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frigid 1
frigidly 1
frivolous 1
from 313
front 2
frothy 1
fruit 2
Frequency    [«  »]
342 what
333 have
314 so
313 from
311 god
307 all
303 one
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

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    Book, Chapter
1 pref, 0| they may profit not only from reading the works of others 2 pref, 0| sacred writings, but also from themselves opening such 3 pref, 0| our Lord do not withhold from me, while I write, the thoughts 4 pref, 0| assaults), to turn them back from a useful study to the dull 5 pref, 0| have received no assistance from this work themselves, will 6 pref, 0| s great gift, yet it was from human teachers they themselves 7 pref, 0| whom I have lately heard from very respectable and trustworthy 8 pref, 0| who, without any teaching from man, attained a full knowledge 9 pref, 0| Scriptures without any directions from man (and if the fact be 10 pref, 0| by hearing it constantly from childhood, and that any 11 pref, 0| by hearing it spoken, or from a human teacher. Now, then, 12 pref, 0| learn whatever can be learnt from man; and let him who teaches 13 pref, 0| Christ and hear the gospel from His own lips rather than 14 pref, 0| His own lips rather than from those of men. ~ 15 pref, 0| admonished by the voice of God from heaven, was yet sent to 16 pref, 0| received the sacraments from the apostle's hands, but 17 pref, 0| God gave forth no oracles from His human temple, but communicated 18 pref, 0| taught to men by voices from heaven, or through the ministration 19 pref, 0| men never learnt anything from their fellow-men. ~ 20 1, arg | are prevented by our sins from enjoying God; and that our 21 1, 1 | which I have engaged, so far from incurring loss and poverty, 22 1, 3 | sometimes even led away from it; so that, getting entangled 23 1, 3 | even altogether turn back from, the pursuit of the real 24 1, 4 | could not live happily away from our fatherland, and that 25 1, 4 | our thoughts are diverted from that home whose delights 26 1, 4 | mortality. We have wandered far from God; and if we wish to return 27 1, 6 | How do I know this, except from the fact that God is unspeakable? 28 1, 8 | is quite a distinct thing from the life by which it is 29 1, 9 | hand, who sees, but shrinks from this truth, is weak in his 30 1, 9 | weak in his mental vision from dwelling long among the 31 1, 9 | thus men are driven back from their native land by the 32 1, 15 | resurrection of our Lord from the dead, and of His ascension 33 1, 15 | men look for Him to come from heaven as the judge of quick 34 1, 16 | when He has transplanted it from this world to the eternal 35 1, 18 | should repent, and turn from his sins, should be saved 36 1, 22 | good, than when he turns from that to enjoy even himself. 37 1, 22 | whole intelligence upon Him from whom you derive all that 38 1, 22 | no stream to be drawn off from itself by whose diversion 39 1, 23 | far a man may fall away from the truth, he still continues 40 1, 23 | The soul which flies away from the unchangeable Light, 41 1, 24 | habit which it has derived from its parent stock, and which 42 1, 28 | neither of whom had either from need or relationship a greater 43 1, 29 | confer no advantage and from whom we look for none. We 44 1, 29 | either give them or accept from them should tend to that 45 1, 29 | seeing they cannot take away from us what we love; but we 46 1, 29 | more are they separated from Him whom we love. For if 47 1, 30 | certain man who, going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, fell 48 1, 30 | to love God is distinct from that to love our neighbour. 49 1, 31 | must be in need of good from us, and no sane man will 50 1, 31 | either Himself, or what comes from Himself. And no one can 51 1, 34 | who has freed our nature from the bondage of temporal 52 1, 36 | hand, a man draws a meaning from them that may be used for 53 1, 36 | and he is wholly clear from the charge of deception. 