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St. Catherine of Siena
The Dialogue of Saint Catherine

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     Chapter, Paragraph
1 Intro, 0| hard to say whether the Age of the Saints, le moyen age 2 Intro, 0| suffered more at the hands of friends or foes. It is at 3 Intro, 0| approach it in the manner of a powerful personality who 4 Intro, 0| indifference. When the contempt of the eighteenth century for 5 Intro, 0| the subject, the result of that century's lack of historic 6 Intro, 0| result of that century's lack of historic imagination, was 7 Intro, 0| somewhat rhetorical enthusiasm of Chateaubriand and of the 8 Intro, 0| enthusiasm of Chateaubriand and of the Romanticists beyond 9 Intro, 0| admiration. The shadows fell out of the picture; the medieval 10 Intro, 0| society reached the zenith of perfection which constituted 11 Intro, 0| with all the paraphernalia of scientific history, and, 12 Intro, 0| perhaps, a juster view of the matter. The Germans, 13 Intro, 0| too, have had disciples of other nations, and though 14 Intro, 0| country now at a certain level of education, the same views 15 Intro, 0| heresy as to the standards of legitimate evidence, the 16 Intro, 0| that the most delicate part of his work begins. History, 17 Intro, 0| begins. History, to be worthy of the name, must produce the 18 Intro, 0| must produce the illusion of living men and women, and, 19 Intro, 0| upon personal appreciation of the particular men and women 20 Intro, 0| but for the determination of their significance, of their 21 Intro, 0| determination of their significance, of their value, as illustrative 22 Intro, 0| their value, as illustrative of a course of policy or of 23 Intro, 0| illustrative of a course of policy or of the character 24 Intro, 0| of a course of policy or of the character of those who 25 Intro, 0| policy or of the character of those who were responsible 26 Intro, 0| measure on the personality of the historian. It is evident 27 Intro, 0| Now, while this is true of all history whatever, it 28 Intro, 0| whatever, it is perhaps truer of the history of the middle 29 Intro, 0| perhaps truer of the history of the middle ages than of 30 Intro, 0| of the middle ages than of that of any more recent 31 Intro, 0| middle ages than of that of any more recent period, 32 Intro, 0| period, nor is the reason of this far to seek. The middle 33 Intro, 0| Capital" or the "Rights of Man" has largely taken the 34 Intro, 0| largely taken the place of the individual as a plastic 35 Intro, 0| force. The one great Tyrant of the nineteenth century found 36 Intro, 0| last rather by a conspiracy of the slowly developing anonymous 37 Intro, 0| developing anonymous forces of his time than by the superior 38 Intro, 0| superior skill or strength of an individual rival. The 39 Intro, 0| trecento. Then, the fate of populations was bound up 40 Intro, 0| up with the animosities of princes, and, in order to 41 Intro, 0| to understand the state of Europe at any particular 42 Intro, 0| at any particular moment of that period, it is necessary 43 Intro, 0| to understand the state of soul of the individuals 44 Intro, 0| understand the state of soul of the individuals who happened, 45 Intro, 0| however, that the personality of the prince was the only 46 Intro, 0| force which we, in spite of the petulant acerbity of 47 Intro, 0| of the petulant acerbity of modern theological controversies, 48 Intro, 0| before the Judgment- seat of Christ, and the theory of 49 Intro, 0| of Christ, and the theory of medieval Christianity was 50 Intro, 0| was considerably in favor of the serf. The Father of 51 Intro, 0| of the serf. The Father of Christendom, at once Priest 52 Intro, 0| consecrated as the social exponent of the Divine Justice, could 53 Intro, 0| one day, render an account of his stewardship. Nor did 54 Intro, 0| from contemplating the fate of the faithless steward. In 55 Intro, 0| Florence, the ministers of justice seem to have a special 56 Intro, 0| weighed on the conscience of Christendom solely, or even 57 Intro, 0| aided by the ignorance of the people, succeeded in 58 Intro, 0| to control the destinies of the soul by quasi-magical 59 Intro, 0| agencies and the powers of excommunication. Nothing 60 Intro, 0| the whole external fabric of Catholicism, its sacraments, 61 Intro, 0| and sacred in its place, of the Idea of Christianity, 62 Intro, 0| in its place, of the Idea of Christianity, that the vitality 63 Intro, 0| Christianity, that the vitality of that Idea was the life by 64 Intro, 0| confusion, committed the blunder of adding to the formula of 65 Intro, 0| of adding to the formula of excommunication from the 66 Intro, 0| Church Militant, a sentence of exclusion from the Church 67 Intro, 0| he was in the tradition of medieval orthodoxy. Moreover, 68 Intro, 0| though the strict logic of her theory might have required 69 Intro, 0| as the sole manifestation of the Divine Will to Christendom. 