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St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

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     Book, Chapter
1 pref | rules for the interpretation of Scripture is not a superfluous 2 pref, 0| rules for the interpretation of Scripture which I think 3 pref, 0| taught to earnest students of the word, that they may 4 pref, 0| only from reading the works of others who have laid open 5 pref, 0| have laid open the secrets of the sacred writings, but 6 pref, 0| well to meet the objections of those who are likely to 7 pref, 0| study to the dull sloth of ignorance. ~ 8 pref, 0| likely to object to this work of mine, because they have 9 pref, 0| their opinion that it can be of no use to anybody. There 10 pref, 0| There is a third class of objectors who either really 11 pref, 0| attained a certain power of interpreting the sacred 12 pref, 0| without reading any directions of the kind that I propose 13 pref, 0| clearing up the obscurities of Scripture could be better 14 pref, 0| by the unassisted grace of God. ~ 15 pref, 0| be blamed for their want of understanding. It is just 16 pref, 0| to penetrate the meaning of obscure passages in Scripture, 17 pref, 0| would grant them the sight of their eyes. For though I 18 pref, 0| out an object, it is out of my power to open men's eyes 19 pref, 0| those who talk vauntingly of Divine Grace, and boast 20 pref, 0| Scripture without the aid of such directions as those 21 pref, 0| read by others, and by dint of wise meditation to have 22 pref, 0| a thorough understanding of them; or by that barbarian 23 pref, 0| barbarian slave Christianus, of whom I have lately heard 24 pref, 0| attained a full knowledge of the art of reading simply 25 pref, 0| full knowledge of the art of reading simply through prayer 26 pref, 0| the fact be so, they boast of a real advantage, and one 27 pref, 0| real advantage, and one of no ordinary kind), they 28 pref, 0| surely grant that every one of us learnt his own language 29 pref, 0| Greek, or Hebrew, or any of the rest, we have learnt 30 pref, 0| teach their children any of these things, because on 31 pref, 0| because on the outpouring of the Holy Spirit the apostles 32 pref, 0| began to speak the language of every race; and warn every 33 pref, 0| being ensnared by such wiles of the enemy and by our own 34 pref, 0| whether in the body or out of the body," as the apostle 35 pref, 0| lips rather than from those of men. ~ 36 pref, 0| Let us beware of such dangerous temptations 37 pref, 0| such dangerous temptations of pride, and let us rather 38 pref, 0| admonished by the voice of God from heaven, was yet 39 pref, 0| as to the proper objects of faith, hope, and love. And 40 pref, 0| through the instrumentality of angels, but the condition 41 pref, 0| angels, but the condition of our race would have been 42 pref, 0| had not chosen to make use of men as the ministers of 43 pref, 0| of men as the ministers of His word to their fellow-men. 44 pref, 0| is written, "The temple of God is holy, which temple 45 pref, 0| through the ministration of angels? Moreover, love itself, 46 pref, 0| men together in the bond of unity, would have no means 47 pref, 0| unity, would have no means of pouring soul into soul, 48 pref, 0| illuminated by the grace of God without the interposition 49 pref, 0| without the interposition of man; on the contrary, at 50 pref, 0| contrary, at the suggestion of God, Philip, who did understand 51 pref, 0| wisdom and entire absence of jealous pride, accepted 52 pref, 0| pride, accepted the plan of his father-in-law, a man 53 pref, 0| his father-in-law, a man of an alien race, for ruling 54 pref, 0| administering the affairs of the great nation entrusted 55 pref, 0| understands the obscurities of Scripture, though not instructed 56 pref, 0| instructed in any rules of interpretation, at the same 57 pref, 0| not his own, in the sense of originating with himself, 58 pref, 0| himself, but is the gift of God. For so he seeks God' 59 pref, 0| he does, without the aid of any human interpreter, why 60 pref, 0| learn by the inward teaching of the Spirit without the help 61 pref, 0| Spirit without the help of man? The truth is, he fears 62 pref, 0| understand, but also the rules of interpretation they follow. 