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Alphabetical    [«  »]
idioms 2
idol 1
idols 11
if 343
ignorance 15
ignorant 14
ignoro 1
Frequency    [«  »]
373 i
368 his
355 when
343 if
342 what
333 have
314 so
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

if

    Book, Chapter
1 pref, 0| able and willing to learn, if God our Lord do not withhold 2 pref, 0| conciliate them beforehand. And if, after all, men should still 3 pref, 0| understanding. It is just as if they were anxious to see 4 pref, 0| point it out with my finger: if they had not sight enough 5 pref, 0| But if any one thinks that these 6 pref, 0| directions from man (and if the fact be so, they boast 7 pref, 0| been much more degraded if God had not chosen to make 8 pref, 0| holy, which temple ye are," if God gave forth no oracles 9 pref, 0| mingling them one with another, if men never learnt anything 10 pref, 0| surely they cannot blame me if I likewise teach not only 11 pref, 0| we did not receive? And if we have received it, why 12 pref, 0| it, why do we glory, as if we had not received it? ~ 13 pref, 0| here attempt to lay down, if he meet with an obscure 14 1, arg | remission of our sins. And if our sins are remitted and 15 1, arg | the body to eternal glory; if not, we shall be raised 16 1, 1 | undertaking, and one that, if difficult to carry out, 17 1, 1 | it would undoubtedly be, if I were counting on my own 18 1, 1 | being shared with others, if it is possessed and not 19 1, 1 | who have; that is to say, if they use freely and cheerfully 20 1, 2 | in such a way that even if some of them may be used 21 1, 3 | among both kinds of objects, if we set ourselves to enjoy 22 1, 4 | obtain what one desires, if it is a proper object of 23 1, 4 | wandered far from God; and if we wish to return to our 24 1, 5 | common to all who enjoy Him, if He is an object, and not 25 1, 5 | objects, or indeed even if He is the cause of all. 26 1, 6 | than desire to speak; and if I have said anything, it 27 1, 6 | unspeakable? But what I have said, if it had been unspeakable, 28 1, 6 | contradiction of words, because if the unspeakable is what 29 1, 6 | of, it is not unspeakable if it can be called unspeakable. 30 1, 7 | itself, is God of gods: or if they try to get beyond the 31 1, 7 | form of the human body, if they think that superior 32 1, 7 | superior to all others. Or if they think that there is 33 1, 8 | nature of the life itself, if they find it mere nutritive 34 1, 8 | never can become so. And if men never caught sight of 35 1, 8 | change. This will be evident, if we consider that the very 36 1, 18 | despair, and becomes worse, as if no greater good remained 37 1, 22 | sake of something else. If it is for his own sake, 38 1, 22 | own sake, we enjoy him; if it is for the sake of something 39 1, 22 | sake of something else. For if a thing is to be loved for 40 1, 22 | hope of which at least, if not yet the reality, is 41 1, 22 | to have joy in himself, if you look at the matter clearly, 42 1, 22 | entirely fixed upon that. If, however, he loves himself 43 1, 22 | even himself. Wherefore if you ought not to love even 44 1, 22 | has a right to be angry if you love him too for God' 45 1, 23 | attained something very great if it is able to lord it over 46 1, 24 | war upon their own body as if it were a natural enemy. 47 1, 26 | love of our neighbour. Now, if you take yourself in your 48 1, 27 | loved for His own sake. And if God is to be loved more 49 1, 28 | to more than one person; if two persons presented themselves, 50 1, 29 | iniquity though they be, if a man is fond of a particular 51 1, 29 | show him to others; and if he find any one comparatively 52 1, 29 | urging his favorite's merits: if, however, he meet with any 53 1, 29 | he can to remove it. Now, if this be so, what does it 54 1, 29 | from Him whom we love. For if they would turn to Him, 55 1, 30 | would be our duty to help if he were in need. Whence 56 1, 30 | Thou shalt not covet; and if there be any other commandment, 57 1, 30 | apostle thought it no sin, if a man were not a Christian 58 1, 30 | But now, if every one to whom we ought 59 1, 31 | as objects of enjoyment? If He enjoys us, He must be 60 1, 31 | but makes use of us. For if He neither enjoys nor uses 61 1, 33 | For if we find our happiness complete 62 1, 33 | of thee in the Lord." For if he had not added "in the 63 1, 33 | bring delight with it. And if you pass beyond this delight, 64 1, 33 | say that you enjoy it. But if you cling to it, and rest 65 1, 35 | such love and delight as if it were a good to rest in, 66 1, 36 | understand them as he ought. If, on the other hand, a