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baskets 1
baths 1
battle 4
be 723
bear 12
beard 1
bearing 4
Frequency    [«  »]
937 a
867 not
797 for
723 be
715 he
686 as
670 are
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

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be

1-500 | 501-723

    Book, Chapter
1 pref, 0| might with great advantage be taught to earnest students 2 pref, 0| after all, men should still be found to make objections, 3 pref, 0| their opinion that it can be of no use to anybody. There 4 pref, 0| obscurities of Scripture could be better done by the unassisted 5 pref, 0| answer is, that I am not to be blamed for their want of 6 pref, 0| they should for that reason be held in contempt by the 7 pref, 0| through prayer that it might be revealed to him; after three 8 pref, 0| from man (and if the fact be so, they boast of a real 9 pref, 0| pride and learn whatever can be learnt from man; and let 10 pref, 0| in the hope that we shall be carried up to the third 11 pref, 0| receive the sacraments and be admitted into the Church; 12 pref, 0| fellow-men. For how could that be true which is written, " 13 pref, 0| everything that He wished to be taught to men by voices 14 pref, 0| might originate, was to be ascribed not to the man 15 pref, 0| does it that others may be able to read for themselves. 16 pref, 0| no other object than to be of service, yet as it seemed 17 1, arg | knowledge of these things is to be sought. In this first book 18 1, arg | three classes, things to be enjoyed, things to be used, 19 1, arg | to be enjoyed, things to be used, and things which use 20 1, arg | only object which ought to be enjoyed is the Triune God, 21 1, arg | and that our sins might be taken away, "The Word was 22 1, arg | glory; if not, we shall be raised to everlasting punishment. 23 1, arg | though some of them may be loved, yet our love is not 24 1, 1 | of the meaning, and is to be undertaken in dependence 25 1, 1 | presumptuous it would undoubtedly be, if I were counting on my 26 1, 1 | possessed as it ought to be possessed. The Lord saith, " 27 1, 1 | Whosoever has, to him shall be given." I He will give, 28 1, 1 | to impart them to others, be multiplied by His grace, 29 1, 1 | loss and poverty, I shall be made to rejoice in a marvellous 30 1, 2 | something else; and hence may be understood what I call signs: 31 1, 2 | even if some of them may be used as signs also, that 32 1, 3 | things, then, which are to be enjoyed, others which are 33 1, 3 | enjoyed, others which are to be used, others still which 34 1, 4 | unlawful use ought rather to be called an abuse. Suppose, 35 1, 4 | s home, this world must be used, not enjoyed, that 36 1, 4 | invisible things of God may be clearly seen, being understood 37 1, 6 | And so God is not even to be called "unspeakable," because 38 1, 6 | unspeakable is what cannot be spoken of, it is not unspeakable 39 1, 6 | not unspeakable if it can be called unspeakable. And 40 1, 6 | opposition of words is rather to be avoided by silence than 41 1, 6 | avoided by silence than to be explained away by speech. 42 1, 6 | worthy of His greatness can be said of Him, has condescended 43 1, 7 | heavens, or what appears to be most brilliant in the heavens, 44 1, 7 | of God: nor could any one be found to believe that any 45 1, 8 | Chap. 8. God to be esteemed above all else 46 1, 8 | itself; and, whatever may be the bodily form that has 47 1, 8 | subject to change. This will be evident, if we consider 48 1, 8 | the unchangeable life to be the more excellent, is itself 49 1, 9 | to that which they own to be more excellent and more 50 1, 10 | To see God, the soul must be purified~ 51 1, 10 | has made, the soul must be purified that it may have 52 1, 14 | carefully, that there may be a certain degree of neatness 53 1, 15 | He points out as right to be done, not only without a 54 1, 17 | should return, do that would be still gracious and more 55 1, 18 | should bind on earth might be bound in heaven, and whatsoever 56 1, 18 | should loose on earth might be loosed in heaven; that is 57 1, 18 | remitted, they should not be remitted to him; but that 58 1, 18 | turn from his sins, should be saved by the same faith 59 1, 18 | believe that his sins can be