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St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

(Hapax - words occurring once)


132-crave | creat-handi | hangi-paral | pardo-stead | steep-zepha

     Book, Chapter
1501 1, 18 | believe that his sins can be pardoned, falls into despair, and 1502 1, 24 | it has derived from its parent stock, and which has grown 1503 4, 21 | When did she wound her parents even by a look? When did 1504 3, 21 | impious an adulterer and parricide had been hurried. For prior 1505 1, 29 | good, and love us too as partakers with them in so great a 1506 2, 16 | live unstained by, and not partaking of, any delight in time, 1507 3, 36 | the garden, and which was parted into four heads, the sources 1508 3, 32 | time united in a common participation of the sacraments. An example 1509 3, 2 | translators who have omitted this particle have preferred the interpretation 1510 4, 7 | reader's attention more particularly to the investigation of 1511 4, 29 | to true believers, both parties speak what is their own, 1512 2, 41 | the love of Christ which passeth knowledge," who is equal 1513 4, 21 | that this eloquence calls passionately upon women to avoid tampering 1514 3, 32 | not; I will lead them in paths that they have not known; 1515 3, 30 | he follow these rules as pathways of light, be preserved from 1516 3, 9 | spiritual persons belonged the patriarchs and the prophets, and all 1517 4, 7 | the period, and comes to a pause on the third. ~ 1518 4, 20 | beautiful in which, as if paying what was due, things that 1519 3, 9 | bondage to a sign who uses, or pays homage to, any significant 1520 3, 37 | expressed, which is the peculiarity of figurative diction; and 1521 3, 34 | as applying to the same peep]e. But when the prophet 1522 3, 33 | greatly aggravated, the Pelagian heresy. And the efforts 1523 4, 14 | shoots of the vine trees, pendulous and intertwined, creep amongst 1524 pref, 0| understand my directions, fail to penetrate the meaning of obscure passages 1525 2, 16 | to it on account of the Pentecost, and how this number taken 1526 1, 8 | such as that of men. And, perceiving that even this is subject 1527 4, 10 | African ears have no quick perception of the shortness or length 1528 2, 2 | of their minds, or their perceptions, or their thoughts. Nor 1529 3, 2 | next sentence, "et spiritus perficientes sanctificationem in timore 1530 4, 4 | what is wrong, and in the performance of this task to conciliate 1531 4, 25 | panegyrics, and suchlike performances, where the object is not 1532 1, 16 | has many members, and all performing different functions, He 1533 4, 20 | famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? (As it is written, 1534 4, 7 | which the Greeks call "periodos", the clauses of which are 1535 4, 29 | chap. 29. It is permissible for a preacher to deliver 1536 1, 37 | himself. And if he should once permit that evil to creep in, it 1537 3, 2 | themselves, it pronounces for and permits to be dovetailed into itself. ~ 1538 3, 18 | men to whom the apostle permitted as a matter of indulgence 1539 1, 36 | builds us up in love is not perniciously deceptive nor mendacious, 1540 2, 16 | easy to understand that perpetual peace is indicated by the 1541 2, 15 | Testament, again, if any perplexity arises from the diversities 1542 4, 20 | hospitality. Bless them which persecute you: bless, and curse not. 1543 2, 40 | the yoke of Christ, it was persecuting the Christians) have ever 1544 4, 20 | tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, 1545 4, 20 | Romans, he urges that the persecutions of this world should be 1546 4, 25 | it more zealously, and to persevere in it with constancy. Accordingly, 1547 2, 40 | scattered abroad, and are perversely and unlawfully prostituting 1548 3, 16 | him destroy and lose that perverted and unnatural use which 1549 4, 21 | too free, nor her voice petulant; so that her outward appearance 1550 2, 41 | sees toiling in Egypt under Pharaoh: "Come unto me, all ye that 1551 pref, 0| at the suggestion of God, Philip, who did understand the 1552 2, 8 | to the Ephesians, to the Philippians, two to the Thessalonians, 1553 4, 7 | great," and "Gath of the Philistine." Then the words joined 1554 2, arg | useful in their science and philosophy may be turned to a Christian 1555 2, 20 | the less offensive name of physica, so as to appear not to 1556 3, 34 | that he deals with us as a physician, giving us a wholesome exercise 1557 3, 12 | meaning they contain is to be picked out as food for the nourishment 1558 2, 25 | But in regard to pictures and statues, and other works 1559 4, 14 | that breaketh the rock in pieces." For to this God Himself 1560 3, 19 | by