Table of Contents | Words: Alphabetical - Frequency - Inverse - Length - Statistics | Help | IntraText Library
Alphabetical    [«  »]
hindrance 2
hindrances 1
hinges 1
his 368
historical 2
history 11
hit 1
Frequency    [«  »]
431 or
418 this
373 i
368 his
355 when
343 if
342 what
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

his

    Book, Chapter
1 pref, 0| supplication obtaining his request that he might read 2 pref, 0| that every one of us learnt his own language by hearing 3 pref, 0| and hear the gospel from His own lips rather than from 4 pref, 0| angel announced to him that his prayers were heard and his 5 pref, 0| his prayers were heard and his alms had in remembrance, 6 pref, 0| men as the ministers of His word to their fellow-men. 7 pref, 0| gave forth no oracles from His human temple, but communicated 8 pref, 0| pride, accepted the plan of his father-in-law, a man of 9 pref, 0| that this power is not his own, in the sense of originating 10 pref, 0| he seeks God's glory, not his own. But reading and understanding, 11 pref, 0| to consider anything as his own, except perhaps what 12 1, arg | Argument~The author divides his work into two parts, one 13 1, arg | heaven, taking to Himself as his bride the Church, in which 14 1, arg | love the love of God for His own sake and the love of 15 1, 1 | will add to and perfect His gifts. The loaves in the 16 1, 1 | others, be multiplied by His grace, so that, in this 17 1, 2 | Abraham offered up instead of his son; for these, though they 18 1, 6 | spoken of God, or uttered His praise, in any worthy way? 19 1, 6 | although nothing worthy of His greatness can be said of 20 1, 6 | own words to rejoice in His praise. For on this principle 21 1, 6 | conveys no true knowledge of His nature; but yet all who 22 1, 9 | so near, is poured into his very eyeballs. The man, 23 1, 9 | from this truth, is weak in his mental vision from dwelling 24 1, 14 | medicine, Wisdom, was by His assumption of humanity adapted 25 1, 14 | man has applied Himself to his cure, being Himself healer 26 1, 14 | penalty of death: Christ used His mortality so well as to 27 1, 14 | cured by the example of His virtues. On the other hand, 28 1, 15 | Christ, and is stimulated by His coming to judgment~ 29 1, 15 | Lord from the dead, and of His ascension into heaven, has 30 1, 15 | how freely He laid down His life for us when He had 31 1, 15 | for us when He had it in His power thus to take it up 32 1, 15 | holy living to long for His approach, instead of quaking 33 1, 15 | has given us so freely of His Spirit, that in the adversities 34 1, 15 | suitable for the building up of His Church, that we may do what 35 1, 16 | Chap. 16. Christ purges His church by medicinal afflictions~ 36 1, 16 | For the Church is His body, as the apostle's teaching 37 1, 16 | us;and it is even called His spouse. His body, then, 38 1, 16 | even called His spouse. His body, then, which has many 39 1, 16 | may take it to Himself as His bride, without spot or wrinkle, 40 1, 18 | therefore, the keys to His Church, that whatsoever 41 1, 18 | should not believe that his sins are remitted, they 42 1, 18 | should repent, and turn from his sins, should be saved by 43 1, 18 | who does not believe that his sins can be pardoned, falls 44 1, 18 | faith in the results of his own repentance. ~ 45 1, 20 | shall revive, not to change his earthly for a heavenly habitation, 46 1, 20 | to endure the penalty of his sin. ~ 47 1, 22 | is to be loved by man for his own sake, or for the sake 48 1, 22 | something else. If it is for his own sake, we enjoy him; 49 1, 22 | pronounced on him who places his hope in man. ~ 50 1, 22 | to love even himself for his own sake, but for the sake 51 1, 22 | so good a state as when his whole life is a journey 52 1, 22 | the unchangeable life, and his affections are entirely 53 1, 22 | however, he loves himself for his own sake, he does not look 54 1, 22 | relation to God, but turns his mind in upon himself, and 55 1, 22 | does not enjoy himself at his best, because he is better 56 1, 22 | because he is better when his mind is fully fixed upon, 57 1, 22 | is fully fixed upon, and his affections wrapped up in, 58 1, 22 | for your own sake, but for His in whom your love finds 59 1, 22 | flows. Whoever, then, loves his neighbour aright, ought 60 1, 22 | too should love God with his whole heart, and soul, and 61 1, 22 | For in this way, loving his neighbour as himself, a 62 1, 22 | turns the whole current of his love both for himself and 63 1, 22 | love both for himself and his neighbour into the channel 64 1, 23 | injunction to love himself and his own body~ 65 1, 23 | love himself, and to love his own body. The soul which 66 1, 23 | who loveth iniquity hateth his own soul." And accordingly 67 1, 24 | chap. 24. No man hates his own flesh, not even those 68 1, 24 | neither does any man hate his own body. For the apostle 69 1, 24 | No man ever yet hated his own flesh." And when some 70 1, 24 | No man ever yet hated his own flesh." He adds too, " 71 1, 25 | love something more than his body, but does not therefore 72 1, 25 | does not therefore hate his body~ 73 1, 25 | in what measure to love his body, so as to care for 74 1, 25 | equally manifest that he loves his body also, and desires to 75 1, 25 | safety and soundness of his body. For many have been 76 1, 25 | the safety and health of his body because there is something 77 1, 26 | should love himself and his own body, seeing, that is, 78 1, 26 | together, and your neighbour in his entirety, soul and body 79 1, 27 | estimate of things, and keeps his affections also under strict 80 1, 27 | but God is to be loved for His own sake. And if God is 81 1, 29 | particular actor, and enjoys his art as a great or even as 82 1, 29 | with him in admiration of his favourite, not for their 83 1, 29 | the more fervent he is in his admiration, the more he 84 1, 29 | does all he can to excite his interest by urging his favorite' 85 1, 29 | excite his interest by urging his favorite's merits: if, however, 86 1, 29 | such a man's contempt of his favourite, and strives in 87 1, 30 | it is our duty to help in his need, or whom it would be 88 1, 30 | Love worketh no ill to his neighbour." Whoever then 89 1, 30 | to commit adultery with his wife, or to kill him, or 90 1, 30 | to kill him, or to covet his goods. And as nobody but 91 1, 30 | And the Psalmist says in his prayer, "I behaved myself 92 1, 30 | shows us pity on account of His own goodness, but we show 93 1, 30 | one another on account of His; that is, He pities us that 94 1, 32 | of God. God, however, in His use of us, has reference 95 1, 32 | of us, has reference to His own goodness. For it is 96 1, 32 | of us has no reference to His own advantage, but to ours 97 1, 32 | concerned, has reference only to His goodness. When we take pity 98 1, 32 | care for him, it is for his advantage we do so; but 99 1, 33 | rather worship Him who is his Master, and under whom he 100 1, 33 | have implied that he fixed his hope of happiness upon him, 101 1, 34 | created me in the beginning of His way," that is, that those 102 1, 34 | called him to the reward of His heavenly calling, yet forgetting 103 1, 34 | down at the right hand of His Father. ~ 104 1, 36 | to express in that place, his error is not pernicious, 105 1, 36 | him; and yet he betrays his confidence by lying to him. 106 1, 36 | as I was going to say, if his mistaken interpretation 107 1, 37 | how, that, out of love for his own opinion, he begins to 108 1, 37 | shall attain the object of his love. And so these are the 109 1, 38 | of desire, for no one in his longing for it can set a 110 1, 38 | set upon it when he is on his way to possess it, he will 111 1, 38 | find it, when it comes into his possession, of higher value 112 1, 40 | is bent upon making all his understanding of Scripture 113 2, arg | Argument~Having completed his exposition of things, the 114 2, 1 | think of the feeling in his mind; and when the trumpet 115 2, 1 | indicates the feeling in his mind, independently of his 116 2, 1 | his mind, independently of his will: and in the same way 117 2, 2 | giver of the sign has in his own mind. We wish, then, 118 2, 2 | discovered food, he signals with his voice for the hen to run 119 2, 2 | the dove by cooing calls his mate, or is called by her 120 2, 3 | which was poured out upon His feet; and in the sacrament 121 2, 3 | and in the sacrament of His body and blood He signified 122 2, 3 | body and blood He signified His will through the sense of 123 2, 3 | when by touching the hem of His garment the woman was made 124 2, 6 | this, he does not please his hearer so much as when he 125 2, 7 | to seek the knowledge of His will, what He commands us 126 2, 7 | that God is to be loved for His own sake, and our neighbour 127 2, 7 | God and such a love for his neighbour as Scripture enjoins. 