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Alphabetical    [«  »]
calumniously 1
calves 6
came 18
can 109
candid 1
candidly 1
cannot 71
Frequency    [«  »]
115 because
114 must
113 s
109 can
109 its
109 signs
108 lord
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

can

    Book, Chapter
1 pref, 0| as their opinion that it can be of no use to anybody. 2 pref, 0| their eyes. For though I can move my finger to point 3 pref, 0| that they understand and can explain Scripture without 4 pref, 0| pride and learn whatever can be learnt from man; and 5 pref, 0| work itself that no one can justly object to this undertaking 6 1, 3 | after happiness, so that we can attain the things that make 7 1, 6 | is not unspeakable if it can be called unspeakable. And 8 1, 6 | worthy of His greatness can be said of Him, has condescended 9 1, 8 | Him as living, they only can form any conception of Him 10 1, 8 | never was unwise, and never can become so. And if men never 11 1, 10 | change of place that we can come nearer to Him who is 12 1, 14 | were dead. And those who can follow out the matter more 13 1, 15 | evil deeds. And what tongue can tell, or what imagination 14 1, 15 | tell, or what imagination can conceive, the reward He 15 1, 18 | not believe that his sins can be pardoned, falls into 16 1, 19 | no uneasiness because it can feel no want, shall be animated 17 1, 27 | to God, and another man can have fellowship with us 18 1, 29 | Now of all who can with us enjoy God, we love 19 1, 29 | he works in every way he can to secure new admirers for 20 1, 29 | indifferent, he does all he can to excite his interest by 21 1, 29 | strives in every way he can to remove it. Now, if this 22 1, 30 | relative one, and no one can be neighbour except to a 23 1, 31 | from Himself. And no one can be ignorant or in doubt 24 1, 31 | discover in what way He can love us. ~ 25 1, 35 | love of an object which can enjoy that other in fellowship 26 1, 35 | Perhaps some other comparison can be found that will more 27 1, 37 | so it comes to pass, one can hardly tell how, that, out 28 1, 38 | one in his longing for it can set a higher value on it 29 2, 1 | even when nothing but smoke can be seen. And the footprint 30 2, 2 | showing, as well as they can, the feelings of their minds, 31 2, 7 | purifies the eye itself which can see God, so far as God can 32 2, 7 | can see God, so far as God can be seen by those who as 33 2, 9 | memory be defective, no rules can supply the want. ~ 34 2, 11 | Scriptures from Hebrew into Greek can be counted, but the Latin 35 2, 12 | so many texts, that you can hardly find it written in 36 2, 13 | How faulty interpretations can be emended~ 37 2, 13 | in any way at all that he can get the words out, to pardon 38 2, 14 | more learned man of whom we can inquire, or with a passage 39 2, 14 | phrase we are ignorant of, we can easily by the help of our 40 2, 16 | raised about that number, we can only refer it to the Creator 41 2, 17 | I doubt whether any one can be found among them more 42 2, 18 | superstition of the heathen, if we can derive anything from it 43 2, 21 | Nor can we exclude from this kind 44 2, 21 | instance any one who cares can easily see that the stars 45 2, 22 | of time between them that can be apprehended and marked 46 2, 28 | His actions together we can make it out, yet that no 47 2, 28 | arise from another source, can be ascertained more clearly 48 2, 29 | computes the moon's age can tell, when he has found 49 2, 35 | itself cannot be true. We can also divide it, saying that 50 2, 36 | the less true that they can be used for persuading men 51 2, 36 | what is false; but as they can be used to enforce the truth 52 2, 39 | sure whether the same thing can be done in regard to the 53 2, 42 | found nowhere else, but can be learnt only in the wonderful 54 3, arg | rule being, that whatever can be shown to be in its literal 55 3, arg | that no interpretation can be true which does not promote 56 3, 1 | ambiguous signs, I so far as I can give him instruction (it 57 3, 1 | going to say, so far as I can give instruction, let him 58 3, 1 | a state of mind that he can be instructed by me know, 59 3, 3 | saying of Nathanael's, "Can any good thing come out 60 3, 3 | not see how a difference can be made. But neither sense 61 3, 10 | comes first; because no one can confer an advantage on another 62 3, 18 | literally and not figuratively, can be transferred to the present 63 3, 18 | that the custom they spurn can be turned to a good use, 64 3, 18 | that which they embrace can be used to condemnation, 65 3, 27 | there is no danger if it can be shown from other passages 66 3, 29 | speech from other writings, can imagine or believe. Nevertheless 67 3, 33 | for His sake." Who, then, can doubt that each of these 68 3, 34 | seeking in the species what he can find much better and more 69 3, 34 | who looks into the matter can doubt. And that saying of 70 3, 35 | times, a rule by which we can frequently discover or conjecture 71 4, arg | laws of rhetoric. These can be learned elsewhere, and 72 4, 3 | age. But only by those who can learn them quickly; for 73 4, 3 | cannot learn this art quickly can never thoroughly learn it 74 4, 3 | inquire? For even if this art can occasionally be in the end 75 4, 3 | there are scarcely any who can do both things that is, 76 4, 3 | imitating them as far as they can? And what do we find from 77 4, 5 | be undertaken by one who can argue and speak with wisdom, 78 4, 5 | man who, when he wishes, can repeat the words, and at 79 4, 5 | of greater service if he can do both), I would rather 80 4, 6 | me not only that nothing can be wiser, but also that 81 4, 6 | wiser, but also that nothing can be more eloquent. And I 82 4, 6 | in old age, and nothing can be called eloquence if it 83 4, 10 | and if instead of them he can find words which are at 84 4, 11 | there to a wooden one if it can, seeing that to open what 85 4, 12 | all the other things that can be done by powerful eloquence 86 4, 12 | be instructed before they can be moved. And perhaps the 87 4, 14 | holy man shows both that he can speak in that style. for 88 4, 15 | anything else), does all he can to be heard with intelligence, 89 4, 15 | the hearts of all? And who can make us say what we ought, 90 4, 16 | God gives them virtue (who can heal without their aid, 91 4, 17 | shall be eloquent, who can say little things in a subdued 92 4, 17 | shall be eloquent, who can say little things in a subdued 93 4, 19 | opens up before man, who can task his powers to the utmost 94 4, 19 | praising Him whom no one can adequately praise, though 95 4, 20 | things? If God be for us, who can be against us? He that spared 96 4, 21 | sincerity and truth.' Now can sincerity and truth continue 97 4, 21 | lie? Thy Lord says, 'Thou can't not make one hair white 98 4, 21 | testimony to thine ugliness can we find, O woman, that is 99 4, 21 | be beautiful, when thou can't not enjoy the pleasure 100 4, 22 | or becoming languid. We can bear the subdued style, 101 4, 22 | pitch to which it is raised, can be maintained the shorter 102 4, 22 | treat in a quieter style, we can return with good effect 103 4, 26 | is it not plain that he can neither give pleasure nor 104 4, 26 | applause so great that one can hardly believe it to be 105 4, 26 | majestic style. But who can be moved if he does not 106 4, 27 | yet we see that the truth can be preached, though not 107 4, 28 | the fulfilling of the law, can be rightly exercised unless 108 4, 29 | things they say. For how can they say in words what they 109 4, 29 | generation of vipers, how can ye, being evil, speak good


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