pardoned, falls into despair, 60 1, 18 | remained for him than to be evil, when he has ceased 61 1, 19 | shall at the resurrection be changed into a better form; 62 1, 19 | can feel no want, shall be animated by a spirit perfectly 63 1, 20 | world and begin here to be conformed to the truth, 64 1, 22 | chap. 22. God alone to be enjoyed~ 65 1, 22 | are for use, that we may be able to arrive at the full 66 1, 22 | question whether man is to be loved by man for his own 67 1, 22 | me, then, that he is to be loved for the sake of something 68 1, 22 | else. For if a thing is to be loved for its own sake, 69 1, 22 | other man has a right to be angry if you love him too 70 1, 22 | no part of our life is to be unoccupied, and to afford 71 1, 22 | object worthy of love is to be borne into the same channel 72 1, 22 | which suffers no stream to be drawn off from itself by 73 1, 22 | diversion its own volume would be diminished. ~ 74 1, 23 | are not all, however, to be loved, but those only which 75 1, 23 | kinds of things that are to be loved, first, that which 76 1, 23 | beneath us, no precepts need be given about the second and 77 1, 23 | desire what is beneath it to be obedient to it while itself 78 1, 23 | must love the body, and be grieved at its corruption; 79 1, 24 | say that they would rather be without a body altogether, 80 1, 24 | body of that kind would be no body at all, because 81 1, 24 | such a thing as that must be a spirit. And as to the 82 1, 24 | that what it loves should be subject to the higher principle; 83 1, 24 | hate their bodies would be prepared to sacrifice one 84 1, 24 | unless some object was to be attained which would overbalance 85 1, 25 | Man, therefore, ought to be taught the due measure of 86 1, 25 | may love himself so as to be of service to himself. For 87 1, 25 | fool would doubt. He is to be taught, too, in what measure 88 1, 25 | highly. But no one is to be told not to desire the safety 89 1, 26 | classes of things that are to be loved is overlooked in these 90 1, 26 | in Him, nothing seems to be said about our love for 91 1, 27 | that more which ought to be loved less, nor loves that 92 1, 27 | that equally which ought to be loved either less or more, 93 1, 27 | less or more which ought to be loved equally. No sinner 94 1, 27 | equally. No sinner is to be loved as a sinner; and every 95 1, 27 | sinner; and every man is to be loved as a man for God's 96 1, 27 | God's sake; but God is to be loved for His own sake. 97 1, 27 | own sake. And if God is to be loved more than any man, 98 1, 27 | because all things are to be loved in reference to God, 99 1, 28 | Further, all men are to be loved equally. But since 100 1, 28 | none, and that it could not be given to more than one person; 101 1, 28 | would give what could not be given to both. Just so among 102 1, 28 | happens for the time being to be more closely connected with 103 1, 29 | of iniquity though they be, if a man is fond of a particular 104 1, 29 | remove it. Now, if this be so, what does it become 105 1, 29 | who comes to know Him will be disappointed in Him, and 106 1, 30 | 30. Whether angels are to be reckoned our neighbours~ 107 1, 30 | his need, or whom it would be our duty to help if he were 108 1, 30 | that he whose duty it would be in turn to help us is our 109 1, 30 | relative one, and no one can be neighbour except to a neighbour. 110 1, 30 | the offices of mercy may be denied when our Lord extends 111 1, 30 | not covet; and if there be any other commandment, it 112 1, 30 | clear that every man is to be considered our neighbour, 113 1, 30 | our behalf, as may easily be shown by turning the attention 114 1, 30 | Himself, our Lord, desired to be called our neighbour. For 115 1, 31 | use, there seems still to be something that requires 116 1, 31 | If He enjoys us, He must be in need of good from us, 117 1, 31 | Himself. And no one can be ignorant or in doubt as 118 1, 32 | we cannot with impunity be evil; and so far as we are 119 1, 32 | has given it to them to be so. That use, then, which 120 1, 33 | In what way man should be enjoyed~ 121 1, 33 | complete in it, then you may be truly and properly said 122 1, 34 | the journey, but also to be Himself the way to those 123 1, 34 | as He has condescended to be