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wax 1
way 131
ways 8
we 483
weak 17
weakly 1
weakness 8
Frequency    [«  »]
572 but
571 by
486 they
483 we
469 with
460 who
431 or
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

we

    Book, Chapter
1 pref, 0| that any other language we have learnt, Greek, or Hebrew, 2 pref, 0| Hebrew, or any of the rest, we have learnt either in the 3 pref, 0| teacher. Now, then, suppose we advise all our brethren 4 pref, 0| let us tempt Him in whom we have believed, lest, being 5 pref, 0| and by our own perversity, we may even refuse to go to 6 pref, 0| preaching, in the hope that we shall be carried up to the 7 pref, 0| And we know that the eunuch who 8 pref, 0| the truth." For what have we that we did not receive? 9 pref, 0| For what have we that we did not receive? And if 10 pref, 0| did not receive? And if we have received it, why do 11 pref, 0| have received it, why do we glory, as if we had not 12 pref, 0| why do we glory, as if we had not received it? ~ 13 1, arg | to discover the meaning we must attend both to things 14 1, arg | necessary to know what things we ought to teach to the Christian 15 1, arg | and our true happiness. We are prevented by our sins 16 1, arg | bride the Church, in which we receive remission of our 17 1, arg | souls renewed by grace, we may await with hope the 18 1, arg | to eternal glory; if not, we shall be raised to everlasting 19 1, arg | have reference to God. And we ourselves are not objects 20 1, 1 | when it is ascertained. We shall treat first of the 21 1, 2 | however, the wood which we read Moses cast into the 22 1, 2 | and signs afterwards. But we must carefully remember 23 1, 2 | carefully remember that what we have now to consider about 24 1, 3 | after happiness, so that we can attain the things that 25 1, 3 | happy and rest in them. We ourselves, again, who enjoy 26 1, 3 | both kinds of objects, if we set ourselves to enjoy those 27 1, 3 | ourselves to enjoy those which we ought to use, are hindered 28 1, 3 | of lower gratifications, we lag behind in, or even altogether 29 1, 4 | an abuse. Suppose, then, we were wanderers in a strange 30 1, 4 | our fatherland, and that we felt wretched in our wandering, 31 1, 4 | determined to return home. We find, however, that we must 32 1, 4 | We find, however, that we must make use of some mode 33 1, 4 | the country through which we pass, and the very pleasure 34 1, 4 | turning these things which we ought to use into objects 35 1, 4 | into objects of enjoyment, we become unwilling to hasten 36 1, 4 | this life of mortality. We have wandered far from God; 37 1, 4 | wandered far from God; and if we wish to return to our Father' 38 1, 4 | is material and temporary we may lay hold upon that which 39 1, 8 | This will be evident, if we consider that the very rule 40 1, 10 | by change of place that we can come nearer to Him who 41 1, 11 | But of this we should have been wholly 42 1, 11 | own humanity. Yet, since we when we come to Him do wisely, 43 1, 11 | humanity. Yet, since we when we come to Him do wisely, He 44 1, 11 | very foolishly. And since we when we come to Him become 45 1, 11 | foolishly. And since we when we come to Him become strong, 46 1, 11 | Himself also the way by which we should reach our home. ~ 47 1, 13 | among us"? Just as when we speak, in order that what 48 1, 13 | speak, in order that what we leave in our minds may enter 49 1, 13 | the hearer, the word which we have in our hearts becomes 50 1, 14 | restored him through humility. We were ensnared by the wisdom 51 1, 14 | the wisdom of the serpent: we are set free by the foolishness 52 1, 14 | who overcome the devil. We used our immortality so 53 1, 15 | bestow at the last, when we consider that for our comfort 54 1, 15 | adversities of this life we may retain our confidence 55 1, 15 | love for, Him whom as yet we see not; and that He has 56 1, 15 | building up of His Church, that we may do what He points out 57 1, 17 | Further, when we are on the way, and that 58 1, 17 | down as the way by which we should