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St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

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(Hapax - words occurring once)


132-crave | creat-handi | hangi-paral | pardo-stead | steep-zepha

     Book, Chapter
1001 2, 20 | they call characters, or in hanging or tying on or even dancing 1002 1, 4 | country, and could not live happily away from our fatherland, 1003 4, 25 | ones, if they are not so hardened as to need the vehement 1004 3, 12 | Keeping company with a harlot, for example, is one thing 1005 3, 12 | the contrary, it is base harlotry to seek either gain or offspring 1006 2, 20 | divider of friends, does less harm than to cuff an innocent 1007 4, 20 | words does not run very harmoniously even in the original tongue. ~ 1008 1, 37 | statements which he cannot harmonize with this meaning. And if 1009 2, 16 | between the psalters and the harp. And it is a question which 1010 2, 6 | church's body, with all their harshness softened down, just as if 1011 2, 20 | his assailant run in hot haste for a real surgeon. To this 1012 1, 4 | we become unwilling to hasten the end of our journey; 1013 2, 6 | But hasty and careless readers are 1014 1, 23 | He who loveth iniquity hateth his own soul." And accordingly 1015 4, 21 | pass by. There is nothing haughty in her eyes, nothing bold 1016 4, 21 | accustomed to visit only those haunts of men that pity would not 1017 1, 14 | his cure, being Himself healer and medicine both in one. 1018 2, 23 | you should come to pass, hearken not unto them." For though 1019 1, 24 | its corruptions and its heaviness, that they hate. And so 1020 1, 17 | of our past sins like a hedge of thorns barred against 1021 2, 39 | of life, not to venture heedlessly upon the pursuit of the 1022 2, 22 | hold with his hand upon the heel of his brother, who preceded 1023 3, 12 | wear tunics reaching to the heels, and furnished with sleeves, 1024 4, 14 | shun and abhor, many and heinous deeds of wickedness and 1025 3, 32 | Ishmael, who "shall not be heir with the son of the free 1026 2, 21 | any law transfer to her heirs what she had never possessed, 1027 1, 29 | our need and in turn are helped by us, partly those upon 1028 3, 18 | him Eve his wife for an helper and stay. ... And now, O 1029 4, 16 | Wherefore though holy men be our helpers, or even holy angels assist 1030 2, 16 | of language and things is helpful for the understanding of 1031 3, 37 | to more or fewer external helps. And, as in the case of 1032 2, 3 | and when by touching the hem of His garment the woman 1033 2, 2 | signals with his voice for the hen to run to him, and the dove 1034 1, 34 | after the flesh, yet now henceforth know we Him no more." For 1035 2, 29 | nature of animals, trees, herbs, stones, and other bodies. 1036 4, 7 | that he was a shepherd or herdsman, and was called by God from 1037 2, 39 | of which I shall speak hereafter, than in ascertaining the 1038 3, 30 | against the Donatists (and herein showed himself of a most 1039 3, 25 | the Jews, for "the dregs hereof is not yet wrung out." The 1040 3, 2 | look at some examples. The heretical pointing,"In principio erat 1041 2, 17 | he says that afterwards Hesiod the poet gave names to them 1042 4, 7 | meaning upon it. He did not hesitate plainly to assert his knowledge, 1043 2, 20 | or telling you when you hiccup to hold your left thumb 1044 4, 21 | art comely why dost thou hide thy comeliness? If thou 1045 3, 12 | disgraceful outbreak, its own hideousness, which was concealed under 1046 2, 40 | Victorious, and Optatus, and Hilary, not to speak of living 1047 1, 3 | which we ought to use, are hindered in our course, and sometimes 1048 3, 10 | crimes, in order to remove hindrances to, or to find assistance 1049 2, 37 | way you ought to move the hinges of the joints and knees. 1050 2, 6 | some places they cannot hit upon even a fair interpretation. 1051 3, 7 | Thou, Father Neptune, whose hoary temples are wreathed with 1052 2, 16 | itself through a narrow hole, and thus acquires new strength 1053 3, 9 | a sign who uses, or pays homage to, any significant object 1054 4, 28 | as well, providing things honest in the sight of God and 1055 4, 20 | armour of light. Let us walk honestly, as in the day; not in rioting 1056 3, 12 | it is disgraceful for men honorably born not to wear tunics 1057 3, 9 | hand, who either uses or honours a useful sign divinely appointed, 1058 2, 7 | loving his enemy, full of hopes and unbroken in strength, 1059 4, 20 | almost the whole of this hortatory passage is in the temperate 1060 4, 20 | necessity of saints; given to hospitality. Bless them which persecute 1061 4, 4 | this task to conciliate the hostile, to rouse the careless, 1062 2, 16 | each; the diurnal in the hours of the morning, the noontime, 1063 3, 36 | which shall be upon the housetop, and his stuff in the house, 1064 1, 14 | He restored him through humility. We were ensnared by the 1065 2, 7 | resolution, in which he hungers and thirsts after righteousness. 