our way, is willing to detain 124 1, 35 | of an object which is to be enjoyed, and the love of 125 1, 35 | might know this truth and be able to act upon it; and 126 1, 35 | some other comparison can be found that will more suitably 127 1, 36 | mendacious, even though it be faulty. The interpreter, 128 1, 36 | interpreter, however should be corrected~ 129 1, 36 | meaning from them that may be used for the building up 130 1, 36 | but nobody who wishes to be deceived. Since, then, the 131 1, 36 | the road leads. He is to be corrected, however, and 132 1, 36 | corrected, however, and to be shown how much better it 133 1, 37 | the former passage cannot be the true one: and so it 134 1, 38 | displace faith; and hope shall be swallowed up in that perfect 135 1, 39 | fulfilled: "Whether there be prophecies, they shall fail; 136 1, 39 | shall fail; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; 137 1, 39 | shall cease; whether there be knowledge, it shall vanish 138 1, 39 | instruments (as they may be called), so great an edifice 139 1, 40 | that our hope shall not be in vain. For these reasons 140 1, 40 | myself. And so let this be the end of the present book. 141 2, arg | ignorance of signs is to be removed by learning the 142 2, arg | are true and useful, may be turned to account in removing 143 2, arg | of signs, whether these be direct or figurative. Whilst 144 2, arg | science and philosophy may be turned to a Christian use. 145 2, 1 | when nothing but smoke can be seen. And the footprint 146 2, 1 | altogether pass it over. It will be enough to have noticed it 147 2, 5 | could at the fit season be disseminated through the 148 2, 6 | either of these causes is to be avoided. Accordingly the 149 2, 6 | obscure passages which may not be found set forth in the plainest 150 2, 7 | necessary that we should be led by the fear of God to 151 2, 7 | we feel as if we could be wiser and give better commands 152 2, 7 | written, even though it be hidden, is better and truer 153 2, 7 | them but that God is to be loved for His own sake, 154 2, 7 | sake; and that God is to be loved with all the heart. 155 2, 7 | Divine help that he may not be overwhelmed in despair, 156 2, 7 | see God, so far as God can be seen by those who as far 157 2, 7 | though our conversation be in heaven. And at this stage, 158 2, 7 | Accordingly, that holy man will be so single and so pure in 159 2, 8 | sacred writings, then, will be he who in the first place 160 2, 8 | course, a high place must be given to such as have been 161 2, 8 | have been thought worthy to be the seat of an apostle and 162 2, 8 | authority on the two sides is to be looked upon as equal. ~ 163 2, 8 | say this judgment is to be exercised, is contained 164 2, 8 | Sirach. Still they are to be reckoned among the prophetical 165 2, 9 | search the first rule to be observed is, as I said, 166 2, 9 | or rules of faith, are to be searched into more carefully 167 2, 9 | down in Scripture are to be found all matters that concern 168 2, 9 | deal; but if the memory be defective, no rules can 169 2, 11 | them, again, are said to be untranslatable into another 170 2, 11 | there are words that cannot be translated into the idiom 171 2, 11 | given above are said to be of this kind, Racha expressing 172 2, 11 | from Hebrew into Greek can be counted, but the Latin translators 173 2, 12 | other; because "flesh" may be taken in its literal sense, 174 2, 12 | domestics of thy seed" may be understood figuratively 175 2, 12 | literal translation cannot be ascertained without reference 176 2, 12 | knowledge, a great truth is to be found in each. For it is 177 2, 13 | faulty interpretations can be emended~ 178 2, 13 | since the translator, if he be not a very learned man, 179 2, 13 | translated, which could not be translated at all into the 180 2, 13 | ignoscere (to pardon) should be pronounced with the third 181 2, 13 | which it is hard not to be puffed up, seeing that the 182 2, 13 | they dwell in, whether it be good or bad: and what cities 183 2, 13 | bad: and what cities they be that they dwell in. Num. 184 2, 13 | prefer that this should be corrected, and that we should 185 2, 13 | as if the meaning might be, that the folly of men or 186 2, 13 | ambiguity, even though it be free from solecism. For 187 2, 13 | to the meaning. It would be better then to say,"sapientius 188 2, 14 | unknown words and idioms is to be discovered~ 189 2, 14 | Scripture, but which are not to be found in Latin authors. 