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St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

(Hapax - words occurring once)


132-crave | creat-handi | hangi-paral | pardo-stead | steep-zepha

     Book, Chapter
501 2, 23 | idols, or to worshipping creation or its parts instead of 502 3, 18 | bless Thee, and all Thy creatures. Thou merriest Adam, and 503 2, 18 | four-footed beasts, and creeping things." ~ 504 2, 12 | calves;" and this error has crept into so many texts, that 505 2, 25 | agreement of men, the public crier would not in former times 506 2, 24 | see the flight or hear the cries of birds, because these 507 3, 32 | darkness light before them, and crooked things straight: these things 508 4, 10 | who cannot ask it. Now a crowd anxious for instruction 509 2, 39 | are either lost amid the crowds of the careless, or are 510 3, 26 | read, "Thou, Lord, hast crowned us with Thy favour as with 511 2, 7 | death that is before us, and crucify all the motions of pride 512 4, 24 | hearts and lives an evil so cruel and inveterate; it was not, 513 3, 11 | therefore, and apparent cruelty, either in word or deed, 514 2, 20 | does less harm than to cuff an innocent boy if he happens 515 4, arg | of style, and ought to be cultivated with especial care by the 516 1, 10 | every place, but by the cultivation of pure desires and virtuous 517 2, 31 | true, the one man being cunning and the other simple. Then 518 2, 20 | place also all amulets and cures which the medical art condemns, 519 1, 14 | humanity adapted to our wounds, curing some of them by their opposites, 520 2, 24 | are all full of hurtful curiosity, torturing anxiety, and 521 2, 30 | arts a very superficial and cursory knowledge is to be acquired, 522 3, 22 | our Lord's advent are the custodians of the divine commands, 523 3, 12 | that a wise man may use the daintiest food without any sin of 524 1, 20 | 20. The resurrection to damnation~ 525 1, 37 | chap. 37. Dangers of mistaken interpretation~ 526 2, 8 | prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Daniel, Ezekiel. The authority 527 2, 28 | readers and admirers of Plato dared calumniously to assert that 528 2, 15 | words in all the rest, who dares put anything in comparison 529 2, 18 | their foolish heart was darkened. Professing themselves to 530 3, 26 | to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked." Nor ought 531 3, 19 | the whirlpool of vice or dash them on the rocks of crime. 532 2, 28 | learnt theology, lived at a date prior to the books of that 533 2, 28 | when we reflect upon the dates, it becomes much more probable 534 2, 13 | put as the plural of the dative or as the plural of the 535 3, 17 | where it is said, "Marry thy daughter, and so shalt thou have 536 2, 17 | represent the nine Muses as daughters of Jupiter and Mercury. 537 3, 35 | Lord's day which was just dawning, and count it also a whole 538 1, 7 | themselves something of dazzling brightness, and think of 539 4, 10 | congregabo conventicula eorum de sanguinibus" (I shall not 540 2, 24 | torturing anxiety, and deadly slavery. For it was not 541 4, 3 | listened to the speeches and debates of eloquent men. For even 542 3, 20 | concubines were solicited and debauched. ~ 543 3, 19 | themselves in a multitude of debaucheries, or even in regard to one 544 1, 19 | death which we all owe as a debt contracted through sin, 545 1, 36 | man who knows practices deceit, and the ignorant man is 546 4, 21 | mind by these meretricious deceits, yet, in corrupting and 547 4, 20 | report and good report: as deceivers, and yet true; as unknown, 548 1, 36 | a better man than he who deceives, seeing that it is better 549 2, 24 | spirits which are bent upon deceiving, take care to provide for 550 1, 36 | love is not perniciously deceptive nor mendacious, even though 551 2, 35 | say that falsehood is the declaration of a state of things which 552 4, 21 | proclaimed in all the types and declarations of Scripture. For we find 553 2, 35 | things which is not as we declare it to be; and this definition 554 4, 10 | is neither customary nor decorous for a person to ask a question 555 1, 17 | for us to remove the stern decrees that barred the door against 556 2, 21 | Romans made an attempt to dedicate the star which we call Lucifer 557 2, 38 | he cannot in any sense be deemed. ~ 558 2, 13 | another language than that any deeper meaning is intended. Again, 559 4, 21 | first artist would feel deeply insulted, and his indignation 560 4, 31 | man I am myself (for my defects are very many), but the 561 4, 26 | established, and so victoriously