return, do that would 59 1, 19 | after a better pattern, so we must hope and believe that 60 1, 19 | after that death which we all owe as a debt contracted 61 1, 21 | clings to the assurance, and we must believe that it is 62 1, 22 | objects of enjoyment which we have spoken of as eternal 63 1, 22 | The rest are for use, that we may be able to arrive at 64 1, 22 | enjoyment of the former. We, however, who enjoy and 65 1, 22 | themselves, or to do both. For we are commanded to love one 66 1, 22 | it is for his own sake, we enjoy him; if it is for 67 1, 22 | sake of something else, we use him. It seems to me, 68 1, 24 | eternity; even in this life we must make it an object to 69 1, 26 | body, seeing, that is, that we love ourselves, and what 70 1, 27 | more than himself. Likewise we ought to love another man 71 1, 27 | and it is by the soul that we enjoy God. ~ 72 1, 28 | chap. 28. How we are to decide whom to aid~ 73 1, 29 | chap. 29. We are to desire and endeavour 74 1, 29 | who can with us enjoy God, we love partly those to whom 75 1, 29 | love partly those to whom we render services, partly 76 1, 29 | partly those upon whom we confer no advantage and 77 1, 29 | advantage and from whom we look for none. We ought 78 1, 29 | from whom we look for none. We ought to desire, however, 79 1, 29 | all the assistance that we either give them or accept 80 1, 29 | bear Him, concerning whom we have no fear that any one 81 1, 29 | love? And hence it is that we love even our enemies. For 82 1, 29 | love even our enemies. For we do not fear them, seeing 83 1, 29 | cannot take away from us what we love; but we pity them rather, 84 1, 29 | from us what we love; but we pity them rather, because 85 1, 29 | separated from Him whom we love. For if they would 86 1, 30 | the enjoyment of Him whom we long to enjoy; and the more 87 1, 30 | long to enjoy; and the more we enjoy Him in this life as 88 1, 30 | darkly, the more easy do we find it to bear our pilgrimage, 89 1, 30 | and the more eagerly do we long for its termination. 90 1, 30 | considered our neighbour, because we are to work no ill to any 91 1, 30 | now, if every one to whom we ought to show, or who ought 92 1, 30 | of His own goodness, but we show pity to one another 93 1, 30 | that is, He pities us that we may fully enjoy Himself; 94 1, 30 | may fully enjoy Himself; we pity one another that we 95 1, 30 | we pity one another that we may fully enjoy Him. ~ 96 1, 31 | And on this ground, when we say that we enjoy only that 97 1, 31 | ground, when we say that we enjoy only that which we 98 1, 31 | we enjoy only that which we love for its own sake, and 99 1, 31 | say that; for all the good we enjoy is either Himself, 100 1, 32 | fashion of using. For when we use objects, we do so with 101 1, 32 | For when we use objects, we do so with a view to the 102 1, 32 | it is because He is good we exist; and so far as we 103 1, 32 | we exist; and so far as we truly exist we are good. 104 1, 32 | so far as we truly exist we are good. And, further, 105 1, 32 | because He is also just, we cannot with impunity be 106 1, 32 | impunity be evil; and so far as we are evil, so far is our 107 1, 32 | only to His goodness. When we take pity upon a man and 108 1, 32 | it is for his advantage we do so; but somehow or other 109 1, 32 | does not leave the mercy we show to him who needs it 110 1, 32 | our highest reward, that we should fully enjoy Him, 111 1, 33 | For if we find our happiness complete 112 1, 33 | complete in one another, we stop short upon the road, 113 1, 33 | the holy angel, even when we are weary and anxious to 114 1, 33 | in the enjoyment of whom we find our common happiness. 