190 2, 14 | all positive error must be removed. For those who are 191 2, 15 | the Italian (Itala) is to be preferred to the others, 192 2, 15 | all; even so, it would not be right or becoming for any 193 2, 15 | as I was about to say, to be corrected if necessary by 194 2, 16 | standstill, their meaning is to be traced partly by the knowledge 195 2, 16 | one could interpret them, be of great value and service 196 2, 16 | command, that we should be wise as serpents; that is 197 2, 16 | faith should, as it were, be destroyed in us, if to save 198 2, 16 | with hyssop, and I shall be clean". ~ 199 2, 16 | may so speak, cannot but be anxious, for example, to 200 2, 16 | involved in this action cannot be got over. For the number 201 2, 16 | parts, whence also God is to be loved with the whole heart, 202 2, 16 | strings; or whether, if there be no such law, the number 203 2, 16 | very account the more to be considered as of sacred 204 2, 17 | doubt whether any one can be found among them more curious 205 2, 17 | statues of the Muses, to be placed as an offering in 206 2, 17 | that all were bought to be dedicated in the temple 207 2, 18 | chap. 18. No help is to be despised even though it 208 2, 18 | that wherever truth may be found, it belongs to his 209 2, 18 | Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools, 210 2, 19 | for it is one that cannot be omitted), there are two 211 2, 20 | so as to appear not to be engaged in superstitious 212 2, 20 | superstitious observances, but to be taking advantage of the 213 2, 20 | frivolous practices, that are to be observed if any part of 214 2, 20 | clothes are eaten by mice, to be more frightened at the prospect 215 2, 21 | men. And this is not to be wondered at, when we consider 216 2, 21 | heaven. But whatever they may be called by men, still there 217 2, 22 | indeed, are only fit to be unlearnt again), this superstition 218 2, 22 | time between them that can be apprehended and marked in 219 2, 22 | birth of these two could not be marked in any way that would 220 2, 22 | now so widely spread as to be in the mouth of all nations. ~ 221 2, 22 | which must, of course, be the same whether he is consulted 222 2, 22 | presumption of men, are to be referred to the same class 223 2, 23 | of God, delivered over to be mocked and deceived, as 224 2, 23 | men and devils, and are to be utterly repudiated and avoided 225 2, 23 | if there chance only to be something unusual in the 226 2, 25 | themselves that they should be in force, are human institutions; 227 2, 25 | signs may as far as possible be like the things they signify. 228 2, 25 | this whole class are to be reckoned among the superfluous 229 2, 25 | devices, and nothing is to be considered more peculiarly 230 2, 25 | arrangements of men with men are to be reckoned whatever differences 231 2, 25 | intercourse either could not be carried on at all, or would 232 2, 25 | carried on at all, or would be carried on at great inconvenience; 233 2, 25 | devices of men, would not be different in different nations, 234 2, 25 | different nations, and could not be changed among particular 235 2, 26 | must, as has been said, be utterly rejected and held 236 2, 26 | luxury and superfluity, to be adopted, especially the 237 2, 26 | objects to which they ought to be subservient. ~ 238 2, 28 | the Scriptures, even if it be learnt without the pale 239 2, 28 | from another source, can be ascertained more clearly 240 2, 28 | the gospel. It will still be evident, however, that it 241 2, 28 | so that, as this cannot be referred to our Lord's age, 242 2, 28 | to our Lord's age, it may be referred to the more secret 243 2, 28 | because (they urged) it cannot be denied that Plato lived 244 2, 28 | our literature, so as to be able to teach and write 245 2, 28 | history itself is not to be reckoned among human institutions; 246 2, 28 | past and gone and cannot be undone are to be reckoned 247 2, 28 | cannot be undone are to be reckoned as belonging to 248 2, 28 | another to show what ought to be done. History