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went 1
wept 2
were 147
what 342
whatever 38
whatsoever 5
wheat 1
Frequency    [«  »]
368 his
355 when
343 if
342 what
333 have
314 so
313 from
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

what

    Book, Chapter
1 pref, 0| those who do not understand what is here set down, my answer 2 pref, 0| who think, therefore, that what I have undertaken to write 3 pref, 0| teaches another communicate what he has himself received 4 pref, 0| and did not understand what he read, was not sent by 5 pref, 0| angel who explained to him what he did not understand, nor 6 pref, 0| through speech or writing, what they understand, surely 7 pref, 0| likewise teach not only what they understand, but also 8 pref, 0| his own, except perhaps what is false. All truth is of 9 pref, 0| says, "I am the truth." For what have we that we did not 10 pref, 0| communicates to others what he has learnt himself. Just 11 pref, 0| finds a book, to tell him what is written in it, so the 12 1, arg | it is necessary to know what things we ought to teach 13 1, 1 | He will go on to supply what is yet wanting when once 14 1, 1 | once I have begun to use what He has already given. For 15 1, 1 | use freely and cheerfully what they have received, He will 16 1, 2 | Chap. 2. What a thing is, and what a sign~ 17 1, 2 | 2. What a thing is, and what a sign~ 18 1, 2 | hence may be understood what I call signs: those things, 19 1, 2 | sign is also a thing; for what is not a thing is nothing 20 1, 2 | carefully remember that what we have now to consider 21 1, 2 | consider about things is what they are in themselves, 22 1, 2 | they are in themselves, not what other things they are signs 23 1, 4 | one's disposal to obtain what one desires, if it is a 24 1, 4 | that is, that by means of what is material and temporary 25 1, 6 | Chap. 6. In what sense God is ineffable~ 26 1, 6 | said anything, it is not what I desired to say. How do 27 1, 6 | God is unspeakable? But what I have said, if it had been 28 1, 6 | because if the unspeakable is what cannot be spoken of, it 29 1, 7 | Chap. 7. What all men understand by the 30 1, 7 | that either the heavens, or what appears to be most brilliant 31 1, 7 | shape and form, according to what each man thinks the pattern 32 1, 8 | does not live, and prefer what is living to what is dead; 33 1, 8 | prefer what is living to what is dead; who understand 34 1, 12 | Chap. 12. In what sense the Wisdom of God 35 1, 13 | In what way did He come but this, " 36 1, 13 | we speak, in order that what we leave in our minds may 37 1, 15 | to take it up again. With what assurance, then, is the 38 1, 15 | of their evil deeds. And what tongue can tell, or what 39 1, 15 | what tongue can tell, or what imagination can conceive, 40 1, 15 | His Church, that we may do what He points out as right to 41 1, 17 | thorns barred against us, what could He, who was willing 42 1, 23 | just that it should desire what is beneath it to be obedient 43 1, 24 | mistaken interpretation of what they read: "The flesh lusteth 44 1, 24 | to the spirit, which is what the order of nature demands. 45 1, 24 | because it desires that what it loves should be subject 46 1, 25 | measure of loving, that is, in what measure he may love himself 47 1, 25 | is to be taught, too, in what measure to love his body, 48 1, 25 | plain, but this is just what the error of wicked men 49 1, 26 | that we love ourselves, and what is beneath us but connected 50 1, 27 | so that he neither loves what he ought not to love, nor 51 1, 27 | love, nor fails to love what he ought to love, nor loves 52 1, 28 | to which you would give what could not be given to both. 53 1, 29 | it. Now, if this be so, what does it become us to do 54 1, 29 | cannot take away from us what we love; but we pity them 55 1, 30 | is compelled to admit, what is at once most absurd and 56 1, 31 | love He has towards us. In what way then does He love us? 57 1, 31 | enjoy is either Himself, or what comes from Himself. And 58 1, 31 | at a loss to discover in what way He can love us. ~ 59 1, 32 | chap. 32. In what way God uses man~ 60 1, 33 | chap. 33. In what way man should be enjoyed~ 61 1, 36 | deception the intention to say what is false; and we find plenty 62 1, 37 | love; for he cannot love what he does not believe to exist. 63 1, 39 | in them, that, holding to what is perfect, they do not 64 1, 39 | perfect, they do not seek for what is only in part perfect 65 1, 40 | chap. 40. What manner of reader Scripture 66 1, 40 | both abstain from loving what is unworthy of our love, 67 2, arg | signs. He first defines what a sign is, and shows that 68 2, 1 | attending to anything but what they are in themselves, 69 2, 1 | direction, not to attend to what they are in themselves, 70 2, 1 | they are signs, that is, to what they signify. For a sign 71 2, 2 | conveying into another's mind what the giver of the sign has 72 2, 6 | generally holds in small esteem what is discovered without difficulty. 