63 pref, 0| what is false. All truth is of Him who says, "I am the 64 pref, 0| an audience the passages of Scripture he understands 65 pref, 0| man who is in possession of the rules which I here attempt 66 pref, 0| sufficiently appear in the course of the work itself that no 67 pref, 0| object to this undertaking of mine, which has no other 68 pref, 0| other object than to be of service, yet as it seemed 69 1 | Containing a General View of the Subjects Treated in 70 1, arg | other to the expression, of the true sense of Scripture. 71 1, arg | expression, of the true sense of Scripture. He shows that 72 1, arg | people, and also the signs of these things, that is, where 73 1, arg | is, where the knowledge of these things is to be sought. 74 1, arg | this first book he treats of things, which he divides 75 1, arg | which we receive remission of our sins. And if our sins 76 1, arg | with hope the resurrection of the body to eternal glory; 77 1, arg | for use; for, though some of them may be loved, yet our 78 1, arg | ourselves are not objects of enjoyment to God: he uses 79 1, arg | show that love the love of God for His own sake and 80 1, arg | His own sake and the love of our neighbour for God's 81 1, arg | the fulfilment and the end of all Scripture. After adding 82 1, 1 | Chap. 1. The interpretation of Scripture depends on the 83 1, 1 | discovery and enunciation of the meaning, and is to be 84 1, 1 | which all interpretation of Scripture depends: the mode 85 1, 1 | Scripture depends: the mode of ascertaining the proper 86 1, 1 | proper meaning, and the mode of making known the meaning 87 1, 1 | ascertained. We shall treat first of the mode of ascertaining, 88 1, 1 | treat first of the mode of ascertaining, next of the 89 1, 1 | mode of ascertaining, next of the mode of making known, 90 1, 1 | ascertaining, next of the mode of making known, the meaning; 91 1, 1 | strength; but since my hope of accomplishing the work rests 92 1, 1 | distribute them, though the wants of so many thousands were satisfied, 93 1, 1 | increased in the very act of breaking it, so those thoughts 94 1, 1 | that, in this very work of distribution in which I 95 1, 1 | in a marvellous increase of wealth. ~ 96 1, 2 | things are learnt by means of signs. I now use the word " 97 1, 2 | never employed as a sign of anything else: for example, 98 1, 2 | cattle, and other things of that kind. Not, however, 99 1, 2 | Abraham offered up instead of his son; for these, though 100 1, 2 | are things, are also signs of other things. There are 101 1, 2 | things. There are signs of another kind, those which 102 1, 2 | uses words except as signs of something else; and hence 103 1, 2 | signs, I shall, when I speak of things, speak in such a 104 1, 2 | a way that even if some of them may be used as signs 105 1, 2 | interfere with the division of the subject according to 106 1, 2 | other things they are signs of. ~ 107 1, 3 | things which are objects of enjoyment make us happy. 108 1, 3 | things which are objects of use assist, and (so to speak) 109 1, 3 | placed among both kinds of objects, if we set ourselves 110 1, 3 | getting entangled in the love of lower gratifications, we 111 1, 3 | turn back from, the pursuit of the real and proper objects 112 1, 3 | real and proper objects of enjoyment. ~ 113 1, 4 | Chap. 4. Difference of use and enjoyment~ 114 1, 4 | if it is a proper object of desire; for an unlawful 115 1, 4 | however, that we must make use of some mode of conveyance, 116 1, 4 | must make use of some mode of conveyance, either by land 117 1, 4 | commence. But the beauty of the country through which 118 1, 4 | pass, and the very pleasure of the motion, charm our hearts, 119 1, 4 | ought to use into objects of enjoyment, we become unwilling 120 1, 4 | unwilling to hasten the end of our journey; and becoming 121 1, 4 | happy. Such is a picture of our condition in this life 122 1, 4 | our condition in this life of mortality. We have wandered 123 1, 4 | so the invisible things of God may be clearly seen, 124 1, 4 | that is, that by means of what is material and