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haunts 1
have 333
having 26
he 715
head 13
heads 3
heal 2
Frequency    [«  »]
867 not
797 for
723 be
715 he
686 as
670 are
641 which
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

he

1-500 | 501-715

    Book, Chapter
1 pref, 0| while I write, the thoughts He is wont to vouchsafe to 2 pref, 0| obtaining his request that he might read through a book 3 pref, 0| had a like experience that he need not consider himself 4 pref, 0| may at least doubt whether he has yet received the Holy 5 pref, 0| another communicate what he has himself received without 6 pref, 0| communicated everything that He wished to be taught to men 7 pref, 0| did not understand what he read, was not sent by the 8 pref, 0| who explained to him what he did not understand, nor 9 pref, 0| not understand, nor was he inwardly illuminated by 10 pref, 0| talk with Moses, and yet he, with great wisdom and entire 11 pref, 0| every one who boasts that he, through divine illumination, 12 pref, 0| the gift of God. For so he seeks God's glory, not his 13 pref, 0| reading and understanding, as he does, without the aid of 14 pref, 0| human interpreter, why does he himself undertake to interpret 15 pref, 0| interpret for others? Why does he not rather send them direct 16 pref, 0| help of man? The truth is, he fears to incur the reproach: " 17 pref, 0| He who reads to an audience 18 pref, 0| pronounces aloud the words he sees before him: he who 19 pref, 0| words he sees before him: he who teaches reading, does 20 pref, 0| communicates to others what he has learnt himself. Just 21 pref, 0| the passages of Scripture he understands is like one 22 pref, 0| themselves. So that, just as he who knows how to read is 23 pref, 0| dependent on some one else, when he finds a book, to tell him 24 pref, 0| attempt to lay down, if he meet with an obscure passage 25 pref, 0| passage in the books which he reads, will not need an 26 1, arg | true sense of Scripture. He shows that to discover the 27 1, arg | sought. In this first book he treats of things, which 28 1, arg | treats of things, which he divides into three classes, 29 1, arg | objects of enjoyment to God: he uses us, but for our own 30 1, arg | but for our own advantage. He then goes on to show that 31 1, arg | a few words about hope, he shows, in conclusion, that 32 1, 1 | I do not fear but that He will go on to supply what 33 1, 1 | I have begun to use what He has already given. For a 34 1, 1 | to him shall be given." I He will give, then, to those 35 1, 1 | what they have received, He will add to and perfect 36 1, 5 | to all who enjoy Him, if He is an object, and not rather 37 1, 5 | objects, or indeed even if He is the cause of all. For 38 1, 6 | this principle it is that He is called Deus (God). For 39 1, 8 | esteemed above all else because He is unchangeable Wisdom~ 40 1, 9 | that very truth about which he asks, how I know it? is 41 1, 10 | truth for the things which He has made, the soul must 42 1, 11 | we come to Him do wisely, He when He came to us was considered 43 1, 11 | to Him do wisely, He when He came to us was considered 44 1, 11 | come to Him become strong, He when He came to us was looked 45 1, 11 | Him become strong, He when He came to us was looked upon 46 1, 11 | Wisdom was Himself our home, He made Himself also the way 47 1, 12 | And though He is everywhere present to 48 1, 12 | when it is sound and clear, He condescended to make Himself 49 1, 12 | traversing space, but because He appeared to mortal men in 50 1, 12 | the form of mortal flesh, He is said to have come to 51 1, 12 | to have come to us. For He came to a place where He 52 1, 12 | He came to a place where He had always been, seeing 53 1, 12 | always been, seeing that "He was in the world, and the 54 1, 12 | knew not God. Why then did He come, seeing that He was 55 1, 12 | did He come, seeing that He was already here, except 56 1, 13 | In what way did He come but this, "The Word 57 1, 13 | yet became flesh, that He might dwell among us. ~ 58 1, 14 | their likes. And just as he who ministers to a bodily 59 1, 14 | man fell through pride, He restored him through humility. 