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7 4
8 4
9 4
a 937
ab 2
abandoned 2
abhor 4
Frequency    [«  »]
1457 is
1269 that
941 it
937 a
867 not
797 for
723 be
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

a

1-500 | 501-937

    Book, Chapter
1 pref | interpretation of Scripture is not a superfluous task ~ 2 pref, 0| to turn them back from a useful study to the dull 3 pref, 0| use to anybody. There is a third class of objectors 4 pref, 0| that they have attained a certain power of interpreting 5 pref, 0| have no right to fly into a passion with me on that 6 pref, 0| the Egyptian monk Antony, a just and holy man, who, 7 pref, 0| meditation to have arrived at a thorough understanding of 8 pref, 0| teaching from man, attained a full knowledge of the art 9 pref, 0| that he might read through a book presented to him on 10 pref, 0| fact be so, they boast of a real advantage, and one 11 pref, 0| hearing it spoken, or from a human teacher. Now, then, 12 pref, 0| every one who has not had a like experience that he 13 pref, 0| need not consider himself a Christian, or may at least 14 pref, 0| gospel itself, or to read a book, or to listen to another 15 pref, 0| heaven, was yet sent to a man to receive the sacraments 16 pref, 0| in human words, and with a human tongue, opened to 17 pref, 0| plan of his father-in-law, a man of an alien race, for 18 pref, 0| him? For Moses knew that a wise plan, in whatever mind 19 pref, 0| one else, when he finds a book, to tell him what is 20 1 | BOOK I. - Containing a General View of the Subjects 21 1, arg | Scripture. After adding a few words about hope, he 22 1, 1 | making known, the meaning; a great and arduous undertaking, 23 1, 1 | He has already given. For a possession which is not 24 1, 1 | already vouchsafed to me with a view to undertaking this 25 1, 1 | shall be made to rejoice in a marvellous increase of wealth. ~ 26 1, 2 | Chap. 2. What a thing is, and what a sign~ 27 1, 2 | What a thing is, and what a sign~ 28 1, 2 | use the word "thing" in a strict sense, to signify 29 1, 2 | which is never employed as a sign of anything else: for 30 1, 2 | stone which Jacob used as a pillow, nor the ram which 31 1, 2 | Accordingly, every sign is also a thing; for what is not a 32 1, 2 | a thing; for what is not a thing is nothing at all. 33 1, 2 | thing, however, is not also a sign. And so, in regard 34 1, 2 | of things, speak in such a way that even if some of 35 1, 4 | For to enjoy a thing is to rest with satisfaction 36 1, 4 | what one desires, if it is a proper object of desire; 37 1, 4 | then, we were wanderers in a strange country, and could 38 1, 4 | and becoming engrossed in a factitious delight, our 39 1, 4 | us truly happy. Such is a picture of our condition 40 1, 5 | For it is not easy to find a name that will suitably 41 1, 5 | each of them by Himself is a complete substance, and 42 1, 6 | of Him. Thus there arises a curious contradiction of 43 1, 6 | their ears, to think of a nature supreme in excellence 44 1, 7 | reach the conception of a nature, than which nothing 45 1, 7 | the intelligence to reach a conception of God, place 46 1, 7 | being to whom there exists a superior is God. And so 47 1, 8 | them in beauty, is quite a distinct thing from the 48 1, 8 | contrary is wisdom itself. For a wise intelligence, that 49 1, 8 | entire confidence prefer a life which is unchangeably 50 1, 8 | and they cannot find such a rule, except by going beyond 51 1, 9 | ask, "How do you know that a life of unchangeable wisdom 52 1, 9 | does not see it is like a blind man in the sun, whom 53 1, 10 | upon this purification as a kind of journey or voyage 54 1, 11 | Wisdom becoming incarnate, a pattern to us of purification~ 55 1, 11 | weakness, and to show us a pattern of holy life in 56 1, 12 | come to us. For He came to a place where He had always 57 1, 14 | up wounds, do it not in a slovenly way, but carefully, 58 1, 14 | carefully, that there may be a certain degree of neatness 59 1, 14 | just as he who ministers to a bodily hurt in some cases 60 1, 14 | cases applies likes, as a round cloth to a round wound, 61 1, 14 | likes, as a round cloth to a round