temporary 125 1, 5 | Trinity the true object of enjoyment~ 126 1, 5 | The true objects of enjoyment, then, are the 127 1, 5 | and not rather the cause of all objects, or indeed even 128 1, 5 | even if He is the cause of all. For it is not easy 129 1, 5 | way: The Trinity, one God, of whom are all things, through 130 1, 5 | the Holy Spirit, and each of these by Himself, is God, 131 1, 5 | are all one God; and each of them by Himself is a complete 132 1, 5 | Holy Spirit the harmony of unity and equality; and 133 1, 5 | attributes are all one because of the Father, all equal because 134 1, 5 | Father, all equal because of the Son, and all harmonious 135 1, 5 | and all harmonious because of the Holy Spirit. ~ 136 1, 6 | Have I spoken of God, or uttered His praise, 137 1, 6 | say even this is to speak of Him. Thus there arises a 138 1, 6 | a curious contradiction of words, because if the unspeakable 139 1, 6 | is what cannot be spoken of, it is not unspeakable if 140 1, 6 | unspeakable. And this opposition of words is rather to be avoided 141 1, 6 | although nothing worthy of His greatness can be said 142 1, 6 | His greatness can be said of Him, has condescended to 143 1, 6 | condescended to accept the worship of men's mouths, and has desired 144 1, 6 | desired us through the medium of our own words to rejoice 145 1, 6 | Deus (God). For the sound of those two syllables in itself 146 1, 6 | conveys no true knowledge of His nature; but yet all 147 1, 6 | reaches their ears, to think of a nature supreme in excellence 148 1, 7 | when the one supreme God of gods is thought of, even 149 1, 7 | supreme God of gods is thought of, even by those who believe 150 1, 7 | their thought takes the form of an endeavour to reach the 151 1, 7 | to reach the conception of a nature, than which nothing 152 1, 7 | moved by different kinds of pleasures, partly by those 153 1, 7 | intellect and soul, those of them who are in bondage 154 1, 7 | universe itself, is God of gods: or if they try to 155 1, 7 | to themselves something of dazzling brightness, and 156 1, 7 | dazzling brightness, and think of it vaguely as infinite, 157 1, 7 | vaguely as infinite, or of the most beautiful form 158 1, 7 | represent it in the form of the human body, if they 159 1, 7 | or even innumerable gods of equal rank, still these 160 1, 7 | they conceive as possessed of shape and form, according 161 1, 7 | each man thinks the pattern of excellence. Those, on the 162 1, 7 | who endeavour by an effort of the intelligence to reach 163 1, 7 | intelligence to reach a conception of God, place Him above all 164 1, 7 | to exalt the excellence of God: nor could any one be 165 1, 8 | who think about God think of Him as living, they only 166 1, 8 | can form any conception of Him that is not absurd and 167 1, 8 | absurd and unworthy who think of Him as life itself; and, 168 1, 8 | to look into the nature of the life itself, if they 169 1, 8 | sensibility, such as that of plants, they consider it 170 1, 8 | sentient life, such as that of cattle; and above this, 171 1, 8 | intelligent life, such as that of men. And, perceiving that 172 1, 8 | if men never caught sight of this wisdom, they could 173 1, 8 | consider that the very rule of truth by which they affirm 174 1, 9 | acknowledge the superiority of unchangeable: wisdom to 175 1, 9 | do you know that a life of unchangeable wisdom is preferable 176 1, 9 | wisdom is preferable to one of change?" For that very truth 177 1, 9 | unchangeably fixed in the minds of all men, and presented to 178 1, 9 | nothing that the splendour of its light, so clear and 179 1, 9 | dwelling long among the shadows of the flesh. And thus men 180 1, 9 | land by the contrary blasts of evil habits, and pursue 181 1, 10 | this purification as a kind of journey or voyage to our 182 1, 10 | For it is not by change of place that we can come nearer 183 1, 10 | but by the cultivation of pure desires and virtuous 184 1, 11 | incarnate, a pattern to us of purification~ 185 1, 11 | But of this we should have been 186 1, 11 | and to show us a pattern of holy life in the form of 187 1, 11 | of holy life in the form of our own humanity. Yet, since 188 1, 11 | weak. But "the foolishness