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irony 2
irrational 1
irresistibly 1
is 1457
isaiah 5
ishmael 1
israel 18
Frequency    [«  »]
2450 to
2197 and
1557 in
1457 is
1269 that
941 it
937 a
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

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is

1-500 | 501-1000 | 1001-1457

     Book, Chapter
1 pref | interpretation of Scripture is not a superfluous task ~ 2 pref, 0| I write, the thoughts He is wont to vouchsafe to me 3 pref, 0| no use to anybody. There is a third class of objectors 4 pref, 0| who do not understand what is here set down, my answer 5 pref, 0| here set down, my answer is, that I am not to be blamed 6 pref, 0| want of understanding. It is just as if they were anxious 7 pref, 0| see the stars at which it is pointed. And so both these 8 pref, 0| point out an object, it is out of my power to open 9 pref, 0| have undertaken to write is entirely superfluous. I 10 pref, 0| being able to read himself, is said to have committed the 11 pref, 0| unspeakable words, such as it is not lawful for man to utter, 12 pref, 0| could that be true which is written, "The temple of 13 pref, 0| written, "The temple of God is holy, which temple ye are," 14 pref, 0| devised it, but to Him who is the Truth, the unchangeable 15 pref, 0| believes, that this power is not his own, in the sense 16 pref, 0| originating with himself, but is the gift of God. For so 17 pref, 0| the help of man? The truth is, he fears to incur the reproach: " 18 pref, 0| own, except perhaps what is false. All truth is of Him 19 pref, 0| what is false. All truth is of Him who says, "I am the 20 pref, 0| Scripture he understands is like one who reads aloud 21 pref, 0| rules for interpretation is like one who teaches reading, 22 pref, 0| who teaches reading, that is, shows others how to read 23 pref, 0| he who knows how to read is not dependent on some one 24 pref, 0| a book, to tell him what is written in it, so the man 25 pref, 0| written in it, so the man who is in possession of the rules 26 pref, 0| preliminary objections, such is the start I have thought 27 1, arg | things and to signs, as it is necessary to know what things 28 1, arg | signs of these things, that is, where the knowledge of 29 1, arg | knowledge of these things is to be sought. In this first 30 1, arg | which ought to be enjoyed is the Triune God, who is our 31 1, arg | enjoyed is the Triune God, who is our highest good and our 32 1, arg | may be loved, yet our love is not to rest in them, but 33 1, arg | neighbour for God's sake is the fulfilment and the end 34 1, 1 | enunciation of the meaning, and is to be undertaken in dependence 35 1, 1 | known the meaning when it is ascertained. We shall treat 36 1, 1 | difficult to carry out, it is, I fear, presumptuous to 37 1, 1 | will go on to supply what is yet wanting when once I 38 1, 1 | For a possession which is not diminished by being 39 1, 1 | shared with others, if it is possessed and not shared, 40 1, 1 | possessed and not shared, is not yet possessed as it 41 1, 1 | to those who have; that is to say, if they use freely 42 1, 2 | Chap. 2. What a thing is, and what a sign~ 43 1, 2 | All instruction is either about things or about 44 1, 2 | sense, to signify that which is never employed as a sign 45 1, 2 | Accordingly, every sign is also a thing; for what is 46 1, 2 | is also a thing; for what is not a thing is nothing at 47 1, 2 | for what is not a thing is nothing at all. Every thing, 48 1, 2 | all. Every thing, however, is not also a sign. And so, 49 1, 2 | to consider about things is what they are in themselves, 50 1, 4 | For to enjoy a thing is to rest with satisfaction 51 1, 4 | use, on the other hand, is to employ whatever means 52 1, 4 | what one desires, if it is a proper object of desire; 53 1, 4 | fatherland where our enjoyment is to commence. But the beauty 54 1, 4 | make us truly happy. Such is a picture of our condition 55 1, 4 | things that are made, that is, that by means of what is 56 1, 4 | is, that by means of what is material and temporary we 57 1, 4 | lay hold upon that which is spiritual and eternal. ~ 58 1, 5 | all who enjoy Him, if He is an object, and not rather 59 1, 5 | objects, or indeed even if He is