115 1, 33 | For when the thing that we love is near us, it is a 116 1, 33 | said to enjoy it. And this we must never do except in 117 1, 34 | apostle yet says: "Yea, though we have known Christ after 118 1, 34 | yet now henceforth know we Him no more." For Christ, 119 1, 34 | in me they rest. For when we come to Him, we come to 120 1, 34 | For when we come to Him, we come to the Father also, 121 1, 34 | it were seals us, so that we are able to rest permanently 122 1, 34 | unchangeable God. And hence we may learn how essential 123 1, 35 | that has been said since we entered upon the discussion 124 1, 35 | things, this is the sum: that we should clearly understand 125 1, 35 | the providence of God that we might know this truth and 126 1, 35 | able to act upon it; and we ought to use that dispensation, 127 1, 35 | feeling rather, such as we have towards the road, or 128 1, 35 | suitably express the idea that we are to love the things by 129 1, 35 | love the things by which we are borne only for the sake 130 1, 35 | sake of that towards which we are borne. ~ 131 1, 36 | to say what is false; and we find plenty of people who 132 1, 37 | utterly destroy him. "For we walk by faith, not by sight." 133 1, 38 | that perfect bliss to which we shall come: love, on the 134 1, 38 | these others fail. For if we love by faith that which 135 1, 38 | faith that which as yet we see not, how much more shall 136 1, 38 | not, how much more shall we love it when we begin to 137 1, 38 | more shall we love it when we begin to see! And if we 138 1, 38 | we begin to see! And if we love by hope that which 139 1, 38 | by hope that which as yet we have not reached, how much 140 1, 38 | reached, how much more shall we love it when we reach it! 141 1, 38 | more shall we love it when we reach it! For there is this 142 1, 38 | object is valued more before we possess it, and begins to 143 1, 38 | prove worthless the moment we attain it, because it does 144 1, 40 | from all hypocrisy, then we both abstain from loving 145 1, 40 | and by living uprightly we are able to indulge the 146 2, 1 | consequence of itself: as when we see a footprint, we conclude 147 2, 1 | when we see a footprint, we conclude that an animal 148 2, 1 | has passed by; and when we see smoke, we know that 149 2, 1 | and when we see smoke, we know that there is fire 150 2, 1 | is fire beneath; and when we hear the voice of a living 151 2, 1 | the voice of a living man, we think of the feeling in 152 2, 1 | attention to experience we come to know that fire is 153 2, 1 | countenance, even though we do nothing with the intention 154 2, 2 | 2. Of the kind of signs we are now concerned with~ 155 2, 2 | sign has in his own mind. We wish, then, to consider 156 2, 3 | other senses. For, when we nod, we give no sign except 157 2, 3 | senses. For, when we nod, we give no sign except to the 158 2, 3 | eyes of the man to whom we wish by this sign to impart 159 2, 7 | then, it is necessary that we should be led by the fear 160 2, 7 | or, when not understood, we feel as if we could be wiser 161 2, 7 | understood, we feel as if we could be wiser and give 162 2, 7 | better commands ourselves. We must rather think and believe 163 2, 7 | and truer than anything we could devise by our own 164 2, 7 | steps of fear and piety, we come to the third step, 165 2, 7 | through a glass darkly that we are said to see, because 166 2, 7 | are said to see, because we walk by faith, not by sight, 167 2, 7 | faith, not by sight, while we continue to wander as strangers 168 2, 7 | that beginning, then, till we reach wisdom itself, our 169 2, 8 | canon of Scripture on which we say this judgment is to 170 2, 9 | chap. 9. How we should proceed in studying 171 2, 9 | previous book. After this, when we have made ourselves to a 172 2, 9 | the language of Scripture, we may proceed to open up and 173 2, 10 | designed to point out, as we say bos when we mean an 174 2, 10 | out, as we say bos when we mean an ox, because all 175 2, 10 | things themselves which we indicate by the proper names 176 2, 10 | signify something else, as we say bos, and understand 177 2, 11 | doubt. Although, indeed, we often find Hebrew words 178 2, 11 | than any part of a thought we have in our mind. And the 179 2, 12 | temporal things (for now we walk by faith, not by sight); 180 2, 12 | sight); as, moreover, unless we walk by faith, we shall 181 2, 12 | unless we walk by faith, we shall not attain to sight, 182 2, 12 | between the two