defended, naturally affords? Wherefore 562 4, 4 | teacher of Holy Scripture, the defender of the true faith and the 563 3, 33 | much labour and trouble in defending against it the grace of 564 4, 20 | prophets were so far from being deficient in the musical training 565 3, 34 | in their own land, they defiled it by their own way, and 566 2, arg | subject of signs. He first defines what a sign is, and shows 567 4, 20 | to come to something more definite. We have an example of the 568 2, 37 | deals with inferences, and definitions, and divisions, is of the 569 4, 28 | than if his body too were deformed, so men who teach lies are 570 4, 18 | defrauded? Nay, ye do wrong, and defraud, and that your brethren. 571 4, 18 | suffer yourselves to be defrauded? Nay, ye do wrong, and defraud, 572 pref, 0| would have been much more degraded if God had not chosen to 573 1, 4 | diverted from that home whose delights would make us truly happy. 574 4, 8 | they ought in all their deliverances to make it their first and 575 4, 29 | some men who have a good delivery, but cannot compose anything 576 2, 23 | evil desires. For they are deluded and imposed on by the false 577 2, 22 | observation, is a great delusion and great madness. And among 578 3, 5 | which I am next to speak, demand no ordinary care and diligence. 579 4, 13 | force of truth, though it is demonstrated to his own confession, and 580 3, 2 | follows, which is translated denim [for]; and the translators 581 4, 29 | prophet, through whom God denounces those who steal His words 582 4, 7 | quondam rustic prophet, was denouncing the godless, the proud, 583 1, 29 | end. For in the theatres, dens of iniquity though they 584 2, 27 | chap. 27. Some departments of knowledge, not of mere 585 2, 13 | very learned man, often departs from the meaning of his 586 1, 1 | and is to be undertaken in dependence on God's aid.~ 587 4, 7 | ideas have a connection of dependency the one upon the other, 588 pref, 0| knows how to read is not dependent on some one else, when he 589 4, 21 | but about the dress and deportment of virgins. Yet that great 590 4, 13 | teacher's discourse, without deriving any profit from it. For 591 4, 7 | that puffery while thus descanting on matters of this kind. 592 4, 7 | trust," "pass on," "go," "descend." ~ 593 3, 34 | grace, not by nobility of descent, in feeling, not in race; 594 2, 41 | hope for heaven, and not to desecrate the sacraments. And purified 595 3, 35 | Tichonius lays down is one he designates of times, a rule by which 596 2, 40 | appropriated to themselves, designing them for a better use, not 597 1, 34 | Him no more." For Christ, desiring not only to give the possession 598 1, 40 | of a bad conscience, he despairs of ever reaching that which 599 3, 14 | referred to the love of God, destroys all vices; when to the love 600 3, 11 | themselves involved in the destruction of their lust. When, however, 601 4, arg | and power of speech. After detailing with much care and minuteness 602 2, 23 | was brought up the less detestable; and though the ventriloquist 603 2, 8 | Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy; one book of Joshua the 604 2, 35 | false, nor framed by man's device, but is evolved from the 605 2, 7 | truer than anything we could devise by our own wisdom. ~ 606 2, 40 | take away from them, and to devote to their proper use in preaching 607 4, 21 | induce those who have not yet devoted themselves to take the vows 608 4, 21 | he pursues the subject, devoting himself chiefly to proving 609 2, 37 | 37. Use of rhetoric and dialectic~ 610 2, 31 | chap. 31. Use of dialectics. Of fallacies~ 611 4, 30 | address the people or to dictate what others will deliver 612 4, 3 | practice himself in writing, or dictating, and at last also in speaking, 613 3, 3 | hid from Thee, which Thou didst make in secret," it is not 614 1, 20 | truth, falls when the body dies into a more terrible death, 615 2, 12 | difficult for interpreters to differ so widely as not to touch 616 3, 6 | case of the Jewish people, differed widely from what it was 617 2, 25 | to be reckoned whatever differences they choose to make in bodily 618 4, 20 | example: "Having then gifts, differing according to the grace that 619 4, 20 | majestic style of speech differs from the temperate style 620 4, 20 | him with a weapon that he digs out of the ground. The apostle 621 1, 12 | inward sight is weak and dim. "For after that, in the 622 pref, 0| them read by others, and by dint of wise meditation to have 623 4, 10 | give, if the attention be directed not to the things themselves, 