the cause of all. For it 60 1, 5 | the cause of all. For it is not easy to find a name 61 1, 5 | great excellence, unless it is better to speak in this 62 1, 5 | each of these by Himself, is God, and at the same time 63 1, 5 | each of them by Himself is a complete substance, and 64 1, 5 | one substance. The Father is not the Son nor the Holy 65 1, 5 | the Holy Spirit; the Son is not the Father nor the Holy 66 1, 5 | Spirit; the Holy Spirit is not the Father nor the Son: 67 1, 5 | the Son: but the Father is only Father, the Son is 68 1, 5 | is only Father, the Son is only Son, and the Holy Spirit 69 1, 5 | Son, and the Holy Spirit is only Holy Spirit. To all 70 1, 5 | same power. In the Father is unity, in the Son equality, 71 1, 6 | Chap. 6. In what sense God is ineffable~ 72 1, 6 | I have said anything, it is not what I desired to say. 73 1, 6 | except from the fact that God is unspeakable? But what I 74 1, 6 | been spoken. And so God is not even to be called "unspeakable," 75 1, 6 | because to say even this is to speak of Him. Thus there 76 1, 6 | because if the unspeakable is what cannot be spoken of, 77 1, 6 | cannot be spoken of, it is not unspeakable if it can 78 1, 6 | this opposition of words is rather to be avoided by 79 1, 6 | For on this principle it is that He is called Deus ( 80 1, 6 | principle it is that He is called Deus (God). For the 81 1, 7 | one supreme God of gods is thought of, even by those 82 1, 7 | or the universe itself, is God of gods: or if they 83 1, 7 | if they think that there is no one God supreme above 84 1, 7 | there exists a superior is God. And so all concur in 85 1, 7 | concur in believing that God is that which excels in dignity 86 1, 8 | above all else because He is unchangeable Wisdom~ 87 1, 8 | any conception of Him that is not absurd and unworthy 88 1, 8 | them, recognize that it is by life it lives or does 89 1, 8 | not live, and prefer what is living to what is dead; 90 1, 8 | prefer what is living to what is dead; who understand that 91 1, 8 | and excel them in beauty, is quite a distinct thing from 92 1, 8 | from the life by which it is quickened; and who look 93 1, 8 | worth to the mass which is quickened and animated by 94 1, 8 | perceiving that even this is subject to change, they 95 1, 8 | unchangeable life, which is not at one time foolish, 96 1, 8 | wise, but on the contrary is wisdom itself. For a wise 97 1, 8 | wise intelligence, that is, one that has attained to 98 1, 8 | confidence prefer a life which is unchangeably wise to one 99 1, 8 | unchangeably wise to one that is subject to change. This 100 1, 8 | to be the more excellent, is itself unchangeable: and 101 1, 8 | nothing in themselves that is not subject to change. ~ 102 1, 9 | unchangeable: wisdom to that which is variable~ 103 1, 9 | Now, no one is so egregiously silly as 104 1, 9 | life of unchangeable wisdom is preferable to one of change?" 105 1, 9 | he asks, how I know it? is unchangeably fixed in the 106 1, 9 | man who does not see it is like a blind man in the 107 1, 9 | light, so clear and so near, is poured into his very eyeballs. 108 1, 9 | shrinks from this truth, is weak in his mental vision 109 1, 10 | Wherefore, since it is our duty fully to enjoy 110 1, 10 | and to rest in it when it is perceived. And let us look 111 1, 10 | our native land. For it is not by change of place that 112 1, 10 | can come nearer to Him who is in every place, but by the 113 1, 11 | the foolishness of God is wiser than men; and the 114 1, 11 | and the weakness of God is stronger than men." And 115 1, 12 | And though He is everywhere present to the 116 1, 12 | to the inner eye when it is sound and clear, He condescended 117 1, 12 | those whose inward sight is weak and dim. "For after 118 1, 12 | form of mortal flesh, He is said to have come to us. 119 1, 13 | becomes an outward sound and is called speech; and yet our 120 1, 14 | as the use of remedies is the way to health, so this 121 1, 14 | despised God, so the latter is called foolishness, but 122 1, 14 | called foolishness, but is true wisdom in those who 123 1, 15 | Chap. 15. Faith is buttressed by the resurrection 124 1, 15 | ascension of Christ, and is stimulated by His coming 125 1, 15 | With what assurance, then, is the hope of believers animated, 126 1, 16 | For the Church is His body, as the apostle' 127 1, 16 | teaching shows us;and it is even called His spouse. 