128 2, 7 | Scripture, compel him to bewail his condition. For the knowledge 129 2, 7 | turning away from these, fixes his affection on things eternal, 130 2, 7 | And when, to the extent of his power, he has gazed upon 131 2, 7 | owing to the weakness of his sight he cannot endure that 132 2, 7 | of compassion he cleanses his soul, which is violently 133 2, 7 | diligently in the love of his neighbour; and when he has 134 2, 7 | reached the point of loving his enemy, full of hopes and 135 2, 7 | man so purges the eye of his affections as not to place 136 2, 7 | affections as not to place his neighbour before, or even 137 2, 8 | all and retained them in his knowledge, if not yet with 138 2, 9 | the more capacious does his understanding become. For 139 2, 11 | man who happened to get his hands upon a Greek manuscript, 140 2, 12 | admonished not to despise his own body; and "the domestics 141 2, 12 | too. And he calls the Jews his "flesh," on account of the 142 2, 13 | express, each according to his own ability and judgment, 143 2, 13 | departs from the meaning of his author, we must either endeavour 144 2, 13 | the words out, to pardon his sins. What then is purity 145 2, 15 | for any one man, whatever his experience, to aspire to 146 2, 16 | between the other two, while His three disciples looked on 147 2, 18 | be found, it belongs to his Master; and while he recognizes 148 2, 20 | the dog sometimes makes his assailant run in hot haste 149 2, 20 | that the mice had eaten his boots, replied, "That is 150 2, 21 | distant ages, only that his ancestress Venus had given 151 2, 21 | made and set in order after His own pleasure, and they have 152 2, 22 | found to have laid hold with his hand upon the heel of his 153 2, 22 | his hand upon the heel of his brother, who preceded him. 154 2, 22 | consulted about Jacob or his brother, what does it profit 155 2, 22 | there is no difference in his chart, which he looks into 156 2, 23 | and in accordance with His most admirable arrangement 157 2, 23 | observances as those by which his ghost was brought up the 158 2, 24 | sort of omens as they see his own conjectures and preconceptions 159 2, 25 | movements mean, he will give his whole attention to them 160 2, 28 | which He took as a symbol of His body) was in building. Now 161 2, 28 | afterwards, although by putting His actions together we can 162 2, 28 | learnt all those sayings of His, which they are compelled 163 2, 28 | illustrious bishop, when by his investigations into profane 164 2, 28 | and write those views of his which are so justly praised? 165 2, 30 | remains as a result of his work, as, for example, a 166 2, 30 | to speak, assist God in His operations, as medicine, 167 2, 30 | any of these arts moves his limbs in any operation without 168 2, 31 | when the other has given his assent to this also, the 169 2, 31 | this also, the first draws his conclusion: "Then you are 170 2, 31 | thus leading him to give up his error, when he finds that 171 2, 31 | that if he wishes to retain his old opinion, he must of 172 2, 38 | though Virgil could at his own pleasure make the first 173 2, 38 | s power to determine at his pleasure that three times 174 2, 39 | for the Christian to spend his strength on many subjects 175 2, 39 | labour for the advantage of his brethren. In this way he 176 2, 39 | these only, and committing his account to writing. This 177 2, 41 | indicated, shall enter upon his investigations, let him 178 2, 42 | Christ, and loaded with His light burden, rooted and 179 3, 1 | Scripture for a knowledge of His will. And when he has become 180 3, 1 | either from the greatness of his intellect, or the greater 181 3, 2 | Because there is a need for his remaining, which he adds 182 3, 3 | bring any charges against His elect, and that Christ will 183 3, 3 | Christ will not condemn His elect, did not stand in 184 3, 5 | sacrifice, does not carry his thoughts beyond the customary 