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Alphabetical    [«  »]
stuff 1
stultum 2
stumble 1
style 105
styles 13
subdue 3
subdued 25
Frequency    [«  »]
106 been
105 into
105 says
105 style
101 would
100 body
99 ought
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

style

    Book, Chapter
1 2, 8| a certain resemblance of style, but the most likely opinion 2 2, 31| hated;" although, indeed, a style of speech which is not intended 3 4, arg| most essential quality of style, and ought to be cultivated 4 4, arg| there are three species of style, the subdued, the elegant, 5 4, 7| concealed under a metaphorical style, which the more completely 6 4, 7| but only to commend the style. And I shall do so, quoting 7 4, 7| things are spoken of, the style is adorned with names of 8 4, 9| which are written in such a style that, if understood, they, 9 4, 10| necessity for perspicuity of style~ 10 4, 10| told. Nay, even when the style itself is already well known, 11 4, 11| be done without grace of style, the benefit does not extend 12 4, 12| but for that purpose the style of speaking is a matter 13 4, 12| the intention, that the style of speech should make the 14 4, 12| truth pleasing, or that the style should of itself give pleasure; 15 4, 13| and clothed in beauty of style, nothing remains but to 16 4, 14| his subsequent letters, a style which is admired without 17 4, 14| people who are fond of this style are apt to think that men 18 4, 14| employ a more chastened style, do so because they cannot 19 4, 14| that he can speak in that style. for he has done so once, 20 4, 17| little things in a subdued style, moderate things in a temperate 21 4, 17| moderate things in a temperate style, and great things in a majestic 22 4, 17| great things in a majestic style:" as if he had taken in 23 4, 17| little things in a subdued style, in order to give instruction, 24 4, 17| moderate things in a temperate style, in order to give pleasure, 25 4, 17| great things in a majestic style, in order to sway the mind." ~ 26 4, 18| in a subdued and humble style. Is it not the case that 27 4, 20| example of the calm, subdued style in the Apostle Paul, where 28 4, 20| apostle we have the temperate style: "Rebuke not an elder, but 29 4, 20| passage is in the temperate style of eloquence; and those 30 4, 20| The majestic style of speech differs from the 31 4, 20| differs from the temperate style just spoken of, chiefly 32 4, 20| is written in the subdued style, except at the end, where 33 4, 21| memory writes in the subdued style in his treatise on the sacrament 34 4, 21| that follows, the subdued style is maintained, as the reader 35 4, 21| Son, employs the subdued style, because the object he has 36 4, 21| earth.'" And in the same style he pursues the subject, 37 4, 21| example of the temperate style is the celebrated encomium 38 4, 21| temperate and ornamented style when he is holding up before 39 4, 21| examples of the temperate style, because their purpose is 40 4, 21| on fire by the majestic style. Cyprian the martyr, however, 41 4, 21| examples of the majestic style from their treatment of 42 4, 21| Accordingly, we notice that the style is neither subdued nor temperate, 43 4, 22| necessity of variety in style~ 44 4, 22| contrary, every variety of style should be introduced so 45 4, 22| keep monotonously to one style, we fail to retain the hearer' 46 4, 22| but when we pass from one style to another, the discourse 47 4, 22| greater length. Each separate style, again, has varieties of 48 4, 22| We can bear the subdued style, however, longer without 49 4, 22| variety than the majestic style. For the mental emotion 50 4, 22| have to treat in a quieter style, we can return with good 51 4, 22| this, that the majestic style, if it is to be long continued, 52 4, 22| being referred to that style which is the prevailing 53 4, 23| importance to determine what style should be alternated with 54 4, 23| necessary that any particular style should be used. In the majestic 55 4, 23| be used. In the majestic style, for instance, it is always, 56 4, 23| discretion to use the subdued style even where the majestic 57 4, 23| Again, whatever may be the style of the speech or writing, 58 4, 23| naturally demands the subdued style. And accordingly this style 59 4, 23| style. And accordingly this style must be used in alternation 60 4, 23| we must use the temperate style, no matter what may be the 61 4, 23| action. In the majestic style, then, and in the quiet 62 4, 23| find place. The temperate style, on the other hand, not 63 4, 23| occasionally, needs the quiet style; for example, when, as I 64 4, 23| and expressed in the quiet style, in order to give greater 65 4, 23| ornament. But the temperate style never needs the aid of the 66 4, 24| produced by the majestic style~ 67 4, 24| speaking in the majestic style; for this effect is often 68 4, 24| distinctions of the quiet style, and by the beauties of 69 4, 24| temperate. The majestic style, on the other hand, frequently 70 4, 24| The quiet style, too, has made a change 71 4, 24| expressed, even in the temperate style, produce such an effect 72 4, 24| are moved by the majestic style act accordingly, and all 73 4, 24| are taught by the quiet style know or believe a truth 74 4, 25| chap. 25. How the temperate style is to be used~ 75 4, 25| hand, what the temperate style properly aims at, viz., 76 4, 25| persuade them, beauty of style may have its influence in 77 4, 25| speak persuasively, whatever style he may adopt; but unless 78 4, 25| object. Now in the subdued style, he persuades his hearers 79 4, 25| is true; in the majestic style, he persuades them to do 80 4, 25| do not; in the temperate style, he persuades them that 81 4, 25| the effecting by this style of eloquence what we aim 82 4, 25| when we use the majestic style. For we may by the use of 83 4, 25| we may by the use of this style persuade men to cultivate 84 4, 25| as to need the vehement style; or if they have already 85 4, 25| Accordingly, even in the temperate style we must use beauty of expression 86 4, 26| chap. 26. In every style the orator should aim at 87 4, 26| perspicuity, beauty of style, and persuasive power, we 88 4, 26| peculiar to the subdued style, beauty to the temperate, 89 4, 26| all speech, whatever its style, ought constantly to aim 90 4, 26| what we say in the subdued style to pall upon the hearer; 91 4, 26| story, even in the subdued style, what does he wish but to 92 4, 26| attention by some beauty of style? And if he be not intelligible, 93 4, 26| conviction? The subdued style, again, in its own naked 94 4, 26| a rhythm and balance of style which is not ostentatiously 95 4, 26| nature of the subject: this style, so used, frequently calls 96 4, 26| believe it to be the subdued style. For the fact that it comes 97 4, 26| when he uses the subdued style, to endeavour not only to 98 4, 26| Eloquence of the temperate style, also, must, in the case 99 4, 26| without perspicuity this style cannot give pleasure. And 100 4, 26| are to be sought in this style also; beauty, of course, 101 4, 26| hearer's mind by the majestic style (and this is always necessary 102 4, 26| course, speak in the majestic style. But who can be moved if 103 4, 26| pleasure? Wherefore, in this style, too, when an obdurate heart 104 4, 27| may be the majesty of the style, the life of the speaker 105 4, 28| words which in the subdued style are adequate, in the temperate,


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