the bait of praise, or pierced by the stings of insult; 1561 2, 16 | power it is said to have of piercing rocks with its roots, although 1562 1, 30 | do we find it to bear our pilgrimage, and the more eagerly do 1563 1, 2 | stone which Jacob used as a pillow, nor the ram which Abraham 1564 4, 22 | excited, the higher the pitch to which it is raised, can 1565 4, 28 | teach lies are the more pitiable if they happen to be eloquent 1566 1, 30 | account of His; that is, He pities us that we may fully enjoy 1567 4, 21 | delighting in study; not placing her confidence in uncertain 1568 2, 16 | small and insignificant plant, cannot make out why it 1569 2, 12 | words that follow. For "the plantings of an adulterer will not 1570 2, 40 | philosophers, and especially the Platonists, have said aught that is 1571 2, 37 | to lead people astray by plausible speech and catching questions, 1572 4, 2 | falsehoods briefly, clearly, and plausibly, while the latter shall 1573 2, 6 | the facts, both that it is pleasanter in some cases to have knowledge 1574 1, 7 | moved by different kinds of pleasures, partly by those which pertain 1575 4, 21 | the Lord, to whom you have pledged your vows. Ye who are advanced 1576 4, 20 | possible, ye would have plucked out your own eyes, and have 1577 2, 34 | validity of the inference, plume themselves as if this involved 1578 4, 21 | it, that is, judiciously, pointedly, and with beauty and power 1579 4, 10 | leads to neglect of the more polished forms of speech, and indifference 1580 2, 16 | knowledge of things. The pool of Siloam, for example, 1581 4, 14 | leafy covering has made a portico of vine." There is wonderful 1582 4, 21 | man, and that, when the portrait had been finished with consummate 1583 4, 20 | having nothing, and yet possessing all things." See him still 1584 2, 2 | their mind. For when the poultry-cock has discovered food, he 1585 4, 15 | drink in what he is about to pour forth, and to be himself 1586 pref, 0| would have no means of pouring soul into soul, and, as 1587 4, 19 | importance is being urged, and powerfully when we are forcing a mind 1588 4, 13 | then, when he is urging a practical truth, must not only teach 1589 2, 30 | acquired, not with a view to practicing them (unless some duty compel 1590 3, 3 | for he does not say, sicut praedicavi, but sicut praedixi. ~ 1591 3, 12 | that make what we do either praiseworthy or blameable. ~ 1592 4, 19 | powers to the utmost in praising Him whom no one can adequately 1593 4, 30 | discourse. For if Queen Esther prayed, when she was about to speak 1594 4, 29 | in this way many become preachers of the truth (which is certainly 1595 4, 1 | place, then, I wish by this preamble to put a stop to the expectations 1596 2, 24 | nature, but by agreement and prearrangement as to its signification; 1597 4, 7 | of the statements which precede the period; this is the 1598 2, 22 | heel of his brother, who preceded him. Now, assuredly, the 1599 4, 3 | ought evidently to take precedence of it. For men of quick 1600 1, 36 | does not happen upon the precise meaning which the author 1601 2, 24 | his own conjectures and preconceptions have already entangled him 1602 2, 13 | that which those of our predecessors who spoke with any authority 1603 3, 35 | which Christ uttered the prediction and the first part of the 1604 2, 15 | authority of the Septuagint is preeminent as far as the Old Testament 1605 4, 28 | his very speech even he prefers to please by matter rather 1606 4, 21 | sacrament of the Lord's supper prefigured in the case of Melchizedek 1607 2, 40 | exodus was no doubt a type prefiguring what happens now. And this 1608 pref, 0| outset to any who might make preliminary objections, such is the 1609 4, arg | of expression, the author premises that it is no part of his 1610 1, 15 | retake themselves to diligent preparation, and learn by holy living 1611 4, 30 | to pray for those who are preparing it; and when they have received 1612 4, 7 | Hebrew into Latin by the presbyter Jerome, a man thoroughly 1613 1, 26 | measure of our love for Him is prescribed in such terms that it is 1614 4, 21 | that we are instructed, in presenting the cup, to maintain the 1615 2, 13 | purity of speech, except the preserving of the custom of language 1616 4, 20 | and not only when I am preset with you. My little children, 1617 1, 34 | but wishes us rather to press on; and, instead of weakly 1618 1, 34 | things which were behind, and pressing on towards those things 1619 2, 22 | arbitrarily fixed upon by the presumption of men, are to be referred 1620 4, 27 | apostle says: "Whether in pretence or in truth Christ is preached." 