narrates what 249 2, 28 | at teaching what ought to be done or observed, using 250 2, 29 | that these objects are to be used conformably to certain 251 2, 29 | virtue, in which case it may be freely used; or acts by 252 2, 29 | efficacious it may seem to be. But when the reason why 253 2, 29 | years ago, or what will be her age any number of years 254 2, 30 | cursory knowledge is to be acquired, not with a view 255 2, 30 | about them, that we may not be wholly ignorant of what 256 2, 31 | follows that since they would be true if the dead rise not, 257 2, 31 | dead rise not, there will be a resurrection of the dead. 258 2, 31 | then, valid conclusions may be drawn not only from true 259 2, 31 | valid reasoning may easily be learnt in the schools, outside 260 2, 31 | truth of propositions must be inquired into in the sacred 261 2, 32 | noted by them that they may be able to learn and teach 262 2, 32 | the antecedent must also be false," says what is most 263 2, 32 | the antecedent must also be removed, is not made by 264 2, 33 | 33. False inferences may be drawn from valid seasonings, 265 2, 33 | above, a false inference may be drawn by a valid process 266 2, 33 | error we wish to correct may be sorry that he has admitted 267 2, 33 | that as the inferences may be valid where the opinions 268 2, 33 | false, so the inferences may be unsound where the opinions 269 2, 33 | of these statements may be true, still the principle 270 2, 35 | not false, though it may be applied to falsities~ 271 2, 35 | no reason why it should be false, for example, that 272 2, 35 | partition, is anything to be included that does not pertain 273 2, 35 | in hand, nor anything to be omitted that does. This 274 2, 35 | even though the things to be defined or divided are not 275 2, 35 | not as we declare it to be; and this definition is 276 2, 35 | falsehood itself cannot be true. We can also divide 277 2, 35 | regard to things that cannot be true at all, the other in 278 2, 35 | it is possible they might be, true. For example, the 279 2, 35 | eleven, says what cannot be true under any circumstances; 280 2, 35 | therefore, of what is false may be perfectly true, although 281 2, 35 | cannot, of course, itself be true. ~ 282 2, 36 | less true that they can be used for persuading men 283 2, 36 | is false; but as they can be used to enforce the truth 284 2, 36 | faculty itself that is to be blamed, but the perversity 285 2, 36 | cause in which they are used be true or false, are themselves 286 2, 36 | arranged that they should be so. ~ 287 2, 37 | it is learnt, is not to be used so much for ascertaining 288 2, 38 | value on these things as to be inclined to boast himself 289 2, 38 | things which he perceives to be true derive their truth, 290 2, 38 | others which he perceives to be unchangeable also derive 291 2, 38 | in this way may seem to be learned, but wise he cannot 292 2, 38 | wise he cannot in any sense be deemed. ~ 293 2, 39 | studies attention should be given, and in what spirit~ 294 2, 39 | the same, I think, might be done in regard to other 295 2, 39 | writing. This might also be done in relation to numbers, 296 2, 39 | in Holy Scripture, might be explained and written down. 297 2, 39 | whether the same thing can be done in regard to the theory 298 2, 40 | the things they gave would be turned to the service of 299 2, 40 | interpretation that may be as good, or better. ~ 300 2, 41 | feel that, whatever may be the riches he brings with 301 2, 41 | the Passover, he cannot be safe. Now Christ is our 302 2, 41 | grounded in love, we may be able to comprehend with 303 2, 41 | Christian action, we shall be able to know even "the love 304 2, 41 | were made, "that we may be filled with all the fullness 305 2, 41 | that the breast may not be swollen with that knowledge 306 2, 41 | psalmist says, "and I shall be clean; wash me, and I shall 307 2, 41 | clean; wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. Make me 308 2, 42 | abundance things that are to be found nowhere else, but 309 2, 42 | found nowhere else, but can be learnt only in the wonderful 310 2, 42 | unknown signs have ceased to be a hindrance to him; when 311 2, 42 | say what the Lord shall be pleased to vouchsafe. ~ 312 3, arg | ambiguous signs. Such signs may be either direct or figurative. 