1066 1, 1 | to divide them among the hungry people. But when once they 1067 1, 14 | who ministers to a bodily hurt in some cases applies contraries, 1068 3, 12 | one woman to have several husbands, because a woman does not 1069 3, 7 | the winding rivers." This husk shakes its rattling stones 1070 1, 35 | more suitably express the idea that we are to love the 1071 4, 7 | ladder), when the words and ideas have a connection of dependency 1072 2, 23 | friendship. Not as if the idol were anything," says the 1073 3, 2 | sentence thus: "et quid eligam ignoro: compellor autem ex duobus" [ 1074 2, 13 | it? For whether the word ignoscere (to pardon) should be pronounced 1075 2 | BOOK II.~ 1076 3 | BOOK III.~ 1077 4, 28 | with a comely body but an ill-conditioned mind is a more painful object 1078 4, 7 | however, to reply to the ill-taught men who think our authors 1079 pref, 0| understand, nor was he inwardly illuminated by the grace of God without 1080 pref, 0| that he, through divine illumination, understands the obscurities 1081 3, arg | proceeds to expound and illustrate the seven rules of Tichonius 1082 3, 7 | of all those things, the images of which are worshipped 1083 1, 15 | tongue can tell, or what imagination can conceive, the reward 1084 2, 18 | but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart 1085 pref, 0| who, in the case I have imagined, are just able to see my 1086 4, 21 | part, become thoroughly imbued with them all. ~ 1087 4, 2 | That the former, while imbuing the minds of their hearers 1088 4, 8 | with eloquence, not to be imitated by Christian teachers~ 1089 1, 33 | him, although even in the immediate context to "enjoy" is used 1090 4, 7 | each: one describing the imminent catastrophe; another, the 1091 3, 21 | woman. But in his case the immoderate desire did not take up its 1092 4, 21 | granting that thou art not immodest in thy behaviour towards 1093 3, 34 | to them in the sure and immutable purpose of God; for what 1094 3, 34 | which, as we see, is now imparted to all nations, no one who 1095 4, 10 | to lead to weariness and impatience. ~ 1096 4, 21 | beautified by such arts is an impeachment of God's handiwork, and 1097 2, 21 | compelled by royal power or impelled by human folly to honour, 1098 3, 11 | after thy hardness and impenitent heart, treasures up unto 1099 3, 34 | generally, in any given Imperial command. The same thing 1100 3, 20 | restrained themselves from implacable hatred towards their sons, 1101 2, 6 | rising thence do, through the implanting of the Holy Spirit, yield 1102 1, 33 | of thee," he would have implied that he fixed his hope of 1103 4, 13 | enough, to give one's assent implies nothing more than to confess 1104 2, 7 | in this frame of mind he implores with unremitting prayers 1105 3, 36 | statement might be thought to imply, did we not accurately mark 1106 2, 1 | which, over and above the impression it makes on the senses, 1107 4, 20 | distresses, in strifes, in imprisonments, in tumults, in labours, 1108 4, 21 | his hand over it, as if to improve by his superior skill the 1109 1, 11 | should have been wholly incapable, had not Wisdom condescended 1110 1, 11 | Chap. 11. Wisdom becoming incarnate, a pattern to us of purification~ 1111 4, 21 | says: "Hence arise these incentives to vice, that women, in 1112 2, 37 | who have learnt them an inclination to lead people astray by 1113 1, 26 | love God and our neighbour includes a command to love ourselves~ 1114 1, 8 | who look upon the life as incomparably superior in dignity and 1115 1, 21 | wicked rise again to endure inconceivable punishment, and the good 1116 3, 18 | one wife because of their incontinence, were less near to God than 1117 2, 25 | would be carried on at great inconvenience; and the arrangements as 1118 1, 23 | and the immortality and incorruptibility of the body spring out of 1119 2, 18 | changed the glory of the incorruptible God into an image made like 1120 1, 19 | corruptible shall put on incorruption, and this mortal shall put 1121 1, 1 | Now, just as that bread increased in the very act of breaking 1122 4, 24 | them of what they thought incredible, not to make them do what 1123 4, 21 | proclaim openly that they have incurred their own! For the woman 1124 2, 1 | the feeling