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St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

(Hapax - words occurring once)


132-crave | creat-handi | hangi-paral | pardo-stead | steep-zepha

     Book, Chapter
1 2, 13 | my holiness flourish Ps.132:18), surely takes away nothing 2 2, 41 | chap. 41. What kind of spirit is 3 2, 42 | chap. 42. Sacred Scripture compared 4 2, 12 | does not pass away, but abides, our understanding being 5 1, 39 | Therefore the apostle says: "Now abideth faith, hope, charity, these 6 2, 12 | consists in sight, and is abiding, but faith feeds us as babes, 7 2, 13 | or as the plural of the ablative, does not appear, unless 8 4, 21 | when crucified, should abolish in His flesh the sins of 9 4, 5 | must beware of the man who abounds in eloquent nonsense, and 10 2, 39 | chap. 39. To which of the above-mentioned studies attention should 11 4, 18 | tone, so frequent and so abrupt, testify to the depth of 12 3, 3 | the barbarism, "non est absconditum a te ossum meum", than have 13 4, 21 | quickened, if the wine be absent; for by the wine is the 14 3, 18 | there is no difficulty in abstaining unless when there is lust 15 1, 24 | scourge their bodies by abstinence and toil, those who do this 16 pref, 0| without falling into any gross absurdity. And so although it will 17 2, 42 | find there in much greater abundance things that are to be found 18 4, 21 | in them flourishes more abundantly; and in proportion as bright 19 3, 12 | them; for lust not only abuses to wicked ends the customs 20 4, 20 | living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your 21 3, 37 | intellect, or as they have access to more or fewer external 22 4, 14 | I think, came there by accident, or else was inserted designedly 23 1, 28 | regard to those who, by the accidents of time, or place, or circumstance, 24 2, 16 | the annual revolutions are accomplished in periods numbering four 25 1, 1 | strength; but since my hope of accomplishing the work rests on Him who 26 4, 20 | all the day long, we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter.) 27 3, 4 | brethren] is in the vocative or accusative case, and it is not contrary 28 3, 21 | be put to death, he was accused of his crime by a prophet, 29 3, 21 | appetite is called even by the accusing prophet, a guest. For he 30 2, 18 | while he recognizes and acknowledges the truth, even in their 31 2, 30 | cursory knowledge is to be acquired, not with a view to practicing 32 2, 16 | a narrow hole, and thus acquires new strength how appropriately 33 4, 3 | and the proper means for acquiring rhetorical skill~ 34 4, 23 | reference to the condemnation or acquittal of any one, or to obtaining 35 4, 21 | of a pander shrinks from acting the pander's part, and though 36 4, 20 | exceedingly powerful and active, the reasoner finds it impossible 37 1, 29 | is fond of a particular actor, and enjoys his art as a 38 2, 16 | ignorance of the beryl or the adamant often shuts the doors of 39 1, 11 | not Wisdom condescended to adapt Himself to our weakness, 40 4, 20 | no man disannulleth, or addeth thereto. Now to Abraham 41 3, 25 | case. The examples I have adduced are indeed by no means doubtful 42 4, 19 | praising Him whom no one can adequately praise, though there is 43 4, 25 | compliance, or in making them adhere to it more tenaciously. 44 3, 5 | to the flesh by a blind adherence to the letter. For he who 45 3, 4 | juro "gloriam", the form of adjuration appearing in the Greek without 46 pref, 0| alien race, for ruling and administering the affairs of the great 47 4, 14 | letters, a style which is admired without effort, is sought 48 1, 33 | increase." And the angel admonisheth the man who is about to 49 2, 26 | luxury and superfluity, to be adopted, especially the forms of 50 3, 7 | reference to the worship and adoration of the creature. What difference 51 3, 6 | meaning, they had learnt to adore the One Eternal God,) were 52 4, 14 | dignified even if used to adorn great and fundamental truths. 