128 1, 16 | of unity and love, which is its true health. Moreover 129 1, 18 | be loosed in heaven; that is to say, that whosoever in 130 1, 18 | on the ground of which he is received into the bosom 131 1, 19 | Furthermore, as there is a kind of death of the soul, 132 1, 19 | repentance its former habits, is created anew after a better 133 1, 19 | kingdom of God (for that is impossible), but that this 134 1, 21 | we must believe that it is so in fact, that neither 135 1, 22 | For a great thing truly is man, made after the image 136 1, 22 | mortal body in which he is clothed, but as respects 137 1, 22 | rational soul by which he is exalted in honour above 138 1, 22 | love one another: but it is a question whether man is 139 1, 22 | is a question whether man is to be loved by man for his 140 1, 22 | of something else. If it is for his own sake, we enjoy 141 1, 22 | sake, we enjoy him; if it is for the sake of something 142 1, 22 | seems to me, then, that he is to be loved for the sake 143 1, 22 | something else. For if a thing is to be loved for its own 144 1, 22 | if not yet the reality, is our comfort in the present 145 1, 22 | present time. But a curse is pronounced on him who places 146 1, 22 | for the sake of Him who is the true object of enjoyment. 147 1, 22 | of enjoyment. For a man is never in so good a state 148 1, 22 | state as when his whole life is a journey towards the unchangeable 149 1, 22 | in upon himself, and so is not occupied with anything 150 1, 22 | occupied with anything that is unchangeable. And thus he 151 1, 22 | at his best, because he is better when his mind is 152 1, 22 | is better when his mind is fully fixed upon, and his 153 1, 22 | for God's sake. For this is the law of love that has 154 1, 22 | that no part of our life is to be unoccupied, and to 155 1, 22 | an object worthy of love is to be borne into the same 156 1, 23 | loved, first, that which is above us; second, ourselves; 157 1, 23 | ourselves; third, that which is on a level with us; fourth, 158 1, 23 | with us; fourth, that which is beneath us, no precepts 159 1, 23 | something very great if it is able to lord it over its 160 1, 23 | over its companions, that is, other men. For it is inherent 161 1, 23 | that is, other men. For it is inherent in the sinful soul 162 1, 23 | due to itself, that which is properly due to God only. 163 1, 23 | Now such love of itself is more correctly called hate. 164 1, 23 | correctly called hate. For it is not just that it should 165 1, 23 | that it should desire what is beneath it to be obedient 166 1, 23 | Now the health of the soul is to cling steadfastly to 167 1, 23 | to the better part, that is, to the unchangeable God. 168 1, 23 | nature its equals, that is, its fellow-men, this is 169 1, 23 | is, its fellow-men, this is a reach of arrogance utterly 170 1, 24 | deceive themselves. For it is not their body, but its 171 1, 24 | that they hate. And so it is not no body, but an uncorrupted 172 1, 24 | hurtful to the body, that is, those habits and affections 173 1, 24 | to the other." For this is said of the carnal habit 174 1, 24 | subject to the spirit, which is what the order of nature 175 1, 24 | in subduing the flesh, is working as it were to destroy 176 1, 24 | the truth how well-founded is the statement of the apostle 177 1, 25 | measure of loving, that is, in what measure he may 178 1, 25 | but a fool would doubt. He is to be taught, too, in what 179 1, 25 | within due limits. For it is equally manifest that he 180 1, 25 | more highly. But no one is to be told not to desire 181 1, 25 | of his body because there is something he desires more. 182 1, 25 | bread for himself, that is, he gives away money that 183 1, 25 | gives away money that he is very fond of and desires 184 1, 25 | desires to heap up, but it is because he values more highly 185 1, 25 | which the bread sustains. It is superfluous to argue longer 186 1, 25 | so very plain, but this is just what the error of wicked 187 1, 26 | Seeing, then, that there is no need of a command that 188 1, 26 | his own body, seeing, that is, that we