54 1, 37 | For if a man has fallen from faith, he must necessarily 55 1, 37 | must necessarily also fall from love; for he cannot love 56 1, 40 | For if our faith is free from all hypocrisy, then we both 57 1, 40 | hypocrisy, then we both abstain from loving what is unworthy 58 2, arg | Scripture spring chiefly from two sources, unknown and 59 2, arg | The difficulty arising from ignorance of signs is to 60 2, 1 | signs are those which, apart from any intention or desire 61 2, 1 | indicates fire. For it is not from any intention of making 62 2, 2 | instinctively and apart from any purpose, or whether 63 2, 2 | of the subject I exclude from the scope of this work as 64 2, 4 | among men, which springs from every man trying to snatch 65 2, 6 | in Scripture which arise from its figurative language~ 66 2, 6 | redeeming those who come to it from all kinds of superstitions, 67 2, 6 | he draws the same meaning from that passage in Canticles, 68 2, 6 | are shorn, which came up from the washing, whereof every 69 2, 6 | Church, tearing men away from their errors, and bringing 70 2, 6 | like fleeces, and coming up from the washing, i.e., from 71 2, 6 | from the washing, i.e., from baptism, and all bearing 72 2, 6 | no such figure were drawn from the sacred books, though 73 2, 6 | seek but do not find suffer from hunger. Those, again, who 74 2, 6 | them often grow languid from satiety. Now weakness from 75 2, 6 | from satiety. Now weakness from either of these causes is 76 2, 7 | has been drawn far away from such a love for God and 77 2, 7 | mind he extricates himself from every form of fatal joy 78 2, 7 | things, and turning away from these, fixes his affection 79 2, 7 | upon this object shining from afar, and has felt that 80 2, 7 | disturbs him with base desires, from the filth it has contracted. 81 2, 7 | that he will not step aside from the truth, either for the 82 2, 7 | the beginning of wisdom. From that beginning, then, till 83 2, 8 | are ascribed to Solomon from a certain resemblance of 84 2, 9 | in doing so draw examples from the plainer expressions 85 2, 10 | signs prevent Scripture from being understood~ 86 2, 10 | prevent what is written from being understood: its being 87 2, 11 | translations of the Scriptures from Hebrew into Greek can be 88 2, 12 | is useful. Errors arising from ambiguous words~ 89 2, 12 | blood. Again, that passage from the same prophet Isaiah: " 90 2, 13 | learned man, often departs from the meaning of his author, 91 2, 13 | knowledge of those languages from which the Scriptures are 92 2, 13 | according to a different rule from that which those of our 93 2, 13 | word in a different way from that in which those who 94 2, 13 | we cannot now take away from the lips of the people who 95 2, 13 | surely takes away nothing from the meaning. Yet a more 96 2, 13 | stronger than men) is not free from ambiguity, even though it 97 2, 13 | even though it be free from solecism. For whether "hominibus" 98 2, 14 | make inquiry about them from men who speak those tongues, 99 2, 14 | those which they have learnt from Scripture, but which are 100 2, 15 | Hebrew in a different form from that in which these men 101 2, 15 | race were unwilling, either from religious scruple or from 102 2, 15 | from religious scruple or from jealousy, to make known 103 2, 15 | if any perplexity arises from the diversities of the Latin 104 2, 16 | Scripture is accustomed to draw from that animal, so ignorance 105 2, 16 | numbers, too, prevents us from understanding things that 106 2, 16 | we must abstain and fast from all joy in time, for the 107 2, 16 | often shuts out the reader from this instruction. ~ 108 2, 16 | explained some metaphors from the difference between the 109 2, 17 | recollect the name) ordered from each of three artists a 110 2, 17 | should select and purchase from him. It so happened that 111 2, 18 | despised even though it come from a profane source~ 112 2, 18 | if we can derive anything from it that is of use for the 113 2, 21 | Nor can we exclude from this kind of superstition 114 2, 21 | and Augustus Caesar; and from this instance any one who 115 2, 22 | fate of those who are born from such an observation, is 116 2, 23 | against our return. As, then, from the stars which God created 117 2, 23 | their own fancy, so also from things that are born, or 118 2, 24 | when writing to a Greek from that in which he uses it 119 2, 24 | of no significance apart from the previous arrangement 120 2, 25 | remembered by many old men from whom we have frequently 121 2, 25 | peculiarly man's own and derived from himself than, anything that 122 2, 27 | pointed out to us, or infer from experience. ~ 123 2, 28 | Anything, then, that we learn from history about the chronology 124 2, 28 | shadow of doubt might arise from another source, can be