of God is wiser than men; and 189 1, 11 | than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men." 190 1, 12 | In what sense the Wisdom of God came to us~ 191 1, 12 | manifest to the outward eye of those whose inward sight 192 1, 12 | after that, in the wisdom of God, the world by wisdom 193 1, 12 | pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that 194 1, 12 | Not then in the sense of traversing space, but because 195 1, 12 | to mortal men in the form of mortal flesh, He is said 196 1, 12 | enjoy the creature instead of the Creator had grown into 197 1, 12 | grown into the likeness of this world, and are therefore 198 1, 12 | not." Thus, in the wisdom of God, the world by wisdom 199 1, 12 | through the foolishness of preaching to save them that 200 1, 13 | through the ear into the mind of the hearer, the word which 201 1, 13 | itself, and takes the form of speech without being modified 202 1, 13 | though suffering no change of nature, yet became flesh, 203 1, 14 | Chap. 14. How the wisdom of God healed man~ 204 1, 14 | Moreover, as the use of remedies is the way to health, 205 1, 14 | may be a certain degree of neatness in the binding, 206 1, 14 | Wisdom, was by His assumption of humanity adapted to our 207 1, 14 | our wounds, curing some of them by their opposites, 208 1, 14 | by their opposites, some of them by their likes. And 209 1, 14 | the same way the Wisdom of God in healing man has applied 210 1, 14 | were ensnared by the wisdom of the serpent: we are set 211 1, 14 | free by the foolishness of God. Moreover, just as the 212 1, 14 | was in reality the folly of those who despised God, 213 1, 14 | as to incur the penalty of death: Christ used His mortality 214 1, 14 | body. To the same class of opposite remedies it belongs, 215 1, 14 | are cured by the example of His virtues. On the other 216 1, 14 | are applied: He was born of a woman to deliver us who 217 1, 14 | hurried on by the necessity of carrying out a set undertaking, 218 1, 14 | will find many other points of instruction in considering 219 1, 14 | employed in the medicine of Christianity. ~ 220 1, 15 | resurrection and ascension of Christ, and is stimulated 221 1, 15 | The belief of the resurrection of our 222 1, 15 | belief of the resurrection of our Lord from the dead, 223 1, 15 | Lord from the dead, and of His ascension into heaven, 224 1, 15 | adding a great buttress of hope. For it clearly shows 225 1, 15 | assurance, then, is the hope of believers animated, when 226 1, 15 | from heaven as the judge of quick and dead, it strikes 227 1, 15 | for His approach, instead of quaking at it on account 228 1, 15 | quaking at it on account of their evil deeds. And what 229 1, 15 | He has given us so freely of His Spirit, that in the 230 1, 15 | that in the adversities of this life we may retain 231 1, 15 | suitable for the building up of His Church, that we may 232 1, 16 | holds together in the bond of unity and love, which is 233 1, 17 | space, but through a change of affections, and one which 234 1, 17 | and one which the guilt of our past sins like a hedge 235 1, 17 | our past sins like a hedge of thorns barred against us, 236 1, 18 | repentance on the ground of which he is received into 237 1, 18 | received into the bosom of the Church. For he who does 238 1, 18 | have faith in the results of his own repentance. ~ 239 1, 19 | Furthermore, as there is a kind of death of the soul, which 240 1, 19 | there is a kind of death of the soul, which consists 241 1, 19 | consists in the putting away of former habits and former 242 1, 19 | former habits and former ways of life, and which comes through 243 1, 19 | repentance, so also the death of the body consists in the 244 1, 19 | consists in the dissolution of the former principle of 245 1, 19 | of the former principle of life. And just as the soul, 246 1, 19 | shall inherit the kingdom of God (for that is impossible), 247 1, 19 | the body, being the source of no uneasiness because it 248 1, 20 | but to endure the penalty of his sin. ~ 249 1, 22 | only are the true objects of enjoyment which we have 250 1, 22 | enjoyment which we have spoken of as eternal and unchangeable. 