wound, or an oblong 62 1, 14 | disease was brought in through a woman's corrupted soul: 63 1, 14 | the remedy came through a woman's virgin body. To 64 1, 14 | applied: He was born of a woman to deliver us who 65 1, 14 | deliver us who fell through a woman: He came as a man 66 1, 14 | through a woman: He came as a man to save us who are men, 67 1, 14 | save us who are men, as a mortal to save us who are 68 1, 14 | necessity of carrying out a set undertaking, will find 69 1, 15 | strengthened our faith by adding a great buttress of hope. 70 1, 15 | be done, not only without a murmur, but even with delight? ~ 71 1, 17 | on the way, and that not a way that lies through space, 72 1, 17 | through space, but through a change of affections, and 73 1, 17 | guilt of our past sins like a hedge of thorns barred against 74 1, 19 | Furthermore, as there is a kind of death of the soul, 75 1, 19 | habits, is created anew after a better pattern, so we must 76 1, 19 | death which we all owe as a debt contracted through 77 1, 19 | resurrection be changed into a better form; not that flesh 78 1, 19 | want, shall be animated by a spirit perfectly pure and 79 1, 20 | when the body dies into a more terrible death, and 80 1, 20 | to change his earthly for a heavenly habitation, but 81 1, 22 | are things ourselves. For a great thing truly is man, 82 1, 22 | love one another: but it is a question whether man is 83 1, 22 | of something else. For if a thing is to be loved for 84 1, 22 | enjoyment of it consists a happy life, the hope of 85 1, 22 | in the present time. But a curse is pronounced on him 86 1, 22 | object of enjoyment. For a man is never in so good 87 1, 22 | man is never in so good a state as when his whole 88 1, 22 | as when his whole life is a journey towards the unchangeable 89 1, 22 | object, no other man has a right to be angry if you 90 1, 22 | his neighbour as himself, a man turns the whole current 91 1, 23 | either united with us in a common relation to God, 92 1, 23 | relation to God, such as a man or an angel, or are 93 1, 23 | third, that which is on a level with us; fourth, that 94 1, 23 | these. For, however far a man may fall away from the 95 1, 23 | its fellow-men, this is a reach of arrogance utterly 96 1, 24 | would rather be without a body altogether, they entirely 97 1, 24 | they want. But they think a body of that kind would 98 1, 24 | because they think such a thing as that must be a 99 1, 24 | a thing as that must be a spirit. And as to the fact 100 1, 24 | work. For they strive by a kind of toilsome exercise 101 1, 24 | other hand, who do this in a perverse spirit, make war 102 1, 24 | their own body as if it were a natural enemy. And in this 103 1, 24 | matter they are led astray by a mistaken interpretation 104 1, 24 | has grown in upon it by a law of nature till it has 105 1, 24 | peace which springs out of a good habit. Nevertheless, 106 1, 25 | chap. 25. A man may love something more 107 1, 25 | good to himself, nobody but a fool would doubt. He is 108 1, 25 | safe and sound. And yet a man may have something that 109 1, 25 | superfluous to argue longer on a point so very plain, but 110 1, 26 | and our neighbour includes a command to love ourselves~ 111 1, 26 | that there is no need of a command that every man should 112 1, 26 | connected with us, through a law of nature which has 113 1, 27 | Now he is a man of just and holy life 114 1, 27 | sinner is to be loved as a sinner; and every man is 115 1, 27 | every man is to be loved as a man for God's sake; but 116 1, 28 | For, suppose that you had a great deal of some commodity, 117 1, 28 | from need or relationship a greater claim upon you than 118 1, 28 | matter as decided for you by a sort of lot, according as 119 1, 29 | iniquity though they be, if a man is fond of a particular 120 1, 29 | be, if a man is fond of a particular actor, and enjoys 121 1, 29 | actor, and enjoys his art as a great or even as the very 122 1, 29 | exceedingly displeased by such a man's contempt of his favourite, 123 1, 29 | partakers with them in so great a blessing. ~ 124 1, 30 | further in this connection a question about angels. For 125 1, 30 | in