73 2, 6 | through figures and that what is attended with difficulty 74 2, 6 | at all because they have what they require just beside 75 2, 7 | the knowledge of His will, what He commands us to desire 76 2, 7 | commands us to desire and what to avoid. Now this fear 77 2, 10 | two causes which prevent what is written from being understood: 78 2, 13 | since we do not clearly see what the actual thought is which 79 2, 13 | in their own purity. For what is called a solecism is 80 2, 13 | facts. And in the same way, what is a barbarism but the pronouncing 81 2, 13 | out, to pardon his sins. What then is purity of speech, 82 2, 13 | inhabitant in ipsis?" (And what the land is that they dwell 83 2, 13 | whether it be good or bad: and what cities they be that they 84 2, 13 | Dei fortius est hominum" (What is foolish of God is wiser 85 2, 13 | God is wiser of men, and what is weak of God is stronger 86 2, 16 | Scripture, and telling us what Adam means, what Eve, what 87 2, 16 | telling us what Adam means, what Eve, what Abraham, what 88 2, 16 | what Adam means, what Eve, what Abraham, what Moses, and 89 2, 16 | what Eve, what Abraham, what Moses, and also the names 90 2, 16 | also the names of places, what Jerusalem signifies, or 91 2, 16 | for example, to ascertain what is meant by the fact that 92 2, 20 | either to the worship of what is created or of some part 93 2, 21 | law transfer to her heirs what she had never possessed, 94 2, 22 | equal fortune either in what they do or what they suffer, 95 2, 22 | either in what they do or what they suffer, but often meet 96 2, 22 | same constellation. But what a difference there was between 97 2, 22 | about Jacob or his brother, what does it profit him that 98 2, 23 | lies, but it says, "Even if what they tell you should come 99 2, 23 | fellowship with devils." Now what the apostle has said about 100 2, 25 | the pantomime was dancing, what it was he meant to express, 101 2, 25 | unless some one tells him what these movements mean, he 102 2, 25 | regard to any of them, for what reason, where, when, and 103 2, 26 | chap. 26. What human contrivances we are 104 2, 26 | contrivances we are to adopt, and what we are to avoid~ 105 2, 28 | chap. 28. To what extent history is an aid ~ 106 2, 28 | passing over the Greeks, what a great question our own 107 2, 28 | it is one thing to tell what has been done, another to 108 2, 28 | been done, another to show what ought to be done. History 109 2, 28 | be done. History narrates what has been done, faithfully 110 2, 28 | same kind, aim at teaching what ought to be done or observed, 111 2, 29 | chap. 29. To what extent natural science is 112 2, 29 | found out her age today, what her age was any number of 113 2, 29 | number of years ago, or what will be her age any number 114 2, 29 | bodies. And I have stated what my views are about all this 115 2, 30 | chap. 30. What the mechanical arts contribute 116 2, 30 | not be wholly ignorant of what Scripture means to convey 117 2, 31 | adversary. For there are many of what are called sophisms, inferences 118 2, 31 | talking, the proposition, "What I am, you are not." The 119 2, 32 | must also be false," says what is most true; but he does 120 2, 34 | the former case we learn what is consequent, what is inconsequent, 121 2, 34 | learn what is consequent, what is inconsequent, and what 122 2, 34 | what is inconsequent, and what is incompatible. An example 123 2, 35 | and three are eleven, says what cannot be true under any 124 2, 35 | the fact is not so, says what possibly might have been. 125 2, 35 | division, therefore, of what is false may be perfectly 126 2, 35 | perfectly true, although what is false cannot, of course, 127 2, 36 | used to persuade men of what is false~ 128 2, 36 | used for persuading men of what is false; but as they can 129 2, 37 | the joints and knees. For what he says is true, and one 130 2, 39 | should be given, and in what spirit~ 131 2, 39 | What, then, some men have done 132 2, 39 | without interpretation; and what Eusebius has done in regard 133 2, 39 | history for their solution; what, I say, these men have done 134 2, 40 | And what else have many good and 135 2, 40 | done? Do we not see with what a quantity of gold and silver 136 2, 40 | the service of Christ. For what was done at the time of 137 2, 40 | doubt a type prefiguring what happens now. And this I 138 2, 41 | chap. 41. What kind of spirit is required 139 2, 41 | comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, 