313 3, arg | of the words, and is to be resolved by attention to 314 3, arg | being, that whatever can be shown to be in its literal 315 3, arg | whatever can be shown to be in its literal sense inconsistent 316 3, arg | correctness of doctrine must be taken figuratively. He then 317 3, arg | which have been proved to be figurative; the general 318 3, arg | that no interpretation can be true which does not promote 319 3, 1 | languages, so as not to be stopped by unknown words 320 3, 1 | necessary objects, so as not to be ignorant of the force and 321 3, 1 | Scripture. And that he may not be led astray by ambiguous 322 3, 1 | state of mind that he can be instructed by me know, that 323 3, 2 | passage, it shall appear to be uncertain in what way it 324 3, 2 | in what way it ought to be punctuated or pronounced, 325 3, 2 | pronounces for and permits to be dovetailed into itself. ~ 326 3, 2 | Word was God. But this must be rejected by the rule of 327 3, 2 | take it, and therefore must be decided from the context. 328 3, 2 | desire to depart, and to be with Christ, which is far 329 3, 2 | desire to depart, and to be with Christ]. But since 330 3, 2 | other; a desire, viz., to be with Christ, and a necessity 331 3, 2 | desire to depart, and to be with Christ]. And, as if 332 3, 2 | however, the ambiguity cannot be cleared up, either by the 333 3, 2 | the passage, "that she may be holy both in body and in 334 3, 3 | ambiguous punctuations are to be observed likewise in the 335 3, 3 | that the reader will not be in fault in whatever way 336 3, 3 | charge of God's elect?" might be pronounced in such a way 337 3, 3 | who died." But as it would be the height of madness to 338 3, 3 | believe this, the passage will be pronounced in such a way 339 3, 3 | interrogative the answer must be either "No" or "Yes." The 340 3, 3 | Yes." The passage will be pronounced, then, in such 341 3, 3 | elect?" what follows will be put as an interrogative: " 342 3, 3 | righteousness;" it would not be in harmony with the succeeding 343 3, 3 | see how a difference can be made. But neither sense 344 3, 3 | the middle syllable should be pronounced long or short. 345 3, 3 | is clear that it should be pronounced long; for he 346 3, 4 | 4. How ambiguities may be solved~ 347 3, 4 | or pronunciation, are to be examined in the same way. 348 3, 4 | original, the case is shown to be vocative. Now if the translator 349 3, 5 | signs for things, and to be unable to lift the eye of 350 3, 6 | advantage it had been to be so guided by the schoolmaster 351 3, 6 | at the apostles' feet to be distributed among the needy, 352 3, 7 | Neptune is not itself to be considered a god, but only 353 3, 7 | unless indeed the result be that I worship neither? 354 3, 7 | worship of these, you will not be anything the more free from 355 3, 9 | which their carnality is to be overcome. To this class 356 3, 9 | And it is better even to be in bondage to unknown but 357 3, 10 | cannot, when taken literally, be referred either to purity 358 3, 10 | asserts contrary to this must be figurative. Now Scripture 359 3, 10 | into which all sins may be divided. But the vices come 360 3, 11 | lust. And if its meaning be clear, we are not to give 361 3, 11 | language is figurative, and to be referred to the end I have 362 3, 12 | seem to the unskilful to be wicked~ 363 3, 12 | to the inexperienced to be sinful, and which are ascribed 364 3, 12 | meaning they contain is to be picked out as food for the 365 3, 12 | follow that it is a sin to be naked in the baths. ~ 366 3, 12 | did things which could not be done at the present time, 367 3, 13 | to spend this life, is to be turned by good and great 368 3, 14 | even so to them," I cannot be altered by any diversity 369 3, 14 | one wishes an injury to be done him by another; he 370 3, 15 | such as the following will be observed, to carefully turn 371 3, 15 | read till an interpretation be found that tends to establish 372 3, 15 | the expression is not to be considered figurative. ~ 373 3, 17 | ruling a wife are not to be taken literally, but figuratively; 374 3, 17 | understanding the Scriptures will be as follows, to recognize 375 3, 17 | member. For that which cannot be raised to a