251 1, 22 | arrive at the full enjoyment of the former. We, however, 252 1, 22 | the image and similitude of God, not as respects the 253 1, 22 | own sake, or for the sake of something else. If it is 254 1, 22 | him; if it is for the sake of something else, we use him. 255 1, 22 | to be loved for the sake of something else. For if a 256 1, 22 | sake, then in the enjoyment of it consists a happy life, 257 1, 22 | consists a happy life, the hope of which at least, if not yet 258 1, 22 | own sake, but for the sake of Him who is the true object 259 1, 22 | Him who is the true object of enjoyment. For a man is 260 1, 22 | sake. For this is the law of love that has been laid 261 1, 22 | He means that no part of our life is to be unoccupied, 262 1, 22 | to us as an object worthy of love is to be borne into 263 1, 22 | which the whole current of our affections flows. Whoever, 264 1, 22 | turns the whole current of his love both for himself 265 1, 22 | neighbour into the channel of the love of God, which suffers 266 1, 22 | the channel of the love of God, which suffers no stream 267 1, 23 | things which are objects of use are not all, however, 268 1, 23 | as to need the goodness of God through our instrumentality, 269 1, 23 | not love the wickedness of their persecutors, although 270 1, 23 | it to attain the favour of God. As, then, there are 271 1, 23 | then, there are four kinds of things that are to be loved, 272 1, 23 | about the second and fourth of these. For, however far 273 1, 23 | unchangeable Light, the Ruler of all things, does so that 274 1, 23 | God only. Now such love of itself is more correctly 275 1, 23 | about the mortal body. For, of course, it must love the 276 1, 23 | immortality and incorruptibility of the body spring out of the 277 1, 23 | incorruptibility of the body spring out of the health of the soul. 278 1, 23 | spring out of the health of the soul. Now the health 279 1, 23 | the soul. Now the health of the soul is to cling steadfastly 280 1, 23 | fellow-men, this is a reach of arrogance utterly intolerable. ~ 281 1, 24 | want. But they think a body of that kind would be no body 282 1, 24 | not that they may get rid of their body, but that they 283 1, 24 | For they strive by a kind of toilsome exercise of the 284 1, 24 | kind of toilsome exercise of the body itself to root 285 1, 24 | those habits and affections of the soul that lead to the 286 1, 24 | that lead to the enjoyment of unworthy objects. They are 287 1, 24 | themselves; they are taking care of their health. ~ 288 1, 24 | mistaken interpretation of what they read: "The flesh 289 1, 24 | other." For this is said of the carnal habit yet unsubdued, 290 1, 24 | but to eradicate the lust of the body i.e., its evil 291 1, 24 | which is what the order of nature demands. For as, 292 1, 24 | not in hatred, but because of the bondage of habit which 293 1, 24 | but because of the bondage of habit which it has derived 294 1, 24 | grown in upon it by a law of nature till it has become 295 1, 24 | destroy the ill founded peace of an evil habit, and to bring 296 1, 24 | peace which springs out of a good habit. Nevertheless, 297 1, 24 | This and other indications of the same kind are sufficient 298 1, 24 | well-founded is the statement of the apostle when he says, " 299 1, 25 | be taught the due measure of loving, that is, in what 300 1, 25 | love himself so as to be of service to himself. For 301 1, 25 | the safety and soundness of his body. For many have 302 1, 25 | both pains and amputations of some of their limbs that 303 1, 25 | and amputations of some of their limbs that they might 304 1, 25 | desire the safety and health of his body because there is 305 1, 25 | money that he is very fond of and desires to heap up, 306 1, 25 | this is just what the error of wicked men often compels 307 1, 26 | then, that there is no need of a command that every man 308 1, 26 | connected with us, through a law of nature which has never been 309 1, 26 | prophets." Thus the end of the commandment is love, 310 1, 26 | and that twofold, the love of God and the love of our 311 1, 26 | love of God and the love of our neighbour. Now, if you 312 1, 26 | together (for man is made up of soul and body), you will 313 1, 26 | you will find that none of the classes of things that 314 1, 26 | that none of the classes of things that are to be loved 315 1, 26 | For though, when the love of God comes first, and the 316 1, 26 | comes first, and the measure of our love for Him is prescribed 317 1, 27 | chap. 27. The order of love~ 318 1, 27 | Now he is a man of just and holy life who forms 319 1, 27 | an unprejudiced estimate of things, and keeps his affections 320 1, 27 | with us in the enjoyment of God, whereas our body cannot; 321 1, 28 | those who, by the accidents of time, or place, or circumstance, 322 1, 28 | that you had a great deal of some commodity, and felt 323 1, 28 | presented themselves, neither of whom had either from need 324 1, 28 | cannot consult for the good of them all, you must take 325 1, 28 | decided for you by a sort of lot, according as each man 326 1, 29 | Now of all who can with us enjoy 327 1, 29 | For in the theatres, dens of iniquity though they be, 328 1, 29 | they be, if a man is fond of a particular actor, and 329 1, 29 | greatest good, he is fond of all who join with him in 330 1, 29 | join with him in admiration of his favourite, not for their 331 1, 29 | sakes, but for the sake of him whom they admire in 332 1, 29 | by such a man's contempt of his favourite, and strives 333 1, 29 | who live in the fellowship of the love of God, the enjoyment 334 1, 29 | the fellowship of the love of God, the enjoyment of whom 335 1, 29 | love of God, the enjoyment of whom is true happiness of 336 1, 29 | of whom is true happiness of life, to whom all who love 337 1, 29 | would turn to Him, they must of necessity love Him as the 338 1, 30 | are happy in the enjoyment of Him whom we long to enjoy; 339 1, 30 | commandments is included the love of angels also. For that He 340 1, 30 | neighbour?" He told him of a certain man who, going 341 1, 30 | question admitted the truth of this when he was himself 342 1, 30 | that no exception is made of any one as a person to whom 343 1, 30 | person to whom the offices of mercy may be denied when 344 1, 30 | ought to show to us, the of offices of mercy is by right 345 1, 30 | show to us, the of offices of mercy is by right called 346 1, 30 | seeing that so great offices of mercy have been performed 347 1, 30 | attention to many passages of Holy Scripture. And on this 348 1, 30 | Himself under the figure of the man who brought aid 349 1, 30 | as the Divine nature is of higher excellence than, 350 1, 30 | shows us pity on account of His own goodness, but we 351 1, 30 | to one another on account of His; that is, He pities 352 1, 31 | nothing is a true object of enjoyment except that which 353 1, 31 | does He love us? As objects of use or as objects of enjoyment? 354 1, 31 | objects of use or as objects of enjoyment? If He enjoys 355 1, 31 | enjoys us, He must be in need of good from us, and no sane 356 1, 31 | light stands in no need of the glitter of the things 357 1, 31 | in no need of the glitter of the things it has itself 358 1, 31 | enjoy us then, but makes use of us. For if He neither enjoys 359 1, 32 | He use after our fashion of using. For when we use objects, 360 1, 32 | view to the full enjoyment of the goodness of God. God, 361 1, 32 | enjoyment of the goodness of God. God, however, in His 362 1, 32 | God, however, in His use of us, has reference to His 363 1, 32 | say in the fullest sense of the words, "I AM THAT I 364 1, 32 | which God is said to make of us has no reference to His 365 1, 32 | advantage follows by a sort of natural consequence, for 366 1, 33 | road, and place our hope of happiness in man or angel. 