things. For we must learn not to interpret, 183 2, 13 | But since we do not clearly see what 184 2, 13 | ability and judgment, unless we examine it in the language 185 2, 13 | the meaning of his author, we must either endeavour to 186 2, 13 | translated into Latin, or we must get hold of the translations 187 2, 13 | sufficient, but because we may use them to correct 188 2, 13 | authority followed. For whether we say inter homines (among 189 2, 13 | Again, that phrase, which we cannot now take away from 190 2, 13 | should be corrected, and that we should say, not fliriet, 191 2, 14 | belong to foreign tongues, we must either make inquiry 192 2, 14 | speak those tongues, or if we have leisure we must learn 193 2, 14 | tongues, or if we have leisure we must learn the tongues ourselves, 194 2, 14 | the tongues ourselves, or we must consult and compare 195 2, 14 | idioms in our own tongue that we are unacquainted with, we 196 2, 14 | we are unacquainted with, we gradually come to know them 197 2, 14 | and phrases whose meaning we do not know, so that where 198 2, 14 | not know, so that where we happen to meet either with 199 2, 14 | more learned man of whom we can inquire, or with a passage 200 2, 14 | significance of the phrase we are ignorant of, we can 201 2, 14 | phrase we are ignorant of, we can easily by the help of 202 2, 15 | And to correct the Latin we must use the Greek versions, 203 2, 15 | have expressed it, I think we must give way to the dispensation 204 2, 15 | diversities of the Latin texts, we must of course yield to 205 2, 16 | would lie unnoticed. And we cannot doubt that, in the 206 2, 16 | other names in that language we are not acquainted with. 207 2, 16 | expressions obscure, as when we do not know the nature of 208 2, 16 | our Lord's command, that we should be wise as serpents; 209 2, 16 | our head, which is Christ, we should willingly offer our 210 2, 16 | us, if to save the body we deny our God! Or again, 211 2, 16 | as the apostle says, that we may put on the new; and 212 2, 16 | And the only reason why we find it easy to understand 213 2, 16 | returned to the ark, is that we know both that the smooth 214 2, 16 | winter months. Now while we live in time, we must abstain 215 2, 16 | Now while we live in time, we must abstain and fast from 216 2, 16 | of that eternity in which we wish to live; although by 217 2, 16 | although by the passage of time we are taught this very lesson 218 2, 16 | it is taken four times, we are admonished to live unstained 219 2, 16 | for forty days. Of this we are admonished by the law 220 2, 16 | looked on in amazement. Next, we have to inquire in the same 221 2, 16 | raised about that number, we can only refer it to the 222 2, 16 | places in the Holy Scriptures we find both numbers and music 223 2, 17 | For we must not listen to the falsities 224 2, 18 | related, or is not so, still we ought not to give up music 225 2, 18 | superstition of the heathen, if we can derive anything from 226 2, 18 | nor does it follow that we must busy ourselves with 227 2, 18 | theatrical trumpery because we enter upon an investigation 228 2, 18 | upon spiritual things. For we ought not to refuse to learn 229 2, 18 | place in the heart, ought we on that account to forsake 230 2, 20 | and augurs. In this class we must place also all amulets 231 2, 20 | To these we may add thousands of the 232 2, 21 | Nor can we exclude from this kind of 233 2, 21 | to be wondered at, when we consider that even in times 234 2, 21 | dedicate the star which we call Lucifer to the name 235 2, 21 | carried out. For example, we have changed the names of 236 2, 22 | unfortunate. As, for example, we are told that Esau and Jacob 237 2, 23 | chap. 23. Why we repudiate arts of divination~ 238 2, 23 | offered in their honour, that we ought to feel in regard 239 2, 23 | these branches of knowledge, we must fear and shun the fellowship 240 2, 25 | the mind of the Christian, we must then look at human 241 2, 25 | by many old men from whom we have frequently heard it. 242 2, 25 | frequently heard it. And we may well