1621 4, 21 | plain, why test thou lyingly pretend to be beautiful, when thou 1622 3, 25 | of the tribe of Judah has prevailed;" and again, stands for 1623 2, 6 | subduing pride by toil, and of preventing a feeling of satiety in 1624 2, 16 | Ignorance of numbers, too, prevents us from understanding things 1625 3, 6 | their goods, and laid their price at the apostles' feet to 1626 4, 7 | reckoned of great value; great prices are paid for them, and the 1627 4, 14 | prophesy falsely, and the priests applaud them with their 1628 4, 26 | beauty, of course, being its primary object. ~ 1629 2, 23 | who, with the Devil their prince, strive only to shut and 1630 4, 7 | And I shall do so, quoting principally from the book of that prophet 1631 4, 5 | then, the men who teach the principles of eloquence have been forced 1632 4, 20 | translated thus, "et carnis prividentiam ne in concupiscentiis feceritis", 1633 2, 21 | former times, the usual proceeding in such cases was carried 1634 2, 33 | may be drawn by a valid process of reasoning, in order that 1635 2, 31 | There are also valid processes of reasoning which lead 1636 4, 21 | husband's disapproval, to proclaim openly that they have incurred 1637 3, 19 | measure necessary for the procreation of children, but with the 1638 2, 22 | separates the birth of twins, produces great effects in nature, 1639 2, 36 | as they are effective in producing knowledge or belief, or 1640 3, 3 | you in time past [sicut proedixi]," we could not know without 1641 2, 18 | foolish heart was darkened. Professing themselves to be wise, they 1642 3, 16 | should retain a sweet and profitable memory of the fact that 1643 1, 9 | man in the sun, whom it profits nothing that the splendour 1644 3, 12 | for which luxurious and profligate men are accustomed to have 1645 4, 21 | apostles, though clear, are yet profound, and are so written that 1646 4, 5 | he has made more or less progress in the knowledge of Scripture; 1647 3, 16 | interpreting commands and prohibitions~ 1648 4, 6 | former; if they had made it prominent, they might have appeared 1649 3, 12 | either gain or offspring by promiscuous intercourse. In regard to 1650 3, arg | can be true which does not promote the love of God and the 1651 2, 23 | God as the public means of promoting love towards God and our 1652 4, 25 | influence in securing their prompter compliance, or in making 1653 4, 21 | thee. Thou art the evil promptress of thine own injury. For 1654 3, 10 | But as men are prone to estimate sins, not by 1655 2, 13 | what is a barbarism but the pronouncing of a word in a different 1656 3, 3 | in the case of doubtful pronunciations. For these too, unless the 1657 3, 19 | circumstances of the time, of propagating the race; and what they 1658 4, 21 | hair: I would that, with a prophetic look to the future, thou 1659 2, 33 | example, suppose that a man propounds the statement, "If this 1660 4, 17 | does this with elegance and propriety, he may justly be called 1661 3, 2 | manere in carne necessarium propter vos" [nevertheless to abide 1662 2, 20 | be more frightened at the prospect of coming misfortune than 1663 3, 21 | passion and by temporal prosperity, had taken unlawful possession 1664 3, 19 | rumour, whether it appear prosperous or adverse, will carry them 1665 2, 40 | perversely and unlawfully prostituting to the worship of devils. 1666 2, 16 | serpent, for example, that to protect its head it will present 1667 3, 26 | shield put to indicate a protection of any kind, we must take 1668 4, 28 | modesty, because his life protects him against contempt. For 1669 3, 4 | where the apostle says, "I protest by your rejoicing [per vestram 1670 2, 8 | books of Solomon, viz., Proverbs, Song of Songs, and Ecclesiastes. 1671 2, 14 | number of the translators proves a very great assistance, 1672 4, 21 | violating what is God's, thou provest thyself worse than an adulteress. 1673 3, 34 | but in regard to a single province, or tribe, or kingdom. Not 1674 4, 21 | devoting himself chiefly to proving and enforcing his point. ~ 1675 2, 13 | shall my holiness flourish Ps.132:18), surely takes away 1676 4, 16 | is thus addressed in the psalm: "Teach me to do Thy will; 1677 2, 15 | assistance of the power of King Ptolemy, made known so long beforehand 1678 4, 7 | too should smack of that puffery while thus descanting on 1679 3, 11 | kingdoms, to root out, and to pull down, and to destroy, and 1680 3, 10 | the dominion of lust is pulled down, in the same proportion 1681 3, 11 | His saints, avails to the pulling down of the dominion of 1682 3, 2 | for two. We must therefore punctuate the sentence thus: "et quid 1683 3, 2 | what way it ought to be punctuated or pronounced, let the reader 1684 3, 3 | have given about ambiguous punctuations