higher state 376 3, 17 | raised to a higher state must be cared for in its own state. ~ 377 3, 18 | We must also be on our guard against supposing 378 3, 18 | and not figuratively, can be transferred to the present 379 3, 18 | the custom they spurn can be turned to a good use, and 380 3, 18 | that which they embrace can be used to condemnation, if 381 3, 18 | if the use of the former be accompanied with charity, 382 3, 21 | that his son should not be slain if he were conquered 383 3, 21 | husband also he ordered to be put to death, he was accused 384 3, 21 | commanded that he should be put to death, and the lamb 385 3, 22 | the Old Testament are to be taken not literally only, 386 3, 22 | at that time, cannot now be done except through lust. ~ 387 3, 23 | great men, although he may be able to see and to trace 388 3, 23 | both the storms that are to be avoided and the shipwrecks 389 3, 23 | the shipwrecks that are to be wept over. For the sins 390 3, 24 | The chief thing to be inquired into, therefore, 391 3, 24 | when it is ascertained to be figurative, it is easy, 392 3, 25 | And when it is shown to be figurative, the words in 393 3, 25 | which it is expressed will be found to be drawn either 394 3, 25 | expressed will be found to be drawn either from like objects 395 3, 25 | similitude in one place it is to be taken to signify in all 396 3, 25 | is used in a good sense, "Be wise as serpents;" and again, 397 3, 25 | plain instances ought to be used as examples. There 398 3, 25 | what sense they ought to be taken, as for example, " 399 3, 25 | things besides water must be interpreted according to 400 3, 26 | Obscure passages are to be interpreted by those which 401 3, 26 | sense in which they are to be understood in obscure passages. 402 3, 26 | says the apostle, "ye shall be able to quench all the fiery 403 3, 27 | there is no danger if it can be shown from other passages 404 3, 27 | that the same words might be understood in several senses, 405 3, 28 | is doubtful in it cannot be cleared up by indubitable 406 3, 29 | advise, however, that they be learnt elsewhere, although 407 3, 29 | tropes which are said to be learnt as a matter of liberal 408 3, 29 | It would be tedious to go over all the 409 3, 29 | inquire whether they may not be used in this or that figurative 410 3, 30 | an example, for it would be too tedious and troublesome 411 3, 30 | duly applied, we should be able to interpret all the 412 3, 30 | if this system of rules be received as I communicate 413 3, 30 | jealousy, what is shut shall be laid open, and what is obscure 414 3, 30 | and what is obscure shall be elucidated, so that a man 415 3, 30 | rules as pathways of light, be preserved from going astray." 416 3, 30 | said "What is shut shall be laid open," but, "Many things 417 3, 30 | things that are shut shall be laid open," he would have 418 3, 30 | order both that the book may be read by the studious (for 419 3, 30 | Scripture), and that no more may be expected from it than it 420 3, 30 | contains. Certainly it must be read with caution, not only 421 3, 31 | is Christ), we need not be in a difficulty when a transition 422 3, 32 | of Christ which will not be with Him in eternity. We 423 3, 32 | hypocrites cannot even now be said to be in Him, although 424 3, 32 | cannot even now be said to be in Him, although they seem 425 3, 32 | Him, although they seem to be in His Church. And hence 426 3, 32 | And hence this rule might be designated thus: Concerning 427 3, 32 | rule requires the reader to be on his guard when Scripture, 428 3, 32 | set of persons, seems to be addressing or speaking of 429 3, 32 | Church declares itself to be at present both; and this 430 3, 32 | Ishmael, who "shall not be heir with the son of the 431 3, 32 | with the good, "They shall be turned back." Now these 432 3, 33 | promises and the law, and may be designated in other terms 433 3, 33 | on this subject. It may be also named, of grace and 434 3, 33 | however, seems to me to be a great question in itself, 435 3, 33 | itself, rather than a rule to be applied to the solution 436 3, 33 | saying of the apostle: "Peace be to the brethren, and love 437 3, 33 | the apostle, "There must be also heresies among you, 438 3, 33 | they which are approved may