in his mind, independently of his will: and in the 1125 1, 29 | find any one comparatively indifferent, he does all he can to excite 1126 4, 21 | at the weak, or shun the indigent? She is accustomed to visit 1127 4, 18 | it that the apostle is so indignant, and that he thus accuses, 1128 2, 40 | intercourse with men which is indispensable in this life, we must take 1129 3, 28 | cannot be cleared up by indubitable evidence from Scripture, 1130 4, 26 | censures it should aim at inducing the hearer to strive after 1131 1, 40 | uprightly we are able to indulge the hope that our hope shall 1132 3, 18 | permitted as a matter of indulgence to have one wife because 1133 1, 6 | 6. In what sense God is ineffable~ 1134 4, 3 | And, therefore, as infants cannot learn to speak except 1135 1, 8 | plants, they consider it inferior to sentient life, such as 1136 1, 7 | and think of it vaguely as infinite, or of the most beautiful 1137 4, 20 | all. Ye know how, through infirmity of the flesh, I preached 1138 3, 21 | beginning of his reign he was inflamed with a desire for wisdom, 1139 4, 18 | of that cold water which inflames even the cold hearts of 1140 2, 38 | but which the acuteness of ingenious men brought to light. ~ 1141 4, 7 | territory, to show their ingratitude in trusting to the mountain 1142 2, 13 | civitates, in quibus ipsi inhabitant in ipsis?" (And what the 1143 4, 14 | what is just, not what is iniquitous, be listened to with pleasure. 1144 1, 23 | chap. 23. Man needs no injunction to love himself and his 1145 1, 26 | remained necessary to lay injunctions upon us in regard to God 1146 4, 20 | am as ye are: ye have not injured me at all. Ye know how, 1147 4, 21 | guide of her conscience; injuring no one, wishing well to 1148 3, 34 | epistle ... written not with ink, but with the Spirit of 1149 1, 12 | everywhere present to the inner eye when it is sound and 1150 1, 7 | that there are many or even innumerable gods of equal rank, still 1151 1, 24 | the better, so that its inordinate affections may not war against 1152 2, 23 | they become more eagerly inquisitive, and involve themselves 1153 4, 6 | and eloquence, like an inseparable attendant, followed it without 1154 3, 9 | yoke of bondage only to insert it in the coils of error. ~ 1155 4, 14 | by accident, or else was inserted designedly with this view, 1156 4, 21 | the light of a lamp set inside sheds its radiance on the 1157 2, 13 | Quae est terra in qua isti insidunt super eam, si bona est an 1158 2, 16 | although it is a small and insignificant plant, cannot make out why 1159 pref, 0| false, I do not strongly insist on them. For, as I am dealing 1160 4, 6 | authority, and who are evidently inspired of God. With this eloquence 1161 2, 2 | the movement of the mind instinctively and apart from any purpose, 1162 1, 39 | except for the purpose of instructing others. Accordingly, many 1163 4, 27 | with the conduct of their instructors, and who say in their hearts, 1164 2, 17 | with the mouth without an instrument; or by blowing, as in the 1165 4, 21 | artist would feel deeply insulted, and his indignation would 1166 4, 11 | distinctive features of good intellects not to love words, but the 1167 3, 18 | regard to wives is abuse and intemperance, as is proved by Tobit's 1168 1, 29 | all he can to excite his interest by urging his favorite's 1169 2, 13 | with indifference, as not interfering with a right understanding. 1170 2, 11 | happens chiefly in the case of interjections, which are words that express 1171 4, 21 | latter has no intervals of intermission, the former doubles the 1172 4, 7 | in deaths oft." Next is interposed a short period; for, by 1173 4, 20 | temperate eloquence, yet he interposes one passage of so much feeling 1174 4, 7 | gives the hearer rest, by interposing a slight narrative. For 1175 2, 12 | For it is difficult for interpreters to differ so widely as not 1176 1, 30 | this when he was himself interrogated in turn. To whom our Lord 1177 4, 14 | vine trees, pendulous and intertwined, creep amongst the supporting 1178 2, 22 | closely that there is no interval of time between them that 1179 2, 16 | things, and that knowledge interwoven with time. For both the 1180 4, 7 | then, turning to others, he intimates that these men have not 1181 1, 23 | reach of arrogance utterly intolerable. ~ 1182 2, 37 | in going through the very intricate and thorny discipline of 1183 4, 2 | false are to know how to introduce their subject, so as to 1184 4, 21 | Ambrose again, inveighing against such practices, 1185 2, 27 | knowledge, not of mere human invention, aid us in interpreting 1186 2, 9 | may proceed to open up and