are to be observed likewise 1685 3, 21 | wives when he was forced to punish himself for transgressing 1686 2, 17 | they should select and purchase from him. It so happened 1687 4, 20 | watchings, in fastings; by pureness, by knowledge, by longsuffering, 1688 2, 41 | There is besides in hyssop a purgative virtue, that the breast 1689 2, 7 | sixth step, in which he purifies the eye itself which can 1690 2, 41 | adds, to show that it is purifying from pride that is indicated 1691 4, arg | mingled, and when and for what purposes they are mingled; and that 1692 2, 9 | the will of God. And in pursuing this search the first rule 1693 2, 28 | justly praised? For not even Pythagoras himself, from whose successors 1694 2, 13 | expressed: "Quae est terra in qua isti insidunt super eam, 1695 4, 21 | colouring and the deceptions of quackery into a lie? Thy Lord says, ' 1696 2, 34 | If he is a man, he is a quadruped." In these instances we 1697 1, 15 | His approach, instead of quaking at it on account of their 1698 4, arg | perspicuity is the most essential quality of style, and ought to be 1699 3, 35 | frequently discover or conjecture quantities of time which are not expressly 1700 2, 40 | Do we not see with what a quantity of gold and silver and garments 1701 4, 21 | by a look? When did she quarrel with her neighbours? When 1702 4, 26 | acute observations from a quarter whence nothing was expected; 1703 4, 30 | suitable discourse. For if Queen Esther prayed, when she 1704 3, 26 | apostle, "ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the 1705 2, 13 | quae sunt civitates, in quibus ipsi inhabitant in ipsis?" ( 1706 3, 2 | punctuate the sentence thus: "et quid eligam ignoro: compellor 1707 4, 22 | that we have to treat in a quieter style, we can return with 1708 2, 21 | the names of the months Quintilis and Sextilis to July and 1709 1, 36 | much better it is not to quit the straight road, lest, 1710 1, 36 | as a man who by mistake quits the high road, but yet reaches 1711 2, 13 | sapientius est hominum et quo infirmum est Dei fortius 1712 4, 7 | When, then, this rustic, or quondam rustic prophet, was denouncing 1713 4, 7 | style. And I shall do so, quoting principally from the book 1714 2, 30 | action, as dancing, and racing, and wrestling; in all these 1715 4, 21 | lamp set inside sheds its radiance on the outside. Why need 1716 3, 35 | shone as the sun, and His raiment was white as snow, one evangelist 1717 3, 5 | than when that in it which raises it above the brutes, the 1718 1, 2 | used as a pillow, nor the ram which Abraham offered up 1719 2, 22 | nature, and in the extremely rapid motion of the heavenly bodies. 1720 4, 20 | the sacred authors very rarely. ~ 1721 4, 21 | words of thy Lord? With rash and sacrilegious hand thou 1722 1, 22 | clothed, but as respects the rational soul by which he is exalted 1723 3, 7 | rivers." This husk shakes its rattling stones within a sweet covering, 1724 4, 7 | who would have shrunk from raving like madmen? ~ 1725 3, 2 | about things. But if both readings, or all of them (if there 1726 4, 21 | virginity shall begin to reap its reward of honour." ~ 1727 4, 20 | unto God, which is your reasonable service." And almost the 1728 4, 20 | powerful and active, the reasoner finds it impossible to return 1729 2, 16 | Lord Himself, who, as if receiving the witness both of the 1730 2, 21 | that even in times more recent and nearer our own, the 1731 4, 21 | entrance that there is no dark recess within, as the light of 1732 4, 7 | analysing it as kindled by reciting it with spirit. Nor was 1733 2, 27 | next point, we are not to reckon among human institutions 1734 2, 8 | since they have attained recognition as being authoritative. 1735 4, 7 | not as confessing that he recognized its truth. If he had said, " 1736 4, 14 | have with great eloquence recommended, not with a view to gaining 1737 4, arg | qualities of an orator, he recommends the authors of the Holy 1738 3, 36 | of the sons of Noah are recounted, it is said: "These are 1739 2, 11 | Greek, that they may have recourse to the original texts if 1740 1, 33 | them, set themselves to recruit our energies with the provision 1741 3, 5 | one day out of seven which recurs in constant succession; 1742 3, 25 | is a cup, and the wine is red: it is full of mixture." 