624 4, 7 | passages with the view of directing the reader's attention more 625 3, 13 | or benevolent end, either directly, as is our duty, or figuratively, 626 4, 20 | thirty years after, cannot disannul, that it should make the 627 4, 20 | it be confirmed, no man disannulleth, or addeth thereto. Now 628 1, 29 | comes to know Him will be disappointed in Him, and who desires 629 4, 21 | incurring their husband's disapproval, to proclaim openly that 630 3, 10 | chap. 10. How we are to discern whether a phrase is figurative~ 631 4, 5 | Scripture. For the more he discerns the poverty of his own speech, 632 4, 16 | of course, as teacher to disciple: "But continue thou in the 633 4, 21 | women who colour, or rather discolour, their faces with paint. 634 2, 4 | nations owing to the sin of discord among men, which springs 635 2, 4 | thrown into confusion and discordance. ~ 636 4, 21 | their various writings and discourses; and the diligent student 637 2, 9 | the more of these a man discovers, the more capacious does 638 4, 20 | these should cast doubt or discredit on what we say. If, however, 639 2, 39 | soberly and carefully to discriminate among them. And if they 640 1, 14 | restore us to life. The disease was brought in through a 641 2, 5 | remedy for the terrible diseases of the human will, being 642 2, 39 | service to the reader in disentangling and explaining ambiguous 643 3, 12 | vilest food with a most disgusting eagerness of appetite. And 644 2, 30 | example, a house, a bench, a dish, and other things of that 645 4, 20 | the left, by honour and dishonour, by evil report and good 646 2, 8 | another, and having never been disjoined, are reckoned as one book; 647 4, 18 | is the same in a great disk that it is in the smallest 648 4, 11 | making people like what they disliked, nor in making them do what 649 3, 34 | the heathen, and they were dispersed through the countries: according 650 1, 38 | But sight shall displace faith; and hope shall be 651 1, 29 | opposes him, he is exceedingly displeased by such a man's contempt 652 4, 21 | that she has first been displeasing to herself. And what testimony 653 1, 4 | whatever means are at one's disposal to obtain what one desires, 654 2, 22 | and carelessly brings into disrepute, when there is no difference 655 2, 5 | could at the fit season be disseminated through the whole world, 656 4, 20 | cheerfulness. Let love be without dissimulation. Abhor that which is evil, 657 1, 19 | the body consists in the dissolution of the former principle 658 4, 24 | Caesarean in Mauritania I was dissuading the people from that civil, 659 2, 21 | the name handed down to distant ages, only that his ancestress 660 4, 24 | produced both by the accurate distinctions of the quiet style, and 661 4, 11 | enough. And it is one of the distinctive features of good intellects 662 4, 7 | to show us that we must distinguish the music of the wise from 663 2, 25 | ornament for the purpose of distinguishing sex or rank; and the countless 664 3, 14 | nations and other times. And, distracted by this endless variety 665 4, 20 | afflictions, in necessities, in distresses, in strifes, in imprisonments, 666 3, 6 | the apostles' feet to be distributed among the needy, and consecrated 667 4, 20 | continuing instant in prayer; distributing to the necessity of saints; 668 1, 1 | that, in this very work of distribution in which I have engaged, 669 4, 20 | arise, it is useless to disturb what we cannot remove. And 670 2, 7 | violently agitated, and disturbs him with base desires, from 671 1, 22 | off from itself by whose diversion its own volume would be 672 1, 4 | delight, our thoughts are diverted from that home whose delights 673 2, 20 | a stone, as if it were a divider of friends, does less harm 674 4, 16 | not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth?" And 675 2, 29 | pernicious error of the diviners of the fates, it is more 676 3, 37 | students of these venerable documents ought to be counselled not 677 2, 20 | sometimes avenged by the dogs; for frequently men are 678 3, 30 | triumphantly against the Donatists (and herein showed himself 679 2, 41 | were ordered to mark their door-posts with the blood of the lamb, 680 2, 16 | adamant often shuts the doors of knowledge. And the only 681 2, 38 | true that they are not the double of any number because odd 682 4, 21 | intermission, the former doubles the days by fasting; and 683 3, 4 | hardly any one would have doubted that the vocative case was 684 3, 2 | pronounces for and permits to be dovetailed into itself. ~ 685 2, 41 | whole body from the head