53 3, 14 | the other necessities and adornments of human life, appear sinful 54 4, 21 | provest thyself worse than an adulteress. The fact that thou considerest 55 4, 21 | pledged your vows. Ye who are advanced in age, exercise control 56 3, 30 | of the heresies which he advances as a Donatist. And now I 57 4, 28 | does not mean that, when adversaries oppose the truth, we are 58 3, 19 | it appear prosperous or adverse, will carry them into the 59 1, 15 | His Spirit, that in the adversities of this life we may retain 60 2, 28 | using the boldness of an adviser, not the fidelity of a narrator. ~ 61 2, 7 | this object shining from afar, and has felt that owing 62 4, 20 | which is good. Be kindly affectioned one to another with brotherly 63 3, 25 | from objects having some affinity. ~ 64 3, 3 | that of a man who gives an affirmative answer, so that "out of 65 3, 21 | though he was dreadfully afflicted for him while he was sick, 66 4, 26 | victoriously defended, naturally affords? Wherefore the Christian 67 4, 10 | singular of "ora", seeing that African ears have no quick perception 68 4, 16 | sound doctrine: that the aged men be sober," and so on. 69 3, 33 | originated, or at least greatly aggravated, the Pelagian heresy. And 70 2, 7 | soul, which is violently agitated, and disturbs him with base 71 2, 24 | as, further, men did not agree upon them as signs because 72 4, 26 | you say is both true and agreeable, and yet is unwilling to 73 2, 23 | observances, many things turn out agreeably to their observances, and 74 4, 7 | divine mind; wisdom not aiming at eloquence, yet eloquence 75 2, 4 | as they strike upon the air, and last no longer than 76 4, 29 | Nor are such men to be alarmed by the words of Jeremiah 77 3, 35 | Church is a sojourner among aliens); or when multiplied into 78 3, 18 | these last had been still alive at the advent of our Lord, 79 3, 11 | obscure the sense, and make it allegorical or enigmatical, which is 80 3, 18 | the Old Testament, making allowance for the condition of those 81 3, 18 | anything was enjoyed or allowed~ 82 4, 21 | outward act, the broth to the allurement of lust within, as it is 83 pref, 0| prayers were heard and his alms had in remembrance, was 84 4, 21 | the woman who desires to alter her natural appearance pronounces 85 4, 20 | retaining the words he finds and altering their arrangement), he will 86 4, 22 | be unvaried, but should alternate at intervals with the other 87 4, 23 | determine what style should be alternated with what other, and the 88 4, 23 | this style must be used in alternation with the other two styles 89 4, 20 | killed; as sorrowful, yet alway rejoicing; as poor, yet 90 2, 16 | three disciples looked on in amazement. Next, we have to inquire 91 4, 7 | follows a rounded sentence (ambitus sive circuitus) which the 92 2, 39 | Christians), but are either lost amid the crowds of the careless, 93 4, 14 | pendulous and intertwined, creep amongst the supporting reeds, the 94 4, 18 | loss or gain, whether the amount be great or small, should 95 4, 7 | who has bestowed upon them ample territory, to show their 96 1, 25 | to suffer both pains and amputations of some of their limbs that 97 2, 20 | class we must place also all amulets and cures which the medical 98 4, 11 | But as there is a certain analogy between learning and eating, 99 4, 7 | instructed by carefully analysing it as kindled by reciting 100 4, 24 | their fathers and their ancestors of generations long gone 101 2, 21 | distant ages, only that his ancestress Venus had given her name 102 1, 19 | former habits, is created anew after a better pattern, 103 3, 11 | and wrath, tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man 104 2, 29 | reference to celebrating the anniversary of our Lord's passion, is 105 2, 7 | view to avoid any of the annoyances which beset this life. Such 106 4, 24 | armed with stones, fought annually at a certain season of the 107 3, 12 | the footsteps of Christ, anoints His feet (so to speak) with 108 4, 1 | after a preface, in which I answered by anticipation those who 109 4, 20 | Mount Sinai in Arabia, and answereth to Jerusalem which now is, 110 4, 21 | unblemished, the image of God answering to the holiness of the Lord, 111 4, 20 | the law given? he himself anticipates this objection and asks, " 112 4, 1 | in which I answered by anticipation those who were likely to 113 2, 29 | It involves also regular anticipations of the future, not in the 114 4, 20 | contrasted words arranged antithetically, or of words rising gradually 115 pref, 0| contempt by the Egyptian monk Antony, a just and holy man, who, 116 2, 22 | chart, which he looks into anxiously but in vain? And so these 117 pref, 0| that it can be of no use to anybody. There is a third class 118 4, 31 | chap. 31. Apology for the length of the work~ 119 2, 38 | mounting up from bodily appearances to the mind of man, and 120 3, 32 | shall cut him asunder and appoint him his portion with the 121 3, 6 | though they did not clearly apprehend their spiritual meaning, 122 4, 7 | oppressive king is announced as approaching, when it is added: "Ye that 123 2, 40 | when going out of Egypt appropriated to themselves, designing 124 4, 20 | blamed: but in all