1743 4, 21 | His blood by which we are redeemed and quickened, if the wine 1744 2, 6 | Christ uses as a means of redeeming those who come to it from 1745 2, 38 | strive to make all things redound to the praise and love of 1746 4, 14 | teaching had cured him of that redundancy of language, and confined 1747 4, 14 | creep amongst the supporting reeds, the leafy covering has 1748 2, 16 | except by knowledge of and reflection upon the number, the difficulty 1749 1, 33 | themselves; and then urge us thus refreshed to go on our way towards 1750 4, 21 | and when the desire for refreshment does arise, it is satisfied 1751 3, 6 | not believe that one who refused to observe them in the way 1752 4, 8 | which they are themselves regarded, but coming next to it. 1753 2, 29 | this knowledge, so far as regards its utility. ~ 1754 3, 34 | promise of that washing of regeneration which, as we see, is now 1755 2, 29 | course of the moon, which is regularly employed in reference to 1756 3, 21 | pass away like a guest, but reigned as a king. And about him 1757 3, 15 | thus overthrown, charity reigns through its supremely just 1758 3, 19 | But those who, giving the rein to lust, either wander about 1759 4, 21 | their mother the Church rejoices in them, and in them flourishes 1760 2, 39 | senses, are subject to the relations of space and time. ~ 1761 1, 30 | the name "neighbour" is a relative one, and no one can be neighbour 1762 4, 20 | overcome by charity, in assured reliance on the help of God. And 1763 1, 30 | him and came forward to relieve and care for him. And the 1764 2, 16 | number fifty, which in our religion has no ordinary sacredness 1765 2, 8 | being authoritative. The remainder are the books which are 1766 2, 17 | because it was obvious to remark that all sound, which is 1767 2, 25 | to express, a thing still remembered by many old men from whom 1768 4, 10 | forgotten anything, when he is reminded of it he is taught. But 1769 1, arg | Church, in which we receive remission of our sins. And if our 1770 4, 20 | order to give an accurate rendering of the words, he has not 1771 1, arg | are remitted and our souls renewed by grace, we may await with 1772 4, 26 | praises, and to avoid or renounce what it condemns. On the 1773 3, 36 | past life which they have renounced? Is not the present rather 1774 4, 7 | the same pronoun being repeated each time, and each clause 1775 1, 18 | should believe, and should repent, and turn from his sins, 1776 3, 36 | is finished, there is a repetition of the fact which had been 1777 2, 20 | mice had eaten his boots, replied, "That is not strange, but 1778 3, 20 | cried down by the slanderous reports of their persecutors. But 1779 3, 31 | For a single person is represented as saying, "He has decked 1780 3, 7 | considered a god, but only as representing the wide ocean, and all 1781 4, 16 | in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort, with all 1782 2, 23 | chap. 23. Why we repudiate arts of divination~ 1783 3, 22 | of them are praised, are repugnant to the habits of the good 1784 4, 28 | care to maintain a good reputation as well, providing things 1785 pref, 0| supplication obtaining his request that he might read through 1786 4, arg | teacher, as it is the main requisite for instruction, although 1787 4, 10 | acquaintance with them, but reread with delight by those who 1788 2, 15 | of greater learning and research. ~ 1789 2, 27 | of their own, but as the resell of investigation into the 1790 2, 8 | to Solomon from a certain resemblance of style, but the most likely 1791 2, 25 | But because one thing may resemble another in many ways, such 1792 2, 29 | also a species of narrative resembling description, in which not 1793 2, arg | ambiguities of language being reserved for treatment in the next 1794 3, 23 | clearly written that God resisteth the proud and giveth grace 1795 4, 21 | the cup. In this book he resolves the question, whether the 1796 3, 7 | temples are wreathed with the resounding sea, whose beard is the 1797 pref, 0| have lately heard from very respectable and trustworthy witnesses, 1798 2, 25 | the discretion of their respective sovereigns. ~ 1799 4, 26 | qualities attach themselves respectively to the three several styles 1800 4, arg | pointing out the dignity and responsibility of the office he holds, 1801 1, 39 | And thus a man who is resting upon faith, hope and love, 1802 1, 38 | has its only true and sure resting-place in eternity: an eternal 1803 1, 18 | ceased to have faith in the results of his own repentance. ~ 1804 2, 8 | place has read them all and retained them in his knowledge, if 1805 4, 20 | equivalent meaning, or by retaining the words he finds and altering 1806 1, 15 | the careless, so that they retake themselves to diligent preparation, 1807 4, 5 | these the men who are not so retentive of the words, but see with 1808 2, 16 | brought with it when it returned to the ark, is that we know 1809 4, 7 | stripes save one." Then he returns to sections, and three are 1810 3, 9 | is not yet expedient to reveal to carnal minds those signs 1811 4, 21 | poor; diligent