love ourselves, 189 1, 26 | love ourselves, and what is beneath us but connected 190 1, 26 | been violated, and which is common to us with the beasts ( 191 1, 26 | the end of the commandment is love, and that twofold, 192 1, 26 | yourself in your entirety, that is, soul and body together, 193 1, 26 | and body together (for man is made up of soul and body), 194 1, 26 | things that are to be loved is overlooked in these two 195 1, 26 | measure of our love for Him is prescribed in such terms 196 1, 26 | prescribed in such terms that it is evident all other things 197 1, 26 | for ourselves; yet when it is said, "Thou shalt love thy 198 1, 27 | Now he is a man of just and holy life 199 1, 27 | loved equally. No sinner is to be loved as a sinner; 200 1, 27 | a sinner; and every man is to be loved as a man for 201 1, 27 | for God's sake; but God is to be loved for His own 202 1, 27 | His own sake. And if God is to be loved more than any 203 1, 27 | through the soul, and it is by the soul that we enjoy 204 1, 29 | though they be, if a man is fond of a particular actor, 205 1, 29 | the very greatest good, he is fond of all who join with 206 1, 29 | and the more fervent he is in his admiration, the more 207 1, 29 | one who opposes him, he is exceedingly displeased by 208 1, 29 | God, the enjoyment of whom is true happiness of life, 209 1, 29 | they love? And hence it is that we love even our enemies. 210 1, 30 | its termination. But it is not irrational to ask whether 211 1, 30 | in those two commandments is included the love of angels 212 1, 30 | far as men are concerned, is shown both by our Lord Himself 213 1, 30 | prophets, asked Him, "And who is my neighbour?" He told him 214 1, 30 | likewise;" teaching us that he is our neighbour whom it is 215 1, 30 | is our neighbour whom it is our duty to help in his 216 1, 30 | would be in turn to help us is our neighbour. For the name " 217 1, 30 | For the name "neighbour" is a relative one, and no one 218 1, 30 | not see that no exception is made of any one as a person 219 1, 30 | any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in 220 1, 30 | every man in this precept, is compelled to admit, what 221 1, 30 | compelled to admit, what is at once most absurd and 222 1, 30 | fool would say this, it is clear that every man is 223 1, 30 | is clear that every man is to be considered our neighbour, 224 1, 30 | the of offices of mercy is by right called a neighbour, 225 1, 30 | right called a neighbour, it is manifest that the command 226 1, 30 | But as the Divine nature is of higher excellence than, 227 1, 30 | the command to love God is distinct from that to love 228 1, 30 | on account of His; that is, He pities us that we may 229 1, 31 | own sake, and that nothing is a true object of enjoyment 230 1, 31 | for all the good we enjoy is either Himself, or what 231 1, 32 | His own goodness. For it is because He is good we exist; 232 1, 32 | goodness. For it is because He is good we exist; and so far 233 1, 32 | And, further, because He is also just, we cannot with 234 1, 32 | far as we are evil, so far is our existence less complete. 235 1, 32 | existence less complete. Now He is the first and supreme existence, 236 1, 32 | and supreme existence, who is altogether unchangeable, 237 1, 32 | That use, then, which God is said to make of us has no 238 1, 32 | only; and, so far as He is concerned, has reference 239 1, 32 | man and care for him, it is for his advantage we do 240 1, 32 | without reward. Now this is our highest reward, that 241 1, 33 | Paul?" And again: "Neither is he that planteth anything, 242 1, 33 | admonisheth the man who is about to worship him, that 243 1, 33 | should rather worship Him who is his Master, and under whom 244 1, 33 | and under whom he himself is a fellow-servant. ~ 245 1, 33 | joy of a man in God, it is God rather than man that 246 1, 33 | immediate context to "enjoy" is used in the sense of to " 247 1, 33 | when the thing that we love is near us, it is a matter 248 1, 33 | that we love is near us, it is a matter of course that 249 1, 33 | you are using it, and it is an abuse of language to 250 1, 33 | the Blessed Trinity, who is the Supreme and Unchangeable 251 1, 34 | mark that even when He who is Himself the