things approving ourselves as the ministers 125 4, 14 | are fond of this style are apt to think that men who do 126 4, 20 | Hagar is Mount Sinai in Arabia, and answereth to Jerusalem 127 2, 22 | certain signs of things being arbitrarily fixed upon by the presumption 128 1, 38 | hand, is loved with greater ardour when it is in possession 129 1, 1 | the meaning; a great and arduous undertaking, and one that, 130 3, 33 | with this heresy, which has arisen in our time, and has given 131 2, 16 | when it returned to the ark, is that we know both that 132 4, 26 | strength of its own right arm. How explain the frequent 133 2, 20 | when friends are walking arm-in-arm, a stone, or a dog, or a 134 3, 35 | of the night in which He arose we join the Lord's day which 135 2, 39 | on intercourse with those around us. I think, however, there 136 4, 26 | listen to him if he do not arrest attention by some beauty 137 2, 36 | effective, and that variety arrests men's attention without 138 1, 33 | man and the proud angel arrogate this to themselves, and 139 2, 20 | dancing in a fashion certain articles, not with reference to the 140 3, 29 | signs of sounds made by the articulate voice with which we speak. 141 4, 21 | insult to God the great artifices? For, granting that thou 142 4, 21 | completed; surely the first artist would feel deeply insulted, 143 1, arg | died, and rose again, and ascended into heaven, taking to Himself 144 2, 7 | beset this life. Such a son ascends to wisdom which is the seventh 145 2, 16 | anxious, for example, to ascertain what is meant by the fact 146 3, 11 | interpreting phrases which seem to ascribe severity to God and the 147 4, 7 | speak of himself though he ascribes this as folly to himself 148 4, 10 | any one has the power of asking a question; but when all 149 2, 6 | greater delight under that aspect than if no such figure were 150 1, 23 | unchangeable God. But when it aspires to lord it even over those 151 2, 20 | dog sometimes makes his assailant run in hot haste for a real 152 2, 16 | present its whole body to its assailants how much light it throws 153 pref, 0| forearmed against their assaults), to turn them back from 154 4, 10 | sanguinibus" (I shall not assemble their assemblies of blood), 155 4, 10 | shall not assemble their assemblies of blood), because they 156 4, 14 | In a serious assembly, moreover, such as is spoken 157 2, 31 | you are not." The other assents, for the proposition is 158 2, 32 | from this antecedent, the assertion, viz., that there is no 159 4, 21 | diligent student may by assiduous reading, intermingled with 160 3, 26 | spiritual armour of this kind to assign faith to the shield only; 161 4, 13 | no small place has been assigned in eloquence to the art 162 2, 28 | chronology of past times assists us very much in understanding 163 4, 25 | these three forms it may assume, is to speak persuasively, 164 4, 7 | Suppose those men who, assuming to be themselves learned 165 1, 14 | medicine, Wisdom, was by His assumption of humanity adapted to our 166 3, 34 | Judea also, and Egypt, and Assyria, or any other nation you 167 pref, 0| to him on the spot by the astonished bystanders. ~ 168 2, 21 | chap. 21. Superstition of astrologers~ 169 3, 32 | he comes, "shall cut him asunder and appoint him his portion 170 4, 26 | that these three qualities attach themselves respectively 171 2, 16 | has no ordinary sacredness attached to it on account of the 172 2, 11 | more sacred authority that attaches to it, as for example, Amen 173 4, 24 | anything of the sort was attempted there. In many other cases 174 4, 10 | and all faces are turned attentively upon him, it is neither 175 4, 21 | that they may not prove attractive to men, paint their faces 176 3, 30 | true, and he would not, by attributing more than is warranted by 177 4, 21 | carry off with impunity so audacious an act of wickedness, such 178 2, 40 | the Platonists, have said aught that is true and in harmony 179 2, 21 | and Sextilis to July and August, naming them in honour of 180 2, 21 | the men Julius Caesar and Augustus Caesar; and from this instance 181 2, 16 | annual in the spring, summer, autumn, and winter months. Now 182 4, 16 | their fellow-men are of no avail except God gives them virtue ( 183 3, 11 | Scripture to God or His saints, avails to the pulling down of the 184 2, 20 | that the boys are sometimes avenged by the dogs; for frequently 185 2, 36 | men's minds to desire and aversion. And men rather found out 186 4, 14 | with pleasure. But may God avert from His Church what the 187 4, 21 | not envious of her equals; avoiding boastfulness, following 188 