this life as through a glass darkly, the more easy 126 1, 30 | neighbour?" He told him of a certain man who, going down 127 1, 30 | the name "neighbour" is a relative one, and no one 128 1, 30 | can be neighbour except to a neighbour. And, again, who 129 1, 30 | exception is made of any one as a person to whom the offices 130 1, 30 | apostle thought it no sin, if a man were not a Christian 131 1, 30 | no sin, if a man were not a Christian or were an enemy, 132 1, 30 | goods. And as nobody but a fool would say this, it 133 1, 30 | mercy is by right called a neighbour, it is manifest 134 1, 31 | sake, and that nothing is a true object of enjoyment 135 1, 31 | enjoys nor uses us, I am at a loss to discover in what 136 1, 32 | use objects, we do so with a view to the full enjoyment 137 1, 32 | When we take pity upon a man and care for him, it 138 1, 32 | own advantage follows by a sort of natural consequence, 139 1, 33 | under whom he himself is a fellow-servant. ~ 140 1, 33 | But when you have joy of a man in God, it is God rather 141 1, 33 | we love is near us, it is a matter of course that it 142 1, 33 | this delight, and make it a means to that which you 143 1, 34 | out, determined to take a fleshly body. Whence also 144 1, 35 | For there is no need of a command that each man should 145 1, 35 | and delight as if it were a good to rest in, but with 146 1, 35 | good to rest in, but with a transient feeling rather, 147 1, 36 | If, on the other hand, a man draws a meaning from 148 1, 36 | other hand, a man draws a meaning from them that may 149 1, 36 | the man who is deceived is a better man than he who deceives, 150 1, 36 | and if any man thinks that a lie is ever useful, he must 151 1, 36 | which is impossible), or a lie is never useful. ~Whoever 152 1, 36 | in much the same way as a man who by mistake quits 153 1, 36 | road, lest, if he get into a habit of going astray, he 154 1, 37 | For if he takes up rashly a meaning which the author 155 1, 37 | itself will grow cold. For if a man has fallen from faith, 156 1, 38 | and things eternal, that a temporal object is valued 157 1, 38 | his longing for it can set a higher value on it than 158 1, 39 | And thus a man who is resting upon 159 1, 39 | and love, and who keeps a firm hold upon these, does 160 1, 39 | charity:" because, when a man shall have reached the 161 1, 40 | And, therefore, if a man fully understands that " 162 1, 40 | commandment is charity, out of a pure heart, and of a good 163 1, 40 | of a pure heart, and of a good conscience, and of 164 1, 40 | love," he adds "out of a pure heart," to provide 165 1, 40 | And he joins with this "a good conscience," in reference 166 1, 40 | reference to hope; for, if a man has the burthen of a 167 1, 40 | a man has the burthen of a bad conscience, he despairs 168 2, arg | signs. He first defines what a sign is, and shows that 169 2, arg | philosophy may be turned to a Christian use. And in conclusion, 170 2, 1 | introduced the subject with a warning against attending 171 2, 1 | to what they signify. For a sign is a thing which, over 172 2, 1 | they signify. For a sign is a thing which, over and above 173 2, 1 | to come into the mind as a consequence of itself: as 174 2, 1 | of itself: as when we see a footprint, we conclude that 175 2, 1 | when we hear the voice of a living man, we think of 176 2, 1 | any intention of making it a sign that it is so, but 177 2, 2 | there any reason for giving a sign except the desire of 178 2, 2 | expression or the cry of a man in grief, follow the 179 2, 3 | some to that of hearing, a very few to the other senses. 