185 3, 9 | free even at the time of his bondage, when it is not 186 3, 10 | man, moreover, has hope in his own conscience, so far as 187 3, 10 | and knowledge of God and his neighbour. Now all these 188 3, 10 | blameable except what the men of his own country and time are 189 3, 10 | sanctioned by the custom of his companions; and thus it 190 3, 10 | the enjoyment of God for His own sake, and the enjoyment 191 3, 11 | Holy Scripture to God or His saints, avails to the pulling 192 3, 11 | to every man according to his deeds: to them who, by patient 193 3, 12 | that is to blame. Nobody in his sober senses would believe, 194 3, 12 | footsteps of Christ, anoints His feet (so to speak) with 195 3, 12 | when done in the course of his prophecy by the prophet 196 3, 14 | one is willing to defile his own dwelling; he ought not, 197 3, 15 | laws of love to God for His own sake, and love to one' 198 3, 16 | says Christ, "and drink His blood, ye have no life in 199 3, 16 | memory of the fact that His flesh was wounded and crucified 200 3, 16 | shalt heap coals of fire on his head," one would think a 201 3, 16 | enemy of one who came to his assistance in distress. 202 3, 16 | Lord says, "He who loveth his life shall lose it," we 203 3, 16 | a man's duty to care for his life, but that He says in 204 3, 16 | figurative sense, "Let him lose his life" that is, let him destroy 205 3, 16 | use which he now makes of his life, and through which 206 3, 16 | life, and through which his desires are fixed on temporal 207 3, 16 | figuratively for sin, so that it is his sin you are not to help. ~ 208 3, 17 | he has determined to keep his virgin unmarried, he tries 209 3, 18 | prayer when he was married to his wife. For he says: "Blessed 210 3, 18 | Adam, and gavest him Eve his wife for an helper and stay. ... 211 3, 21 | this injury at the hands of his impious and unnatural son, 212 3, 21 | not only bore with him in his mad passion, but mourned 213 3, 21 | but mourned over him in his death. He certainly was 214 3, 21 | seeing that it was not his own injuries but the sins 215 3, 21 | injuries but the sins of his son that moved him. For 216 3, 21 | he had given orders that his son should not be slain 217 3, 21 | design, he mourned over his son's death, not because 218 3, 21 | s death, not because of his own loss, but because he 219 3, 21 | comforted himself after his death. ~ 220 3, 21 | death, he was accused of his crime by a prophet, who, 221 3, 21 | he had come to show him his sin set before him the parable 222 3, 21 | to him spared to take of his own flock, but set his poor 223 3, 21 | of his own flock, but set his poor neighbour's one lamb 224 3, 21 | neighbour's one lamb before his guest to eat. And David' 225 3, 21 | against him, he wiped out his sin in deep penitence. But 226 3, 21 | regard to one woman. But in his case the immoderate desire 227 3, 21 | ewe-lamb to make a feast for his king, but for his guest. 228 3, 21 | feast for his king, but for his guest. In the case of his 229 3, 21 | his guest. In the case of his son Solomon, however, this 230 3, 21 | for in the beginning of his reign he was inflamed with 231 3, 22 | not transfer the act to his habits of life. For many 232 3, 23 | dare to vaunt himself in his own good deeds, and in comparison 233 3, 23 | and in comparison with his own righteousness, to despise 234 3, 25 | serpent beguiled Eve through his subtilty." Bread is used 235 3, 25 | as for example, "Out of his belly shall flow rivers 236 3, 30 | relates to the Lord and His body, the second to the 237 3, 30 | seventh to the devil and his body. Now these rules, as 238 3, 30 | passages without using any of his rules; finding, indeed, 239 3, 30 | passage of the kind to which his rules apply. As, for example, 240 3, 30 | warranted by the facts to his very elaborate and useful 241 3, 31 | first is about the Lord and His body, and it is this, that, 242 3, 31 | body that is, Christ and His Church are sometimes indicated 243 3, 32 | although they seem to be in His Church. And hence this rule 244 3, 32 | requires the reader to be on his guard when Scripture, although 245 3, 32 | asunder and appoint him his portion with the hypocrites." ~ 246 3, 33 | but also to suffer for His sake." Who, then, can doubt 247 3, 34 | when applied to Christ and His Church, of which Solomon 248 3, 34 | must then be carefully on his guard against seeking in 249 3, 34 | race; but the prophet, in his depth of meaning, while 250 3, 34 | works, but according to His own purpose and grace, which 251 3, 35 | presence of only three of His disciples, our Lord was 252 3, 35 | transfigured on the mount, so that His face shone as the sun, and 253 3, 35 | face shone as the sun, and His raiment was white as snow, 254 3, 35 | means just the same as "His praise shall continually 255 3, 36 | be upon the housetop, and his stuff in the house, let 256 3, 36 | revealed every man may receive his reward according to the 257 3, 37 | is about the devil and his body. For he is the head 258 3, 37 | wicked, who are in a sense his body, and destined to go 259 3, 37 | of the Church, which is His body, destined to be with 260 3, 37 | destined to be with Him in His eternal kingdom and glory. 261 3, 37 | is called of the Lord and His body, directs us, when Scripture 262 3, 37 | himself as in regard to his body; and his body is made 263 3, 37 | regard to his body; and his body is made up not only 264 3, 37 | although the devil sends his angels to all nations, yet 265 3, 37 | to all nations, yet it is his body, not himself, that 266 3, 37 | except that he himself is in his body, which is beaten small 267 3, 37 | Lord giveth wisdom: out of His mouth comets knowledge and 268 4, arg | Passing to the second part of his work, that which treats 269 4, arg | premises that it is no part of his intention to write a treatise 270 4, arg | gladness, and practice it in his life. Finally, he exhorts 271 4, arg | lead a life in harmony with his own teaching, and to show 272 4, 4 | the future. But once that his hearers are friendly, attentive, 273 4, 5 | eloquence, and with profit to his hearers, even though he 274 4, 5 | discerns the poverty of his own speech, the more he 275 4, 5 | so that what he says in his own words he may prove by 276 4, 5 | though small and weak in his own words, may gain strength 277 4, 5 | testimony of great men. For his proof gives pleasure when 278 4, 5 | when he cannot please by his mode of speech. But if a 279 4, 6 | sacred writings which God in His goodness has provided to 280 4, 7 | eloquence, so I do not deny that his wisdom naturally produced, 281 4, 7 | had been trying to injure his character; and being compelled 282 4, 7 | he speaks! But wisdom is his guide, eloquence his attendant; 283 4, 7 | is his guide, eloquence his attendant; he follows the 284 4, 7 | as if granting so much to his detractors, not as confessing 285 4, 7 | hesitate plainly to assert his knowledge, because without 286 4, 7 | bring forward anything of his as a model of eloquence, 287 4, 7 | those epistles which even his very detractors, who thought 288 4, 7 | detractors, who thought his bodily presence weak and 289 4, 7 | bodily presence weak and his speech contemptible, confessed 290 4, 7 | altogether, or whether he suspend his voice at the first, the 291 4, 7 | speech, checks the flow of his invective, and not now speaking 292 4, 7 | out illustrious from among his brethren, both in regard 293 4, 9 | as about the clearness of his teaching. ~ 294 4, 10 | if only the substance of his thought be conveyed and 295 4, 10 | he ought either to bring his address to a close, or pass 296 4, 12 | understood, he has said his say, whatever may have been 297 4, 12 | whatever may have been his manner of saying it. But 298 4, 12 | wishes to delight or persuade his hearer as well, he will 299 4, 12 | accomplish that end by putting his thought in any shape no 300 4, 12 | pleased in order to secure his attention, so he must be 301 4, 12 | when the hearer yields his assent to one who simply 302 4, 12 | delighted, and yet not give his consent. And what will be 303 4, 13 | eloquence, if he does not yield his consent, when it is only 304 4, 13 | for the sake of securing his consent that the speaker 305 4, 13 | though it is demonstrated to his own confession, and clothed 306 4, 14 | But may God avert from His Church what the prophet 307 4, 14 | the same prophet compared His own word spoken through 308 4, 14 | own word spoken through His holy prophets. God forbid, 309 4, 14 | eloquence, such as we