in labour; reverent in word; accustomed to look 1812 3, 9 | what they refer, and so reveres them not in carnal bondage, 1813 3, 36 | recapitulation by which the narrative reverts to what had previously been 1814 1, 20 | terrible death, and shall revive, not to change his earthly 1815 2, 16 | the diurnal and the annual revolutions are accomplished in periods 1816 4, 20 | schools of the grammarians and rhetoricians to consider of importance; 1817 4, 26 | of expression, and by a rhythm and balance of style which 1818 4, 20 | as poor, yet making many rich; as having nothing, and 1819 2, 16 | nets were cast out on the right-hand side of the boat. And in 1820 2, 20 | top of each ear, or the rings of ostrich bone on the fingers, 1821 4, 20 | honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and drunkenness, not in 1822 4, 20 | except at the end, where it rises into a temperate eloquence, 1823 4, 21 | should depict in colours that rival nature's the features and 1824 3, 36 | good and evil." Next the river is mentioned which watered 1825 1, 36 | may sometimes take cross roads, or even go in the wrong 1826 3, 25 | adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about seeking 1827 1, 22 | unoccupied, and to afford room, as it were, for the wish 1828 4, 7 | kommata", there follows a rounded sentence (ambitus sive circuitus) 1829 4, 4 | and all the other means of rousing the emotions, are necessary. ~ 1830 2, 21 | were either compelled by royal power or impelled by human 1831 4, 18 | guarded against is eternal ruin, everything that we say 1832 2, 24 | those signs by which the ruinous intercourse with devils 1833 1, 23 | unchangeable Light, the Ruler of all things, does so that 1834 4, 20 | with simplicity; he that ruleth, with diligence; he that 1835 3, 19 | so light that a breath of rumour, whether it appear prosperous 1836 2, 39 | it cannot, because this runs like a system of nerves 1837 4, 3 | seize upon the faults of rustics. ~ 1838 2, 8 | Judges; one short book called Ruth, which seems rather to belong 1839 2, 16 | religion has no ordinary sacredness attached to it on account 1840 2, 23 | said about idols and the sacrifices offered in their honour, 1841 4, 21 | And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth bread and 1842 3, 18 | good hope may learn the salutary lesson, both that the custom 1843 2, 23 | though the ghost of the dead Samuel foretold the truth to King 1844 2, 13 | Super ipsum autem floriet sanctificatio mea" (But upon himself shall 1845 3, 2 | et spiritus perficientes sanctificationem in timore Dei capite nos" [ 1846 3, 34 | to say: "And I shall be sanctified in you before their eyes. 1847 3, 34 | begins to say, "And I will sanctify my great name, which was 1848 2, 8 | prefer such as have the sanction of the greater number and 1849 3, 34 | children of Israel be as the sand of the sea, yet a remnant 1850 4, 10 | congregabo conventicula eorum de sanguinibus" (I shall not assemble their 1851 pref, 0| prophet, came to him, and sat with him, and in human words, 1852 1, 4 | a thing is to rest with satisfaction in it for its own sake. 1853 2, 23 | foretold the truth to King Saul, that does not make such 1854 4, 21 | knowledge of divine and saving truth, and have ministered 1855 3, 34 | by the appearing of our Saviour." He speaks of the grace 1856 4, 7 | they do not care to call it scala (a ladder), when the words 1857 4, 3 | Indeed, I think there are scarcely any who can do both things 1858 1, 24 | they seem in some sort to scourge their bodies by abstinence 1859 4, 27 | made this observation: "The scribes and the Pharisees sit in 1860 2, 15 | unwilling, either from religious scruple or from jealousy, to make 1861 1, 34 | Spirit binds, and as it were seals us, so that we are able 1862 2, 9 | God. And in pursuing this search the first rule to be observed 1863 2, 9 | rules of faith, are to be searched into more carefully and 1864 2, 33 | may be drawn from valid seasonings, and vice versa~ 1865 2, 21 | fixed movement, by which the seasons are distinguished and varied. 