180 2, 3 | desire. And some convey a great deal by the motion 181 2, 3 | these signs are as it were a kind of visible words. The 182 2, 3 | frequently give not only a sweet but a significant 183 2, 3 | give not only a sweet but a significant sound, yet all 184 2, 3 | away the chief place as a means of indicating the 185 2, 3 | Our Lord, it is true, gave a sign through the odour of 186 2, 5 | Scripture, which brings a remedy for the terrible 187 2, 6 | they cannot hit upon even a fair interpretation. Some 188 2, 6 | toil, and of preventing a feeling of satiety in the 189 2, 6 | Church of Christ uses as a means of redeeming those 190 2, 6 | Spirit, yield the fruit of a twofold love, a love, that 191 2, 6 | fruit of a twofold love, a love, that is, of God and 192 2, 6 | how is it, I say, that if a man says this, he does not 193 2, 6 | praised under the figure of a beautiful woman, "Thy teeth 194 2, 6 | woman, "Thy teeth are like a flock of sheep that are 195 2, 7 | s self that is, in such a way that all our love for 196 2, 7 | drawn far away from such a love for God and such a 197 2, 7 | a love for God and such a love for his neighbour as 198 2, 7 | condition. For the knowledge of a good hope makes a man not 199 2, 7 | knowledge of a good hope makes a man not boastful, but sorrowful. 200 2, 7 | still it is only through a glass darkly that we are 201 2, 7 | And at this stage, too, a man so purges the eye of 202 2, 7 | of pleasing men or with a view to avoid any of the 203 2, 7 | which beset this life. Such a son ascends to wisdom which 204 2, 8 | take first possession of a weak mind, nor, cheating 205 2, 8 | with prejudices averse to a sound understanding. Now, 206 2, 8 | among these, of course, a high place must be given 207 2, 8 | authority (though this is not a very likely thing to happen), 208 2, 8 | happen), I think that in such a case the authority on the 209 2, 8 | history, which contains a connected narrative of the 210 2, 8 | which last look more like a sequel to the continuous 211 2, 8 | ascribed to Solomon from a certain resemblance of style, 212 2, 9 | who fear God and are of a meek and pious disposition 213 2, 9 | diligently; and the more of these a man discovers, the more 214 2, 9 | we have made ourselves to a certain extent familiar 215 2, 9 | matter memory counts for a great deal; but if the memory 216 2, 10 | further by that ox understand a preacher of the gospel, 217 2, 11 | the mind than any part of a thought we have in our mind. 218 2, 11 | angry man, Hosanna that of a joyful man. But the knowledge 219 2, 11 | necessary, not for the sake of a few words like these which 220 2, 11 | happened to get his hands upon a Greek manuscript, and who 221 2, 12 | chap. 12. A diversity of interpretations 222 2, 12 | For the examination of a number of texts has often 223 2, 12 | its literal sense, so that a man may understand that 224 2, 12 | translators is compared, a more likely sense of the 225 2, 12 | who read with knowledge, a great truth is to be found 226 2, 12 | And very often a translator, to whom the 227 2, 12 | and puts upon the passage a construction that is wholly 228 2, 12 | but false; and there is a wide difference between 229 2, 12 | Greek word "moschos" means a calf, some have not understood 230 2, 12 | not take deep root," is a more suitable form of expression 231 2, 13 | translator, if he be not a very learned man, often 232 2, 13 | either endeavour to get a knowledge of those languages 233 2, 13 | purity. For what is called a solecism is nothing else 234 2, 13 | words together according to a different rule from that 235 2, 13 | is of no consequence to a man who only wishes to know 236 2, 13 | in the same way, what is a barbarism but the pronouncing 237 2, 13 | barbarism but the pronouncing of a word in a different way 238 2, 13 | pronouncing of a word in a different way from that 239 2, 13 | syllable long or short, is not a matter of much concern to 240 2, 13 | men are easily offended in a matter of this kind, just 241 2, 13 | nothing from the meaning. Yet a more learned man would prefer 242 2, 13 | Mistakes of this kind, then, if a man do not choose to avoid 243 2, 13 | as not interfering with a right understanding. But 244 2, 13 | God is stronger of men), a quick and careful reader 245 2, 13 | true meaning, but still a man of slower intelligence 246 2, 13 | it. For not only is such a form of speech faulty in 247 2, 14 | are two kinds. For either a word or an idiom, of which 248 2, 14 | ignorant, brings him to a stop. Now if these belong 249 2, 14 | happen to meet either with a more learned man of whom 250 2, 14 | we can inquire, or with a passage that shows, either 251 2, 14 | that those who have been in a sort of way