man 67 1, 36 | commits an injustice; and if any man thinks that a lie 68 1, 36 | as I was going to say, if his mistaken interpretation 69 1, 36 | the straight road, lest, if he get into a habit of going 70 1, 37 | For if he takes up rashly a meaning 71 1, 37 | harmonize with this meaning. And if he admits that these statements 72 1, 37 | he is with himself. And if he should once permit that 73 1, 37 | Now faith will totter if the authority of Scripture 74 1, 37 | begin to shake. And then, if faith totter, love itself 75 1, 37 | itself will grow cold. For if a man has fallen from faith, 76 1, 37 | not believe to exist. But if he both believes and loves, 77 1, 38 | when these others fail. For if we love by faith that which 78 1, 38 | when we begin to see! And if we love by hope that which 79 1, 40 | And, therefore, if a man fully understands 80 1, 40 | reference to hope; for, if a man has the burthen of 81 1, 40 | of faith unfeigned." For if our faith is free from all 82 2, 6 | For why is it, I ask, that if any one says that there 83 2, 6 | how is it, I say, that if a man says this, he does 84 2, 6 | harshness softened down, just as if they had been torn off and 85 2, 6 | delight under that aspect than if no such figure were drawn 86 2, 7 | the motions of pride as if our flesh were nailed to 87 2, 7 | not understood, we feel as if we could be wiser and give 88 2, 8 | retained them in his knowledge, if not yet with full understanding, 89 2, 8 | those of less authority. If, however, he shall find 90 2, 9 | said, to know these books, if not yet with the understanding, 91 2, 9 | counts for a great deal; but if the memory be defective, 92 2, 11 | recourse to the original texts if the endless diversity of 93 2, 12 | understanding of Scripture, if only readers were not careless. 94 2, 12 | apostle, when he says, "If by any means I may provoke 95 2, 12 | the same prophet Isaiah: "If ye will not believe, ye 96 2, 12 | another has translated: "If ye will not believe, ye 97 2, 12 | these reasons one says, "If ye will not believe, ye 98 2, 12 | understand;" but the other, "If ye will not believe, ye 99 2, 13 | and since the translator, if he be not a very learned 100 2, 13 | would often set up our neck, if it were not held down by 101 2, 13 | Mistakes of this kind, then, if a man do not choose to avoid 102 2, 13 | stronger than men 1 Cor.1:25 ). If any one should retain in 103 2, 13 | it is ambiguous too, as if the meaning might be, that 104 2, 14 | brings him to a stop. Now if these belong to foreign 105 2, 14 | speak those tongues, or if we have leisure we must 106 2, 14 | compare several translators. If, however, there are words 107 2, 14 | a very great assistance, if they are examined and discussed 108 2, 15 | there was but one voice. And if, as is reported, and as 109 2, 15 | anything to it? And even if they conferred together 110 2, 15 | learned men. Wherefore, even if anything is found in the 111 2, 15 | to say, to be corrected if necessary by the authority 112 2, 15 | the New Testament, again, if any perplexity arises from 113 2, 16 | figurative signs, again, if ignorance of any of them 114 2, 16 | a secret sense; but yet if the evangelist had not interpreted 115 2, 16 | writers of those books, would, if any one could interpret 116 2, 16 | were, be destroyed in us, if to save the body we deny 117 2, 16 | mystical way. A candid mind, if I may so speak, cannot but 118 2, 16 | our Lord Himself, who, as if receiving the witness both 119 2, 16 | many strings; or whether, if there be no such law, the 120 2, 16 | commandments of the law (and if again any question is raised 121 2, 18 | superstition of the heathen, if we can derive anything from 122 2, 20 | that are to be observed if any part of the body should 123 2, 20 | the body should jump, or if, when friends are walking 124 2, 20 | the kicking of a stone, as if it were a divider of friends, 125 2, 20 | to cuff an innocent boy if he happens to run between 126 2, 20 | house; to go back to bed if any one should sneeze when 127 2, 20 | slippers; to return home if you stumble when going to 128 2, 20 | been very strange indeed if the boots had eaten the 129 2, 21 | Writ in these terms: "For if they were able to know so 130 2, 22 | professes to read the fates. If, then, he does not discover 131 2, 22 | referred to the same class as if they were leagues and covenants 132 2, 23 | lies, but it says, "Even if what they tell you should 133 2, 23 | treacherous friendship. Not as if the idol were anything," 134 2, 23 | government of God's providence, if there chance only to be 135 2, 23 | committed them to writing, as if they had drawn