1866 1, 24 | question was ever raised by any sect. But neither does any man 1867 4, 10 | best mode is that which secures that he who hears shall 1868 4, 20 | made. He saith not, And to seeds, as of many; but as of one, 1869 4, 26 | nothing was expected; when it seizes upon and exposes the falsity 1870 3, 21 | with what moderation and self-restraint those men used their wives 1871 2, 23 | wretched men in private and selfish strivings after temporal 1872 2, 21 | actions, grievously err, and sell inexperienced men into a 1873 3, 37 | ground down on the earth, who sendeth to all nations," does not 1874 3, 37 | For, although the devil sends his angels to all nations, 1875 1, 8 | nutritive life, without sensibility, such as that of plants, 1876 2, 8 | which last look more like a sequel to the continuous regular 1877 2, 32 | chap. 32. Valid logical sequence is not devised but only 1878 2, 32 | the validity of logical sequences is not a thing devised by 1879 2, 31 | than is consistent with seriousness of purpose, is also called 1880 2, 6 | men who, as good and true servants of God, have come to the 1881 3, 7 | that we should love and serve the One God, who is the 1882 3, 20 | these things, as occasion served, and were not corrupted; 1883 3, 3 | chap. 3. How pronunciation serves to remove ambiguity different 1884 4, 20 | and asks, "Wherefore then serveth the law?" And the answer 1885 3, 28 | controversy arises, may settle it by the application of 1886 1, 30 | fell among thieves, and was severely wounded by them, and left 1887 2, 25 | purpose of distinguishing sex or rank; and the countless 1888 2, 21 | the months Quintilis and Sextilis to July and August, naming 1889 1, 9 | dwelling long among the shadows of the flesh. And thus men 1890 1, 37 | authority of Scripture begin to shake. And then, if faith totter, 1891 3, 7 | winding rivers." This husk shakes its rattling stones within 1892 4, 18 | Church. I speak to your shame. Is it so, that there is 1893 3, 12 | prophet Hosea. Because it is a shamefully wicked thing to strip the 1894 3, 19 | of children, but with the shameless license of a sort of slavish 1895 3, 16 | enjoining that we should have a share in the sufferings of our 1896 4, 21 | light of a lamp set inside sheds its radiance on the outside. 1897 4, 7 | prophet who says that he was a shepherd or herdsman, and was called 1898 4, 23 | comparison and may as it were shine out with greater brilliance 1899 2, 16 | carbuncle, for instance, which shines in the dark, throws light 1900 2, 7 | has gazed upon this object shining from afar, and has felt 1901 3, 23 | are to be avoided and the shipwrecks that are to be wept over. 1902 4, 22 | raised, can be maintained the shorter time. And therefore we must 1903 3, 34 | land," and what he says shortly afterwards, as if repeating 1904 4, 10 | quick perception of the shortness or length of vowels? And 1905 4, 21 | look to the future, thou shouldst dye it the color of flame." 1906 4, 11 | making them do what they shrank from, but in making clear 1907 4, 7 | eloquence, yet eloquence not shrinking from wisdom. For if, as 1908 2, 6 | expressions are so obscure as to shroud the meaning in the thickest 1909 4, 7 | at least, who would have shrunk from raving like madmen? ~ 1910 2, 13 | isti insidunt super eam, si bona est an nequam; et quae 1911 3, 21 | afflicted for him while he was sick, yet he comforted himself 1912 2, 2 | has discovered food, he signals with his voice for the hen 1913 3, 25 | opposite, but only in different significations: water denotes people, as 1914 3, 26 | kind, we must take it as signifying nothing but the favour of 1915 1, 6 | rather to be avoided by silence than to be explained away 1916 4, 24 | the other hand, frequently silences the audience by its impressiveness, 1917 1, 9 | no one is so egregiously silly as to ask, "How do you know 1918 2, 16 | knowledge of things. The pool of Siloam, for example, where the 1919 2, 31 | being cunning and the other simple. Then the first speaker 1920 4, 21 | continue to exist when what is sincere is polluted, and what is 1921 3, 10 | reference to their inherent sinfulness, but rather by reference 1922 2, 13 | except the usage of the singers. Mistakes of this kind, 1923 2, 16 | Jerusalem signifies, or Sion, or Sinai, or Lebanon, or 1924 2, 8 | written by Jesus the son of Sirach. Still they are to be reckoned 1925 3, 18 | that I take not this my sister for lust, but uprightly: 1926 4, 20 | mothers, the younger as sisters." And also in these: "I 1927 4, 27 | scribes and the Pharisees sit in Moses's seat." The seat 1928 4, 27 | teach their own doctrines, sitting as they do in the high places 1929 2, 29 | has been written about the situation of places, and the nature 1930 2, 32 | as he who describes the situations of places, or the natures 1931 4, 7 | rounded sentence (ambitus sive circuitus) which the Greeks 1932 1, 8 | splendour, overtop them in size, and excel them in beauty, 1933 2, 8 | grant me wisdom. The most skilful interpreter of the sacred 1934 2, 16 | serpent gets rid of its old skin by squeezing itself through 1935 3, 21 | that his son should not be slain if he were conquered in 1936 3, 20 | believers, and cried down by the slanderous reports of their persecutors. 