Truth and the 252 1, 34 | beginning of His way," that is, that those who wished to 253 1, 34 | truth, and the life;" that is, by me men come, to me they 254 1, 34 | through an equal an equal is known; and the Holy Spirit 255 1, 34 | may learn how essential it is that nothing should detain 256 1, 34 | condescended to be our way, is willing to detain us, but 257 1, 35 | fulfilment and end of Scripture is the love of God and our 258 1, 35 | discussion about things, this is the sum: that we should 259 1, 35 | and of all Holy Scripture, is the love of an object which 260 1, 35 | love of an object which is to be enjoyed, and the love 261 1, 35 | with ourselves. For there is no need of a command that 262 1, 36 | which builds us up in love is not perniciously deceptive 263 1, 36 | in that place, his error is not pernicious, and he is 264 1, 36 | is not pernicious, and he is wholly clear from the charge 265 1, 36 | of deception. For there is involved in deception the 266 1, 36 | the intention to say what is false; and we find plenty 267 1, 36 | deceit, and the ignorant man is practiced upon, it is quite 268 1, 36 | man is practiced upon, it is quite clear that in any 269 1, 36 | particular case the man who is deceived is a better man 270 1, 36 | the man who is deceived is a better man than he who 271 1, 36 | deceives, seeing that it is better to suffer than to 272 1, 36 | any man thinks that a lie is ever useful, he must think 273 1, 36 | must think that injustice is sometimes useful. For no 274 1, 36 | every man who breaks faith is unjust. Either, then, injustice 275 1, 36 | Either, then, injustice is sometimes useful (which 276 1, 36 | sometimes useful (which is impossible), or a lie is 277 1, 36 | is impossible), or a lie is never useful. ~Whoever takes 278 1, 36 | to build up love, which is the end of the commandment, 279 1, 36 | which the road leads. He is to be corrected, however, 280 1, 36 | shown how much better it is not to quit the straight 281 1, 37 | which the author whom he is reading did not intend, 282 1, 37 | angry with Scripture than he is with himself. And if he 283 1, 38 | when we reach it! For there is this great difference between 284 1, 38 | that a temporal object is valued more before we possess 285 1, 38 | object, on the other hand, is loved with greater ardour 286 1, 38 | with greater ardour when it is in possession than while 287 1, 38 | possession than while it is still an object of desire, 288 1, 38 | may set upon it when he is on his way to possess it, 289 1, 39 | chap. 39. He who is mature in faith hope and 290 1, 39 | And thus a man who is resting upon faith, hope 291 1, 39 | case, I think, the saying is already fulfilled: "Whether 292 1, 39 | them, that, holding to what is perfect, they do not seek 293 1, 39 | they do not seek for what is only in part perfect of 294 1, 39 | course, I mean, so far as is possible in this life; for, 295 1, 39 | of no just and holy man is perfect here. Therefore 296 1, 39 | but the greatest of these is charity:" because, when 297 1, 40 | the end of the commandment is charity, out of a pure heart, 298 1, 40 | of faith unfeigned," and is bent upon making all his 299 1, 40 | being loved but that which is worthy of love. And he joins 300 1, 40 | unfeigned." For if our faith is free from all hypocrisy, 301 1, 40 | abstain from loving what is unworthy of our love, and 302 2, arg | first defines what a sign is, and shows that there are 303 2, arg | interpreter of Scripture is chiefly concerned. The difficulties 304 2, arg | from ignorance of signs is to be removed by learning 305 2, arg | languages, in which Scripture is written, by comparing the 306 2, arg | expressions, knowledge of things is as necessary as knowledge 307 2, arg | points out how all that is sound and useful in their 308 2, 1 | that they are signs, that is, to what they signify. For 309 2, 1 | they signify. For a sign is a thing which, over and 310 2, 1 | animal whose footprint this is has passed by; and when 311 2, 1 | smoke, we know that there is fire beneath; and when we 312 2, 1 | it indicates fire. For it is not from any intention of 313 2, 1 | making it a sign that it is so, but through attention 314 2, 1 | we come to know that fire is beneath, even when nothing 315 2, 1 | other emotion of the mind is betrayed by the telltale 316 2, 1 | class of signs however, it is no part of my design to 317 2, 2 | or their thoughts. Nor is there any reason for giving 318 2, 2 | cooing calls his mate, or is called by her in turn; and 319 2, 2 | purpose of signification, is another question, and does 320 2, 3 | of the mind. Our Lord, it is true, gave a sign through 321 2, 6 | holds in small esteem what is discovered without difficulty. 