called), so great an edifice of faith and love 38 1, 40 | interpretation of these books with an easy mind. For while the 39 2, 1 | footprint, we conclude that an animal whose footprint this 40 2, 1 | seen. And the footprint of an animal passing by belongs 41 2, 1 | And the countenance of an angry or sorrowful man indicates 42 2, 4 | built to reach to heaven was an indication of this arrogance 43 2, 8 | worthy to be the seat of an apostle and to receive epistles. 44 2, 10 | we say bos when we mean an ox, because all men who 45 2, 11 | words that express rather an emotion of the mind than 46 2, 11 | Racha expressing the cry of an angry man, Hosanna that 47 2, 12 | well known, is deceived by an ambiguity in the original 48 2, 12 | taking the wrong sense of an ambiguous word, fell into 49 2, 12 | follow. For "the plantings of an adulterer will not take 50 2, 13 | insidunt super eam, si bona est an nequam; et quae sunt civitates, 51 2, 13 | careful reader would indeed by an effort attain to the true 52 2, 13 | it at all, or would put an utterly false construction 53 2, 14 | kinds. For either a word or an idiom, of which the reader 54 2, 15 | anything in comparison with an authority like this, not 55 2, 16 | that the tree itself is an evergreen. Many, again, 56 2, 17 | the Muses, to be placed as an offering in the temple of 57 2, 17 | sing with the mouth without an instrument; or by blowing, 58 2, 18 | trumpery because we enter upon an investigation about harps 59 2, 18 | the incorruptible God into an image made like to corruptible 60 2, 20 | does less harm than to cuff an innocent boy if he happens 61 2, 21 | when any freeman goes to an astrologer of this kind, 62 2, 21 | our own, the Romans made an attempt to dedicate the 63 2, 22 | those who are born from such an observation, is a great 64 2, 23 | mule brings forth young, or an object is struck by lightning, 65 2, 24 | entangled him in. For, to take an illustration, the same figure 66 2, 28 | To what extent history is an aid ~ 67 2, 28 | even when in the course of an historical narrative former 68 2, 28 | observed, using the boldness of an adviser, not the fidelity 69 2, 29 | extent natural science is an exegetical aid~ 70 2, 29 | in which not a past but an existing state of things 71 2, 30 | those whose sole result is an action, as dancing, and 72 2, 31 | childish vanity of entrapping an adversary. For there are 73 2, 31 | false, and yet so close an imitation of the true, as 74 2, 33 | admitted: If a snail is an animal, it has a voice. 75 2, 33 | false) that the snail is not an animal. Now this conclusion 76 2, 33 | merits; the validity of an inference depends on the 77 2, 33 | statement is true, "If he is an orator, he is a man." But 78 2, 33 | But if we add, "He is not an orator," the consequence 79 2, 34 | and what is incompatible. An example of a consequent 80 2, 34 | consequent is, "If he is an orator, he is a man;" of 81 2, 34 | orator, he is a man;" of an inconsequent, "If he is 82 2, 34 | If he is a man, he is an orator;" of an incompatible, " 83 2, 34 | man, he is an orator;" of an incompatible, "If he is 84 2, 34 | hold the true opinions have an unfounded contempt for themselves, 85 2, 36 | use. Nor is it owing to an arrangement among men that 86 2, 37 | clever man often sees that an inference is unsound more 87 2, 37 | those who have learnt them an inclination to lead people 88 2, 37 | great thing that gives them an advantage over the good 89 2, 39 | several classes, and give an account of the unknown places, 90 3, arg | which we may decide whether an expression is literal or 91 3, 3 | as to make what follows an answer to this question, " 92 3, 3 | that the difference between an inquiry and an interrogative 93 3, 3 | difference between an inquiry and an interrogative was this, 94 3, 3 | interrogative was this, that an inquiry admits of many answers, 95 3, 3 | of many answers, but to an interrogative the answer 96 3, 3 | what follows will be put as an interrogative: "Shall God 97 3, 3 | here again in the form of an interrogative, "Is it Christ 98 3, 3 | that of a man who gives an affirmative answer, so that " 99 3, 3 | There is, again, an ambiguity arising out of 100 3, 6 | showed clearly how great an advantage it had been to 101 3, 10 | men. In the same way, if an erroneous opinion has taken 102 3, 10 | because no one can confer an advantage on another which 103 3, 12 | holiness is put before us as an example, are wholly figurative, 104 3, 12 | were, under the form of an earthly kingdom, foreshadowing 105 3, 14 | of one's neighbour, puts an end to all crimes. For no 106 3, 14 | himself. And