367 1, 33 | are glad to have the hope of others fixed upon them. 368 1, 33 | which they have received of God for us or for themselves; 369 1, 33 | towards Him, in the enjoyment of whom we find our common 370 1, 33 | ye baptized in the name of Paul?" And again: "Neither 371 1, 33 | But when you have joy of a man in God, it is God 372 1, 33 | presence you place your hope of joy. And accordingly, Paul 373 1, 33 | brother, let me have joy of thee in the Lord." For if 374 1, 33 | only said, "Let me have joy of thee," he would have implied 375 1, 33 | implied that he fixed his hope of happiness upon him, although 376 1, 33 | enjoy" is used in the sense of to "use with delight." For 377 1, 33 | near us, it is a matter of course that it should bring 378 1, 33 | using it, and it is an abuse of language to say that you 379 1, 33 | never do except in the case of the Blessed Trinity, who 380 1, 34 | created me in the beginning of His way," that is, that 381 1, 34 | called him to the reward of His heavenly calling, yet 382 1, 34 | passed over the beginning of the way, and had now no 383 1, 34 | had now no further need of it; yet by this way all 384 1, 34 | to press on; and, instead of weakly clinging to temporal 385 1, 34 | nature from the bondage of temporal things, and has 386 1, 34 | it down at the right hand of His Father. ~ 387 1, 35 | The fulfilment and end of Scripture is the love of 388 1, 35 | of Scripture is the love of God and our neighbour~ 389 1, 35 | Of all, then, that has been 390 1, 35 | the fulfilment and the end of the Law, and of all Holy 391 1, 35 | the end of the Law, and of all Holy Scripture, is the 392 1, 35 | Holy Scripture, is the love of an object which is to be 393 1, 35 | be enjoyed, and the love of an object which can enjoy 394 1, 35 | ourselves. For there is no need of a command that each man 395 1, 35 | framed by the providence of God that we might know this 396 1, 35 | borne only for the sake of that towards which we are 397 1, 36 | 36. That interpretation of Scripture which builds us 398 1, 36 | Scriptures, or any part of them, but puts such an interpretation 399 1, 36 | build up this twofold love of God and our neighbour, does 400 1, 36 | used for the building up of love, even though he does 401 1, 36 | wholly clear from the charge of deception. For there is 402 1, 36 | false; and we find plenty of people who intend to deceive, 403 1, 36 | which he lies. He wishes, of course, that the man to 404 1, 36 | takes another meaning out of Scripture than the writer 405 1, 36 | up love, which is the end of the commandment, he goes 406 1, 36 | if he get into a habit of going astray, he may sometimes 407 1, 37 | chap. 37. Dangers of mistaken interpretation~ 408 1, 37 | hardly tell how, that, out of love for his own opinion, 409 1, 37 | totter if the authority of Scripture begin to shake. 410 1, 37 | attention to the precepts of morality, he comes to hope 411 1, 37 | shall attain the object of his love. And so these are 412 1, 38 | while it is still an object of desire, for no one in his 413 1, 38 | worthless when he finds it of less value than he thought; 414 1, 38 | comes into his possession, of higher value still. ~ 415 1, 39 | Scriptures except for the purpose of instructing others. Accordingly, 416 1, 39 | many live without copies of the Scriptures, even in 417 1, 39 | solitude, on the strength of these three graces. So that 418 1, 39 | vanish away." Yet by means of these instruments (as they 419 1, 39 | called), so great an edifice of faith and love has been 420 1, 39 | is only in part perfect of course, I mean, so far as 421 1, 39 | the future life, the life of no just and holy man is 422 1, 39 | three; but the greatest of these is charity:" because, 423 1, 40 | chap. 40. What manner of reader Scripture demands~ 424 1, 40 | understands that "the end of the commandment is charity, 425 1, 40 | commandment is charity, out of a pure heart, and of a good 426 1, 40 | out of a pure heart, and of a good conscience, and of 427 1, 40 | of a good conscience, and of faith unfeigned," and is 428 1, 40 | making all his understanding of Scripture to bear upon these 429 1, 40 | come to the interpretation of these books with an easy 430 1, 40 | says "love," he adds "out of a pure heart," to provide 431 1, 40 | but that which is worthy of love. And he joins with 432 1, 40 | if a man has the burthen of a bad conscience, he despairs 433 1, 40 | conscience, he despairs of ever reaching that which 434 1, 40 | third place he says: "and of faith unfeigned." For if 435 1, 40 | loving what is unworthy of our love, and by living 436 1, 40 | speak about the objects of faith, as far as I thought 437 1, 40 | And so let this be the end of the present book. In the 438 1, 40 | give me light, the subject of signs. ~ 439 2, arg | completed his exposition of things, the author now proceeds 440 2, arg | proceeds to discuss the subject of signs. He first defines 441 2, arg | that there are two classes of signs, the natural and the 442 2, arg | natural and the conventional. Of conventional signs (which 443 2, arg | with which the interpreter of Scripture is chiefly concerned. 