60 1, 14 | which they are applied: He was born of a woman to deliver 61 1, 14 | who fell through a woman: He came as a man to save us 62 1, 15 | clearly shows how freely He laid down His life for us 63 1, 15 | down His life for us when He had it in His power thus 64 1, 15 | when they reflect how great He was who suffered so great 65 1, 15 | can conceive, the reward He will bestow at the last, 66 1, 15 | in this earthly journey He has given us so freely of 67 1, 15 | yet we see not; and that He has also given to each gifts 68 1, 15 | Church, that we may do what He points out as right to be 69 1, 16 | performing different functions, He holds together in the bond 70 1, 16 | its true health. Moreover He exercises it in the present 71 1, 16 | wholesome afflictions, that when He has transplanted it from 72 1, 16 | world to the eternal world, He may take it to Himself as 73 1, 17 | barred against us, what could He, who was willing to lay 74 1, 18 | He has given, therefore, the 75 1, 18 | repentance on the ground of which he is received into the bosom 76 1, 18 | bosom of the Church. For he who does not believe that 77 1, 18 | him than to be evil, when he has ceased to have faith 78 1, 20 | Now he whose soul does not die 79 1, 22 | the mortal body in which he is clothed, but as respects 80 1, 22 | the rational soul by which he is exalted in honour above 81 1, 22 | seems to me, then, that he is to be loved for the sake 82 1, 22 | upon that. If, however, he loves himself for his own 83 1, 22 | himself for his own sake, he does not look at himself 84 1, 22 | is unchangeable. And thus he does not enjoy himself at 85 1, 22 | himself at his best, because he is better when his mind 86 1, 22 | unchangeable good, than when he turns from that to enjoy 87 1, 22 | that you bring. For when He says, "With all thy heart, 88 1, 22 | and with all thy mind," He means that no part of our 89 1, 22 | ought to urge upon him that he too should love God with 90 1, 23 | fall away from the truth, he still continues to love 91 1, 23 | justly has it been said, "He who loveth iniquity hateth 92 1, 24 | statement of the apostle when he says, "No man ever yet hated 93 1, 24 | yet hated his own flesh." He adds too, "but nourisheth 94 1, 25 | that is, in what measure he may love himself so as to 95 1, 25 | service to himself. For that he does love himself, and does 96 1, 25 | but a fool would doubt. He is to be taught, too, in 97 1, 25 | is equally manifest that he loves his body also, and 98 1, 25 | may have something that he loves better than the safety 99 1, 25 | because there is something he desires more. For the miser, 100 1, 25 | more. For the miser, though he loves money, buys bread 101 1, 25 | bread for himself, that is, he gives away money that he 102 1, 25 | he gives away money that he is very fond of and desires 103 1, 25 | heap up, but it is because he values more highly the bodily 104 1, 26 | beside us. "Thou shalt love," He says, "the Lord thy God 105 1, 27 | Now he is a man of just and holy 106 1, 27 | strict control, so that he neither loves what he ought 107 1, 27 | that he neither loves what he ought not to love, nor fails 108 1, 27 | nor fails to love what he ought to love, nor loves 109 1, 29 | the very greatest good, he is fond of all who join 110 1, 29 | common; and the more fervent he is in his admiration, the 111 1, 29 | his admiration, the more he works in every way he can 112 1, 29 | more he works in every way he can to secure new admirers 113 1, 29 | him, and the more anxious he becomes to show him to others; 114 1, 29 | show him to others; and if he find any one comparatively 115 1, 29 | comparatively indifferent, he does all he can to excite 116 1, 29 | indifferent, he does all he can to excite his interest 117 1, 29 | favorite's merits: if, however, he meet with any one who opposes 118 1, 29 | any one who opposes him, he is exceedingly displeased 119 1, 29 | and strives in every way he can to remove it. Now, if 120 1, 30 | of angels also. For that He who commanded us to love 121 1, 30 | commandments, and to whom He said that on these hang 122 1, 30 | And who is my neighbour?" He told him of a certain man 123 1, 30 | naked and half dead. And He showed him that nobody was 124 1, 30 | admitted the truth of this when he was himself interrogated 125 1, 30 | likewise;" teaching us that he is our neighbour whom it 126 1, 30 | would be our duty to help if he were in need. Whence it 127 1, 30 | Whence it follows, that he whose duty it would be in 128 1, 30 | Apostle Paul teaches when he says: "For this, Thou shalt 129 1, 30 | behaved myself as though he had been my friend or brother." 