no one wishes an injury to be done him by 107 3, 15 | meditate upon what we read till an interpretation be found 108 3, 16 | crime or vice, or enjoining an act of prudence or benevolence, 109 3, 16 | crime or vice, or to forbid an act of prudence or benevolence, 110 3, 16 | pointing to the doing of an injury, the other to a display 111 3, 18 | many wives for the sake of an ulterior object, than on 112 3, 18 | gavest him Eve his wife for an helper and stay. ... And 113 3, 21 | what punishment so impious an adulterer and parricide 114 3, 24 | figurative, it is easy, by an application of the laws 115 3, 24 | Now we find out whether an expression is literal or 116 3, 25 | wrung out." The following is an example of the same object 117 3, 29 | tone of voice that we make an antiphrasis to indicate 118 3, 29 | words taken literally give an absurd meaning, we ought 119 3, 30 | rules. This is enough for an example, for it would be 120 3, 32 | participation of the sacraments. An example of this is that 121 3, 34 | tables of the heart," has an evident reference to this 122 3, 34 | flesh, and I will give you an heart of flesh." Now the 123 3, 37 | art of rhetoric. And when an expression of this sort 124 4, arg | the various qualities of an orator, he recommends the 125 4, 6 | at the way in which, by an eloquence peculiarly their 126 4, 6 | to condemn it or to make an ostentatious display of 127 4, 6 | man, and eloquence, like an inseparable attendant, followed 128 4, 7 | the future captivity under an oppressive king is announced 129 4, 7 | passage which I have chosen as an example. But an intelligent 130 4, 7 | chosen as an example. But an intelligent reader will 131 4, 7 | but eloquent also, with an eloquence suited to a character 132 4, 8 | the Church of God obtained an esteem, not indeed equal 133 4, 9 | or companion should have an earnest desire to learn 134 4, 10 | ought to have, so great an anxiety about teaching that 135 4, 10 | godliness who is addressing an unlearned audience shrink 136 4, 12 | orator has truly said that "an eloquent man must speak 137 4, 12 | rejoice when you point out an object for joy; if he pity 138 4, 12 | their duty will have such an effect that there will be 139 4, 12 | for when, in the course of an address, the truth is clearly 140 4, 16 | read there: "Rebuke not an elder, but entreat him as 141 4, 18 | questions, the only ones that an address such as I wish to 142 4, 18 | modus (a measure); and it is an abuse, not a proper use 143 4, 18 | works of mercy in hope of an eternal reward? ~ 144 4, 20 | something more definite. We have an example of the calm, subdued 145 4, 20 | promise. Which things are an allegory: for these are 146 4, 20 | but God is one." And here an objection occurs which he 147 4, 20 | whatever occurs to the mind as an objection that might be 148 4, 20 | temperate style: "Rebuke not an elder, but entreat him as 149 4, 20 | though, in order to give an accurate rendering of the 150 4, 20 | rejected; but received me as an angel of God, even as Christ 151 4, 21 | hear them, but must have an expositor. Let us, then, 152 4, 21 | An example of the temperate 153 4, 21 | her outward appearance is an image of her mind, and a 154 4, 21 | with impunity so audacious an act of wickedness, such 155 4, 21 | act of wickedness, such an insult to God the great 156 4, 21 | provest thyself worse than an adulteress. The fact that 157 4, 21 | beautified by such arts is an impeachment of God's handiwork, 158 4, 24 | from their hearts and lives an evil so cruel and inveterate; 159 4, 24 | I thought I had produced an effect. For the applause 160 4, 24 | long gone by and which like an enemy was besieging their 161 4, 24 | temperate style, produce such an effect on some, that they 162 4, 25 | expressions, is not in itself an adequate end; but when what 163 4, 25 | its object is to persuade, an eloquent man will speak 164 4, 25 | there in attaining such an object as this last? They 165 4, 26 | great difficulty, and throws an unexpected light upon them; 166 4, 26 | and exposes the falsity of an opposing opinion, which 167 4, 26 | in this style, too, when an obdurate heart is to be 168 4, 27 | there are numbers who seek an excuse for their own evil 169 4, 27 | avoid contempt: "but be thou an example of the believers, 170 4, 28 | contempt. For while he pursues an upright life, he takes care 171 4, 28 | man with a comely body but an ill-conditioned mind is 172 4, 29 | for himself, but afford an example to others; and let 173 4, 29 | his manner of living be an eloquent sermon in itself. ~


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