downwards is fixed, its height by 686 2, 16 | comparison, is a very great drawback to the reader. And so in 687 3, 21 | no crime, though he was dreadfully afflicted for him while 688 2, 31 | also vain;" and further on drew other inferences which are 689 4, 24 | command to root out and drive from their hearts and lives 690 1, 9 | flesh. And thus men are driven back from their native land 691 4, 21 | of her affection with any dross of hypocrisy; serious in 692 4, 7 | it throws itself upon the drowsy senses to startle them into 693 2, 17 | in the case of harps and drums, and all other instruments 694 4, 20 | day; not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, 695 1, 14 | as cold to hot, moist to dry, etc., and in other cases 696 4, 20 | Render therefore to all their dues: tribute to whom tribute 697 2, 38 | number, it is clear to the dullest apprehension that this was 698 3, 30 | were thoroughly known and duly applied, we should be able 699 2, 22 | their still more wretched dupes. Now it may happen that, 700 3, 37 | is beaten small like the dust which the wind blows from 701 3, 22 | things which were done as duties at that time, cannot now 702 4, 21 | one, wishing well to all; dutiful to her elders, not envious 703 4, 10 | becomes wearisome when he dwells at length upon things that 704 4, 21 | the future, thou shouldst dye it the color of flame." 705 4, 20 | and yet well known; as dying, and, behold, we live; as 706 3, 34 | applying to the same peep]e. But when the prophet begins 707 2, 13 | qua isti insidunt super eam, si bona est an nequam; 708 2, 20 | Examples of these are the earrings on the top of each ear, 709 3, 36 | Lord God planted a garden eastwards in Eden; and there He put 710 4, 22 | the tide of eloquence to ebb and flow like the sea. It 711 2, 8 | Proverbs, Song of Songs, and Ecclesiastes. For two books, one called 712 2, 8 | called Wisdom and the other Ecclesiasticus, are ascribed to Solomon 713 2, 13 | of things which tend to edification, but in that of signs, by 714 1, 39 | be called), so great an edifice of faith and love has been 715 3, 29 | learnt as a matter of liberal education are found even in the ordinary 716 2, 29 | more carefully, the more efficacious it may seem to be. But when 717 1, 9 | Now, no one is so egregiously silly as to ask, "How do 718 3, 30 | by the facts to his very elaborate and useful work, have led 719 4, 20 | not be selected by careful elaboration of speech. If a brave man 720 4, 7 | interrogatory form being most elegantly suppressed: "in labours 721 4, 6 | wholesome words was a necessary element in eloquence of a kind that 722 2, 16 | the body there are four elements of which it is made up. 723 2, 35 | that seven and three are eleven, says what cannot be true 724 3, 2 | sentence thus: "et quid eligam ignoro: compellor autem 725 4, 7 | are taught in the art of elocution. As then I do not affirm 726 3, 30 | what is obscure shall be elucidated, so that a man travelling 727 3, 30 | these seven rules for their elucidation. ~ 728 1, 30 | command to love our neighbour embraces the holy angels also, seeing 729 2, 13 | faulty interpretations can be emended~ 730 3, 23 | sees in the case of men so eminent both the storms that are 731 4, 4 | other means of rousing the emotions, are necessary. ~ 732 3, 19 | becoming the more eager for the emptiest sort of distinction the 733 4, 6 | that of others (not from empty inflation, but from solid 734 4, 21 | one another to glory by emulous examples of virtue; endure 735 1, 7 | change. All, however, strive emulously to exalt the excellence 736 2, 39 | arrangements of men that enable us to carry on intercourse 737 4, 21 | style is the celebrated encomium on virginity from Cyprian: " 738 4, 21 | wait upon the elders, and encourage your equals; stir up one 739 3, 7 | And if ever any of them endeavoured to make it out that their 740 4, 20 | gratified with a more harmonious ending; but our translator, with 741 1, 23 | the soul becomes weak, and endures much suffering about the 742 1, 33 | themselves to recruit our energies with the provision which 743 2, 26 | involve us in superstition, or enervate us by luxury, if they only 744 2, 29 | of Holy Scripture, and by engaging the attention unprofitably 745 3, 29 | for instance, allegory, enigma, and parable. However, nearly 746 2, 16 | and service in solving the enigmas of Scripture. And a number 747 3, 11 | and make it allegorical or enigmatical, which is the kind of expression 748 3, 16 | deed of malevolence was enjoined. Do not doubt, then, that 749 3, 18 | is engrossed in temporal