believe this, because 243 2, 26 | What human contrivances we are to adopt, and what we 244 2, 26 | we are to adopt, and what we are to avoid~ 245 2, 27 | coming to the next point, we are not to reckon among 246 2, 27 | reached by the bodily senses we either believe on testimony, 247 2, 28 | Anything, then, that we learn from history about 248 2, 28 | childish instruction. For we frequently seek information 249 2, 28 | body) was in building. Now we know on the authority of 250 2, 28 | putting His actions together we can make it out, yet that 251 2, 28 | Lord came. And thus, when we reflect upon the dates, 252 2, 30 | judgement about them, that we may not be wholly ignorant 253 2, 31 | Scripture, only in the use of it we must guard against the love 254 2, 32 | resurrection of the dead. We conclude, therefore, that 255 2, 33 | order that he whose error we wish to correct may be sorry 256 2, 33 | is just, he is good," and we admit its truth. Then he 257 2, 33 | he is not just;" and when we admit this too, he draws 258 2, 33 | orator, he is a man." But if we add, "He is not an orator," 259 2, 34 | opinions. In the former case we learn what is consequent, 260 2, 34 | quadruped." In these instances we judge of the connection. 261 2, 34 | truth of opinions, however, we must consider propositions 262 2, 34 | but when propositions that we are not sure about are joined 263 2, 35 | falsehood itself is defined when we say that falsehood is the 264 2, 35 | of things which is not as we declare it to be; and this 265 2, 35 | falsehood itself cannot be true. We can also divide it, saying 266 2, 37 | regard to all these laws, we derive more pleasure from 267 2, 37 | intellect in better training. We must take care, however, 268 2, 39 | necessities of this life we must not neglect the arrangements 269 2, 39 | And in regard to all these we must hold by the maxim, " 270 2, 40 | rightly said by the heathen, we must appropriate to our 271 2, 40 | harmony with our faith, we are not only not to shrink 272 2, 40 | indispensable in this life, we must take and turn to a 273 2, 40 | among our brethren done? Do we not see with what a quantity 274 2, 41 | rooted and grounded in love, we may be able to comprehend 275 2, 41 | by this Christian action, we shall be able to know even " 276 2, 41 | things, were made, "that we may be filled with all the 277 3, arg | case of figurative signs we need to guard against two 278 3, arg | lays down rules by which we may decide whether an expression 279 3, 2 | make Scripture ambiguous, we must see in the first place 280 3, 2 | it is uncertain whether we should read, "ex duobus 281 3, 2 | to have a desire for two. We must therefore punctuate 282 3, 2 | according to any method we choose of those that suggest 283 3, 2 | fear of God. Receive us; we have wronged no man." It 284 3, 2 | It is doubtful whether we should read, mundemus nos 285 3, 3 | understood. And in the same way we shall have the inquiry, " 286 3, 3 | apostle says, "What shall we say then? That the Gentiles 287 3, 3 | the inquiry, "What shall we say then?" what follows 288 3, 3 | tongue, for in the Greek we find not "stome" [mouth], 289 3, 3 | past [sicut proedixi]," we could not know without going 290 3, 4 | form; and accordingly, when we look into the original, 291 3, 5 | diligence. In the first place, we must beware of taking a 292 3, 7 | But the command is that we should love and serve the 293 3, 9 | resurrection of our Lord, we are not oppressed with the 294 3, 9 | even to those signs which we now understand, but our 295 3, 10 | chap. 10. How we are to discern whether a 296 3, 10 | speech as if it were literal, we must also pay heed to that 297 3, 10 | In the first place, then, we must show the way to find 298 3, 11 | if its meaning be clear, we are not to give it some 299 3, 12 | in those banquets which we abhor. For the sweet odour 300 3, 12 | We must, therefore, consider 301 3, 12 | are more temperate than we are. For in all matters 302 3, 12 | the nature of the things we use, but our reason for 303 3, 12 | seeking them, that make