be made manifest among you" 439 3, 34 | intending that by species should be understood a part, by genus 440 3, 34 | these words have come to be commonly known, so that 441 3, 34 | genus, the reader must then be carefully on his guard against 442 3, 34 | immediately follows, too, may be understood as applying to 443 3, 34 | on to say: "And I shall be sanctified in you before 444 3, 34 | water upon you, and ye shall be clean: from all your filthiness, 445 3, 34 | your fathers; and ye shall be my people, and I will be 446 3, 34 | be my people, and I will be your God. I will also save 447 3, 34 | of the children of Israel be as the sand of the sea, 448 3, 34 | a remnant of them shall be saved," but also the other 449 3, 34 | of the latter, seems to be still speaking of the former; 450 3, 34 | the fathers believed would be given in its own time was 451 3, 34 | those to whom it was to be given were not yet in existence; 452 3, 34 | to come, when there will be a new heaven and a new earth, 453 3, 34 | wherein the unrighteous shall be unable to dwell. And so 454 3, 34 | firmly settled that it shall be given. ~ 455 3, 35 | the number of days cannot be true, unless we suppose 456 3, 35 | He foretold that He would be in the heart of the earth. ~ 457 3, 35 | praise shall continually be in my mouth." And their 458 3, 35 | mentioned in Jeremiah may be taken in a spiritual sense 459 3, 35 | about times that are to be settled by these numbers, 460 3, 36 | the narrative appears to be following the order of time, 461 3, 36 | food." Now here it seems to be indicated that the events 462 3, 36 | previous statement might be thought to imply, did we 463 3, 36 | family or nation could not be said to have its own language 464 3, 36 | all. Even thus shall it be in the day when the Son 465 3, 36 | that day, he which shall be upon the housetop, and his 466 3, 36 | revelation of the Lord will be thought the time for giving 467 3, 36 | sayings, unless the reader be watchful and intelligent 468 3, 36 | recapitulation, in which he will be assisted by that other passage 469 3, 36 | time that the Lord shall be revealed. is the day in 470 3, 36 | the same day, which shall be brought to a close by a 471 3, 37 | is His body, destined to be with Him in His eternal 472 3, 37 | person, are of course to be understood of the devil; 473 3, 37 | law, make one meaning to be understood where another 474 3, 37 | is too widely spread to be comprehended in its full 475 3, 37 | intention that another should be understood we have a figurative 476 3, 37 | name of the trope is not to be found in the art of rhetoric. 477 3, 37 | and in which things are to be understood just as they 478 3, 37 | expressed and another is to be understood, and which I 479 3, 37 | venerable documents ought to be counselled not only to make 480 4, arg | laws of rhetoric. These can be learned elsewhere, and ought 481 4, arg | elsewhere, and ought not to be neglected, being indeed 482 4, arg | quality of style, and ought to be cultivated with especial 483 4, arg | All these gifts are to be sought in earnest prayer 484 4, arg | we are not to forget to be zealous and diligent in 485 4, arg | these various styles may be mingled, and when and for 486 4, 1 | whatever use they have is to be learnt elsewhere; and if 487 4, 2 | defenders of the truth shall be ignorant of that art? That 488 4, 2 | while the latter shall be unable either to defend 489 4, 2 | in defense of the truth be sluggish, and frigid, and 490 4, 3 | eloquence or oratory) may be learnt apart from these 491 4, 3 | a suitable space of time be set aside for the purpose 492 4, 3 | it at all. Whether this be true or not, why need we 493 4, 3 | this art can occasionally be in the end mastered by men 494 4, 3 | these, not all who are to be fitted for usefulness in 495 4, 3 | If, however, such ability be wanting, the rules of rhetoric 496 4, 3 | enforcing them, they come to be in some small measure understood, 497 4, 3 | are speaking. For we must be careful that what we have 498 4, 3 | they use them in order to be eloquent. ~ 499 4, 3 | the examples themselves to be the case in this respect? 500 4, 3 | correctness of speech, need not be learnt by boys, if they


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