130 1, 30 | love our neighbour. For He shows us pity on account 131 1, 30 | account of His; that is, He pities us that we may fully 132 1, 31 | sets before us the love He has towards us. In what 133 1, 31 | us. In what way then does He love us? As objects of use 134 1, 31 | objects of enjoyment? If He enjoys us, He must be in 135 1, 31 | enjoyment? If He enjoys us, He must be in need of good 136 1, 31 | neediest not my goodness." He does not enjoy us then, 137 1, 31 | makes use of us. For if He neither enjoys nor uses 138 1, 31 | to discover in what way He can love us. ~ 139 1, 32 | But neither does He use after our fashion of 140 1, 32 | goodness. For it is because He is good we exist; and so 141 1, 32 | good. And, further, because He is also just, we cannot 142 1, 32 | existence less complete. Now He is the first and supreme 143 1, 32 | are good only so far as He has given it to them to 144 1, 32 | ours only; and, so far as He is concerned, has reference 145 1, 33 | And again: "Neither is he that planteth anything, 146 1, 33 | planteth anything, neither he that watereth; but God that 147 1, 33 | about to worship him, that he should rather worship Him 148 1, 33 | his Master, and under whom he himself is a fellow-servant. ~ 149 1, 33 | thee in the Lord." For if he had not added "in the Lord," 150 1, 33 | Let me have joy of thee," he would have implied that 151 1, 33 | would have implied that he fixed his hope of happiness 152 1, 34 | And mark that even when He who is Himself the Truth 153 1, 34 | had been made flesh that He might dwell among us, the 154 1, 34 | rest in eternal life. For He says: "I am the way, and 155 1, 34 | Lord Himself, so far as He has condescended to be our 156 1, 36 | Whoever, then, thinks that he understands the Holy Scriptures, 157 1, 36 | not yet understand them as he ought. If, on the other 158 1, 36 | up of love, even though he does not happen upon the 159 1, 36 | meaning which the author whom he reads intended to express 160 1, 36 | error is not pernicious, and he is wholly clear from the 161 1, 36 | deceived is a better man than he who deceives, seeing that 162 1, 36 | that a lie is ever useful, he must think that injustice 163 1, 36 | in the matter about which he lies. He wishes, of course, 164 1, 36 | matter about which he lies. He wishes, of course, that 165 1, 36 | course, that the man to whom he lies should place confidence 166 1, 36 | confidence in him; and yet he betrays his confidence by 167 1, 36 | end of the commandment, he goes astray in much the 168 1, 36 | to which the road leads. He is to be corrected, however, 169 1, 36 | straight road, lest, if he get into a habit of going 170 1, 36 | a habit of going astray, he may sometimes take cross 171 1, 37 | For if he takes up rashly a meaning 172 1, 37 | meaning which the author whom he is reading did not intend, 173 1, 37 | reading did not intend, he often falls in with other 174 1, 37 | with other statements which he cannot harmonize with this 175 1, 37 | with this meaning. And if he admits that these statements 176 1, 37 | follows that the meaning he had put upon the former 177 1, 37 | love for his own opinion, he begins to feel more angry 178 1, 37 | angry with Scripture than he is with himself. And if 179 1, 37 | is with himself. And if he should once permit that 180 1, 37 | man has fallen from faith, he must necessarily also fall 181 1, 37 | also fall from love; for he cannot love what he does 182 1, 37 | for he cannot love what he does not believe to exist. 