find in his subsequent letters, a style 310 4, 15 | he ought, before he opens his mouth, to lift up his thirsty 311 4, 15 | opens his mouth, to lift up his thirsty soul to God, to 312 4, 16 | though they cannot without His), and yet they are applied; 313 4, 17 | carry with him the assent of his hearer. For it is these 314 4, 18 | be able to judge between his brethren? But brother goes 315 4, 18 | is it that the changes in his tone, so frequent and so 316 4, 18 | testify to the depth of his emotion? Why is it, in fine, 317 4, 18 | matters deserve so much at his hands? God forbid. No; but 318 4, 18 | of cold water to one of His disciples shall in no wise 319 4, 18 | disciples shall in no wise lose his reward, is very trivial 320 4, 18 | preacher takes this saying as his text, he should think his 321 4, 18 | his text, he should think his subject very unimportant, 322 4, 19 | either in Himself, or in His works, what a field for 323 4, 19 | before man, who can task his powers to the utmost in 324 4, 20 | thereto. Now to Abraham and his seed were the promises made. 325 4, 20 | has not preserved these in his translation. I, however ( 326 4, 20 | the called according to His purpose. For whom He did 327 4, 20 | conformed to the image of His Son, that He might be the 328 4, 20 | against us? He that spared not His own Son, but delivered Him 329 4, 21 | in the subdued style in his treatise on the sacrament 330 4, 21 | cannot appear to contain His blood by which we are redeemed 331 4, 21 | and was uncovered within his tent, and his nakedness 332 4, 21 | uncovered within his tent, and his nakedness was exposed by 333 4, 21 | nakedness was exposed by his second son, and was carefully 334 4, 21 | was carefully hidden by his elder and his younger sons. 335 4, 21 | hidden by his elder and his younger sons. It is not 336 4, 21 | in the introduction to his work, we find the following 337 4, 21 | one man God would deliver His people from their enemies, 338 4, 21 | of the staff that was in his hand, there rose up fire 339 4, 21 | s divine nature, but to His flesh, whose ever-flowing 340 4, 21 | satisfied the hearts of His thirsting people. And so 341 4, 21 | crucified, should abolish in His flesh the sins of the whole 342 4, 21 | angel, then, stretched out his staff and touched the rock, 343 4, 21 | to proving and enforcing his point. ~ 344 4, 21 | another painter should put his hand over it, as if to improve 345 4, 21 | it, as if to improve by his superior skill the painting 346 4, 21 | feel deeply insulted, and his indignation would be justly 347 4, 21 | intermingled with practice on his own part, become thoroughly 348 4, 23 | And the speaker has it in his discretion to use the subdued 349 4, 25 | succeeds in persuading, his eloquence has not secured 350 4, 25 | subdued style, he persuades his hearers that what he says 351 4, 25 | he persuades them that his speech is elegant and ornate. 352 4, 26 | with us, that is, to compel his assert by calling in the 353 4, 27 | life is in harmony with his teaching will teach with 354 4, 28 | breach of modesty, because his life protects him against 355 4, 28 | and caring for men. In his very speech even he prefers 356 4, 28 | a teacher should govern his words, not let the words 357 4, 28 | more painful object than if his body too were deformed, 358 4, 29 | cannot do even this, let his life be such as shall not 359 4, 29 | example to others; and let his manner of living be an eloquent 360 4, 29 | denounces those who steal His words every one from his 361 4, 29 | His words every one from his neighbour. For those who 362 4, 29 | seem to be the result of his own thought, and yet they 363 4, 29 | have nothing in common with his manner of life. And so God 364 4, 29 | has said that they steal His words who would appear good 365 4, 30 | preacher should commence his discourse with prayer to 366 4, 30 | to pray God to put into his mouth a suitable discourse. 367 4, 30 | that all the praise may be His "in whose hand are both 368 4, 31 | Christian doctrine, not for his own instruction only, but


Best viewed with any browser at 800x600 or 768x1024 on Tablet PC
IntraText® (V89) - Some rights reserved by Èulogos SpA - 1996-2007. Content in this page is licensed under a Creative Commons License