what we do either praiseworthy or 304 3, 12 | nature that is there narrated we are to take not only in 305 3, 12 | of that description: so we must take heed in regard 306 3, 12 | customs of those among whom we live, but frequently also 307 3, 13 | habits of those with whom we are either compelled by 308 3, 15 | minds and meditate upon what we read till an interpretation 309 3, 16 | a figure, enjoining that we should have a share in the 310 3, 16 | sufferings of our Lord, and that we should retain a sweet and 311 3, 16 | his life shall lose it," we are not to think that He 312 3, 18 | chap. 18. We must take into consideration 313 3, 18 | We must also be on our guard 314 3, 18 | crime or a vice even if we take it literally and not 315 3, 21 | adultery alone. And hence we may understand with what 316 3, 24 | regard to any expression that we are trying to understand 317 3, 24 | the laws of things which we discussed in the first book, 318 3, 24 | turn it in every way until we arrive at a true interpretation, 319 3, 24 | interpretation, especially when we bring to our aid experience 320 3, 24 | the exercise of piety. Now we find out whether an expression 321 3, 25 | likeness to each other, we are not to suppose there 322 3, 25 | water denotes people, as we read in the Apocalypse,l 323 3, 26 | are used is more manifest we must gather the sense in 324 3, 26 | referring to the passage where we read, "Thou, Lord, hast 325 3, 26 | with a shield." And yet we are not so to understand 326 3, 26 | understand it, as that wherever we meet with a shield put to 327 3, 26 | protection of any kind, we must take it as signifying 328 3, 26 | but the favour of God. For we hear also of the shield 329 3, 26 | of the wicked." Nor ought we, on the other hand, in regard 330 3, 26 | to the shield only; for we read in another place of 331 3, 27 | meaning lay in the words which we are trying to interpret; 332 3, 28 | Scripture; so that when we wish to examine the passages 333 3, 28 | metaphorical expressions, we may either obtain a meaning 334 3, 29 | articulate voice with which we speak. Now of some of these 335 3, 29 | these figures of speech we find in Scripture not only 336 3, 29 | not only examples (which we have of them all), but the 337 3, 29 | antiphrasis. Now in irony we indicate by the tone of 338 3, 29 | tone of voice the meaning we desire to convey; as when 339 3, 29 | desire to convey; as when we say to a man who is behaving 340 3, 29 | by the tone of voice that we make an antiphrasis to indicate 341 3, 29 | law of contraries, as when we ask in a place for what 342 3, 29 | answer, "There is plenty;" or we add words that make it plain 343 3, 29 | words that make it plain we mean the opposite of what 344 3, 29 | mean the opposite of what we say, as in the expression, " 345 3, 29 | give an absurd meaning, we ought forthwith to inquire 346 3, 29 | that figurative sense which we are unacquainted with; and 347 3, 30 | example, he inquires what we are to understand in the 348 3, 30 | known and duly applied, we should be able to interpret 349 3, 31 | is this, that, knowing as we do that the head and the 350 3, 31 | Abraham, and that is Christ), we need not be in a difficulty 351 3, 32 | be with Him in eternity. We ought, therefore, to say 352 3, 32 | that wicked servant of whom we are told in the gospel, 353 3, 34 | of regeneration which, as we see, is now imparted to 354 3, 34 | apprehension of Scripture, as if we were enemies, but that he 355 3, 34 | our spirit. And therefore we ought to take this saying " 356 3, 34 | land of the living; and we are to understand that this 357 3, 35 | of times, a rule by which we can frequently discover 358 3, 35 | days cannot be true, unless we suppose that the writer 359 3, 35 | day on which He suffered we join the previous night, 360 3, 35 | night in which He arose we join the Lord's day which 361 3, 35 | count it also a whole day, we cannot make out the three 362 3, 36 | their proper place. And we make mistakes if we do not 363 3, 36 | And we make mistakes if we do not understand this, 364 3, 