nurtured and 252 2, 14 | of the translators proves a very great assistance, if 253 2, 14 | examined and discussed with a careful comparison of their 254 2, 15 | chap. 15. Among versions a preference is given to the 255 2, 15 | translation, each man being in a cell by himself, and yet 256 2, 15 | together with the result that a unanimous agreement sprang 257 2, 15 | in the original Hebrew in a different form from that 258 2, 15 | they translated in such a way as the Holy Spirit, 259 2, 15 | nevertheless, as I said above, a comparison of those translators 260 2, 15 | often not without value as a help to the clearing up 261 2, 16 | chance to bring the reader to a standstill, their meaning 262 2, 16 | was commanded to wash, has a figurative significance, 263 2, 16 | and undoubtedly conveys a secret sense; but yet if 264 2, 16 | not interpreted that name, a meaning so important would 265 2, 16 | enigmas of Scripture. And a number of men skilled in 266 2, 16 | squeezing itself through a narrow hole, and thus acquires 267 2, 16 | too, by coming through a narrow place, according 268 2, 16 | by way of comparison, is a very great drawback to the 269 2, 16 | is not easily spoiled by a fluid of another kind, and 270 2, 16 | its roots, although it is a small and insignificant 271 2, 16 | set down in Scripture in a figurative and mystical 272 2, 16 | figurative and mystical way. A candid mind, if I may so 273 2, 16 | the creature, for there is a trinity in the Creator; 274 2, 16 | convey instruction under a figurative guise, and ignorance 275 2, 16 | Not a few things, too, are closed 276 2, 16 | and the harp. And it is a question which it is not 277 2, 16 | gospel viz., forty-six has a certain undefinable musical 278 2, 16 | that our Lord put on, not a false, but a true and human 279 2, 16 | put on, not a false, but a true and human body. And 280 2, 17 | such matters. He says that a certain state (I don't recollect 281 2, 17 | from each of three artists a set of statues of the Muses, 282 2, 18 | even though it come from a profane source~ 283 2, 20 | this class belong, but with a bolder reach of deception, 284 2, 20 | tying on or even dancing in a fashion certain articles, 285 2, 20 | are walking arm-in-arm, a stone, or a dog, or a boy, 286 2, 20 | arm-in-arm, a stone, or a dog, or a boy, should come 287 2, 20 | arm-in-arm, a stone, or a dog, or a boy, should come between 288 2, 20 | them. And the kicking of a stone, as if it were a divider 289 2, 20 | of a stone, as if it were a divider of friends, does 290 2, 20 | to venture upon striking a dog who has run between 291 2, 20 | however, for instead of a superstitious remedy, the 292 2, 20 | assailant run in hot haste for a real surgeon. To this class, 293 2, 20 | you stumble when going to a place; when your clothes 294 2, 20 | who, when consulted by a man who told him that the 295 2, 21 | sell inexperienced men into a miserable bondage. For when 296 2, 21 | to beasts, or of men with a view to confer honour on 297 2, 21 | possess, in life. For where a place was vacant, or not 298 2, 21 | pleasure, and they have a fixed movement, by which 299 2, 22 | to predict the events of a life~ 300 2, 22 | such an observation, is a great delusion and great 301 2, 22 | different that one of them has a most fortunate life, the 302 2, 22 | fortunate life, the other a most unfortunate. As, for 303 2, 22 | constellation. But what a difference there was between 304 2, 22 | profit him that there is a difference in the heavens, 305 2, 23 | after evil things are, by a secret judgment of God, 306 2, 23 | themselves further and further in a labyrinth of most pernicious 307 2, 23 | nullities, or are part of a guilty superstition, springing 308 2, 23 | superstition, springing out of a baleful fellowship between 309 2, 23 | Christian as the covenants of a false and treacherous friendship. 310 2, 23 | the occurrence, as when a mule brings forth young, 311 2, 24 | is made in the shape of a cross, means one thing among 312 2, 24 | languages uses this letter in a different sense when writing 313 2, 24 | different sense when writing to a Greek from that in which 314 2, 24 | uses it when writing to a Latin. And the same sound, 315 2, 24 | beta, which is the name of a letter among the Greeks, 316 2, 24 | the Greeks, is the name of a vegetable among the Latins; 317 2, 24 | syllables mean one thing to a Greek and another to a Latin. 