322 2, 6 | without difficulty. For why is it, I ask, that if any one 323 2, 6 | twofold love, a love, that is, of God and their neighbour; 324 2, 6 | and their neighbour; how is it, I say, that if a man 325 2, 6 | passage in Canticles, where it is said of the Church, when 326 2, 6 | said of the Church, when it is being praised under the 327 2, 6 | one bears twins, and none is barren among them?" Does 328 2, 6 | masticated by the teeth. It is with the greatest pleasure, 329 2, 6 | the knowledge the same, is another question, and one 330 2, 6 | the facts, both that it is pleasanter in some cases 331 2, 6 | through figures and that what is attended with difficulty 332 2, 6 | from either of these causes is to be avoided. Accordingly 333 2, 6 | appetite. For almost nothing is dug out of those obscure 334 2, 7 | First of all, then, it is necessary that we should 335 2, 7 | mortality and of the death that is before us, and crucify all 336 2, 7 | nailed to the tree. Next it is necessary to have our hearts 337 2, 7 | and believe that whatever is there written, even though 338 2, 7 | even though it be hidden, is better and truer than anything 339 2, 7 | else in them but that God is to be loved for His own 340 2, 7 | God's sake; and that God is to be loved with all the 341 2, 7 | neighbour as one's self that is, in such a way that all 342 2, 7 | treating about things. It is necessary, then, that each 343 2, 7 | to the fourth step, that is, strength and resolution, 344 2, 7 | then in the fifth step that is, in the counsel of compassion 345 2, 7 | cleanses his soul, which is violently agitated, and 346 2, 7 | more delightful, still it is only through a glass darkly 347 2, 7 | ascends to wisdom which is the seventh and last step, 348 2, 7 | tranquility. For the fear of God is the beginning of wisdom. 349 2, 7 | reach wisdom itself, our way is by the steps now described. ~ 350 2, 8 | step here mentioned, for it is about it that I have set 351 2, 8 | greater authority (though this is not a very likely thing 352 2, 8 | authority on the two sides is to be looked upon as equal. ~ 353 2, 8 | which we say this judgment is to be exercised, is contained 354 2, 8 | judgment is to be exercised, is contained in the following 355 2, 8 | Five books of Moses, that is, Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, 356 2, 8 | Prophets, in which there is one book of the Psalms of 357 2, 8 | the most likely opinion is that they were written by 358 2, 8 | authority of the Old Testament is contained within the limits 359 2, 8 | the New Testament, again, is contained within the following: 360 2, 9 | first rule to be observed is, as I said, to know these 361 2, 9 | passages about which there is no doubt to remove all hesitation 362 2, 10 | causes which prevent what is written from being understood: 363 2, 10 | that syllable the ox, which is ordinarily called by that 364 2, 11 | ignorance of proper signs is knowledge of languages. 365 2, 11 | knowledge of these languages is necessary, not for the sake 366 2, 11 | words like these which it is very easy to mark and to 367 2, 12 | diversity of interpretations is useful. Errors arising from 368 2, 12 | confirms the other. For the one is explained by the other; 369 2, 12 | man may understand that he is admonished not to despise 370 2, 12 | meaning of the two translators is compared, a more likely 371 2, 12 | viz., that the command is not to despise our kinsmen, 372 2, 12 | save some of them;" that is, that through emulation 373 2, 12 | abide." Now which of these is the literal translation 374 2, 12 | knowledge, a great truth is to be found in each. For 375 2, 12 | be found in each. For it is difficult for interpreters 376 2, 12 | understanding consists in sight, and is abiding, but faith feeds 