36 | in the book of Genesis we read, "And the Lord God 365 3, 36 | be thought to imply, did we not accurately mark and 366 3, 36 | tongues. And, accordingly, we are forthwith told of the 367 3, 37 | another should be understood we have a figurative expression, 368 4, arg | prayer from God, though we are not to forget to be 369 4, 3 | be true or not, why need we inquire? For even if this 370 4, 3 | while they are speaking. For we must be careful that what 371 4, 3 | must be careful that what we have got to say does not 372 4, 3 | does not escape us whilst we are thinking about saying 373 4, 3 | speeches of eloquent men, we find rules of eloquence 374 4, 3 | as they can? And what do we find from the examples themselves 375 4, 3 | the case in this respect? We know numbers who, without 376 4, 3 | who have learnt these; but we know no one who is eloquent 377 4, 5 | with eloquence too. But we must beware of the man who 378 4, 5 | Lights, how much more ought we to feel it who are the sons 379 4, 5 | the meaning. It is plain we must set far above these 380 4, 5 | welfare of the world." And as we must often swallow wholesome 381 4, 5 | swallow wholesome bitters, so we must always avoid unwholesome 382 4, 5 | wholesomeness? For the sweeter we try to make such things, 383 4, 7 | the following passage: "We glory in tribulations also: 384 4, 7 | laugh at him? And yet here we find the figure which is 385 4, 7 | the one upon the other, as we see here that patience arises 386 4, 7 | single tone of voice, which we call clauses and sections ( 387 4, 7 | concerning reproach, as though we had been weak. Howbeit, 388 4, 7 | concerning reproach, as though we had been weak." Then is 389 4, 7 | but not in knowledge," we could not in any way have 390 4, 7 | Gentiles. And certainly if we bring forward anything of 391 4, 7 | as a model of eloquence, we take it from those epistles 392 4, 7 | men, and to show us that we must distinguish the music 393 4, 7 | whether with more elegance we hold the words, "and they 394 4, 8 | difficulty in understanding, we are not by any means to 395 4, 9 | in private conversations, we must not shrink from the 396 4, 9 | bringing the truth which we ourselves have reached within 397 4, 10 | understand us for whose sake we speak? He, therefore, who 398 4, 11 | if it cannot open what we want it to open? Or what 399 4, 11 | open what is shut is all we want? But as there is a 400 4, 12 | necessity, depends on what we say; the other two on the 401 4, 12 | the other two on the way we say it. He, then, who speaks 402 4, 12 | gaining the first two ends if we fail in the third? Neither 403 4, 14 | madness! For what shall we do in the end thereof? And 404 4, 14 | form of eloquence, such as we find in his subsequent letters, 405 4, 15 | who can make us say what we ought, and in the way we 406 4, 15 | we ought, and in the way we ought, except Him in whose 407 4, 15 | except Him in whose hand both we and our speeches are? Accordingly, 408 4, 16 | Now if any one says that we need not direct men how 409 4, 16 | he may as well say that we need not pray, since our 410 4, 16 | First Epistle to Timothy do we not read: "These things 411 4, 16 | been told previously. Do we not read there: "Rebuke 412 4, 16 | and so on. What then are we to think? Does the apostle 413 4, 16 | they should teach? Or are we to understand, that though 414 4, 17 | should pray and strive, as we have said above, to be heard 415 4, 18 | eternal ruin, everything that we say is important; so much 416 4, 18 | matters? Know ye not that we shall judge angels? How 417 4, 18 | Of course, if we were giving men advice as 418 4, 18 | before the church courts, we would rightly advise them 419 4, 18 | matters of little moment. But we are treating of the manner 420 4, 18 | importance. Unless indeed we are prepared to say that, 421 4, 18 | it not the case that when we happen to speak on this 422 4, 18 | is with us, so that what we say is not altogether unworthy 423 4, 19 | something is to be done, and we are speaking to those who 424 4, 19 | urged, and powerfully