them by rule. ~ 136 2, 25 | convenience and necessity. For if those signs which the actors 137 2, 25 | this, because even now, if any one who is unaccustomed 138 2, 25 | makes a mistake, especially if they are executed by skilled 139 2, 25 | the same kind. Now these, if they were not devices of 140 2, 26 | or enervate us by luxury, if they only occupy our minds 141 2, 28 | understanding the Scriptures, even if it be learnt without the 142 2, 29 | it is one thing to say: If you bruise down this herb 143 2, 29 | stomach; and another to say: If you hang this herb round 144 2, 31 | error, when he finds that if he wishes to retain his 145 2, 31 | since they would be true if the dead rise not, there 146 2, 32 | briefly expressed thus: If there is no resurrection 147 2, 33 | some man to have admitted: If a snail is an animal, it 148 2, 33 | propounds the statement, "If this man is just, he is 149 2, 33 | the statement is true, "If he is an orator, he is a 150 2, 33 | orator, he is a man." But if we add, "He is not an orator," 151 2, 34 | example of a consequent is, "If he is an orator, he is a 152 2, 34 | man;" of an inconsequent, "If he is a man, he is an orator;" 153 2, 34 | orator;" of an incompatible, "If he is a man, he is a quadruped." 154 2, 34 | inference, plume themselves as if this involved also the truth 155 2, 34 | knows that it follows that if there is no resurrection 156 2, 37 | such rules. It is just as if a man wishing to give rules 157 2, 39 | the Church of Christ, as if these could secure for them 158 2, 39 | discriminate among them. And if they find any of those which 159 2, 39 | conjectures, especially if they involve entering into 160 2, 39 | regard to other matters, if any competent man were willing 161 2, 40 | Moreover, if those who are called philosophers, 162 2, 40 | knowledge it held useful, if it had suspected they were 163 2, 42 | learnt from other sources, if it is hurtful, it is there 164 2, 42 | it is there condemned; if it is useful, it is therein 165 3, 2 | pronunciation. Accordingly, if, when attention is given 166 3, 2 | first book about things. But if both readings, or all of 167 3, 2 | readings, or all of them (if there are more than two), 168 3, 2 | be with Christ]. And, as if he were asked why he has 169 3, 3 | or succeeding context; or if neither of these methods 170 3, 3 | pronounce them. For example, if our faith that God will 171 3, 3 | word "os" as short or long. If he make it short, it is 172 3, 3 | singular of ossa [bones]; if he make it long, it is the 173 3, 3 | the kingdom of God." Now if he had only said, "Of the 174 3, 4 | shown to be vocative. Now if the translator had chosen 175 3, 4 | the meaning; or, indeed, if he had added "nostri", hardly 176 3, 5 | figuratively is taken as if it were said literally, 177 3, 5 | takes figurative words as if they were proper, and does 178 3, 5 | secondary signification; but, if he hears of the Sabbath, 179 3, 7 | And if ever any of them endeavoured 180 3, 7 | poet of theirs, who says, if I recollect aright, "Thou, 181 3, 7 | representations of gods. If, then, to take a sign which 182 3, 7 | things themselves! For even if you go back to the very 183 3, 10 | metaphorical form of speech as if it were literal, we must 184 3, 10 | literal form of speech as if it were figurative. In the 185 3, 10 | thus it comes to pass, that if Scripture either enjoins 186 3, 10 | what is not so opposed, and if at the same time the authority 187 3, 10 | of men. In the same way, if an erroneous opinion has 188 3, 11 | the dominion of lust. And if its meaning be clear, we 189 3, 11 | secondary reference, as if it were spoken figuratively. 190 3, 15 | the reign of love. Now, if when taken literally it 191 3, 16 | If the sentence is one of command, 192 3, 16 | benevolence, it is not figurative. If, however, it seems to enjoin 193 3, 16 | for us. Scripture says: "If thine enemy hunger, feed 194 3, 16 | enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him drink;" 195 3, 17 | figurative; for example, if he has embraced a life of 196 3, 17 | literally, but figuratively; and if he has determined to keep 197 3, 18 | not a crime or a vice even if we take it literally and 198 3, 18 | be used to condemnation, if the use of the former be 199 3, 18 | For, if it was possible for one 200 3, 18 | offspring. And, accordingly, if these last had been still 201 3, 20 | For if they had been under the 202 3, 21 | son should not be slain if he were conquered in battle, 203 3, 27 | undiscovered, there is no danger if it can be shown from other 204 3, 27 | harmony with the truth. And if a man in searching the Scriptures 205 3, 28 | there is no controversy, or if a controversy arises, may 206 3, 30 | that it would appear as if, when they were thoroughly 207 3, 30 | are to many invisible. And if this system of rules be 208 3, 30 | forest of prophecy shall, if he follow these rules as 209 3, 30 | from going astray." Now, if he had said, "There are 210 3, 30 | recesses of the whole law;" and if he had not said "What is 211 3, 32 | persons as before, just as if both sets constituted one 212 3, 32 | in one body, He speaks as if there were no change in 213 3, 34 | rule is of course the same, if anything of the kind referred 214 3, 34 | apprehension of Scripture, as if we were enemies, but that 215 3, 34 | says shortly afterwards, as if repeating himself, "And 216 3, 34 | fathers," not literally, as if they referred to Israel 217 3, 34 | and purpose, the same as if it were already given; just 218 3, 34 | because it is the same as if it were itself given, when 219 3, 36 | place. And we make mistakes if we do not understand this, 220 3, 36 | to have its own language if all had one language in 221 3, 37 | very desire for knowledge, if it is wedded to piety. But 222 4, 1 | known the meaning, in order if possible to bring them all 223 4, 1 | be learnt elsewhere; and if any good man should happen 224 4, 3 | these writings of mine, if a suitable space of time 225 4, 3 | need we inquire? For even if this art can occasionally 226 4, 3 | especially, of course, if in addition he practice 227 4, 3 | grounds of piety and faith. If, however, such ability be 228 4, 3 | either not understood, or if, after great labour has 229 4, 3 | need not be learnt by boys, if they have the advantage 230 4, 4 | whatever way the case requires. If the hearers need teaching, 231 4, 4 | the exhibition of proofs. If, however, the hearers require 232 4, 5 | argue and speak with wisdom, if not with eloquence, and 233 4, 5 | them less than he would if he could speak with eloquence 234 4, 5 | nonsense, and so much the more if the hearer is pleased with 235 4, 5 | and is of service never." If, then, the men who teach 236 4, 5 | his mode of speech. But if a man desire to speak not 237 4, 5 | prove of greater service if he can do both), I would 238 4, 5 | of rhetoric; especially if the men he reads and listens 239 4, 6 | can be called eloquence if it be not suitable to the 240 4, 6 | I could, however, if I had time, show those men 241 4, 6 | ostentatious display of it; and if they had shunned it, they 242 4, 6 | would have done the former; if they had made it prominent, 243 4, 6 | to suggest themselves; as if wisdom were walking out 244 4, 7 | man unlearnedly learned (if I may use the expression) 245 4, 7 | no man think me a fool: if otherwise, yet as a fool 246 4, 7 | are wise. For ye suffer, if a man bring you into bondage, 247 4, 7 | bring you into bondage, if a man devour you, if a man 248 4, 7 | bondage, if a man devour you, if a man take of you, if a 249 4, 7 | you, if a man take of you, if a man exalt himself, if 250 4, 7 | if a man exalt himself, if a man smite you on the face. 251 4, 7 | offended, and I burn not? If I must needs glory, I will 252 4, 7 | next has three members: "if otherwise, yet as a fool 253 4, 7 | members: "for ye suffer, if a man bring you into bondage." 254 4, 7 | three sections (caesa): "if a man devour you, if a man 255 4, 7 | if a man devour you, if a man take of you, if a 256 4, 7 | you, if a man take of you, if a man exalt himself." Next 257 4, 7 | three clauses (membra): if "a man smite you on the 258 4, 7 | this whole passage, as if panting for breath, winds 259 4, 7 | period of two members: "If I must needs glory, I will 260 4, 7 | knowledge," he seems to speak as if granting so much to his 261 4, 7 | he recognized its truth. If he had said, "I am indeed 262 4, 7 | Gentiles. And certainly if we bring forward anything 263 4, 7 | calves out of the herd." If he had so expressed it, 264 4, 7 | shrinking from wisdom. For if, as certain very eloquent 265 4, 7 | and reduced to system, if they had not first had their 266 4, 8 | themselves in the same way, as if putting forward their expositions 267 4, 8 | understand them, or that if what they say should not 268 4, 9 | written in such a style that, if understood, they, so to 269 4, 9 | draw their own readers, and if not understood, give no 270 4, 10 | unlearned employ it. For if our translators did not 271 4, 10 | ossum" instead of "os", if he fear that the latter 272 4, 10 | use at all in speaking, if they do not understand us 273 4, 10 | words that do not teach; and if instead of them he can find 274 4, 10 | take these by preference; if, however, he cannot, either 