1, arg | renewed by grace, we may await with hope the resurrection 189 3, 14 | folly, nor were able to awake into the light of wisdom 190 4, 25 | them to do what they are aware they ought to do, but do 191 4, 2 | their power of speech to awe, to melt, to enliven, and 192 4, 12 | drawn by your promises, and awed by your threats; If he reject 193 2, 12 | abiding, but faith feeds us as babes, upon milk, in the cradles 194 4, 23 | brilliance from the dark background. Again, whatever may be 195 3, 21 | subdued; and when he was baffled in this design, he mourned 196 3, 19 | either being caught by the bait of praise, or pierced by 197 4, 26 | expression, and by a rhythm and balance of style which is not ostentatiously 198 2, 23 | superstition, springing out of a baleful fellowship between men and 199 1, 14 | and does not fit the same bandage to all limbs, but puts like 200 1, 14 | following are, as it were, bandages made in the same shape as 201 2, 23 | these superstitious and baneful modes of divination, many 202 3, 12 | strip the body naked at a banquet among the drunken and licentious, 203 3, 12 | theirs anointed in those banquets which we abhor. For the 204 2, 6 | of God, have come to the baptismal font laying down the burdens 205 2, 23 | strive only to shut and bar the door against our return. 206 pref, 0| understanding of them; or by that barbarian slave Christianus, of whom 207 4, 24 | that this horrible and barbarous custom (which had been handed 208 3, 12 | after the manner of Esau, or barley after the manner of oxen. 209 4, 14 | deeds of wickedness and baseness which wicked and base men 210 1, 1 | were satisfied, they filled baskets with the fragments that 211 3, 12 | a sin to be naked in the baths. ~ 212 3, 7 | the resounding sea, whose beard is the mighty ocean flowing 213 3, 19 | the filth of a still more beastly excess, such men do not 214 4, 21 | considerest thyself adorned and beautified by such arts is an impeachment 215 2, 20 | the house; to go back to bed if any one should sneeze 216 2, 17 | Jupiter, therefore, that begat the nine Muses, but three 217 2, 28 | for our sakes, the only begotten Son of God, by whom all 218 3, 25 | bad sense, "The serpent beguiled Eve through his subtilty." 219 1, 30 | Psalmist says in his prayer, "I behaved myself as though he had 220 3, 29 | when we say to a man who is behaving badly, "You are doing well." 221 4, 21 | art not immodest in thy behaviour towards men, and that thou 222 2, 2 | are those which living beings mutually exchange for the 223 1, 7 | God. And so all concur in believing that God is that which excels 224 3, 25 | for example, "Out of his belly shall flow rivers of living 225 3, 2 | therefore these promises, dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves 226 4, 6 | merit) as it seems to fall below them. Where, however, I 227 2, 30 | for example, a house, a bench, a dish, and other things 228 3, 13 | great men to some prudent or benevolent end, either directly, as 229 2, 16 | metaphorically; and ignorance of the beryl or the adamant often shuts 230 2, 13 | concern to the man who is beseeching God, in any way at all that 231 2, 7 | of the annoyances which beset this life. Such a son ascends 232 4, 24 | which like an enemy was besieging their hearts, or rather 233 1, 15 | conceive, the reward He will bestow at the last, when we consider 234 2, 24 | Latin. And the same sound, beta, which is the name of a 235 2, 1 | other emotion of the mind is betrayed by the telltale countenance, 236 2, 7 | Scripture, compel him to bewail his condition. For the knowledge 237 3, 16 | man's pride is cured who bewails that he has been the enemy 238 1, 14 | degree of neatness in the binding, in addition to its mere 239 2, 21 | account of their attention to birthdays, but are now commonly called 240 1, 2 | read Moses cast into the bitter waters to make them sweet, 241 4, 5 | often swallow wholesome bitters, so we must always avoid 242 3, 12 | several wives was at that time blameless: and for the same reason 243 pref, 0| classes had better give up blaming me, and pray instead that 244 1, 9 | native land by the contrary blasts of evil habits, and pursue 245 4, 20 | Jesus. Where is then the blessedness ye spake of? For I bear 246 4, 30 | from whom they know such blessings come, so that all the praise 247 1, 38 | swallowed up in that perfect bliss to which we shall come: 248 2, 17 | without an instrument; or by blowing, as in the case of trumpets 249 3, 19 | the more widely they are blown about on the tongue of flattery, 250 3, 37 | the dust which the wind blows from the face of the earth. ~ 251 4, 