377 2, 12 | translator, to whom the meaning is not well known, is deceived 378 2, 12 | meaning is not well known, is deceived by an ambiguity 379 2, 12 | passage a construction that is wholly alien to the sense 380 2, 12 | obscure, but false; and there is a wide difference between 381 2, 12 | For the same reason it is, that because the Greek 382 2, 12 | way. And yet the meaning is very clear; for it is made 383 2, 12 | meaning is very clear; for it is made evident by the words 384 2, 12 | will not take deep root," is a more suitable form of 385 2, 13 | what the actual thought is which the several translators 386 2, 13 | their own purity. For what is called a solecism is nothing 387 2, 13 | what is called a solecism is nothing else than the putting 388 2, 13 | men) or inter hominibus, is of no consequence to a man 389 2, 13 | And in the same way, what is a barbarism but the pronouncing 390 2, 13 | syllable long or short, is not a matter of much concern 391 2, 13 | much concern to the man who is beseeching God, in any way 392 2, 13 | pardon his sins. What then is purity of speech, except 393 2, 13 | that of signs, by which it is hard not to be puffed up, 394 2, 13 | ipsis?" (And what the land is that they dwell in, whether 395 2, 13 | disposed to think that this is simply the idiom of another 396 2, 13 | that any deeper meaning is intended. Again, that phrase, 397 2, 13 | avoid them altogether, it is easy to treat with indifference, 398 2, 13 | Because the foolishness of God is wiser than men, and the 399 2, 13 | and the weakness of God is stronger than men 1 Cor. 400 2, 13 | fortius est hominum" (What is foolish of God is wiser 401 2, 13 | What is foolish of God is wiser of men, and what is 402 2, 13 | is wiser of men, and what is weak of God is stronger 403 2, 13 | and what is weak of God is stronger of men), a quick 404 2, 13 | construction upon it. For not only is such a form of speech faulty 405 2, 13 | the Latin tongue, but it is ambiguous too, as if the 406 2, 13 | men or the weakness of men is wiser or stronger than that 407 2, 13 | hominibus"(stronger than men) is not free from ambiguity, 408 2, 13 | For whether "hominibus" is put as the plural of the 409 2, 14 | unknown words and idioms is to be discovered~ 410 2, 14 | idiom, of which the reader is ignorant, brings him to 411 2, 14 | read or to hear them. There is nothing that it is better 412 2, 14 | There is nothing that it is better to commit to memory 413 2, 14 | about it. So great, however, is the force of custom, even 414 2, 15 | Among versions a preference is given to the Septuagint 415 2, 15 | themselves the Italian (Itala) is to be preferred to the others, 416 2, 15 | authority of the Septuagint is preeminent as far as the 417 2, 15 | far as the Old Testament is concerned; for it is reported 418 2, 15 | Testament is concerned; for it is reported through all the 419 2, 15 | but one voice. And if, as is reported, and as many not 420 2, 15 | Wherefore, even if anything is found in the original Hebrew 421 2, 15 | in the Lord. And thus it is possible that they translated 422 2, 15 | most closely to the words, is often not without value 423 2, 16 | both of language and things is helpful for the understanding 424 2, 16 | standstill, their meaning is to be traced partly by the 425 2, 16 | be wise as serpents; that is to say, that for the sake 426 2, 16 | sake of our head, which is Christ, we should willingly 427 2, 16 | metaphors which Scripture is accustomed to draw from 428 2, 16 | mentioned by way of comparison, is a very great drawback to 429 2, 16 | places in books too, where it is used metaphorically; and 430 2, 16 | understand that perpetual peace is indicated by the olive branch 431 2, 16 | it returned to the ark, is that we know both that the 432 2, 16 | smooth touch of olive oil is not easily spoiled by a 433 2, 16 | and that the tree itself is an evergreen. Many, again, 434 2, 16 | lungs, nor the power it is said to have of piercing 435 2, 16 | with its roots, although it is a small and insignificant 436 2, 16 | cannot make out why it is said, Purge me with hyssop, 437 2, 16 | example, to ascertain what is meant by the fact that Moses 438 2, 16 | the creature, for there is a trinity in the Creator; 439 2, 