enjoyments. And those men to whom the 750 4, 20 | opened unto you, our heart is enlarged," and so on; it would be 751 4, 2 | speech to awe, to melt, to enliven, and to rouse them, while 752 2, 31 | man." Now at this sort of ensnaring arguments, Scripture, as 753 1, 35 | that has been said since we entered upon the discussion about 754 4, 1 | This work of mine, which is entitled On Christian Doctrine, was 755 4, 21 | threshold, and show at the very entrance that there is no dark recess 756 2, 31 | which is not intended to entrap, but only aims at verbal 757 2, 31 | and the childish vanity of entrapping an adversary. For there 758 4, 4 | of speech is needed. Here entreaties and reproaches, exhortations 759 pref, 0| affairs of the great nation entrusted to him? For Moses knew that 760 3, 36 | when the sons of Shem are enumerated: "These are the sons of 761 1, 1 | depends on the discovery and enunciation of the meaning, and is to 762 4, 20 | wantonness, not in strife and envying: but put ye on the Lord 763 4, 10 | congregabo conventicula eorum de sanguinibus" (I shall 764 2, 8 | to the Galatians, to the Ephesians, to the Philippians, two 765 3, 12 | food without any sin of epicurism or gluttony, while a fool 766 4, 20 | some words for words of equivalent meaning, or by retaining 767 1, 24 | destroy the body, but to eradicate the lust of the body i.e., 768 2, 21 | our actions, grievously err, and sell inexperienced 769 4, arg | ought to be cultivated with especial care by the teacher, as 770 1, arg | hope, and love are graces essentially necessary for him who would 771 3, 15 | interpretation be found that tends to establish the reign of love. Now, 772 4, 20 | condescend to men of low estate!" And a little afterwards: " 773 1, 14 | cold to hot, moist to dry, etc., and in other cases applies 774 2, 32 | teach it; for it exists eternally in the reason of things, 775 3, 29 | in the opposite of their etymological sense, as a grove is called 776 3, 18 | immediately made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven' 777 2, 39 | interpretation; and what Eusebius has done in regard to the 778 2, 16 | morning, the noontime, the evening, and the night; the annual 779 4, 21 | but to His flesh, whose ever-flowing fountain of blood has ever 780 2, 16 | that the tree itself is an evergreen. Many, again, by reason 781 4, 7 | Christ, which is blessed for evermore, knoweth that I lie not." 782 3, 35 | mouth." And their force is exactly the same, either when multiplied 783 2, 22 | discover the difference when he examines the constellations, which 784 3, 19 | regard to one wife not only exceed the measure necessary for 785 4, arg | models of eloquence, far excelling all others in the combination 786 1, 7 | believing that God is that which excels in dignity all other objects. ~ 787 3, 19 | of a still more beastly excess, such men do not believe 788 2, 2 | which living beings mutually exchange for the purpose of showing, 789 pref, 0| have put my money to the exchangers." Seeing, then, that these 790 1, 33 | happiness. For even the apostle exclaims, "Was Paul crucified for 791 3, 34 | also, or perhaps even to it exclusively. But when Scripture, having 792 4, 27 | are numbers who seek an excuse for their own evil lives 793 2, 37 | find it easier to walk by executing these movements than to 794 4, 20 | the same man does great execution, even when anger furnishes 795 2, 29 | extent natural science is an exegetical aid~ 796 2, 30 | mechanical arts contribute to exegetics~ 797 4, 3 | they are eloquent that they exemplify these rules; it is not that 798 4, 5 | studious and at leisure to exhaust them. ~ 799 3, 10 | first; for when these have exhausted the soul, and reduced it 800 4, 12 | but the truth itself, when exhibited in its naked simplicity, 801 4, 4 | requires reasoning and the exhibition of proofs. If, however, 802 2, 37 | more pleasure from them as exhibitions of truth, than assistance 803 4, 20 | on teaching; or he that exhorteth, on exhortation: he that 804 4, arg | in his life. Finally, he exhorts the Christian teacher himself, 805 2, 29 | which not a past but an existing state of things is made 806 2, 39 | which are included also the experiments and conclusions of the useful 807 4, 26 | when it seizes upon and exposes the falsity of an opposing 808 2, arg | direct or figurative. Whilst exposing the folly and futility of 809 2, arg | Argument~Having completed his exposition of things, the author now 810 4, 8 | if putting forward their expositions as of the same authority; 811 4, 21 | hear them, but must have an expositor. Let us, then, study these 812 4, 8 | but coming next to it. The expositors of these writers, then, 813 2, 11 | to be of this kind, Racha expressing the cry of an angry man, 814 3, 35 | quantities of time which are not expressly mentioned in Scripture. 