318 2, 24 | to a Greek and another to a Latin. Now, just as all 319 2, 25 | was he meant to express, a thing still remembered by 320 2, 25 | vain. Yet all men aim at a certain degree of likeness 321 2, 25 | of things, nobody makes a mistake, especially if they 322 2, 25 | of men, unless when it is a matter of importance to 323 2, 25 | the contrary should pay a sufficient degree of attention 324 2, 26 | institutions of men are in a sort of way representations 325 2, 26 | languages as far as is required a matter I have spoken of 326 2, 28 | the pale of the Church as a matter of childish instruction. 327 2, 28 | frequently seek information about a variety of matters by use 328 2, 28 | temple (which He took as a symbol of His body) was 329 2, 28 | and more certainly from a comparison of profane history 330 2, 28 | that it was not without a purpose it was said that 331 2, 28 | passing over the Greeks, what a great question our own Ambrose 332 2, 28 | discovered that Plato made a journey into Egypt at the 333 2, 28 | learnt theology, lived at a date prior to the books 334 2, 28 | from the writings of Plato, a thing which it is the height 335 2, 28 | adviser, not the fidelity of a narrator. ~ 336 2, 29 | There is also a species of narrative resembling 337 2, 29 | description, in which not a past but an existing state 338 2, 29 | body to cure it, acts by a natural virtue, in which 339 2, 29 | freely used; or acts by a sort of charm, in which 340 2, 29 | But when the reason why a thing is of virtue does 341 2, 29 | the stars, again, is not a matter of narration, but 342 2, 29 | attention unprofitably is a hindrance rather; and as 343 2, 29 | moreover, in addition to a description of the present 344 2, 29 | of things, something like a narrative of the past also; 345 2, 30 | workman is over, remains as a result of his work, as, 346 2, 30 | his work, as, for example, a house, a bench, a dish, 347 2, 30 | as, for example, a house, a bench, a dish, and other 348 2, 30 | example, a house, a bench, a dish, and other things of 349 2, 30 | future. Now of these arts a very superficial and cursory 350 2, 30 | to be acquired, not with a view to practicing them ( 351 2, 30 | unless some duty compel us, a matter on which I do not 352 2, 30 | touch at present), but with a view to forming a judgement 353 2, 30 | but with a view to forming a judgement about them, that 354 2, 31 | first speaker adds: "I am a man;" and when the other 355 2, 31 | conclusion: "Then you are not a man." Now at this sort of 356 2, 31 | hated;" although, indeed, a style of speech which is 357 2, 31 | conclusions are sometimes drawn by a good and learned man, with 358 2, 31 | rise not, there will be a resurrection of the dead. 359 2, 32 | logical sequences is not a thing devised by men, but 360 2, 32 | therefore, that there is a resurrection of the dead. 361 2, 32 | risen, therefore there is a resurrection of the dead. 362 2, 33 | conclusions, too, there is a validity of inference in 363 2, 33 | man to have admitted: If a snail is an animal, it has 364 2, 33 | snail is an animal, it has a voice. This being admitted, 365 2, 33 | conclusion is false, but it is a true and valid inference 366 2, 33 | admission. Thus, the truth of a statement stands on its 367 2, 33 | And thus, as I said above, a false inference may be drawn 368 2, 33 | inference may be drawn by a valid process of reasoning, 369 2, 33 | For example, suppose that a man propounds the statement, " 370 2, 33 | If he is an orator, he is a man." But if we add, "He 371 2, 33 | does not follow, "He is not a man." ~ 372 2, 34 | incompatible. An example of a consequent is, "If he is 373 2, 34 | If he is an orator, he is a man;" of an inconsequent, " 374 2, 34 | inconsequent, "If he is a man, he is an orator;" of 375 2, 34 | incompatible, "If he is a man, he is a quadruped." 