183 1, 37 | believe to exist. But if he both believes and loves, 184 1, 37 | the precepts of morality, he comes to hope also that 185 1, 37 | comes to hope also that he shall attain the object 186 1, 38 | comparatively worthless when he finds it of less value than 187 1, 38 | finds it of less value than he thought; on the contrary, 188 1, 38 | man may set upon it when he is on his way to possess 189 1, 38 | on his way to possess it, he will find it, when it comes 190 1, 39 | chap. 39. He who is mature in faith hope 191 1, 40 | upon these three graces, he may come to the interpretation 192 1, 40 | the apostle says "love," he adds "out of a pure heart," 193 1, 40 | which is worthy of love. And he joins with this "a good 194 1, 40 | burthen of a bad conscience, he despairs of ever reaching 195 1, 40 | ever reaching that which he believes in and loves. And 196 1, 40 | And in the third place he says: "and of faith unfeigned." 197 2, arg | discuss the subject of signs. He first defines what a sign 198 2, arg | use. And in conclusion, he shows the spirit in which 199 2, 2 | poultry-cock has discovered food, he signals with his voice for 200 2, 3 | sacrament of His body and blood He signified His will through 201 2, 6 | that if a man says this, he does not please his hearer 202 2, 6 | his hearer so much as when he draws the same meaning from 203 2, 6 | anything more than when he listens to the same thought 204 2, 7 | knowledge of His will, what He commands us to desire and 205 2, 7 | find in the Scriptures that he, through being entangled 206 2, 7 | And in this frame of mind he implores with unremitting 207 2, 7 | of the Divine help that he may not be overwhelmed in 208 2, 7 | overwhelmed in despair, and so he gradually comes to the fourth 209 2, 7 | and resolution, in which he hungers and thirsts after 210 2, 7 | For in this frame of mind he extricates himself from 211 2, 7 | the extent of his power, he has gazed upon this object 212 2, 7 | the weakness of his sight he cannot endure that matchless 213 2, 7 | the counsel of compassion he cleanses his soul, which 214 2, 7 | contracted. And at this stage he exercises himself diligently 215 2, 7 | his neighbour; and when he has reached the point of 216 2, 7 | and unbroken in strength, he mounts to the sixth step, 217 2, 7 | the sixth step, in which he purifies the eye itself 218 2, 7 | himself, because not him whom he loves as himself. Accordingly, 219 2, 7 | and so pure in heart, that he will not step aside from 220 2, 7 | and last step, and which he enjoys in peace and tranquility. 221 2, 8 | writings, then, will be he who in the first place has 222 2, 8 | are called canonical. For he will read the others with 223 2, 8 | the canonical Scriptures, he must follow the judgment 224 2, 8 | the canonical Scriptures he will judge according to 225 2, 8 | are not received by all, he will prefer such as have 226 2, 8 | authority. If, however, he shall find that some books 227 2, 11 | manuscript, and who thought he had any knowledge, were 228 2, 12 | man may understand that he is admonished not to despise 229 2, 12 | expression of the apostle, when he says, "If by any means I 230 2, 12 | them might believe too. And he calls the Jews his "flesh," 231 2, 12 | sharp and swift. And so he saw the true meaning who 232 2, 13 | since the translator, if he be not a very learned man, 233 2, 13 | in any way at all that he can get the words out, to 234 2, 17 | learned in such matters. He says that a certain state ( 235 2, 17 | the temple of Apollo; and he says that afterwards Hesiod 236 2, 18 | to his Master; and while he recognizes and acknowledges 237 2, 20 | cuff an innocent boy if he happens to run between men 238 2, 21 | astrologer of this kind, he gives money that he may 239 2, 21 | kind, he gives money that he may come away the slave 240 2, 22 | looking into these that he professes to read the fates. 241 2, 22 | read the fates. If, then, he does not discover the difference 242 2, 22 | discover the difference when he examines the constellations, 243 2, 22 | course, be the same whether he is consulted about Jacob 244 2, 22 | difference in the heavens, which he rashly and carelessly brings 245 2, 22 | difference in his chart, which he looks into anxiously but 246 2, 24 | Greek from that in which he uses it when writing to 247 2, 25 | was dancing, what it was he meant to express, a thing 248 2, 25 | what these movements mean, he will give his whole attention 249 2, 25 | but every one, as soon as he sees the likenesses recognizes 250 2, 28 | born, and that in which He suffered, has led some into 251 2, 28 | error of supposing that He was forty-six years of age 252 2, 28 | forty-six years