when we are forcing a mind that 425 4, 19 | not easy to comprehend, we may understand as much as 426 4, 19 | given us to understand? Are we in this case to seek out 427 4, 19 | learn something? But when we come to praise God, either 428 4, 19 | preference to Him, then we ought to speak out with 429 4, 20 | something more definite. We have an example of the calm, 430 4, 20 | doubt or discredit on what we say. If, however, the solution 431 4, 20 | useless to disturb what we cannot remove. And besides, 432 4, 20 | following words of the apostle we have the temperate style: " 433 4, 20 | that, while adding harmony, we take away none of the weight 434 4, 20 | from which this harmony we speak of is most fully learnt, 435 4, 20 | consolations of God's grace, we should bear with patience 436 4, 20 | as dying, and, behold, we live; as chastened, and 437 4, 20 | both power and beauty: "We know," he says, "that all 438 4, 20 | also glorified. What shall we then say to these things? 439 4, 20 | is written, For Thy sake we are killed all the day long, 440 4, 20 | killed all the day long, we are accounted as sheep for 441 4, 20 | Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, 442 4, 21 | water mingled with wine. But we must quote a passage by 443 4, 21 | Observe," he says, "that we are instructed, in presenting 444 4, 21 | contain His blood by which we are redeemed and quickened, 445 4, 21 | declarations of Scripture. For we find that in the book of 446 4, 21 | passion. In the same way we see the sacrament of the 447 4, 21 | introduction to his work, we find the following passage 448 4, 21 | end of the epistle, "As we have borne," he says, "the 449 4, 21 | the image of the earthly, we shall also bear the image 450 4, 21 | testimony to thine ugliness can we find, O woman, that is more 451 4, 21 | modesty and fear. Accordingly, we notice that the style is 452 4, 22 | But we are not to suppose that 453 4, 22 | with good taste. For when we keep monotonously to one 454 4, 22 | monotonously to one style, we fail to retain the hearer' 455 4, 22 | hearer's attention; but when we pass from one style to another, 456 4, 22 | cooling or becoming languid. We can bear the subdued style, 457 4, 22 | shorter time. And therefore we must be on our guard, lest, 458 4, 22 | higher point the emotion we have excited, we rather 459 4, 22 | emotion we have excited, we rather lose what we have 460 4, 22 | excited, we rather lose what we have already gained. But 461 4, 22 | interposition of matter that we have to treat in a quieter 462 4, 22 | treat in a quieter style, we can return with good effect 463 4, 23 | that sort turn up; just as we must use the temperate style, 464 4, 24 | applause follows a speaker, we are not to suppose on that 465 4, 25 | From all this we may conclude, that the end 466 4, 25 | adequate end; but when what we have to say is good and 467 4, 25 | merely to give him pleasure. We, however, ought to make 468 4, 25 | style of eloquence what we aim at effecting when we 469 4, 25 | we aim at effecting when we use the majestic style. 470 4, 25 | the majestic style. For we may by the use of this style 471 4, 25 | already begun a good course, we may induce them to pursue 472 4, 25 | even in the temperate style we must use beauty of expression 473 4, 25 | pursuit of the good end which we hold out before him. ~ 474 4, 26 | style, and persuasive power, we are not to understand that 475 4, 26 | these three merits. For we do not like even what we 476 4, 26 | we do not like even what we say in the subdued style 477 4, 26 | the hearer; and therefore we would be listened to, not 478 4, 26 | pleasure as well. Again, why do we enforce what we teach by 479 4, 26 | why do we enforce what we teach by divine testimony, 480 4, 26 | divine testimony, except that we wish to carry the hearer 481 4, 27 | Christ is the truth; yet we see that the truth can be 482 4, 28 | adversaries oppose the truth, we are to say nothing in defense 483 4, 30 | in whose hand are both we and our words." ~


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