1937 4, 20 | accounted as sheep for the slaughter.) Nay, in all these things 1938 3, 19 | shameless license of a sort of slavish freedom heap up the filth 1939 3, 12 | heels, and furnished with sleeves, but now it is disgraceful 1940 3, 10 | kind of poverty, it easily slides into crimes, in order to 1941 4, 7 | hearer rest, by interposing a slight narrative. For he goes on 1942 2, 20 | you are putting on your slippers; to return home if you stumble 1943 pref, 0| useful study to the dull sloth of ignorance. ~ 1944 1, 14 | up wounds, do it not in a slovenly way, but carefully, that 1945 4, 2 | defense of the truth be sluggish, and frigid, and somnolent? 1946 4, 7 | I fear lest I too should smack of that puffery while thus 1947 2, 8 | such as are held by the smaller number and those of less 1948 2, 16 | that we know both that the smooth touch of olive oil is not 1949 2, 4 | from every man trying to snatch the chief place for himself. 1950 2, 20 | to bed if any one should sneeze when you are putting on 1951 2, 39 | happiness they seek; but soberly and carefully to discriminate 1952 3, 34 | city is a part of the great society of nations: the city he 1953 3, 36 | day that Lot went out of Sodom it rained fire from heaven, 1954 2, 6 | with all their harshness softened down, just as if they had 1955 3, 35 | during which the Church is a sojourner among aliens); or when multiplied 1956 3, 6 | the Holy Spirit that they sold all their goods, and laid 1957 2, 1 | when the trumpet sounds, soldiers know that they are to advance 1958 4, 3 | not aim at this, but is solely intent on the matters treated 1959 3, 20 | wives and concubines were solicited and debauched. ~ 1960 4, 6 | empty inflation, but from solid merit) as it seems to fall 1961 4, 14 | the more crushing from its solidity! Assuredly it is "a hammer 1962 1, 39 | the Scriptures, even in solitude, on the strength of these 1963 4, 14 | abode: the neighbouring solitudes afford a retreat where, 1964 1, 28 | bound to give it away to somebody who had none, and that it 1965 1, 32 | advantage we do so; but somehow or other our own advantage 1966 4, 2 | sluggish, and frigid, and somnolent? Who is such a fool as to 1967 2, 8 | viz., Proverbs, Song of Songs, and Ecclesiastes. For two 1968 4, 20 | gradually to a climax, or of sonorous clauses, and sections, and 1969 2, 31 | many of what are called sophisms, inferences in reasoning 1970 2, 33 | we wish to correct may be sorry that he has admitted the 1971 2, 31 | into and unravelling all sorts of questions that come up 1972 2, 25 | discretion of their respective sovereigns. ~ 1973 2, 23 | the Apostle Paul did not spare the evil spirit on that 1974 4, 21 | prudent in disposition; sparing of words; delighting in 1975 4, 21 | outside. Why need I detail her sparingness in food, her superabundance 1976 4, 15 | Spirit of your Father which speaketh in you." The Holy Spirit, 1977 4, 21 | whom I have selected as specimens of the rest, and in other 1978 2, 24 | and prejudices. For those spirits which are bent upon deceiving, 1979 4, 21 | endure bravely, advance in spirituality, finish your course with 1980 2, 16 | anointed with clay made out of spittle was commanded to wash, has 1981 2, 16 | olive oil is not easily spoiled by a fluid of another kind, 1982 4, 6 | sought out by the speaker as spontaneously to suggest themselves; as 1983 1, 16 | and it is even called His spouse. His body, then, which has 1984 4, 14 | retreat where, whilst the spreading shoots of the vine trees, 1985 2, 23 | of a guilty superstition, springing out of a baleful fellowship 1986 3, 34 | your own land. Then will I sprinkle clean water upon you, and 1987 2, 38 | not nine, or do not make a square, or are not the triple of 1988 2, 16 | gets rid of its old skin by squeezing itself through a narrow 1989 4, 21 | St. Ambrose also, though dealing 1990 4, 27 | quoted about men of this stamp, made this observation: " 1991 2, 25 | weights and measures, and the stamping and weighing of coins, which 1992 2, 3 | the eyes: and the military standards and flags convey through 1993 3, 23 | let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall." 1994 2, 16 | to bring the reader to a standstill, their meaning is to be 1995 pref, 0| objections, such is the start I have thought good to make 1996 4, 7 | upon the drowsy senses to startle them into wakefulness: " 1997 4, 21 | others: "When Gideon was startled by the message he had heard 1998 3, 7 | worship neither? For any statue you like to take is as much 1999 3, 34 | cause you to walk in my statutes, and ye shall keep my commandments, 2000 4, 21 | in faith, humble in fear, steadfast in the endurance of suffering, 2001 1, 23 | of the soul is to cling steadfastly to the better part, that


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