815 3, 37 | access to more or fewer external helps. And, as in the case 816 1, 21 | human body suffers complete extinction, but that the wicked rise 817 1, 21 | 21. Neither body nor soul extinguished at death~ 818 2, 22 | effects in nature, and in the extremely rapid motion of the heavenly 819 3, 25 | God, but not to the last extremity of punishment, that is, " 820 2, 7 | in this frame of mind he extricates himself from every form 821 4, 14 | is wonderful fluency and exuberance of language here; but it 822 4, 23 | greater effect to certain exuberances (as they may be called) 823 1, 9 | is poured into his very eyeballs. The man, on the other hand, 824 2, 8 | Maccabees, and the two of Ezra, which last look more like 825 2, 25 | Finally, the thousands of fables and fictions, in whose lies 826 4, 24 | even, who, divided into two factions and armed with stones, fought 827 1, 4 | becoming engrossed in a factitious delight, our thoughts are 828 1, 38 | chap. 38. Love never faileth~ 829 1, 27 | he ought not to love, nor fails to love what he ought to 830 4, 21 | sacrilegious hand thou wouldst fain change the colour of thy 831 2, 6 | they cannot hit upon even a fair interpretation. Some of 832 1, 28 | other, you could do nothing fairer than choose by lot to which 833 2, 28 | narrates what has been done, faithfully and with advantage; but 834 2, 31 | 31. Use of dialectics. Of fallacies~ 835 4, 14 | land: the prophets prophesy falsely, and the priests applaud 836 2, 9 | ourselves to a certain extent familiar with the language of Scripture, 837 3, 36 | their tongues." For each family or nation could not be said 838 4, 20 | distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, 839 2, 23 | to feel in regard to all fancied signs which lead either 840 2, 40 | false and superstitious fancies and heavy burdens of unnecessary 841 2, 23 | lying omens of their own fancy, so also from things that 842 4, 20 | one another." And a little farther on: "The night is far spent, 843 2, 16 | and our Lord Himself, all fasted for forty days. And except 844 4, 13 | sake at those who are so fastidious that they do not care for 845 4, 21 | former doubles the days by fasting; and when the desire for 846 2, 7 | himself from every form of fatal joy in transitory things, 847 2, 22 | characters, the acts, and the fate of those who are born from 848 pref, 0| accepted the plan of his father-in-law, a man of an alien race, 849 1, 29 | his interest by urging his favorite's merits: if, however, he 850 4, 25 | both acquainted with it and favourably disposed towards it, so 851 4, 12 | before him as men to be feared and shunned. I need not 852 4, 28 | the sight of God and men, fearing God, and caring for men. 853 3, 14 | in regard to marriage, or feasts, or dress, or the other 854 4, 20 | gold and jewels, he works feats of valor with those arms 855 4, 20 | prividentiam ne in concupiscentiis feceritis", the ear would no doubt 856 2, 12 | and is abiding, but faith feeds us as babes, upon milk, 857 4, 24 | Ceterva (for it was not fellow-citizens merely, but neighbours, 858 1, 33 | under whom he himself is a fellow-servant. ~ 859 4, 20 | emotion that makes us feel the fervour of eloquence. ~ 860 3, 37 | they have access to more or fewer external helps. And, as 861 2, 28 | boldness of an adviser, not the fidelity of a narrator. ~ 862 1, 36 | yet reaches through the fields the same place to which 863 3, 26 | be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked." Nor 864 2, 16 | forty springs the number fifty, which in our religion has 865 2, 16 | number of the one hundred and fifty-three fishes which were taken 866 2, 18 | literature, let him reject the figments of superstition, and let 867 2, 8 | falsehoods and delusions, fill it with prejudices averse 868 2, 20 | rings of ostrich bone on the fingers, or telling you when you 869 1, 39 | and love, and who keeps a firm hold upon these, does not 870 4, 20 | Son, that He might be the firstborn among many brethren. Moreover, 871 3, 29 | Who does not speak of a fish-pond in which there is no fish, 872 2, 16 | hundred and fifty-three fishes which were taken after the 873 2, 16 | strength how appropriately it fits in with the direction to 874 4, 3 | these, not all who are to be fitted for usefulness in the Church, 875 4, 20 | feeling should suggest the fitting words; they