investigate the obscure passages, and 1187 2, 16 | when these names have been investigated and explained, many figurative 1188 2, 29 | where incantations and invocations and marks are not used, 1189 pref, 0| not understand, nor was he inwardly illuminated by the grace 1190 2, 13 | sunt civitates, in quibus ipsi inhabitant in ipsis?" (And 1191 2, 13 | quibus ipsi inhabitant in ipsis?" (And what the land is 1192 2, 13 | people who sing it: "Super ipsum autem floriet sanctificatio 1193 1, 30 | termination. But it is not irrational to ask whether in those 1194 4, 26 | the pleasure that truth so irresistibly established, and so victoriously 1195 3, 32 | tents of Cedar pertain to Ishmael, who "shall not be heir 1196 4, 30 | the discourse has a happy issue, they ought to render thanks 1197 2, 13 | Quae est terra in qua isti insidunt super eam, si bona 1198 2, 38 | make the first syllable of Italia long, while the ancients 1199 2, 15 | translations themselves the Italian (Itala) is to be preferred 1200 2, 39 | subjects for the sake of a few items of knowledge, the same, 1201 4 | BOOK IV.~ 1202 2, 8 | one of Jude; and one of James; one book of the Acts of 1203 2, 35 | rained on the kalends of January, although perhaps the fact 1204 pref, 0| wisdom and entire absence of jealous pride, accepted the plan 1205 1, 30 | going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, fell among thieves, and 1206 3, 11 | man that does evil, of the Jew first, and also of the Gentile." 1207 2, 8 | with one another, such as Job, and Tobias, and Esther, 1208 2, 8 | prophets are as follows: Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, 1209 4, 7 | third, and the fifth, and by joining the second to the first, 1210 1, 40 | is worthy of love. And he joins with this "a good conscience," 1211 2, 37 | to move the hinges of the joints and knees. For what he says 1212 2, 8 | Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, 1213 2, 16 | or Sinai, or Lebanon, or Jordan, and whatever other names 1214 2, 8 | Deuteronomy; one book of Joshua the son of Nun; one of Judges; 1215 2, 11 | angry man, Hosanna that of a joyful man. But the knowledge of 1216 3, 25 | The lion of the tribe of Judah has prevailed;" and again, 1217 2, 8 | Peter; three of John; one of Jude; and one of James; one book 1218 3, 34 | nations; but in regard to Judea also, and Egypt, and Assyria, 1219 2, 30 | with a view to forming a judgement about them, that we may 1220 2, 8 | Joshua the son of Nun; one of Judges; one short book called Ruth, 1221 4, 18 | life? If, then, ye have judgments of things pertaining to 1222 4, 21 | well, speak it, that is, judiciously, pointedly, and with beauty 1223 2, 8 | Tobias, and Esther, and Judith, and the two books of Maccabees, 1224 2, 21 | them in honour of the men Julius Caesar and Augustus Caesar; 1225 2, 21 | Quintilis and Sextilis to July and August, naming them 1226 2, 20 | part of the body should jump, or if, when friends are 1227 3, 4 | translator has it, "per vestram" juro "gloriam", the form of adjuration 1228 2, 12 | rest of the context also justifies this translation. ~ 1229 2, 35 | says that it rained on the kalends of January, although perhaps 1230 3, 12 | figurative, and the hidden kernel of meaning they contain 1231 3, 5 | this case too: "The letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life." 1232 4, 20 | to that which is good. Be kindly affectioned one to another 1233 4, 7 | which is called in Greek "klimax" (climax,) and by some in 1234 2, 37 | hinges of the joints and knees. For what he says is true, 1235 3, 18 | And now, O Lord. Thou knowest that I take not this my 1236 4, 7 | caesa), but the Greeks "koola" and "kommata", there follows 1237 3, 25 | we read in the Apocalypse,l and also the Holy Spirit, 1238 2, 23 | further and further in a labyrinth of most pernicious error. 1239 2, 40 | came out of Egypt? How much Lactantius brought with him? And Victorious, 1240 4, 7 | care to call it scala (a ladder), when the words and ideas 1241 2, 41 | that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. 