140 2, 42 | third book, endeavour to say what the Lord shall be pleased 141 3, 2 | appear to be uncertain in what way it ought to be punctuated 142 3, 2 | consult the context, both what goes before and what comes 143 3, 2 | both what goes before and what comes after, to see which 144 3, 2 | where the apostle says: "What I shall choose I wot not: 145 3, 2 | compellor autem ex duobus" [what I shall choose I wot not: 146 3, 3 | in such a way as to make what follows an answer to this 147 3, 3 | charge of God's elect?" what follows will be put as an 148 3, 3 | where the apostle says, "What shall we say then? That 149 3, 3 | unless after the inquiry, "What shall we say then?" what 150 3, 3 | What shall we say then?" what follows were given as the 151 3, 5 | spirit giveth life." For when what is said figuratively is 152 3, 5 | and does not carry out what is indicated by a proper 153 3, 5 | the eye of the mind above what is corporeal and created, 154 3, 6 | people, differed widely from what it was in the case of the 155 3, 6 | themselves, not knowing to what the signs referred, still 156 3, 7 | adoration of the creature. What difference does it make 157 3, 7 | who knows the gospel knows what I mean. What profit is it 158 3, 7 | gospel knows what I mean. What profit is it to me, then, 159 3, 9 | significant object without knowing what it signifies: he, on the 160 3, 9 | observances he knows to what they refer, and so reveres 161 3, 9 | who does not understand what a sign signifies, but yet 162 3, 10 | nothing blameable except what the men of his own country 163 3, 10 | praise or approval except what is sanctioned by the custom 164 3, 10 | Scripture either enjoins what is opposed to the customs 165 3, 10 | the hearers, or condemns what is not so opposed, and if 166 3, 10 | reference to God. Again, what lust, when unsubdued, does 167 3, 10 | body, is called vice; but what it does to injure another 168 3, 10 | vices. In the same way, what charity does with a view 169 3, 10 | advantage is prudence; but what it does with a view to a 170 3, 12 | has a further meaning in what he does, or is sinful. In 171 3, 12 | therefore, consider carefully what is suitable to times and 172 3, 12 | seeking them, that make what we do either praiseworthy 173 3, 15 | minds and meditate upon what we read till an interpretation 174 3, 16 | to do a kindness. But in what follows, "for in so doing 175 3, 18 | guard against supposing that what in the Old Testament, making 176 3, 19 | propagating the race; and what they themselves, who are 177 3, 21 | but because he knew to what punishment so impious an 178 3, 21 | And with what moderation and self-restraint 179 3, 21 | hence we may understand with what temperance he possessed 180 3, 25 | suppose there is any rule that what a thing signifies by similitude 181 3, 25 | which it is uncertain in what sense they ought to be taken, 182 3, 27 | is founded on truth. For what more liberal and more fruitful 183 3, 28 | evolved of such a kind that what is doubtful in it cannot 184 3, 29 | mean the very opposite of what they say, as for example, 185 3, 29 | indicate the opposite of what the words convey; but either 186 3, 29 | when we ask in a place for what is not there, and get the 187 3, 29 | we mean the opposite of what we say, as in the expression, " 188 3, 29 | for he is a good man." And what illiterate man is there 189 3, 30 | for example, he inquires what we are to understand in 190 3, 30 | communicate it, without jealousy, what is shut shall be laid open, 191 3, 30 | shall be laid open, and what is obscure shall be elucidated, 192 3, 30 | secrets of the law," and not what he does say, "the secret 193 3, 30 | and if he had not said "What is shut shall be laid open," 194 3, 30 | open," he would have said what was true, and he would not, 195 3, 30 | I shall briefly indicate what these seven rules teach 196 3, 33 | to discover in Scripture what escaped Tichonius, who, 197 3, 34 | uneducated people understand what is laid down specially, 198 3, 34 | laid down specially, and what generally, in any given 199 3, 34 | against seeking in the species what he can find much better 200 3, 34 | genus. Take, for example, what the prophet Ezekiel says: " 201 3, 34 | that is here referred to. What immediately follows, too, 202 3, 34 | into your own land," and what he says shortly afterwards, 203 3, 34 | immutable purpose of God; for what the fathers believed would 204 3, 36 | recapitulation, to tell what had before been omitted, 205 3, 36 | the narrative reverts to what had previously been passed 206 3, 37 | winnowing. For example, what is said in Isaiah, "How 207 3, 37 | them accurately, but also, what is especially and before 208 4, arg | mingled, and when and for what purposes they are mingled; 209 4, 2 | trying to persuade men of what is false are to know how 210 4, 2 | unable either to defend what is true, or to refute what 211 4, 2 | what is true, or to refute what is false? That the former, 212 4, 3 | ornaments of speech, you have what is called eloquence or oratory) 213 4, 3 | we must be careful that what we have got to say does 214 4, 3 | as far as they can? And what do we find from the examples 215 4, 4 | of error, both to teach what is right and to refute what 216 4, 4 | what is right and to refute what is wrong, and in the performance 217 4, 4 | to tell the ignorant both what is occurring at present 218 4, 4 | occurring at present and what is probable in the future. 219 4, 4 | they may be diligent to do what they already know, and to 220 4, 5 | the hearer is pleased with what is not worth listening to, 221 4, 5 | the speaker is eloquent what he says must be true. And 222 4, 5 | riches of Scripture, so that what he says in his own words 223 4, 5 | unwholesome sweets. But what is better than wholesome 224 4, 6 | all who truly understand what these writers say, perceive 225 4, 7 | For who would not see what the apostle meant to say, 226 4, 7 | sound asleep must notice what a stream of eloquence flows 227 4, 7 | For what is there that sober ears 228 4, 7 | the invective itself; with what vehemence it throws itself 229 4, 7 | addresses to themselves what it is right the voluptuaries 230 4, 8 | understand them, or that if what they say should not be very 231 4, 10 | and indifference about what sounds well, compared with 232 4, 10 | sounds well, compared with what dearly expresses and conveys 233 4, 10 | or length of vowels? And what advantage is there in purity 234 4, 10 | to ask a question about what he does not understand; 235 4, 10 | movements if it understands what is said; and until some 236 4, 10 | speaker has ascertained that what he says is understood, he 237 4, 10 | hear the truth, and that what he hears he shall understand. 238 4, 11 | not in making people like what they disliked, nor in making 239 4, 11 | disliked, nor in making them do what they shrank from, but in 240 4, 11 | from, but in making clear what was obscure; yet if this 241 4, 11 | the truth in words. For of what service is a golden key, 242 4, 11 | golden key, if it cannot open what we want it to open? Or what 243 4, 11 | what we want it to open? Or what objection is there to a 244 4, 11 | can, seeing that to open what is shut is all we want? 245 4, 12 | of necessity, depends on what we say; the other two on 246 4, 12 | suppose that he has said what he has to say as long as 247 4, 12 | understood; for although what he has said be intelligible 248 4, 12 | thought in any shape no matter what, but for that purpose the 249 4, 12 | your threats; If he reject what you condemn, and embrace 250 4, 12 | you condemn, and embrace what you commend; if he grieve 251 4, 12 | hearers, not telling them what they ought to do, but urging 252 4, 12 | do, but urging them to do what they already know ought 253 4, 12 | needful when people, knowing what they ought to do, do it 254 4, 12 | teach is a necessity. For what men know, it is in their 255 4, 12 | that it is their duty to do what they do not know? On the 256 4, 12 | not give his consent. And what will be the use of gaining 257 4, 13 | any profit from it. For what does it profit a man that 258 4, 13 | gives careful attention to what he says? If the truths taught 259 4, 13 | persuaded of the truth of what is said, it is useless to 260 4, 14 | God avert from His Church what the prophet Jeremiah says 261 4, 14 | love to have it so: and what will ye do in the end thereof?" 262 4, 14 | such terrible madness! For what shall we do in the end thereof? 263 4, 14 | preferable, even though what is said should be less intelligible, 264 4, 14 | truth be spoken, and that what is just, not what is iniquitous, 265 4, 14 | and that what is just, not what is iniquitous, be listened 266 4, 14 | course, cannot be, unless what is true and just be expressed 267 4, 15 | Christian orator, while he says what is just, and holy, and good ( 268 4, 15 | soul to God, to drink in what he is about to pour forth, 269 4, 15 | to be himself filled with what he is about to distribute. 270 4, 15 | of saying them, who knows what it is expedient at a given 271 4, 15 | And who can make us say what we ought, and in the way 272 4, 15 | Take no thought how or what ye shall speak; for it shall 273 4, 15 | given you in that same hour what ye shall speak. For it is 274 4, 16 | need not direct men how or what they should teach, since 275 4, 16 | says, "Your Father knoweth what things ye have need of before 276 4, 16 | Timothy and Titus as to how or what they should teach others. 