of age when He suffered, that being the 253 2, 28 | being the number of years He was told by the Jews the 254 2, 28 | the Jews the temple (which He took as a symbol of His 255 2, 28 | authority of the evangelist that He was about thirty years of 256 2, 28 | thirty years of age when He was baptized; but the number 257 2, 28 | but the number of years He lived afterwards, although 258 2, 28 | investigations into profane history he had discovered that Plato 259 2, 29 | moon's age can tell, when he has found out her age today, 260 2, 31 | before another with whom he is talking, the proposition, " 261 2, 31 | give up his error, when he finds that if he wishes 262 2, 31 | error, when he finds that if he wishes to retain his old 263 2, 31 | retain his old opinion, he must of necessity also hold 264 2, 31 | hold other opinions which he condemns. For example, the 265 2, 31 | draw true conclusions when he said, "Then is Christ not 266 2, 32 | create that order; and as he who describes the situations 267 2, 32 | arrangements of man; and as he who points out the stars 268 2, 32 | point out anything that he himself or any other man 269 2, 32 | ordained; in the same way, he who says, "When the consequent 270 2, 32 | says what is most true; but he does not himself make it 271 2, 32 | not himself make it so, he only points out that it 272 2, 33 | reasoning, in order that he whose error we wish to correct 273 2, 33 | correct may be sorry that he has admitted the antecedent, 274 2, 33 | admitted the antecedent, when he sees that its logical consequences 275 2, 33 | statement, "If this man is just, he is good," and we admit its 276 2, 33 | we admit its truth. Then he adds, "But he is not just;" 277 2, 33 | truth. Then he adds, "But he is not just;" and when we 278 2, 33 | when we admit this too, he draws the conclusion, "Therefore 279 2, 33 | the conclusion, "Therefore he is not good." Now although 280 2, 33 | the statement is true, "If he is an orator, he is a man." 281 2, 33 | true, "If he is an orator, he is a man." But if we add, " 282 2, 33 | a man." But if we add, "He is not an orator," the consequence 283 2, 33 | consequence does not follow, "He is not a man." ~ 284 2, 34 | of a consequent is, "If he is an orator, he is a man;" 285 2, 34 | is, "If he is an orator, he is a man;" of an inconsequent, " 286 2, 34 | of an inconsequent, "If he is a man, he is an orator;" 287 2, 34 | inconsequent, "If he is a man, he is an orator;" of an incompatible, " 288 2, 34 | of an incompatible, "If he is a man, he is a quadruped." 289 2, 34 | incompatible, "If he is a man, he is a quadruped." In these 290 2, 35 | under any circumstances; but he who says that it rained 291 2, 37 | joints and knees. For what he says is true, and one cannot 292 2, 37 | unsound more quickly than he apprehends the rules for 293 2, 37 | unsoundness, but much less does he grasp the rules. And in 294 2, 38 | which those things which he perceives to be true derive 295 2, 38 | which those others which he perceives to be unchangeable 296 2, 38 | of the one God from whom he knows that all things have 297 2, 38 | to be learned, but wise he cannot in any sense be deemed. ~ 298 2, 39 | covenants about signs, let these he utterly rejected and held 299 2, 39 | his brethren. In this way he might arrange in their several 300 2, 40 | therefore, the Christian, when he separates himself in spirit 301 2, 40 | martyr, was loaded when he came out of Egypt? How much 302 2, 40 | of him it is written that he was learned in all the wisdom 303 2, 41 | charity edifieth." For so he will feel that, whatever 304 2, 41 | whatever may be the riches he brings with him out of Egypt, 305 2, 41 | out of Egypt, yet unless he has kept the Passover, he 306 2, 41 | he has kept the Passover, he cannot be safe. Now Christ 307 2, 41 | teaches us than the call which He himself addresses to those 308 2, 41 | addresses to those whom He sees toiling in Egypt under 309 2, 41 | joy and gladness." Then he immediately adds, to show 310 2, 42 | may find there all that he has learnt of useful elsewhere, 311 2, 42 | learnt of useful elsewhere, he will find there in much 312 2, 42 | a hindrance to him; when he is meek and lowly of heart, 313 3, arg | must be taken figuratively. He then