376 2, 34 | If he is a man, he is a quadruped." In these instances 377 2, 34 | sure about are joined by a valid inference to propositions 378 2, 34 | who knows that there is a resurrection of the dead 379 2, 35 | falsehood is the declaration of a state of things which is 380 2, 36 | are also certain rules for a more copious kind of argument, 381 2, 36 | perversity of those who put it to a bad use. Nor is it owing 382 2, 36 | conciliates the hearer, or that a narrative, when it is short 383 2, 37 | learnt the true secret of a happy life. Still, it sometimes 384 2, 37 | rules. It is just as if a man wishing to give rules 385 2, 37 | them. And in the same way a clever man often sees that 386 2, 37 | apprehends the rules for it. A dull man, on the other hand, 387 2, 38 | not nine, or do not make a square, or are not the triple 388 2, 38 | triple of three, nor one and a half times the number six, 389 2, 38 | however, who puts so high a value on these things as 390 2, 38 | uninstructed), although it holds a middle place between the 391 2, 39 | history of the past with a view to the questions arising 392 2, 39 | in Scripture that require a knowledge of history for 393 2, 39 | subjects for the sake of a few items of knowledge, 394 2, 39 | competent man were willing in a spirit of benevolence to 395 2, 39 | because this runs like a system of nerves through 396 2, 40 | themselves, designing them for a better use, not doing this 397 2, 40 | themselves, were not making a good use of; in the same 398 2, 40 | we must take and turn to a Christian use. ~ 399 2, 40 | Do we not see with what a quantity of gold and silver 400 2, 40 | the exodus was no doubt a type prefiguring what happens 401 2, 41 | mark them with. Now this is a meek and lowly herb, and 402 2, 41 | There is besides in hyssop a purgative virtue, that the 403 2, 42 | signs have ceased to be a hindrance to him; when he 404 2, 42 | about these I shall now, in a third book, endeavour to 405 3, arg | attention to the context, a comparison of translations, 406 3, arg | comparison of translations, or a reference to the original 407 3, 1 | diligently in Holy Scripture for a knowledge of His will. And 408 3, 1 | when furnished also with a knowledge of languages, 409 3, 1 | let him who is in such a state of mind that he can 410 3, 2 | are more than two), give a meaning in harmony with 411 3, 2 | choose I wot not: for I am in a strait betwixt two, having 412 3, 2 | strait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to 413 3, 2 | concupiscentiam habens " [having a desire for two things], 414 3, 2 | autem ex duobus" [I am in a strait betwixt two]; and 415 3, 2 | esse cum Christo" [having a desire to depart, and to 416 3, 2 | evident that he says he has a desire for that which is 417 3, 2 | so that, while he is in a strait betwixt two, yet 418 3, 2 | betwixt two, yet he has a desire for one and sees 419 3, 2 | desire for one and sees a necessity for the other; 420 3, 2 | necessity for the other; a desire, viz., to be with 421 3, 2 | to be with Christ, and a necessity to remain in the 422 3, 2 | apostle seem not only in a strait betwixt two, but 423 3, 2 | betwixt two, but also to have a desire for two. We must 424 3, 2 | choose I wot not: for I am in a strait betwixt two]; and 425 3, 2 | esse cum Christo" [having a desire to depart, and to 426 3, 2 | he were asked why he has a desire for this in preference 427 3, 2 | better]. Why, then, is he in a strait betwixt the two? 428 3, 2 | the two? Because there is a need for his remaining, 429 3, 3 | the rule of faith, or by a reference to the preceding 430 3, 3 | might be pronounced in such a way as to make what follows 431 3, 3 | justifieth," and to make a second question, "Who is 432 3, 3 | will be pronounced in such a way as to make the first 433 3, 3 | as to make the first part a question of inquiry, and 434 3, 3 | inquiry, and the second a rhetorical interrogative. 