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signifies 6
signify 11
signifying 1
signs 109
silence 1
silences 1
silent 3
Frequency    [«  »]
113 s
109 can
109 its
109 signs
108 lord
108 say
108 than
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

signs

    Book, Chapter
1 1, arg| attend both to things and to signs, as it is necessary to know 2 1, arg| Christian people, and also the signs of these things, that is, 3 1, 2| either about things or about signs; but things are learnt by 4 1, 2| things are learnt by means of signs. I now use the word "thing" 5 1, 2| they are things, are also signs of other things. There are 6 1, 2| other things. There are signs of another kind, those which 7 1, 2| never employed except as signs: for example, words. No 8 1, 2| one uses words except as signs of something else; and hence 9 1, 2| be understood what I call signs: those things, to wit, which 10 1, 2| distinction between things and signs, I shall, when I speak of 11 1, 2| some of them may be used as signs also, that will not interfere 12 1, 2| discuss things first and signs afterwards. But we must 13 1, 2| what other things they are signs of. ~ 14 1, 40| me light, the subject of signs. ~ 15 2, arg| to discuss the subject of signs. He first defines what a 16 2, arg| there are two classes of signs, the natural and the conventional. 17 2, arg| conventional. Of conventional signs (which are the only class 18 2, arg| sources, unknown and ambiguous signs. The present book deals 19 2, arg| deals only with unknown signs, the ambiguities of language 20 2, arg| arising from ignorance of signs is to be removed by learning 21 2, arg| removing our ignorance of signs, whether these be direct 22 2, 1| chap. 1. Signs, their nature and variety~ 23 2, 1| themselves, even though they are signs of something else, so now, 24 2, 1| to discuss the subject of signs, I lay down this direction, 25 2, 1| to the fact that they are signs, that is, to what they signify. 26 2, 1| Now some signs are natural, others conventional. 27 2, 1| others conventional. Natural signs are those which, apart from 28 2, 1| desire of using them as signs, do yet lead to the knowledge 29 2, 1| belongs to this class of signs. And the countenance of 30 2, 1| it known. This class of signs however, it is no part of 31 2, 2| chap. 2. Of the kind of signs we are now concerned with~ 32 2, 2| Conventional signs, on the other hand, are 33 2, 2| and discuss this class of signs so far as men are concerned 34 2, 2| with it, because even the signs which have been given us 35 2, 2| beasts, too, have certain signs among themselves by which 36 2, 2| by her in turn; and many signs of the same kind are matters 37 2, 2| observation. Now whether these signs, like the expression or 38 2, 3| chap. 3. Among signs, words hold the chief place~ 39 2, 3| Of the signs, then, by which men communicate 40 2, 3| their limbs give certain signs to the initiated, and, so 41 2, 3| commanders. And all these signs are as it were a kind of 42 2, 3| kind of visible words. The signs that address themselves 43 2, 3| significant sound, yet all these signs are very few in number compared 44 2, 3| countless multitude of the signs through which men express 45 2, 3| put into words all those signs, the various classes of 46 2, 3| words in terms of those signs. ~ 47 2, 4| means of letters formed signs of words. Thus the sounds 48 2, 4| but by means of certain signs. It has been found impossible, 49 2, 4| however, to make those signs common to all nations owing 50 2, 10| 10. Unknown or ambiguous signs prevent Scripture from being 51 2, 10| unknown, or under ambiguous signs. Signs are either proper 52 2, 10| or under ambiguous signs. Signs are either proper or figurative. 53 2, 10| tongue call it by this name. Signs are figurative when the 54 2, 11| necessary to remove ignorance of signs~ 55 2, 11| for ignorance of proper signs is knowledge of languages. 56 2, 13| in things when even the signs of those things are kept 57 2, 13| edification, but in that of signs, by which it is hard not 58 2, 14| About ambiguous signs, however, I shall speak 59 2, 14| treating at present of unknown signs, of which, as far as the 60 2, 16| In the case of figurative signs, again, if ignorance of 61 2, 20| consultations and arrangements about signs and leagues with devils, 62 2, 20| the body, but to certain signs hidden or manifest; and 63 2, 22| their origin in certain signs of things being arbitrarily 64 2, 23| in regard to all fancied signs which lead either to the 65 2, 24| Now, just as all these signs affect the mind according 66 2, 24| did not agree upon them as signs because they were already 67 2, 24| the same way also, those signs by which the ruinous intercourse 68 2, 25| necessity. For if those signs which the actors make in 69 2, 25| likeness in their choice of signs, that the signs may as far 70 2, 25| choice of signs, that the signs may as far as possible be 71 2, 25| another in many ways, such signs are not always of the same 72 2, 25| the countless varieties of signs without which human intercourse 73 2, 29| used conformably to certain signs as nostrums or the instruments 74 2, 39| leagues and covenants about signs, let these he utterly rejected 75 2, 39| ascertaining the meaning of unknown signs, the topic I am now discussing. ~ 76 2, 42| pointed out, so that unknown signs have ceased to be a hindrance 77 2, 42| discussion of ambiguous signs in Scripture. And about 78 3, arg| of dealing with unknown signs, goes on in this third book 79 3, arg| book to treat of ambiguous signs. Such signs may be either 80 3, arg| of ambiguous signs. Such signs may be either direct or 81 3, arg| figurative. In the case of direct signs ambiguity may arise from 82 3, arg| In the case of figurative signs we need to guard against 83 3, 1| led astray by ambiguous signs, I so far as I can give 84 3, 5| slavery of the soul to take signs for things, and to be unable 85 3, 6| they paid attention to the signs of spiritual realities in 86 3, 6| not knowing to what the signs referred, still they had 87 3, 6| clung obstinately to such signs could not endure our Lord' 88 3, 6| people, clinging to these signs as it they were realities, 89 3, 6| by the schoolmaster that signs, which had been for a season 90 3, 7| that their idols were only signs, yet still they used them 91 3, 7| heathen either as gods, or as signs and representations of gods. 92 3, 7| much more so is it to take signs intended to represent useless 93 3, 7| things signified by such signs, and engage your mind in 94 3, 8| under bondage to useful signs, and who were (so to speak) 95 3, 8| it, and, interpreting the signs to which they were in bondage, 96 3, 8| realities of which these were signs. And out of such were formed 97 3, 8| found in bondage to useless signs, it not only freed from 98 3, 8| from their slavery to such signs, but brought to nothing 99 3, 8| out of the way all these signs themselves, so that the 100 3, 8| now fall into bondage to signs of a useful kind, but rather 101 3, 9| 9. Who is in bondage to signs, and who not~ 102 3, 9| but that to which all such signs refer. Now such a man is 103 3, 9| reveal to carnal minds those signs by subjection to which their 104 3, 9| attending even to those signs which we now understand, 105 3, 9| the letter, and to take signs for the things that are 106 3, 9| bondage; so to interpret signs wrongly is the result of 107 3, 9| bondage to unknown but useful signs than, by interpreting them 108 3, 29| being "grammata") are the signs of sounds made by the articulate 109 3, 37| wedded to piety. But about signs, so far as relates to words,


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