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italia 1
italian 1
items 1
its 109
itself 66
iv 1
ivory 4
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114 must
113 s
109 can
109 its
109 signs
108 lord
108 say
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

its

    Book, Chapter
1 1, 4| with satisfaction in it for its own sake. To use, on the 2 1, 8| wisdom, was, previous to its attaining wisdom, unwise. 3 1, 9| nothing that the splendour of its light, so clear and so near, 4 1, 13| without being modified in its own nature by the change: 5 1, 14| binding, in addition to its mere usefulness, so our 6 1, 16| unity and love, which is its true health. Moreover He 7 1, 19| destroyed by repentance its former habits, is created 8 1, 22| thing is to be loved for its own sake, then in the enjoyment 9 1, 22| in whom your love finds its most worthy object, no other 10 1, 22| itself by whose diversion its own volume would be diminished. ~ 11 1, 23| rule over itself and over its own body; and so it cannot 12 1, 23| but love both itself and its own body. ~ 13 1, 23| is able to lord it over its companions, that is, other 14 1, 23| while itself will not obey its own superior; and most justly 15 1, 23| body, and be grieved at its corruption; and the immortality 16 1, 23| those who are by nature its equals, that is, its fellow-men, 17 1, 23| nature its equals, that is, its fellow-men, this is a reach 18 1, 24| it is not their body, but its corruptions and its heaviness, 19 1, 24| but its corruptions and its heaviness, that they hate. 20 1, 24| the lust of the body i.e., its evil habit and thus to make 21 1, 24| for the better, so that its inordinate affections may 22 1, 24| which it has derived from its parent stock, and which 23 1, 30| more eagerly do we long for its termination. But it is not 24 1, 31| only that which we love for its own sake, and that nothing 25 1, 38| satisfy the soul, which has its only true and sure resting-place 26 2, 1| so now, when I come in its turn to discuss the subject 27 2, 6| Scripture which arise from its figurative language~ 28 2, 6| imitation of good men members of its own body; men who, as good 29 2, 10| written from being understood: its being veiled either under 30 2, 12| flesh" may be taken in its literal sense, so that a 31 2, 16| example, that to protect its head it will present its 32 2, 16| its head it will present its whole body to its assailants 33 2, 16| present its whole body to its assailants how much light 34 2, 16| the serpent gets rid of its old skin by squeezing itself 35 2, 16| have of piercing rocks with its roots, although it is a 36 2, 23| worshipping creation or its parts instead of God, or 37 2, 24| and prearrangement as to its signification; and so, any 38 2, 29| knowledge, so far as regards its utility. ~ 39 2, 31| conclusions, by following out to its logical consequences the 40 2, 32| reason of things, and has its origin with God. For as 41 2, 33| of a statement stands on its own merits; the validity 42 2, 33| antecedent, when he sees that its logical consequences are 43 2, 33| he is good," and we admit its truth. Then he adds, "But 44 2, 41| and more penetrating than its roots; that being rooted 45 2, 41| the hands are stretched, its length by the part from 46 2, 41| head downwards is fixed, its height by the part from 47 2, 41| which the head lies, and its depth by the part which 48 3, arg| whatever can be shown to be in its literal sense inconsistent 49 3, 5| indicated by a proper word into its secondary signification; 50 3, 7| rivers." This husk shakes its rattling stones within a 51 3, 10| or to find assistance in, its vices. In the same way, 52 3, 11| dominion of lust. And if its meaning be clear, we are 53 3, 12| are to take not only in its historical and literal, 54 3, 12| and literal, but also in its figurative and prophetical 55 3, 12| a disgraceful outbreak, its own hideousness, which was 56 3, 14| but that every nation took its own custom for right; and 57 3, 15| charity reigns through its supremely just laws of love 58 3, 17| state must be cared for in its own state. ~ 59 3, 18| the body of one wife for its own sake. For in the former 60 3, 21| immoderate desire did not take up its abode with him, but was 61 3, 22| him refer the figure to its interpretation, but let 62 3, 29| which grammar itself gets its name (the Greek name for 63 3, 29| made for fish, and yet gets its name from fish? And this 64 3, 29| grove is called lucus from its want of light; or it is 65 3, 34| of the New Testament and its excellence in comparison 66 3, 34| believed would be given in its own time was to them, on 67 3, 34| which was to take place in its own time, and he himself 68 3, 35| the day on which he showed its fulfilment as two whole 69 3, 36| could not be said to have its own language if all had 70 3, 37| spread to be comprehended in its full extent by any one. 71 4, 2| that truth in the person of its defenders is to take its 72 4, 2| its defenders is to take its stand unarmed against falsehood? 73 4, 6| authors (not because of its majesty, but because of 74 4, 6| majesty, but because of its inflation), that all those 75 4, 6| not conspicuous either by its presence or its absence: 76 4, 6| either by its presence or its absence: for it did not 77 4, 6| where the learned do note its presence, the matters spoken 78 4, 6| wisdom were walking out of its house, that is, the breast 79 4, 7| confessing that he recognized its truth. If he had said, " 80 4, 7| it, this would have had its beauty: six separate clauses 81 4, 10| conveyed and apprehended in its integrity. ~ 82 4, 10| instruction generally shows by its movements if it understands 83 4, 12| itself, when exhibited in its naked simplicity, gives 84 4, 14| is the more terrible from its purity, and the more crushing 85 4, 14| and the more crushing from its solidity! Assuredly it is " 86 4, 19| taught, temperately when its importance is being urged, 87 4, 20| them. For it is borne on by its own vehemence; and the force 88 4, 20| expression that comes in its way. It is enough for its 89 4, 20| its way. It is enough for its object that warmth of feeling 90 4, 21| virginity shall begin to reap its reward of honour." ~ 91 4, 21| a lamp set inside sheds its radiance on the outside. 92 4, 21| the other rising above its powers? The latter has no 93 4, 22| again, has varieties of its own which prevent the hearer' 94 4, 23| aid of the majestic; for its object is to gratify, never 95 4, 24| silences the audience by its impressiveness, but calls 96 4, 25| beauty of style may have its influence in securing their 97 4, 25| speak persuasively, and its object is to persuade, an 98 4, 25| eloquence has not secured its object. Now in the subdued 99 4, 26| contrary, all speech, whatever its style, ought constantly 100 4, 26| subdued style, again, in its own naked simplicity, when 101 4, 26| opinion, which seemed at its first statement to be unassailable; 102 4, 26| defense, and offers battle in its own naked simplicity, does 103 4, 26| hinder it from crushing its adversary by weight of nerve 104 4, 26| by the mere strength of its own right arm. How explain 105 4, 26| make the giving of pleasure its sole aim, which is all it 106 4, 26| hands of others; but in its encomiums and censures it 107 4, 26| beauty, of course, being its primary object. ~ 108 4, 31| but is anxious to know its contents, may read it in 109 4, 31| it need not complain of its length. I, however, give


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