need not be 876 3, 5 | manner. And nothing is more fittingly called the death of the 877 2, 7 | turning away from these, fixes his affection on things 878 2, 3 | the military standards and flags convey through the eyes 879 4, 21 | shouldst dye it the color of flame." It would be too long to 880 3, 19 | blown about on the tongue of flattery, and so become so light 881 4, 11 | impossible to live must be flavoured to meet the tastes of the 882 2, 40 | people of Israel hated and fled from, but also vessels and 883 4, 19 | this is, and urge men to flee from it. ~ 884 2, 6 | burthens of the world like fleeces, and coming up from the 885 1, 34 | out, determined to take a fleshly body. Whence also that expression, " 886 1, 23 | own body. The soul which flies away from the unchangeable 887 2, 24 | take pains not to see the flight or hear the cries of birds, 888 2, 13 | that we should say, not fliriet, but florebit. Nor does 889 3, 36 | divided in the earth after the flood. And the whole earth was 890 2, 13 | should say, not fliriet, but florebit. Nor does anything stand 891 4, 14 | language here; but it is too florid to be pleasing to serious 892 2, 13 | sing it: "Super ipsum autem floriet sanctificatio mea" (But 893 4, 21 | rejoices in them, and in them flourishes more abundantly; and in 894 4, 7 | man's art and care, but it flowed forth in wisdom and eloquence 895 4, 21 | greater care. These are the flowers on the tree of the Church, 896 3, 7 | beard is the mighty ocean flowing forth unceasingly, and whose 897 2, 16 | not easily spoiled by a fluid of another kind, and that 898 2, 3 | though the bugle and the flute and the lyre frequently 899 2, 17 | the case of trumpets and flutes; or by striking, as in the 900 pref, 0| surely have no right to fly into a passion with me on 901 2, 25 | is unaccustomed to such follies goes into the theatre, unless 902 2, 6 | have come to the baptismal font laying down the burdens 903 2, 37 | you not to lift the hinder foot before you set down the 904 3, 12 | while following in the footsteps of Christ, anoints His feet ( 905 3, 16 | is one of command, either forbidding a crime or vice, or enjoining 906 3, 16 | are not to think that He forbids the prudence with which 907 2, 20 | taking advantage of the forces of nature. Examples of these 908 4, 28 | elegant, and in the majestic, forcible. But the man who cannot 909 4, 22 | that which must be treated forcibly, thus making the tide of 910 4, 19 | and powerfully when we are forcing a mind that is averse to 911 pref, 0| did they not find them forearmed against their assaults), 912 2, 29 | future, not in the way of forebodings and omens, but by way of 913 2, 14 | Now if these belong to foreign tongues, we must either 914 4, 20 | purpose. For whom He did foreknow, He also did predestinate 915 3, 27 | through him spake these words, foresaw that this interpretation 916 3, 30 | travelling through the vast forest of prophecy shall, if he 917 3, 12 | kingdom, foreshadowing and foretelling the kingdom of heaven. And 918 4, arg | God, though we are not to forget to be zealous and diligent 919 1, 34 | His heavenly calling, yet forgetting those things which were 920 1, 17 | more merciful, except to forgive us all our sins, and by 921 1, 17 | Chap. 17. Christ, by forgiving our sins, opened the way 922 2, 28 | referred to the more secret formation of the body which, for our 923 2, 22 | that one of them has a most fortunate life, the other a most unfortunate. 924 2, 22 | they do not meet with equal fortune either in what they do or 925 2, 22 | actions, the labours, and the fortunes of these two, the Scriptures 926 4, 24 | factions and armed with stones, fought annually at a certain season 927 2, 39 | varying pleasure of their founders, and unknown by reason of 928 4, 21 | flesh, whose ever-flowing fountain of blood has ever satisfied 929 3, 7 | besides that spring out of fountains? As it is described by a 930 2, 18 | corruptible man, and to birds, and four-footed beasts, and creeping things." ~ 931 3, 21 | death, and the lamb restored fourfold to the poor man; thus unwittingly 932 1, 1 | filled baskets with the fragments that were left. Now, just 933 2, 21 | miserable bondage. For when any freeman goes to an astrologer of 934 1, 30 | as though he had been my friend or brother." But as the 935 2, 23 | a false and treacherous friendship. Not as if the idol were 936 2, 20 | eaten by mice, to be more frightened at the prospect of coming 937 4, 2 | the truth be sluggish, and frigid, and somnolent? Who is such 938 4, 5 | coarsely, inelegantly, and frigidly while