ascertained 125 2, 28 | clearly and more certainly from a comparison of profane 126 2, 28 | compelled to admire and praise, from the books of Plato because ( 127 2, 28 | even Pythagoras himself, from whose successors these men 128 2, 28 | said that was good and true from our literature, than that 129 2, 28 | Lord Jesus Christ learnt from the writings of Plato, a 130 2, 29 | already set aside as distinct from the lawful and free kind 131 2, 29 | it will remove the pain from your stomach; and another 132 2, 29 | it will remove the pain from your stomach. In the former 133 2, 29 | because one may go back from the present position and 134 2, 29 | drawing any information from them as to our own acts 135 2, 30 | teaches us to infer the future from the past. For no man who 136 2, 30 | figures of speech derived from these arts. ~ 137 2, 31 | object of making the person from whose error these consequences 138 2, 31 | inferences followed legitimately from the opinion of those who 139 2, 31 | conclusions may be drawn not only from true but from false propositions, 140 2, 31 | drawn not only from true but from false propositions, the 141 2, 32 | reasoning I have quoted from the Apostle Paul proceeds. 142 2, 32 | wished to overthrow. Next, from this antecedent, the assertion, 143 2, 33 | inferences may be drawn from valid seasonings, and vice 144 2, 33 | true and valid inference from the false admission. Thus, 145 2, 35 | s device, but is evolved from the reason of things. For 146 2, 37 | we derive more pleasure from them as exhibitions of truth, 147 2, 38 | inquire after the source from which those things which 148 2, 38 | derive their truth, and from which those others which 149 2, 38 | unchangeableness, and who, mounting up from bodily appearances to the 150 2, 38 | and love of the one God from whom he knows that all things 151 2, 39 | withdraw their attention from such institutions of men 152 2, 40 | are not only not to shrink from it, but to claim it for 153 2, 40 | claim it for our own use from those who have unlawful 154 2, 40 | of Israel hated and fled from, but also vessels and ornaments 155 2, 40 | the leadership of Christ from the fellowship of the heathen, 156 2, 40 | separates himself in spirit from the miserable fellowship 157 2, 40 | men, ought to take away from them, and to devote to their 158 2, 41 | its length by the part from the ground up to the crossbar 159 2, 41 | on which the whole body from the head downwards is fixed, 160 2, 41 | its height by the part from the crossbar to the top 161 2, 41 | of the riches brought out from Egypt. "Purge me with hyssop," 162 2, 41 | show that it is purifying from pride that is indicated 163 2, 42 | knowledge which is gathered from the books of the heathen 164 2, 42 | whatever man may have learnt from other sources, if it is 165 3, arg | signs ambiguity may arise from the punctuation, the pronunciation, 166 3, 1 | happen however, that either from the greatness of his intellect, 167 3, 2 | faith which he has gathered from the plainer passages of 168 3, 2 | passages of Scripture, and from the authority of the Church, 169 3, 2 | therefore must be decided from the context. It is where 170 3, 2 | let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh 171 3, 2 | let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh 172 3, 2 | let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh], 173 3, 3 | bone [os meum] was not hid from Thee, which Thou didst make 174 3, 5 | customary offerings of victims from the flock, and of the fruits 175 3, 6 | people, differed widely from what it was in the case 176 3, 6 | Jews did was God, or came from God. But those who did believe, 177 3, 6 | But those who did believe, from among whom the first Church 178 3, 7 | be anything the more free from the burden and the livery 179 3, 8 | chap. 8. The Jews liberated from their bondage in one way, 180 3, 8 | signs, it not only freed from their slavery to such signs, 181 3, 8 | the gentiles were turned from the corruption of a multitude 182 3, 9 | wrongly, to draw the neck from under the yoke of bondage 183 3, 20 | have restrained themselves from implacable hatred towards 184 3, 25 | found to be drawn either from like objects or from objects 185 3, 25 | either from like objects or from objects having some affinity. ~ 186 3, 25 | living bread which came down from heaven;" in a bad, "Bread 187 3, 25 | Scriptures passing away from