435 3, 3 | pronounced, then, in such a way that after the inquiry, " 436 3, 3 | Nazareth?" whether with that of a man who gives an affirmative 437 3, 3 | interrogation, or with that of a man who asks the whole question 438 3, 3 | hesitation, I do not see how a difference can be made. 439 3, 3 | barbarism, "non est absconditum a te ossum meum", than have 440 3, 3 | sometimes when the sound of a syllable is doubtful, it 441 3, 3 | doubtful, it is decided by a word near it belonging to 442 3, 4 | fratres in vobis", But this is a rather dangerous liberty 443 3, 4 | design of the writer, nor a comparison of translations, 444 3, 4 | comparison of translations, nor a reference to the original 445 3, 5 | chap. 5. It is a wretched slavery which takes 446 3, 5 | expressions of Scripture in a literal sense~ 447 3, 5 | we must beware of taking a figurative expression literally. 448 3, 5 | literally, it is understood in a carnal manner. And nothing 449 3, 5 | subjection to the flesh by a blind adherence to the letter. 450 3, 5 | out what is indicated by a proper word into its secondary 451 3, 5 | succession; and when he hears of a sacrifice, does not carry 452 3, 5 | earth. Now it is surely a miserable slavery of the 453 3, 6 | temporal things, it was in such a way that in all these the 454 3, 6 | subjecting themselves to such a bondage they were doing 455 3, 6 | boys under the guidance of a schoolmaster. And those 456 3, 6 | their leaders brought it as a charge against Him that 457 3, 6 | signs, which had been for a season imposed on the obedient, 458 3, 6 | were filled with such a measure of the Holy Spirit 459 3, 6 | themselves wholly to God as a new temple, of which the 460 3, 7 | itself to be considered a god, but only as representing 461 3, 7 | fountains? As it is described by a poet of theirs, who says, 462 3, 7 | its rattling stones within a sweet covering, and yet 463 3, 7 | of Neptune is used with a reference to this explanation 464 3, 7 | gods. If, then, to take a sign which has been established 465 3, 7 | has been established for a useful end instead of the 466 3, 8 | turned from the corruption of a multitude of false gods, 467 3, 8 | into bondage to signs of a useful kind, but rather 468 3, 9 | Now he is in bondage to a sign who uses, or pays homage 469 3, 9 | who either uses or honours a useful sign divinely appointed, 470 3, 9 | such signs refer. Now such a man is spiritual and free 471 3, 9 | have handed down to us a few rites in place of many, 472 3, 9 | are signified by them, is a mark of weakness and bondage; 473 3, 9 | does not understand what a sign signifies, but yet 474 3, 9 | but yet knows that it is a sign, is not in bondage. 475 3, 10 | we are to discern whether a phrase is figurative~ 476 3, 10 | guards us against taking a metaphorical form of speech 477 3, 10 | which tells us not to take a literal form of speech as 478 3, 10 | way to find out whether a phrase is literal or figurative. 479 3, 10 | frequently happens that a man will think nothing blameable 480 3, 10 | authority of the word has a hold upon their minds, they 481 3, 10 | future, and present. It is a narrative of the past, a 482 3, 10 | a narrative of the past, a prophecy of the future, 483 3, 10 | prophecy of the future, and a description of the present. 484 3, 10 | soul, and reduced it to a kind of poverty, it easily 485 3, 10 | what charity does with a view to one's own advantage 486 3, 10 | prudence; but what it does with a view to a neighbor's advantage 487 3, 10 | what it does with a view to a neighbor's advantage is 488 3, 11 | of lust is overturned in a man over whom it had held 489 3, 11 | numerous, nor placed in such a way as to obscure the sense, 490 3, 12 | men about him, either has a further meaning in what 491 3, 12 | report which is earned by a life of good works; and 492 3, 12 | of other persons is often a sin, becomes, when ascribed 493 3, 12 | when ascribed to God or a prophet, the sign of some 494 3, 12 | truth. Keeping company with a harlot, for example, is 495 3, 12 | prophet Hosea. Because it is a shamefully wicked thing 496 3, 12 | strip the body naked at a banquet among the drunken 497 3, 12 | does not follow that it is a sin to be naked in the baths. ~ 498 3, 12 | For it is possible that a wise man may use the daintiest 499 3, 12 | epicurism or gluttony, while a fool will crave for the 500 3, 12 | for the vilest food with a most disgusting eagerness


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