others use them with 939 2, 20 | add thousands of the most frivolous practices, that are to be 940 4, 14 | unimportant truths under a frothy mass of ornamental words, 941 3, 5 | from the flock, and of the fruits of the earth. Now it is 942 4, 28 | the commandment and the fulfilling of the law, can be rightly 943 1, 32 | and who could say in the fullest sense of the words, "I AM 944 2, 41 | may be filled with all the fullness of God." There is besides 945 1, 16 | all performing different functions, He holds together in the 946 4, 14 | used to adorn great and fundamental truths. And something of 947 4, 20 | execution, even when anger furnishes him with a weapon that he 948 1, 19 | Furthermore, as there is a kind of death 949 3, 34 | woman. Wherefore I poured my fury upon them for the blood 950 2, arg | Whilst exposing the folly and futility of many heathen superstitions 951 4, 22 | lose what we have already gained. But after the interposition 952 4, 21 | not voluptuous, nor her gait too free, nor her voice 953 2, 3 | touching the hem of His garment the woman was made whole, 954 2, 16 | Enter ye in at the strait gate!" As, then, knowledge of 955 3, 18 | casting stones away but of gathering them together had come, 956 3, 18 | Thou merriest Adam, and gavest him Eve his wife for an 957 2, 7 | extent of his power, he has gazed upon this object shining 958 4, 20 | from the Mount Sinai, which gendereth to bondage, which is Hagar. 959 4, 29 | upbraiding such men, He says, "O generation of vipers, how can ye, being 960 4, 21 | words, nothing wanton in her gestures: her bearing is not voluptuous, 961 1, 3 | led away from it; so that, getting entangled in the love of 962 4, 21 | passage among others: "When Gideon was startled by the message 963 2, 2 | another's mind what the giver of the sign has in his own 964 1, 33 | this to themselves, and are glad to have the hope of others 965 1, 31 | stands in no need of the glitter of the things it has itself 966 4, 20 | notwithstanding, there is a glow of strong emotion that makes 967 4, 3 | men of quick intellect and glowing temperament find it easier 968 4, 21 | brought forth a kid of the goats, and by direction of the 969 4, 10 | why should a teacher of godliness who is addressing an unlearned 970 3, 16 | is written: "Give to the godly man, and help not a sinner." 971 4, 11 | For of what service is a golden key, if it cannot open what 972 2, 23 | into existence under the government of God's providence, if 973 2, 28 | which God is the author and governor. For it is one thing to 974 4, 14 | words, such as would not be graceful or dignified even if used 975 1, 17 | do that would be still gracious and more merciful, except 976 4, 7 | climax,) and by some in Latin gradatio, for they do not care to 977 3, 17 | has attained, to a higher grade of spiritual life, thinks 978 3, 17 | who are still in the lower grades are figurative; for example, 979 3, 29 | name for letters being "grammata") are the signs of sounds 980 2, 37 | unsoundness, but much less does he grasp the rules. And in regard 981 1, 3 | entangled in the love of lower gratifications, we lag behind in, or even 982 4, 20 | the ear would no doubt be gratified with a more harmonious ending; 983 3, 18 | times; in the latter case he gratifies a lust which is engrossed 984 4, 23 | majestic; for its object is to gratify, never to excite, the mind. ~ 985 3, 33 | originated, or at least greatly aggravated, the Pelagian 986 2, 21 | consequences of our actions, grievously err, and sell inexperienced 987 pref, 0| without falling into any gross absurdity. And so although 988 4, 3 | opinions he has formed on grounds of piety and faith. If, 989 3, 29 | etymological sense, as a grove is called lucus from its 990 4, 3 | they have the advantage of growing up and living among men 991 3, 34 | the former; not that he grudges us the clear apprehension 992 4, 18 | where also the thing to be guarded against is eternal ruin, 993 3, 10 | the foregoing rule, which guards us against taking a metaphorical 994 2, 16 | instruction under a figurative guise, and ignorance of numbers 995 2, 8 | Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, 996 1, 20 | his earthly for a heavenly habitation, but to endure the penalty 997 2, 8 | Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi; then 998 3, 36 | These are the sons of Ham, after their families, after 999 4, 14 | solidity! Assuredly it is "a hammer that breaketh the rock in 1000 4, 21 | an impeachment of God's handiwork, and a violation of truth.


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