1242 1, 3 | lower gratifications, we lag behind in, or even altogether 1243 4, 21 | within, as the light of a lamp set inside sheds its radiance 1244 4, 7 | names of places as with lamps, such as "Zion," "Samaria," " 1245 3, 36 | their tongues, in their lands, after their nations." And 1246 4, 7 | catastrophe; another, the lascivious couch; and the third, the 1247 4, 7 | oppression;" the second to lasciviousness: "ye that lie upon beds 1248 pref, 0| Christianus, of whom I have lately heard from very respectable 1249 3, 6 | had come. And hence their leaders brought it as a charge against 1250 2, 40 | when going out under the leadership of Christ from the fellowship 1251 2, 31 | ashamed of them, and of thus leading him to give up his error, 1252 4, 14 | the supporting reeds, the leafy covering has made a portico 1253 3, 25 | meal, till the whole was leavened." ~ 1254 2, 16 | signifies, or Sion, or Sinai, or Lebanon, or Jordan, and whatever 1255 2, 24 | Latins; and when I say, lege, these two syllables mean 1256 2, 17 | chap. 17. Origin of the legend of the nine Muses~ 1257 2, 31 | false inferences followed legitimately from the opinion of those 1258 3, 12 | manner of our Lord, to eating lentils after the manner of Esau, 1259 4, 18 | justice is in no degree lessened, though the matters to which 1260 1, 23 | third, that which is on a level with us; fourth, that which 1261 2, 8 | that is, Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy; one 1262 1, 36 | sometimes useful. For no liar keeps faith in the matter 1263 3, 8 | chap. 8. The Jews liberated from their bondage in one 1264 3, 19 | but with the shameless license of a sort of slavish freedom 1265 3, 12 | banquet among the drunken and licentious, it does not follow that 1266 2, 23 | or an object is struck by lightning, men have frequently drawn 1267 4, 5 | down from the Father of Lights, how much more ought we 1268 4, 18 | the circle, viz., that all lines drawn from the centre to 1269 1, 31 | the things it has itself lit up. The Psalmist says most 1270 3, 7 | from the burden and the livery of bondage to the flesh. ~ 1271 4, 24 | and thanks to God. And, lo, with the blessing of Christ, 1272 1, 1 | and perfect His gifts. The loaves in the miracle were only 1273 3, 34 | distinction which is in use among logicians, who discuss with great 1274 1, 38 | desire, for no one in his longing for it can set a higher 1275 1, 18 | and whatsoever it should loose on earth might be loosed 1276 1, 18 | loose on earth might be loosed in heaven; that is to say, 1277 3, 20 | were both cried up by the loud praises of believers, and 1278 3, 21 | but accuses him of being a lover of strange women; for in 1279 4, 20 | but condescend to men of low estate!" And a little afterwards: " 1280 2, 23 | false angels, to whom the lowest part of the world has been 1281 3, 29 | sense, as a grove is called lucus from its want of light; 1282 2, 8 | according to Mark, according to Luke, according to John; fourteen 1283 4, 21 | leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For 1284 2, 16 | it has in cleansing the lungs, nor the power it is said 1285 3, 21 | chap. 21. David not lustful, though he fell into adultery~ 1286 4, 21 | that was among them fell a lusting; and the children of Israel 1287 4, 21 | art plain, why test thou lyingly pretend to be beautiful, 1288 2, 3 | bugle and the flute and the lyre frequently give not only 1289 2, 8 | Judith, and the two books of Maccabees, and the two of Ezra, which 1290 3, 21 | only bore with him in his mad passion, but mourned over 1291 4, 7 | shrunk from raving like madmen? ~ 1292 2, 20 | as are employed in the magical arts, and which the poets 1293 4, 7 | and the vendors puff them magniloquently. And I fear lest I too should 1294 4, 20 | sons; the one by a bond maid, the other by a free woman. 1295 4, arg | the teacher, as it is the main requisite for instruction, 1296 4, 11 | to meet the tastes of the majority. ~ 1297 3, 7 | the One God, who is the Maker of all those things, the 1298 2, 8 | Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi; then there are the four 1299 3, 16 | one would think a deed of malevolence was enjoined. Do not doubt, 1300 4, 21 | neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness; but with 1301 3, 2 | he adds in these terms: "manere in carne necessarium propter 1302 3, 37 | not only of those who are manifestly out of the way, but of those 1303 2, 6 | are led astray by many and manifold obscurities and ambiguities, 1304 3, 12 | the result of abandoned manners, another thing when done 1305 2, 24 | was by attending to and marking them that they came to have 1306 3, 18 | Tobit's prayer when he was married to his wife. For he says: " 1307 3, 17 | passage where it is said, "Marry thy daughter, and so shalt 1308 2, 21 | away the slave either of Mars or of Venus, or rather, 1309 1, 23 | body. For assuredly the martyrs did not love the wickedness 1310 1, 1 | be made to rejoice in a marvellous increase of wealth. ~ 1311 4, 7 | any case, it is a touch of marvelous beauty not to say, "and 1312 4, 3 | occasionally be in the end mastered by men of slower intellect, 1313 1, 24 | not in hatred, but for the mastery, because it desires that 1314 2, 6 | they had been torn off and masticated by the teeth. It is with 1315 2, 7 | sight he cannot endure that matchless light, then in the fifth 1316 2, 2 | dove by cooing calls his mate, or is called by her in 1317 2, 21 | are now commonly called mathematici. For these, too, although 1318 2, 8 | the Gospel, according to Matthew, according to Mark, according 1319 4, 24 | example, when at Caesarean in Mauritania I was dissuading the people 1320 2, 39 | these we must hold by the maxim, "Not too much of anything;" 1321 2, 13 | autem floriet sanctificatio mea" (But upon himself shall 1322 3, 25 | hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened." ~ 1323 2, 20 | amulets and cures which the medical art condemns, whether these 1324 4, 16 | learned them." For as the medicines which men apply to the bodies 1325 pref, 0| others, and by dint of wise meditation to have arrived at a thorough 1326 pref, 0| to vouchsafe to me in my meditations on this subject. But before 1327 1, 6 | has desired us through the medium of our own words to rejoice 1328 4, 2 | power of speech to awe, to melt, to enliven, and to rouse 1329 4, 7 | caesum) but in a clause (membrum): "Are they the ministers 1330 1, 36 | perniciously deceptive nor mendacious, even though it be faulty. 1331 4, 21 | It is not necessary to mention the other circumstances 1332 3, 36 | really goes back without mentioning it to previous occurrences, 1333 4, 20 | therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present 1334 1, 17 | still gracious and more merciful, except to forgive us all 1335 3, 18 | all Thy creatures. Thou merriest Adam, and gavest him Eve 1336 4, 7 | they should be found in the messengers of Him who is the author 1337 4, 3 | whether they had never even met with them. For it is because 1338 2, 39 | and trees, and stones, and metals, and other species of things 1339 3, 29 | figure of speech called metaphor. Who does not speak of a 1340 4, 20 | man, describes even the metres employed by some of them, 1341 2, 8 | Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, 1342 4, 18 | are on that account called middling, or moderate. For moderate 1343 3, 7 | sea, whose beard is the mighty ocean flowing forth unceasingly, 1344 2, 3 | conversation to the eyes: and the military standards and flags convey 1345 2, 12 | feeds us as babes, upon milk, in the cradles of temporal 1346 4, 13 | enough for those stubborn minded men who both understand 1347 2, 40 | themselves, but dug out of the mines of God's providence which 1348 4, 22 | that it is against rule to mingle these various styles: on 1349 4, 21 | will support life, but not minister to appetite." Now I have 1350 4, 20 | ministry, let us wait on our ministering; or he that teacheth, on 1351 pref, 0| from heaven, or through the ministration of angels? Moreover, love 1352 2, 37 | and then should describe minutely the way you ought to move 1353 4, arg | detailing with much care and minuteness the various qualities of 1354 1, 1 | gifts. The loaves in the miracle were only five and seven 1355 2, 37 | make it more inclined to mischief or vanity, that is to say, 1356 1, 25 | he desires more. For the miser, though he loves money, 1357 2, 20 | at the prospect of coming misfortune than grieved by your present 1358 3, 9 | wrongly is the result of being misled by error. He, however, who 1359 3, 12 | things also, that lust do not mix with our use of them; for 1360 2, 23 | God, delivered over to be mocked and deceived, as the just 1361 4, arg | Holy Scriptures as the best models of eloquence, far excelling 1362 4, 10 | it ought to be done so moderately as not to lead to weariness 1363 3, 21 | And with what moderation and self-restraint those 1364 4, 14 | to a more dignified and modest form of eloquence, such 1365 4, 20 | in my own speech, however modestly I think it done, neglect 1366 1, 13 | of speech without being modified in its own nature by the 1367 4, 18 | things get their name from modus (a measure); and it is an 1368 1, 14 | contraries, as cold to hot, moist to dry, etc., and in other 1369 pref, 0| contempt by the Egyptian monk Antony, a just and holy 1370 4, 22 | taste. For when we keep monotonously to one style, we fail to 1371 1, 14 | mortal to save us who are mortals, by death to save us who 1372 2, 12 | have not understood that "moscheumata" are shoots of trees, and 1373 2, 12 | because the Greek word "moschos" means a calf, some have 1374 4, 20 | brethren; the elder women as mothers, the younger as sisters." 