21 | men that pity would not blush for, nor modesty pass by. 252 2, 7 | good hope makes a man not boastful, but sorrowful. And in this 253 4, 21 | of her equals; avoiding boastfulness, following reason, loving 254 pref, 0| last place, every one who boasts that he, through divine 255 2, 16 | the right-hand side of the boat. And in the same way, many 256 2, 20 | class belong, but with a bolder reach of deception, the 257 2, 28 | done or observed, using the boldness of an adviser, not the fidelity 258 2, 13 | isti insidunt super eam, si bona est an nequam; et quae sunt 259 2, 40 | Greeks out of number have borrowed! And prior to all these, 260 1, 18 | he is received into the bosom of the Church. For he who 261 2, 17 | state, and that all were bought to be dedicated in the temple 262 2, 16 | is indicated by the olive branch which the dove brought with 263 4, 20 | elaboration of speech. If a brave man be armed with weapons 264 4, 21 | examples of virtue; endure bravely, advance in spirituality, 265 4, 28 | vehemently, without any breach of modesty, because his 266 4, 14 | Assuredly it is "a hammer that breaketh the rock in pieces." For 267 1, 1 | increased in the very act of breaking it, so those thoughts which 268 1, 36 | to him. Now every man who breaks faith is unjust. Either, 269 3, 31 | He has decked me as a bridegroom with ornaments, and adorned 270 2, 22 | that the very smallest and briefest moment of time that separates 271 4, 21 | abundantly; and in proportion as bright virginity adds to her numbers, 272 4, 21 | holiness of the Lord, the brighter portion of the flock of 273 1, 7 | themselves something of dazzling brightness, and think of it vaguely 274 4, 23 | were shine out with greater brilliance from the dark background. 275 1, 7 | what appears to be most brilliant in the heavens, or the universe 276 2, 41 | the bones which Thou hast broken may rejoice." ~ 277 2, 29 | one thing to say: If you bruise down this herb and drink 278 3, 5 | which raises it above the brutes, the intelligence namely, 279 3, 26 | Take hold of shield and buckler and stand up for mine help," 280 2, 3 | of words. For though the bugle and the flute and the lyre 281 1, 36 | interpretation of Scripture which builds us up in love is not perniciously 282 4, 7 | more completely they seem buried under figures of speech, 283 4, 14 | that is false, but which buries small and unimportant truths 284 4, 7 | Next fourteen sections burst forth with a vehemence which 285 1, 40 | hope; for, if a man has the burthen of a bad conscience, he 286 2, 6 | been shorn, laying down the burthens of the world like fleeces, 287 4, 20 | another; not slothful in business; fervent in spirit; serving 288 2, 18 | does it follow that we must busy ourselves with their theatrical 289 1, 15 | faith by adding a great buttress of hope. For it clearly 290 1, 15 | Chap. 15. Faith is buttressed by the resurrection and 291 1, 25 | though he loves money, buys bread for himself, that 292 pref, 0| the spot by the astonished bystanders. ~ 293 4, 24 | tears. For example, when at Caesarean in Mauritania I was dissuading 294 4, 7 | not in another section (caesum) but in a clause (membrum): " 295 4, 21 | laid it with unleavened cakes upon a rock, and poured 296 4, 19 | with power, and in a manner calculated to sway the mind. And sometimes 297 2, 29 | omens, but by way of sure calculation; not with the design of 298 2, 12 | Greek word "moschos" means a calf, some have not understood 299 2, 28 | admirers of Plato dared calumniously to assert that our Lord 300 2, 16 | figurative and mystical way. A candid mind, if I may so speak, 301 1, 24 | sufficient to show those who candidly seek the truth how well-founded 302 4, 20 | original, none of which canoe found in those writings 303 2, 6 | meaning from that passage in Canticles, where it is said of the 304 2, 9 | man discovers, the more capacious does his understanding become. 305 4, 9 | the truth, and should have capacity of mind to receive it in 306 3, 2 | sanctificationem in timore Dei capite nos" [and perfecting holiness 307 2, 16 | plants: knowledge of the carbuncle, for instance, which shines 308 3, 17 | to a higher state must be cared for in its own state. ~ 309 4, 21 | paint their faces with carefully-chosen colours, and then from stains 310 2, 22 | heavens, which he rashly and carelessly brings into disrepute, when 311 3, 3 | unless the fault lies in the carelessness of the reader, are corrected 312 2, 21 | this instance any one who cares can easily see that the 313 4, 28 | and men, fearing God, and caring for men. In his very speech 314 3, 9 | subjection to