goes on to lay down 314 3, arg | Tichonius the Donatist, which he commends to the attention 315 3, 1 | knowledge of His will. And when he has become meek through 316 3, 1 | ambiguities of Scripture. And that he may not be led astray by 317 3, 1 | greater clearness of the light he enjoys, he shall laugh at 318 3, 1 | of the light he enjoys, he shall laugh at the methods 319 3, 1 | such a state of mind that he can be instructed by me 320 3, 2 | the rule of faith which he has gathered from the plainer 321 3, 2 | better], it is evident that he says he has a desire for 322 3, 2 | is evident that he says he has a desire for that which 323 3, 2 | is better; so that, while he is in a strait betwixt two, 324 3, 2 | strait betwixt two, yet he has a desire for one and 325 3, 2 | with Christ]. And, as if he were asked why he has a 326 3, 2 | as if he were asked why he has a desire for this in 327 3, 2 | preference to the other, he adds: "multo enim magis 328 3, 2 | far better]. Why, then, is he in a strait betwixt the 329 3, 2 | for his remaining, which he adds in these terms: "manere 330 3, 3 | in fault in whatever way he may pronounce them. For 331 3, 3 | second question, "Who is he that condemneth?" with the 332 3, 3 | have the inquiry, "Who is he that condemneth?" and the 333 3, 3 | clear to the reader whether he should take the word "os" 334 3, 3 | os" as short or long. If he make it short, it is the 335 3, 3 | singular of ossa [bones]; if he make it long, it is the 336 3, 3 | kingdom of God." Now if he had only said, "Of the which 337 3, 3 | be pronounced long; for he does not say, sicut praedicavi, 338 3, 4 | habuimus fratres in vobis", he would have followed the 339 3, 4 | meaning; or, indeed, if he had added "nostri", hardly 340 3, 4 | vocative case was meant when he heard "propterea consolationem 341 3, 5 | adherence to the letter. For he who follows the letter takes 342 3, 5 | secondary signification; but, if he hears of the Sabbath, for 343 3, 5 | constant succession; and when he hears of a sacrifice, does 344 3, 6 | charge against Him that He healed on the Sabbath, and 345 3, 7 | for men, but for swine. He who knows the gospel knows 346 3, 9 | Now he is in bondage to a sign 347 3, 9 | knowing what it signifies: he, on the other hand, who 348 3, 9 | whose force and significance he understands, does not honour 349 3, 9 | looks upon these observances he knows to what they refer, 350 3, 9 | of being misled by error. He, however, who does not understand 351 3, 10 | own conscience, so far as he perceives that he has attained 352 3, 10 | far as he perceives that he has attained to the love 353 3, 10 | advantage on another which he does not himself possess. 354 3, 12 | custom of those among whom he lives, is either temperate 355 3, 12 | further meaning in what he does, or is sinful. In all 356 3, 14 | defile his own dwelling; he ought not, therefore, to 357 3, 14 | be done him by another; he himself, therefore, ought 358 3, 16 | enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him drink;" 359 3, 16 | is cured who bewails that he has been the enemy of one 360 3, 16 | way, when our Lord says, "He who loveth his life shall 361 3, 16 | we are not to think that He forbids the prudence with 362 3, 16 | care for his life, but that He says in a figurative sense, " 363 3, 16 | and unnatural use which he now makes of his life, and 364 3, 16 | temporal things so that he gives no heed to eternal. 365 3, 17 | has attained, or thinks he has attained, to a higher 366 3, 17 | figurative; for example, if he has embraced a life of celibacy 367 3, 17 | kingdom of heaven's sake, he contends that the commands 368 3, 17 | but figuratively; and if he has determined to keep his 369 3, 17 | keep his virgin unmarried, he tries to put a figurative 370 3, 18 | times; in the latter case he gratifies a lust which is 371 3, 18 | proved by Tobit's prayer when he was married to his wife. 372 3, 18 | married to his wife. For he says: "Blessed art Thou, 373 3, 21 | David not lustful, though he fell into adultery~ 374 3, 21 | impious and unnatural son, he not only bore with him in 375 3, 21 | mourned over him in his death. He certainly was not caught 376 3, 21 | For it was on this account he had given orders that his 