444 2, arg | difficulties and obscurities of Scripture spring chiefly 445 2, arg | unknown signs, the ambiguities of language being reserved 446 2, arg | difficulty arising from ignorance of signs is to be removed by 447 2, arg | context. In the interpretation of figurative expressions, 448 2, arg | figurative expressions, knowledge of things is as necessary as 449 2, arg | as necessary as knowledge of words; and the various sciences 450 2, arg | various sciences and arts of the heathen, so far as they 451 2, arg | in removing our ignorance of signs, whether these be 452 2, arg | exposing the folly and futility of many heathen superstitions 453 2, arg | study and interpretation of the sacred books. ~ 454 2, 1 | even though they are signs of something else, so now, 455 2, 1 | turn to discuss the subject of signs, I lay down this direction, 456 2, 1 | the mind as a consequence of itself: as when we see a 457 2, 1 | and when we hear the voice of a living man, we think of 458 2, 1 | of a living man, we think of the feeling in his mind; 459 2, 1 | whatever else the state of the battle requires. ~ 460 2, 1 | any intention or desire of using them as signs, do 461 2, 1 | yet lead to the knowledge of something else, as, for 462 2, 1 | is not from any intention of making it a sign that it 463 2, 1 | seen. And the footprint of an animal passing by belongs 464 2, 1 | by belongs to this class of signs. And the countenance 465 2, 1 | signs. And the countenance of an angry or sorrowful man 466 2, 1 | his mind, independently of his will: and in the same 467 2, 1 | way every other emotion of the mind is betrayed by 468 2, 1 | nothing with the intention of making it known. This class 469 2, 1 | making it known. This class of signs however, it is no 470 2, 1 | signs however, it is no part of my design to discuss at 471 2, 1 | comes under this division of the subject, I could not 472 2, 2 | chap. 2. Of the kind of signs we are 473 2, 2 | chap. 2. Of the kind of signs we are now concerned 474 2, 2 | exchange for the purpose of showing, as well as they 475 2, 2 | as they can, the feelings of their minds, or their perceptions, 476 2, 2 | a sign except the desire of drawing forth and conveying 477 2, 2 | another's mind what the giver of the sign has in his own 478 2, 2 | consider and discuss this class of signs so far as men are 479 2, 2 | which have been given us of God, and which are contained 480 2, 2 | in turn; and many signs of the same kind are matters 481 2, 2 | the same kind are matters of common observation. Now 482 2, 2 | the expression or the cry of a man in grief, follow the 483 2, 2 | grief, follow the movement of the mind instinctively and 484 2, 2 | really used with the purpose of signification, is another 485 2, 2 | matter in hand. And this part of the subject I exclude from 486 2, 2 | I exclude from the scope of this work as not necessary 487 2, 3 | Of the signs, then, by which 488 2, 3 | some relate to the sense of sight, some to that of hearing, 489 2, 3 | sense of sight, some to that of hearing, a very few to the 490 2, 3 | sign except to the eyes of the man to whom we wish 491 2, 3 | great deal by the motion of the hands: and actors by 492 2, 3 | and actors by movements of all their limbs give certain 493 2, 3 | through the eyes the will of the commanders. And all 494 2, 3 | signs are as it were a kind of visible words. The signs 495 2, 3 | for the most part consist of words. For though the bugle 496 2, 3 | the chief place as a means of indicating the thoughts 497 2, 3 | indicating the thoughts of the mind. Our Lord, it is 498 2, 3 | a sign through the odour of the ointment which was poured 499 2, 3 | feet; and in the sacrament of His body and blood He signified 500 2, 3 | His will through the sense of taste; and when by touching


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