1375 4, 6 | goodness has provided to mould our characters, and to guide 1376 4, 7 | in Zion, and trust in the mountains of Samaria, who are heads 1377 2, 38 | unchangeableness, and who, mounting up from bodily appearances 1378 2, 30 | skilled in any of these arts moves his limbs in any operation 1379 2, 23 | the occurrence, as when a mule brings forth young, or an 1380 3, 21 | husband, that is, about the murder of the poor man himself 1381 1, 15 | done, not only without a murmur, but even with delight? ~ 1382 4, 26 | adversary by weight of nerve and muscle, and overwhelming and destroying 1383 2, 10 | it says: "Thou shalt not muzzle the ox that treadeth out 1384 4, 8 | from a knowledge of the mysteries, from one or other of these 1385 2, 8 | Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, 1386 2, 7 | pride as if our flesh were nailed to the tree. Next it is 1387 2, 21 | Sextilis to July and August, naming them in honour of the men 1388 3, 12 | this nature that is there narrated we are to take not only 1389 2, 29 | again, is not a matter of narration, but of description. Very 1390 2, 28 | adviser, not the fidelity of a narrator. ~ 1391 3, 3 | pronounce that saying of Nathanael's, "Can any good thing come 1392 3, 14 | altered by any diversity of national customs. And this precept, 1393 2, 30 | medicine, and agriculture, and navigation: or those whose sole result 1394 4, 20 | et carnis prividentiam ne in concupiscentiis feceritis", 1395 1, 14 | may be a certain degree of neatness in the binding, in addition 1396 3, 2 | terms: "manere in carne necessarium propter vos" [nevertheless 1397 4, 4 | greater vigour of speech is needed. Here entreaties and reproaches, 1398 4, 16 | unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly 1399 1, 31 | Thou art my God, for Thou neediest not my goodness." He does 1400 3, 6 | be distributed among the needy, and consecrated themselves 1401 4, arg | elsewhere, and ought not to be neglected, being indeed specially 1402 4, 7 | and therefore the most neglectful of brotherly love, he called 1403 4, 10 | in it "a kind of careful negligence." Yet while taking away 1404 3, 10 | it does with a view to a neighbor's advantage is called benevolence. 1405 4, 14 | us seek this abode: the neighbouring solitudes afford a retreat 1406 2, 13 | super eam, si bona est an nequam; et quae sunt civitates, 1407 4, 26 | its adversary by weight of nerve and muscle, and overwhelming 1408 2, 39 | this runs like a system of nerves through the whole structure 1409 3, 32 | time mixed up in the one net. For the tents of Cedar 1410 2, 16 | resurrection of our Lord, when the nets were cast out on the right-hand 1411 3, 34 | which is of one nation, by newness of grace, not by nobility 1412 3, 35 | the three days and three nights during which He foretold 1413 3, 34 | newness of grace, not by nobility of descent, in feeling, 1414 2, 3 | other senses. For, when we nod, we give no sign except 1415 4, 5 | who abounds in eloquent nonsense, and so much the more if 1416 2, 16 | hours of the morning, the noontime, the evening, and the night; 1417 3, 4 | indeed, if he had added "nostri", hardly any one would have 1418 2, 29 | conformably to certain signs as nostrums or the instruments of superstition; 1419 4, 6 | passages where the learned do note its presence, the matters 1420 2, 39 | that many things I had no notion of have been worked out 1421 4, 20 | sections, and periods? Yet, notwithstanding, there is a glow of strong 1422 4, 21 | power so as to bring to nought the words of thy Lord? With 1423 3, 10 | present. But all these tend to nourish and strengthen charity, 1424 1, 24 | flesh." He adds too, "but nourisheth and cherisheth it, even 1425 3, 12 | picked out as food for the nourishment of charity. Now, whoever 1426 2, 42 | things that are to be found nowhere else, but can be learnt 1427 2, 23 | sort, therefore, are either nullities, or are part of a guilty 1428 2, 13 | they be that they dwell in. Num. 13:19) And I am more disposed 1429 2, 16 | accomplished in periods numbering four each; the diurnal in 1430 2, 8 | book of Joshua the son of Nun; one of Judges; one short 1431 2, 14 | have been in a sort of way nurtured and brought up on the study 1432 1, 8 | itself, if they find it mere nutritive life, without sensibility, 1433 2, 8 | follows: Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, 1434 4, 26 | this style, too, when an obdurate heart is to be persuaded 1435 pref, 0| There is a third class of objectors who either really do understand 1436 4, 7 | unskilful of speech, had been obliged to deliver a message like 1437 3, 9 | and most sacred in the observance; such, for example, as the 1438 2, 24 | arrangement in the mind of the observer. ~ 1439 4, 7 | still, the educated man observes that those sections which 