275 4, 10 | that are not quite pure, if only the substance of his 276 4, 10 | generally shows by its movements if it understands what is said; 277 4, 10 | on to another point. For if a man gives pleasure when 278 4, 10 | the pleasure they give, if the attention be directed 279 4, 10 | itself is already well known, if it be pleasing to the hearers, 280 4, 10 | another man repeat them. And if a man has forgotten anything, 281 4, 10 | on the truth itself, as if it required further explanation; 282 4, 10 | bring it home to the heart. If it appear right to do this, 283 4, 11 | clear what was obscure; yet if this be done without grace 284 4, 11 | service is a golden key, if it cannot open what we want 285 4, 11 | is there to a wooden one if it can, seeing that to open 286 4, 12 | does not understand it. If, however, he is understood, 287 4, 12 | manner of saying it. But if he wishes to delight or 288 4, 12 | action. And as he is pleased if you speak with sweetness 289 4, 12 | elegance, so he is persuaded if he be drawn by your promises, 290 4, 12 | and awed by your threats; If he reject what you condemn, 291 4, 12 | embrace what you commend; if he grieve when you heap 292 4, 12 | point out an object for joy; if he pity those whom you present 293 4, 12 | If however, they do not yet 294 4, 12 | gaining the first two ends if we fail in the third? Neither 295 4, 13 | and praises the eloquence, if he does not yield his consent, 296 4, 13 | attention to what he says? If the truths taught are such 297 4, 13 | manner in which it is said, if it be not so learnt as to 298 4, 13 | to subdue the will. For if a man be not moved by the 299 4, 14 | graceful or dignified even if used to adorn great and 300 4, 15 | and he need not doubt that if he succeed in this object, 301 4, 16 | Now if any one says that we need 302 4, 16 | yet they are applied; and if it be done from a sense 303 4, 17 | in a majestic style:" as if he had taken in also the 304 4, 18 | shall judge the world? And if the world shall be judged 305 4, 18 | that pertain to this life? If, then, ye have judgments 306 4, 18 | Of course, if we were giving men advice 307 4, 19 | Him in some measure! But if He be not worshipped, or 308 4, 19 | He be not worshipped, or if idols, whether they be demons 309 4, 20 | but a man's covenant, yet if it be confirmed, no man 310 4, 20 | promise of none effect. For if the inheritance be of the 311 4, 20 | occur to the hearer to ask, If there is no inheritance 312 4, 20 | reason in these words: "For if there had been a law given 313 4, 20 | discredit on what we say. If, however, the solution of 314 4, 20 | these again still others; if these be all discussed and 315 4, 20 | present to answer it, or lest, if it should occur to a man 316 4, 20 | most beautiful in which, as if paying what was due, things 317 4, 20 | the lusts thereof." Now if the passage were translated 318 4, 20 | This I know, however, that if any one who is skilled in 319 4, 20 | that the other does; but if they do not happen to be 320 4, 20 | careful elaboration of speech. If a brave man be armed with 321 4, 20 | then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be 322 4, 20 | I bear you record, that, if it had been possible, ye 323 4, 21 | redeemed and quickened, if the wine be absent; for 324 4, 21 | put his hand over it, as if to improve by his superior 325 4, 21 | afraid to show thyself? If thou art comely why dost 326 4, 21 | thou hide thy comeliness? If thou art plain, why test 327 4, 21 | man; and thou art angry if he love another, though 328 4, 22 | that the majestic style, if it is to be long continued, 329 4, 24 | If frequent and vehement applause 330 4, 25 | habits and give up evil ones, if they are not so hardened 331 4, 25 | need the vehement style; or if they have already begun 332 4, 26 | But who will listen to him if he do not arrest attention 333 4, 26 | some beauty of style? And if he be not intelligible, 334 4, 26 | style. But who can be moved if he does not understand what 335 4, 26 | who will stay to listen if he receives no pleasure? 336 4, 26 | intelligible and pleasing, if you would be heard with 337 4, 27 | do good to very many more if they lived as they preach. 338 4, 28 | more painful object than if his body too were deformed, 339 4, 28 | lies are the more pitiable if they happen to be eloquent 340 4, 29 | If, however, he cannot do even 341 4, 29 | anything to deliver. Now, if such men take what has been 342 4, 29 | follow their own ways. And if you look closely into the 343 4, 30 | suitable discourse. For if Queen Esther prayed, when


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