377 3, 21 | son should not be slain if he were conquered in battle, 378 3, 21 | conquered in battle, that he might have a place of repentance 379 3, 21 | place of repentance after he was subdued; and when he 380 3, 21 | he was subdued; and when he was baffled in this design, 381 3, 21 | baffled in this design, he mourned over his son's death, 382 3, 21 | his own loss, but because he knew to what punishment 383 3, 21 | guilty of no crime, though he was dreadfully afflicted 384 3, 21 | afflicted for him while he was sick, yet he comforted 385 3, 21 | him while he was sick, yet he comforted himself after 386 3, 21 | woman, whose husband also he ordered to be put to death, 387 3, 21 | ordered to be put to death, he was accused of his crime 388 3, 21 | by a prophet, who, when he had come to show him his 389 3, 21 | whose neighbour, though he had many, yet when a guest 390 3, 21 | kindled against the man, he commanded that he should 391 3, 21 | the man, he commanded that he should be put to death, 392 3, 21 | unwittingly condemning the sin he had wittingly committed. 393 3, 21 | wittingly committed. And when he had been shown this, and 394 3, 21 | been denounced against him, he wiped out his sin in deep 395 3, 21 | understand with what temperance he possessed a number of wives 396 3, 21 | possessed a number of wives when he was forced to punish himself 397 3, 21 | accusing prophet, a guest. For he did not say that he took 398 3, 21 | For he did not say that he took the poor man's ewe-lamb 399 3, 21 | the beginning of his reign he was inflamed with a desire 400 3, 21 | desire for wisdom, but after he had attained it through 401 3, 21 | through spiritual love, he lost it through carnal lust. ~ 402 3, 23 | And when he reads of the sins of great 403 3, 23 | sins of great men, although he may be able to see and to 404 3, 23 | others as sinners, when he sees in the case of men 405 3, 23 | Wherefore let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest 406 3, 23 | standeth take heed lest he fall." For there is hardly 407 3, 25 | in a bad sense, as when He said, "Beware of the leaven 408 3, 25 | in a good sense, as when He said, "The kingdom of heaven 409 3, 25 | walketh about seeking whom he may devour." In the same 410 3, 25 | to the Gentiles, because "He has put down one and set 411 3, 27 | Holy Spirit spake, whether he succeeds in this endeavour, 412 3, 27 | this endeavour, or whether he draws a different meaning 413 3, 27 | opposed to sound doctrine, he is free from blame so long 414 3, 27 | free from blame so long as he is supported by the testimony 415 3, 29 | expression, "Beware of him, for he is a good man." And what 416 3, 29 | such expressions, although he knows nothing at all about 417 3, 30 | inconsistent disposition, that he was unwilling to give them 418 3, 30 | altogether), wrote a book which he called the Book of Rules, 419 3, 30 | of Rules, because in it he laid down seven rules, which 420 3, 30 | apply. As, for example, he inquires what we are to 421 3, 30 | in the sacred books. For he thus commences this very 422 3, 30 | forest of prophecy shall, if he follow these rules as pathways 423 3, 30 | from going astray." Now, if he had said, "There are certain 424 3, 30 | of the law," and not what he does say, "the secret recesses 425 3, 30 | of the whole law;" and if he had not said "What is shut 426 3, 30 | shut shall be laid open," he would have said what was 427 3, 30 | said what was true, and he would not, by attributing 428 3, 30 | account of the heresies which he advances as a Donatist. 429 3, 31 | represented as saying, "He has decked me as a bridegroom 430 3, 32 | and not forsake them;" He immediately adds in regard 431 3, 32 | present united in one body, He speaks as if there were 432 3, 32 | will not, however, always he in one body; for one of 433 3, 32 | gospel, whose lord, when he comes, "shall cut him asunder 434 3, 33 | question about faith and works, he said that works were given 435 3, 33 | Lord Jesus Christ." But he had not come into contact 436 3, 33 | is the gift of God, when he learns from this passage, 437 3, 34 | species and genus. For so he calls it, intending that 438 3, 34 | whole of which that which he calls species is a part: 439 3, 34 | society of