1440 2, 22 | Chap. 22. The folly of observing the stars in order to predict 1441 3, 6 | schoolmaster. And those who clung obstinately to such signs could not 1442 4, 26 | which is not ostentatiously obtruded, but seems rather to be 1443 2, 17 | citizens, but because it was obvious to remark that all sound, 1444 3, 20 | used all these things, as occasion served, and were not corrupted; 1445 2, 23 | something unusual in the occurrence, as when a mule brings forth 1446 4, 4 | the ignorant both what is occurring at present and what is probable 1447 2, 38 | double of any number because odd numbers have no half. Whether, 1448 4, 20 | of salvation. Giving no offense in anything, that the ministry 1449 4, 26 | ornament or defense, and offers battle in its own naked 1450 4, arg | and responsibility of the office he holds, to lead a life 1451 2, 16 | the smooth touch of olive oil is not easily spoiled by 1452 2, 28 | of matters by use of the Olympiads, and the names of the consuls; 1453 pref, 0| but also from themselves opening such secrets to others. 1454 4, 21 | disapproval, to proclaim openly that they have incurred 1455 2, 30 | speak, assist God in His operations, as medicine, and agriculture, 1456 4, 4 | of the true faith and the opponent of error, both to teach 1457 4, 26 | exposes the falsity of an opposing opinion, which seemed at 1458 1, 6 | called unspeakable. And this opposition of words is rather to be 1459 3, 9 | of our Lord, we are not oppressed with the heavy burden of 1460 4, 7 | future captivity under an oppressive king is announced as approaching, 1461 2, 40 | him? And Victorious, and Optatus, and Hilary, not to speak 1462 2, 7 | piety which gives him no option but to believe in and submit 1463 pref, 0| are," if God gave forth no oracles from His human temple, but 1464 3, 21 | this account he had given orders that his son should not 1465 2, 17 | each. And the state had originally given the order for three, 1466 pref, 0| in whatever mind it might originate, was to be ascribed not 1467 3, 33 | views on this question that originated, or at least greatly aggravated, 1468 pref, 0| his own, in the sense of originating with himself, but is the 1469 4, 14 | truths under a frothy mass of ornamental words, such as would not 1470 2, 31 | but only aims at verbal ornamentation more than is consistent 1471 4, 21 | also uses the temperate and ornamented style when he is holding 1472 4, 25 | his speech is elegant and ornate. But what use is there in 1473 4, 25 | beauty of expression not for ostentation, but for wise ends; not 1474 4, 6 | condemn it or to make an ostentatious display of it; and if they 1475 4, 26 | balance of style which is not ostentatiously obtruded, but seems rather 1476 3, 3 | not "stome" [mouth], but "osteon" [bone]. And for this reason 1477 2, 20 | each ear, or the rings of ostrich bone on the fingers, or 1478 pref, 0| and slothful servant, thou oughtest to have put my money to 1479 3, 12 | betrays, in a disgraceful outbreak, its own hideousness, which 1480 4, 7 | delightful it is when after this outburst he rests himself, and gives 1481 pref, 0| these things, because on the outpouring of the Holy Spirit the apostles 1482 pref, 0| convenient to reply at the outset to any who might make preliminary 1483 1, 8 | form itself, however it may outshine all others in splendour, 1484 1, 24 | be attained which would overbalance the loss. This and other 1485 3, 34 | Scripture whose significance oversteps the limits of the city, 1486 1, 8 | all others in splendour, overtop them in size, and excel 1487 3, 11 | the dominion of lust is overturned in a man over whom it had 1488 2, 40 | the One God, and thereby overturning the vain worship of idols. 1489 2, 7 | help that he may not be overwhelmed in despair, and so he gradually 1490 4, 26 | of nerve and muscle, and overwhelming and destroying the falsehood 1491 3, 12 | barley after the manner of oxen. For there are several beasts 1492 2, 12 | shed blood;" for the word "oxus" among the Greeks means 1493 3, 23 | For there is hardly a page of Scripture on which it 1494 4, 28 | ill-conditioned mind is a more painful object than if his body 1495 4, 7 | clauses being joined in pairs under the same pronoun, 1496 4, 26 | in the subdued style to pall upon the hearer; and therefore 1497 4, 25 | eloquence and make a boast of panegyrics, and suchlike performances, 1498 4, 7 | this whole passage, as if panting for breath, winds up with 1499 2, 25 | people of Carthage, while the pantomime was dancing, what it was 1500 2, 8 | one another, but running parallel, so to speak, and going


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