16 | three parts, whence also God is to be loved with the whole 440 2, 16 | and the whole mind; and it is very clear that in the body 441 2, 16 | four elements of which it is made up. In this number 442 2, 16 | ten, therefore, when it is placed before us in connection 443 2, 16 | connection with time, that is, when it is taken four times, 444 2, 16 | with time, that is, when it is taken four times, we are 445 2, 16 | any delight in time, that is, to fast for forty days. 446 2, 16 | psalters and the harp. And it is a question which it is not 447 2, 16 | it is a question which it is not out of place for learned 448 2, 16 | to discuss, whether there is any musical law that compels 449 2, 16 | such law, the number itself is not on that very account 450 2, 16 | and if again any question is raised about that number, 451 2, 16 | temple was in building, which is mentioned in the gospel 452 2, 17 | remark that all sound, which is the material of song, is 453 2, 17 | is the material of song, is by nature of three kinds. 454 2, 17 | nature of three kinds. For it is either produced by the voice, 455 2, 18 | chap. 18. No help is to be despised even though 456 2, 18 | But whether the fact is as Varro has related, or 457 2, 18 | as Varro has related, or is not so, still we ought not 458 2, 18 | derive anything from it that is of use for the understanding 459 2, 19 | this whole topic (for it is one that cannot be omitted), 460 2, 19 | vogue among the heathen. One is the knowledge of things 461 2, 19 | with human institutions, is partly superstitious, partly 462 2, 20 | either to the worship of what is created or of some part 463 2, 20 | walking side by side. But it is delightful that the boys 464 2, 20 | his boots, replied, "That is not strange, but it would 465 2, 21 | honour on those men. And this is not to be wondered at, when 466 2, 21 | varied. And when any one is born, it is easy to observe 467 2, 21 | when any one is born, it is easy to observe the point 468 2, 22 | from such an observation, is a great delusion and great 469 2, 22 | again), this superstition is refuted beyond the reach 470 2, 22 | doubt. For the observation is of the position of the stars, 471 2, 22 | womb so closely that there is no interval of time between 472 2, 22 | Nor is it to the point to say that 473 2, 22 | the constellations, and it is by looking into these that 474 2, 22 | be the same whether he is consulted about Jacob or 475 2, 22 | it profit him that there is a difference in the heavens, 476 2, 22 | into disrepute, when there is no difference in his chart, 477 2, 23 | delusions and deceptions is, that through these superstitious 478 2, 23 | advantage, the Word of God is not silent about this species 479 2, 23 | forth young, or an object is struck by lightning, men 480 2, 24 | understanding in the mind which is, as it were, the common 481 2, 24 | figure of the letter X, which is made in the shape of a cross, 482 2, 24 | same sound, beta, which is the name of a letter among 483 2, 24 | letter among the Greeks, is the name of a vegetable 484 2, 24 | intercourse with devils is maintained have meaning 485 2, 25 | not superstitious, that is, such as are not set up 486 2, 25 | even now, if any one who is unaccustomed to such follies 487 2, 25 | devices of men, unless when it is a matter of importance to 488 2, 25 | human devices, and nothing is to be considered more peculiarly 489 2, 25 | himself than, anything that is false and lying. Among the 490 2, 25 | intercourse of life, the Christian is not by any means to neglect, 491 2, 26 | various languages as far as is required a matter I have 492 2, 26 | these are useful, and there is nothing unlawful in learning 493 2, 28 | To what extent history is an aid ~ 494 2, 28 | was there, show that it is much more likely that Plato 495 2, 28 | Plato, a thing which it is the height of folly to believe. ~ 496 2, 28 | described, the history itself is not to be reckoned among 497 2, 28 | course of time, of which God is the author and governor. 498 2, 28 | author and governor. For it is one thing to tell what has 499 2, 29 | what extent natural science is an exegetical aid~ 500 2, 29 | There is also a species of narrative


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