which their carnality is to be overcome. To this 315 3, 2 | these terms: "manere in carne necessarium propter vos" [ 316 1, 35 | have towards the road, or carriages, or other things that are 317 4, 6 | constitute the canon, which carries with it a most wholesome 318 1, 14 | hurried on by the necessity of carrying out a set undertaking, will 319 2, 25 | announced to the people of Carthage, while the pantomime was 320 3, 18 | Lord, when the time not of casting stones away but of gathering 321 3, 29 | this is the figure called catachresis. ~ 322 4, 7 | describing the imminent catastrophe; another, the lascivious 323 2, 37 | by plausible speech and catching questions, or make them 324 2, 20 | Whence that witty saying of Cato, who, when consulted by 325 3, 30 | Certainly it must be read with caution, not only on account of 326 2, 20 | not so much to teach as to celebrate. And to this class belong, 327 2, 29 | employed in reference to celebrating the anniversary of our Lord' 328 3, 9 | Sacrament of baptism, and the celebration of the body and blood of 329 3, 17 | he has embraced a life of celibacy and made himself a eunuch 330 2, 15 | translation, each man being in a cell by himself, and yet nothing 331 4, 24 | be vehement. Praise and censure, too, when they are eloquently 332 pref, 0| and that Cornelius the centurion, although an angel announced 333 4, 24 | civil, war which they called Ceterva (for it was not fellow-citizens 334 3, 37 | this life, or until the chaff is separated from the wheat 335 4, 20 | and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife 336 4, 18 | threatens? Why is it that the changes in his tone, so frequent 337 4, 20 | could very easily do by changing some words for words of 338 3, 3 | that God will not bring any charges against His elect, and that 339 4, 28 | what he says to Timothy: "Charging them before the Lord that 340 2, 23 | with attention to medicinal charms and other observances; for 341 2, 22 | is no difference in his chart, which he looks into anxiously 342 4, 21 | it who are mindful of the chastening of the Lord, who obscene 343 2, 8 | possession of a weak mind, nor, cheating it with dangerous falsehoods 344 4, 7 | wonderful skill of speech, checks the flow of his invective, 345 1, 1 | if they use freely and cheerfully what they have received, 346 4, 20 | that showeth mercy, with cheerfulness. Let love be without dissimulation. 347 4, 21 | virgins, to obscene, to cherish, and fulfill, who having 348 1, 24 | too, "but nourisheth and cherisheth it, even as the Lord the 349 4, 18 | accuses, and upbraids, and chides, and threatens? Why is it 350 pref, 0| hearing it constantly from childhood, and that any other language 351 2, 25 | degree of likeness in their choice of signs, that the signs 352 2, 16 | compels the psalters of ten chords to have just so many strings; 353 1, 14 | employed in the medicine of Christianity. ~ 354 pref, 0| by that barbarian slave Christianus, of whom I have lately heard 355 2, 28 | learn from history about the chronology of past times assists us 356 4, 12 | the orator, according to Cicero, is to teach, to delight, 357 4, 18 | For as the nature of the circle, viz., that all lines drawn 358 4, 7 | rounded sentence (ambitus sive circuitus) which the Greeks call " 359 4, 18 | drawn from the centre to the circumference are equal, is the same in 360 4, 21 | to appetite." Now I have cited these latter passages as 361 2, 17 | to the eyes of any of the citizens, but because it was obvious 362 4, 3 | to, and avoid it; just as citybred men, even when illiterate, 363 2, 13 | an nequam; et quae sunt civitates, in quibus ipsi inhabitant 364 4, 24 | eloquence of a wise man, not by clamorous applause so much as by groans, 365 2, 16 | our Lord had anointed with clay made out of spittle was 366 2, 7 | counsel of compassion he cleanses his soul, which is violently 367 2, 16 | knowing the virtue it has in cleansing the lungs, nor the power 368 4, 20 | Abhor that which is evil, cleave to that which is good. Be 369 1, 21 | And so faith clings to the assurance, and we 370 2, 16 | Not a few things, too, are closed against us and obscured 371 4, 20 | of harmony would take the closing sentences of these writers 372 2, 20 | going to a place; when your clothes are eaten by mice, to be 373 3, 6 | schoolmaster. And those who clung obstinately to such signs 374 4, 5 | as some men employ these coarsely, inelegantly, and frigidly 375 3, 9 | only to insert it in the coils of error. ~ 376 4, 18 | that it is in the smallest coin; so the greatness of justice 377 3, 2 | read, mundemus nos ab omni coinquinatione carnis et spiritus" [let 378 3, 2 | or, "mundemus nos ab omni coinquintione carnis" [let us cleanse 379 2, 25 | stamping and weighing of coins, which are peculiar to each 380 3, 30 | tedious and troublesome to collect all the passages in the 381 4, 21 | thou shouldst dye it the color of flame." It would be too 382 2, 8 | Thessalonians, one to the Colossians, two to Timothy, one to 383 4, 21 | changed by meretricious colouring and the deceptions of quackery 384 4, arg | excelling all others in the combination of eloquence with wisdom. 