nations: the city he calls a species, all nations 440 3, 34 | seeking in the species what he can find much better and 441 3, 34 | the genus taken in. For he goes on to say: "And I shall 442 3, 34 | saying of the apostle, when he is commending the grace 443 3, 34 | sentient life; and by sentient he understood intelligent life. 444 3, 34 | of the former; not that he grudges us the clear apprehension 445 3, 34 | we were enemies, but that he deals with us as a physician, 446 3, 34 | your own land," and what he says shortly afterwards, 447 3, 34 | appearing of our Saviour." He speaks of the grace as given 448 3, 34 | yet in existence; because he looks upon that as having 449 3, 34 | place in its own time, and he himself speaks of it as 450 3, 35 | Tichonius lays down is one he designates of times, a rule 451 3, 35 | mentioned in Scripture. And he says that this rule applies 452 3, 35 | part of the day on which he showed its fulfilment as 453 3, 35 | part of the day on which He suffered we join the previous 454 3, 35 | part of the night in which He arose we join the Lord's 455 3, 35 | three nights during which He foretold that He would be 456 3, 35 | during which He foretold that He would be in the heart of 457 3, 36 | eastwards in Eden; and there He put the man whom He had 458 3, 36 | there He put the man whom He had formed. And out of the 459 3, 36 | and there put the man whom He had formed, the narrative 460 3, 36 | is revealed. In that day, he which shall be upon the 461 3, 36 | down to take it away; and he that is in the field, let 462 3, 36 | according to the things he has given heed to or despised? 463 3, 36 | recapitulation, in which he will be assisted by that 464 3, 37 | devil and his body. For he is the head of the wicked, 465 3, 37 | is said in Isaiah, "How he is fallen from heaven, Lucifer, 466 3, 37 | made in the same place, "He is ground down on the earth, 467 3, 37 | on the earth, except that he himself is in his body, 468 4, arg | qualities of an orator, he recommends the authors of 469 4, arg | of eloquence with wisdom. He points out that perspicuity 470 4, arg | zealous and diligent in study. He shows that there are three 471 4, arg | exhortation: and of each of these he gives examples, selected 472 4, arg | Church, Cyprian and Ambrose. He shows that these various 473 4, arg | truth to the hearer, so that he may understand it, hear 474 4, arg | it in his life. Finally, he exhorts the Christian teacher 475 4, arg | responsibility of the office he holds, to lead a life in 476 4, 1 | leisure for learning them, he is not to ask me to teach 477 4, 3 | are written, even though he does not aim at this, but 478 4, 3 | of course, if in addition he practice himself in writing, 479 4, 3 | in speaking, the opinions he has formed on grounds of 480 4, 4 | ready to learn, whether he has found them so, or has 481 4, 5 | his hearers, even though he profit them less than he 482 4, 5 | he profit them less than he would if he could speak 483 4, 5 | them less than he would if he could speak with eloquence 484 4, 5 | speaker is eloquent what he says must be true. And this 485 4, 5 | more or less wisdom just as he has made more or less progress 486 4, 5 | however, is the man who, when he wishes, can repeat the words, 487 4, 5 | speak wisely, even though he cannot speak eloquently, 488 4, 5 | Scripture. For the more he discerns the poverty of 489 4, 5 | his own speech, the more he ought to draw on the riches 490 4, 5 | Scripture, so that what he says in his own words he 491 4, 5 | he says in his own words he may prove by the words of 492 4, 5 | words of Scripture; and he himself, though small and 493 4, 5 | proof gives pleasure when he cannot please by his mode 494 4, 5 | eloquence also (and assuredly he will prove of greater service 495 4, 5 | prove of greater service if he can do both), I would rather 496 4, 5 | rhetoric; especially if the men he reads and listens to are 497 4, 7 | meant to say, and how wisely he has said it, in the following 498 4, 7 | the Corinthians, again, he refutes certain false apostles 499 4, 7 | speak of himself though he ascribes this as folly to 500 4, 7 | wisely and how eloquently he speaks! But wisdom is his


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