the Jews and coming to the 188 3, 26 | Now from the places where the sense 189 3, 27 | danger if it can be shown from other passages of Scripture 190 3, 27 | draws a different meaning from the words, but one that 191 3, 27 | sound doctrine, he is free from blame so long as he is supported 192 3, 28 | by indubitable evidence from Scripture, it remains for 193 3, 29 | these figures of speech from other writings, can imagine 194 3, 29 | For the written characters from which grammar itself gets 195 3, 29 | fish, and yet gets its name from fish? And this is the figure 196 3, 29 | a grove is called lucus from its want of light; or it 197 3, 30 | required which are so far from being embraced in this number 198 3, 30 | pathways of light, be preserved from going astray." Now, if he 199 3, 30 | no more may be expected from it than it really contains. 200 3, 31 | when a transition is made from the head to the body or 201 3, 31 | the head to the body or from the body to the head, and 202 3, 32 | persons altogether different from the former; but as the two 203 3, 33 | that it did not come to us from God; not keeping in mind 204 3, 33 | brethren, and love with faith, from God the Father and the Lord 205 3, 33 | gift of God, when he learns from this passage, and believes, 206 3, 34 | transition at that point from the species to the genus, 207 3, 34 | eyes. For I will take you from among the heathen, and gather 208 3, 34 | and ye shall be clean: from all your filthiness, and 209 3, 34 | all your filthiness, and from all your idols, will I cleanse 210 3, 34 | God. I will also save you from all your uncleannesses." 211 3, 34 | Now the heart of flesh from which the apostle's expression, " 212 3, 34 | point out as distinguished from the stony heart by the possession 213 3, 34 | therefore, is distinguished from the carnal Israel which 214 3, 36 | do not understand this, from applying the rule here spoken 215 3, 36 | the garden, as now appears from the order of the narrative 216 3, 36 | to tell how it was, that from having one language in common, 217 3, 36 | of Sodom it rained fire from heaven, and destroyed them 218 3, 37 | Church, until they depart from this life, or until the 219 3, 37 | until the chaff is separated from the wheat at the last great 220 3, 37 | Isaiah, "How he is fallen from heaven, Lucifer, son of 221 3, 37 | dust which the wind blows from the face of the earth. ~ 222 3, 37 | labour to understand it, from some more, from some less, 223 3, 37 | understand it, from some more, from some less, just as men have 224 3, 37 | men have got more or less from God of the gifts of intellect, 225 3, 37 | understanding;" and it is from Him they have received their 226 4, arg | sought in earnest prayer from God, though we are not to 227 4, arg | examples, selected both from Scripture and from early 228 4, arg | both from Scripture and from early teachers of the Church, 229 4, 1 | need not look for any such from me. Not that I think such 230 4, 3 | oratory) may be learnt apart from these writings of mine, 231 4, 3 | themselves did not shrink from sayings any one who cannot 232 4, 3 | learning words and phrases from those who do speak, why 233 4, 3 | can? And what do we find from the examples themselves 234 4, 3 | of the faults, they will, from being accustomed to correct 235 4, 5 | wisdom which comes down from the Father of Lights, how 236 4, 5 | gain strength and power from the confirming testimony 237 4, 6 | above that of others (not from empty inflation, but from 238 4, 6 | from empty inflation, but from solid merit) as it seems 239 4, 6 | characters, and to guide us from this world of wickedness 240 4, 7 | of true eloquence drawn from the epistles of Paul and 241 4, 7 | apostles who had gone out from the Jews, and had been trying 242 4, 7 | delighted and affected. For, from the place where I commenced 243 4, 7 | the passages I have quoted from the apostle's writings, 244 4, 7 | of eloquence, we take it from those epistles which even 245 4, 7 | so, quoting principally from the book of that prophet 246 4, 7 | herdsman, and was called by God from that occupation, and sent 247 4, 7 | follow the translation made from the Hebrew into Latin by 248 4, 7 | unto Calneh, and see; and from thence go ye to Hamath the 249 4, 7 | least, who would have shrunk from raving like madmen? ~ 250 4, 7 | he says, "and see, and from thence go ye to Hamath the 251 4, 7 | couches; that eat the lamb from the flock, and the calves 252 4, 7 | couches, who eat the lamb from the flock, and calves out 253 4, 7 | gluttony: "who eat the lamb from the flock, and the calves 254 4, 7 | distinguish the music of the wise from the music of the voluptuary, 255 4, 7 | who stands out illustrious from among his brethren, both 256 4, 7 | in wisdom and eloquence from the divine mind; wisdom 257 4, 7 | eloquence not shrinking from wisdom. For if, as certain 258 4, 8 | some examples of eloquence from those writings of theirs 259 4, 8 | converted to piety or shut out from a knowledge of the mysteries, 260 4, 8 | knowledge of the mysteries, from one or other of these reasons 261 4, 9 | conversations, we must not shrink from the duty of bringing the 262 4, 10 | translators did not shrink from saying, "Non congregabo 263 4, 10 | unlearned audience shrink from using "ossum" instead of " 264 4, 10 | will derive pleasure even from hearing another man repeat 265 4, 11 | them do what they shrank from, but in making clear what 266 4, 12 | objects of pity, and shrink from those whom you set before 267 4, 13 | without deriving any profit from it. For what does it profit 268 4, 14 | pleasure. But may God avert from His Church what the prophet 269 4, 14 | which is the more terrible from its purity, and the more 270 4, 14 | purity, and the more crushing from its solidity! Assuredly 271 4, 14 | no pleasure is derived from that species of eloquence 272 4, 16 | makes him ready to learn from Himself, that God who is 273 4, 16 | applied; and if it be done from a sense of duty, it is esteemed 274 4, 18 | moderate things get their name from modus (a measure); and it 275 4, 18 | addressed to the people from the place of authority, 276 4, 18 | viz., that all lines drawn from the centre to the circumference 277 4, 18 | truths which deliver us from eternal misery and bring 278 4, 19 | is, and urge men to flee from it. ~ 279 4, 20 | the various styles drawn from Scripture~ 280 4, 20 | the two covenants; the one from the Mount Sinai, which gendereth 281 4, 20 | to the original question from which he set out. It is, 282 4, 20 | away none of the weight from these divine and authoritative 283 4, 20 | our prophets were so far from being deficient in the musical 284 4, 20 | in the musical training from which this harmony we speak 285 4, 20 | style of speech differs from the temperate style just 286 4, 20 | us. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall 287 4, 20 | shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is 288 4, 21 | the various styles, drawn from the teachers of the church, 289 4, 21 | custom handed down to us from the Lord, and to do nothing 290 4, 21 | the message he had heard from God, that, though thousands 291 4, 21 | would deliver His people from their enemies, he brought 292 4, 21 | celebrated encomium on virginity from Cyprian: "Now our discourse 293 4, 21 | examples of the majestic style from their treatment of a subject 294 4, 21 | carefully-chosen colours, and then from stains on their features 295 4, 21 | those of a painting, and from fear of incurring their 296 4, 21 | victim of a pander shrinks from acting the pander's part, 297 4, 22 | attention; but when we pass from one style to another, the 298 4, 22 | prevent the hearer's attention from cooling or becoming languid. 299 4, 22 | like the sea. It follows from this, that the majestic 300 4, 23 | with greater brilliance from the dark background. Again, 301 4, 24 | was dissuading the people from that civil, or worse than 302 4, 24 | command to root out and drive from their hearts and lives an 303 4, 24 | been handed down to them from their fathers and their 304 4, 25 | From all this we may conclude, 305 4, 26 | very acute observations from a quarter whence nothing 306 4, 26 | simplicity, does not hinder it from crushing its adversary by 307 4, 27 | which belonged to another, from preaching their own doctrines. ~ 308 4, 29 | steal His words every one from his neighbour. For those 309 4, 29 | is to say, what ye hear from their lips, that do; what 310 4, 29 | speak good things?" And from this it would appear that 311 4, 29 | place, the former draws from himself what does not belong 312 4, 29 | and the latter receives from another what really belongs 313 4, 30 | to render thanks to Him from whom they know such blessings


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