385 2, 16 | many other numbers and combinations of numbers are used in the 386 4, 21 | comely why dost thou hide thy comeliness? If thou art plain, why 387 3, 21 | while he was sick, yet he comforted himself after his death. ~ 388 2, 3 | the eyes the will of the commanders. And all these signs are 389 4, 7 | from the place where I commenced to quote, the passage consists 390 4, 1 | Christian Doctrine, was at the commencement divided into two parts. 391 3, 30 | sacred books. For he thus commences this very book: "Of all 392 3, arg | Tichonius the Donatist, which he commends to the attention of the 393 1, 36 | Now every man who lies commits an injustice; and if any 394 1, 28 | had a great deal of some commodity, and felt bound to give 395 3, 12 | several beasts that feed on commoner kinds of food, but it does 396 pref, 0| themselves. Each, however, communicates to others what he has learnt 397 3, 37 | given me light, the means of communicating our thoughts to others. ~ 398 2, 24 | the arrangements of the community in which each man lives, 399 4, 9 | upon, that our hearer or companion should have an earnest desire 400 3, 12 | some great truth. Keeping company with a harlot, for example, 401 2, 14 | or we must consult and compare several translators. If, 402 4, 1 | bring them all within the compass of one book, and so finish 403 2, 7 | that is, in the counsel of compassion he cleanses his soul, which 404 4, 8 | the sacred writers, though compatible with eloquence, not to be 405 2, 39 | to other matters, if any competent man were willing in a spirit 406 4, 31 | acquainted with it need not complain of its length. I, however, 407 4, 7 | metaphorical style, which the more completely they seem buried under figures 408 4, 21 | the features and form and completion of some man, and that, when 409 4, 29 | say make it their own by composing their lives in harmony with 410 4, 9 | have reached within the comprehension of others, however difficult 411 2, 29 | who are skilled in such computations are accustomed to answer 412 2, 29 | themselves. For, as the man who computes the moon's age can tell, 413 1, 7 | the most beautiful form conceivable; or they represent it in 414 1, 22 | mind:" so that you are to concentrate all your thoughts, your 415 2, 36 | expression of affection conciliates the hearer, or that a narrative, 416 4, 20 | law. But the Scripture has concluded all under sin, that the 417 3, 20 | knew that their wives and concubines were solicited and debauched. ~ 418 4, 20 | carnis prividentiam ne in concupiscentiis feceritis", the ear would 419 1, 7 | superior is God. And so all concur in believing that God is 420 4, 23 | one, or to obtaining the concurrence of any one in a course of 421 3, 27 | which are sanctioned by the concurring testimony of other passages 422 3, 21 | poor man; thus unwittingly condemning the sin he had wittingly 423 4, 20 | Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate!" And 424 4, 7 | his speech contemptible, confessed to be weighty and powerful. ~ 425 4, 13 | profit a man that he both confesses the truth and praises the 426 4, 7 | to his detractors, not as confessing that he recognized its truth. 427 4, 13 | demonstrated to his own confession, and clothed in beauty of 428 4, 24 | I saw their tears I was confident, even before the event proved 429 4, 14 | redundancy of language, and confined him to a more dignified 430 4, 5 | strength and power from the confirming testimony of great men. 431 2, 12 | Each of these in turn confirms the other. For the one is 432 2, 29 | these objects are to be used conformably to certain signs as nostrums 433 2, 4 | tongues besides, thrown into confusion and discordance. ~ 434 4, 10 | shrink from saying, "Non congregabo conventicula eorum de sanguinibus" ( 435 3, 35 | can frequently discover or conjecture quantities of time which 436 2, 30 | in any operation without connecting the memory of the past with 437 4, 18 | themselves or for their connections, before the church courts, 438 3, 21 | not be slain if he were conquered in battle, that he might 439 4, 20 | things we are more than conquerors, through Him that loved 440 4, 21 | lie either in thine own consciousness or in that of another? For 441 3, 6 | distributed among the needy, and consecrated themselves wholly to God 442 3, 30 | carefully considered, afford considerable assistance in penetrating 443 3, 24 | figurative by attending to the considerations indicated above. ~ 444 4, 21 | adulteress. The fact that thou considerest thyself adorned and beautified 445 1, 14 | points of instruction in considering the remedies, whether opposites 446 3, 20 | chap. 20. Consistency of good men in all outward 447 4, 7 | first the smallest possible, consisting of two members; for a period 448 3, 4 | Thessalonians: "Propterea consolati sumus fratres in vobis". 449 4, 6 | eloquence of ours that it is not conspicuous either by its presence or 450 3, 5 | of seven which recurs in constant succession; and when he 451 2, 22 | would not give both the same constellation. But what a difference there 452 3, 32 | before, just as if both sets constituted one body in consequence 453 4, 7 | is to be marked off as constituting one member, to which is 454 2, 28 | Olympiads, and the names of the consuls; and ignorance of the consulship 455 2, 28 | consuls; and ignorance of the consulship in which our Lord was born, 456 2, 20 | part of it as God, or to consultations and arrangements about signs 457 4, 21 | fire out of the rock and consumed the offering. Now this sign 458 4, 21 | portrait had been finished with consummate art, another painter should 459 3, 33 | But he had not come into contact with this heresy, which 460 1 | BOOK I. - Containing a General View of the Subjects 461 2, 6 | feel greater pleasure in contemplating holy men, when I view them 462 1, 9 | presented to their common contemplation. And the man who does not 463 4, 7 | may use the expression) to contend that the apostle had here 464 3, 17 | kingdom of heaven's sake, he contends that the commands given 465 4, 25 | but for wise ends; not contenting ourselves merely with pleasing 466 3, 11 | but unto them that are contentious, and do not obey the truth, 467 4, 31 | but is anxious to know its contents, may read it in parts. He 468 3, 35 | same as "His praise shall continually be in my mouth." And their 469 3, 11 | to them who, by patient continuance in well-doing, seek for 470 1, 23 | from the truth, he still continues to love himself, and to 471 4, 20 | patient in tribulation; continuing instant in prayer; distributing 472 3, 36 | the order of time, or the continuity of events, when it really 473 4, 16 | Does the apostle in any way contradict himself, when, though he 474 1, 6 | Thus there arises a curious contradiction of words, because if the 475 4, 20 | Is there anything here of contrasted words arranged antithetically, 476 2, 30 | What the mechanical arts contribute to exegetics~ 477 2, 26 | chap. 26. What human contrivances we are to adopt, and what 478 4, 10 | saying, "Non congregabo conventicula eorum de sanguinibus" (I 479 4, 8 | either that they may be converted to piety or shut out from 480 1, 4 | make use of some mode of conveyance, either by land or water, 481 4, 10 | substance of his thought be conveyed and apprehended in its integrity. ~ 482 2, 2 | to him, and the dove by cooing calls his mate, or is called 483 4, 22 | hearer's attention from cooling or becoming languid. We 484 2, 36 | certain rules for a more copious kind of argument, which 485 2, 13 | God is stronger than men 1 Cor.1:25 ). If any one should 486 2, 10 | ox that treadeth out the corn." ~ 487 pref, 0| into the Church; and that Cornelius the centurion, although 488 1, 24 | not their body, but its corruptions and its heaviness, that 489 4, 9 | the way of argument it may cost us. Only two conditions 490 4, 20 | battle, not because they are costly, but because they are arms; 491 3, 37 | it is not customary, it costs labour to understand it, 492 4, 7 | another, the lascivious couch; and the third, the luxurious 493 3, 37 | venerable documents ought to be counselled not only to make themselves 494 3, 32 | Lord, or the true and the counterfeit, or some such name; because, 495 1, 1 | undoubtedly be, if I were counting on my own strength; but 496 2, 9 | And in this matter memory counts for a great deal; but if 497 4, 18 | connections, before the church courts, we would rightly advise 498 3, 12 | was concealed under the cover of prevailing fashions. ~ 499 2, 12 | babes, upon milk, in the cradles of temporal things (for 500 3, 12 | gluttony, while a fool will crave for the vilest food with


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