277 4, 16 | things command and teach?" What these things are, has been 278 4, 16 | and powers," and so on. What then are we to think? Does 279 4, 16 | them directions how and what they should teach? Or are 280 4, 17 | speaking, aims at enforcing what is good, should not despise 281 4, 18 | important; so much so, that even what the preacher says about 282 4, 18 | to secular affairs (and what were these but matters of 283 4, 18 | God is with us, so that what we say is not altogether 284 4, 19 | Himself, or in His works, what a field for beauty and splendour 285 4, 20 | teacher not only to interpret what is obscure, and to unravel 286 4, 20 | cast doubt or discredit on what we say. If, however, the 287 4, 20 | it is useless to disturb what we cannot remove. And besides, 288 4, 20 | beautiful in which, as if paying what was due, things that belong 289 4, 20 | opinion, however, is, that what has been translated to us 290 4, 20 | them He also glorified. What shall we then say to these 291 4, 21 | virginity, but to show of what character those who have 292 4, 21 | corrupting and violating what is God's, thou provest thyself 293 4, 21 | truth continue to exist when what is sincere is polluted, 294 4, 21 | sincere is polluted, and what is true is changed by meretricious 295 4, 21 | stains on their chastity. What folly it is to change the 296 4, 21 | displeasing to herself. And what testimony to thine ugliness 297 4, 22 | excited, we rather lose what we have already gained. 298 4, 23 | importance to determine what style should be alternated 299 4, 23 | should be alternated with what other, and the places where 300 4, 23 | temperate style, no matter what may be the general tone 301 4, 24 | but it was to teach them what they were ignorant of, or 302 4, 24 | or to persuade them of what they thought incredible, 303 4, 24 | incredible, not to make them do what they knew they ought to 304 4, 25 | secure. On the other hand, what the temperate style properly 305 4, 25 | an adequate end; but when what we have to say is good and 306 4, 25 | persuades his hearers that what he says is true; in the 307 4, 25 | he persuades them to do what they are aware they ought 308 4, 25 | elegant and ornate. But what use is there in attaining 309 4, 25 | this style of eloquence what we aim at effecting when 310 4, 26 | For we do not like even what we say in the subdued style 311 4, 26 | Again, why do we enforce what we teach by divine testimony, 312 4, 26 | even in the subdued style, what does he wish but to be believed? 313 4, 26 | after or hold more firmly by what it praises, and to avoid 314 4, 26 | and to avoid or renounce what it condemns. On the other 315 4, 26 | necessary when he admits that what you say is both true and 316 4, 26 | if he does not understand what is said? And who will stay 317 4, 27 | though not in truth, that is, what is right and true in itself 318 4, 27 | Lord Himself, before saying what I have just quoted about 319 4, 27 | compelled them to say what was good, though they did 320 4, 27 | was good, though they did what was evil. And so they followed 321 4, 27 | good to many by preaching what they themselves do not perform; 322 4, 27 | Why do you not do yourself what you bid me do? And thus 323 4, 28 | important than expression. What is meant by strife about 324 4, 28 | words govern him. This is what the apostle says: "Not with 325 4, 28 | the same effect also is what he says to Timothy: "Charging 326 4, 28 | For where, then, would be what he says when he is describing 327 4, 29 | to deliver to the people what has been written by a more 328 4, 29 | deliver. Now, if such men take what has been written with wisdom 329 4, 29 | For those who steal take what does not belong to them, 330 4, 29 | how can they say in words what they deny in deeds? It is 331 4, 29 | works; "that is to say, what ye hear from their lips, 332 4, 29 | from their lips, that do; what ye see in their lives, that 333 4, 29 | it would appear that even what they say, when they say 334 4, 29 | they say, when they say what is good, it is not themselves 335 4, 29 | will and in deed they deny what they say. Hence it happens 336 4, 29 | former draws from himself what does not belong to him, 337 4, 29 | latter receives from another what really belongs to himself. 338 4, 29 | believers, both parties speak what is their own, for God is 339 4, 29 | those who could not compose what they say make it their own 340 4, 30 | the people or to dictate what others will deliver or read 341 4, 30 | again, who are to deliver what others compose for them 342 4, 31 | thanks to God that with what little ability I possess


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