70 Intro, 0| saint a well-known type of human character just as 71 Intro, 0| held to be exempt from many of the limitations of fallen 72 Intro, 0| many of the limitations of fallen humanity. His prayers 73 Intro, 0| humanity. His prayers were of certain efficacy; the customary 74 Intro, 0| the customary uniformities of experience were thought 75 Intro, 0| the bearer to Christendom of a Divine message over and 76 Intro, 0| and above the revelation of which the hierarchy was 77 Intro, 0| indeed that message was one of warning or correction to 78 Intro, 0| ecclesiastical system as the Prophets of Israel had done, under the 79 Intro, 0| Priesthood. They came out of their hermitages or cloisters, 80 Intro, 0| been so indeed the state of Europe might have been very 81 Intro, 0| Christians, the organization of the Church was Divine; it 82 Intro, 0| sacred responsibilities of his office that they judged 83 Intro, 0| An apt illustration of this attitude occurs in 84 Intro, 0| attitude occurs in the life of the Blessed Colomba of Rieti. 85 Intro, 0| life of the Blessed Colomba of Rieti. Colomba, who was 86 Intro, 0| to the unusual vocation of preaching. The local representatives 87 Intro, 0| The local representatives of the Holy Office, alarmed 88 Intro, 0| and took the opportunity of a visit of Alexander VI. 89 Intro, 0| the opportunity of a visit of Alexander VI. to the neighboring 90 Intro, 0| to the neighboring town of Perugia to bring her before 91 Intro, 0| reverently kissed the hem of his garment, and, being 92 Intro, 0| with devotion at the sight of the Vicar of Christ, fell 93 Intro, 0| at the sight of the Vicar of Christ, fell into an ecstasy, 94 Intro, 0| Divine judgment on the sins of Rodrigo Borgia. It was useless 95 Intro, 0| she was beyond the control of inquisitor or guards; the 96 Intro, 0| her free with every mark of reverence. In this highly 97 Intro, 0| justified, at perilous odds, of her children. . . . * * * ~ 98 Intro, 0| lightly settled on the summits of three hills which it crowns 99 Intro, 0| which clothe the slopes of the hills or with its crenellated 100 Intro, 0| the neighboring heights of Belcaro, the city is familiar 101 Intro, 0| is familiar to students of the early Italian painters. 102 Intro, 0| fantastic and solemn background of many a masterpiece of the 103 Intro, 0| background of many a masterpiece of the trecentisti, and seems 104 Intro, 0| they can have on earth, of the glorified persons who 105 Intro, 0| turn in the road, on one of the sacred groups so familiarly 106 Intro, 0| once the successful rival of Florence in commerce, war, 107 Intro, 0| which, in the far-off days of 1348, carried off 80,000 108 Intro, 0| 1348, carried off 80,000 of its population. Grassy mounds 109 Intro, 0| walls mark the shrinking of the town since the date 110 Intro, 0| the town since the date of their erection, and Mr. 111 Intro, 0| which, on that memorable 4th of September 1260, defeated, 112 Intro, 0| defeated, with the help of Pisa, at Monte Aperto, the 113 Intro, 0| Aperto, the combined forces of the Guelf party in Tuscany, 114 Intro, 0| has now, after centuries of servitude to Spaniard and 115 Intro, 0| somewhat pinchbeck dignity of an Italian Prefettura. At 116 Intro, 0| overtaken Florence at the hands of her modern rulers has been 117 Intro, 0| its presence in the folds of olive which enwrap the base 118 Intro, 0| olive which enwrap the base of the hill on which the city 119 Intro, 0| paved streets between lines of palaces, some grim and massive 120 Intro, 0| others delicate specimens of Italian Gothic like the 121 Intro, 0| illustrating the combination of grace and strength which 122 Intro, 0| the domestic architecture of the Renaissance at its prime, 123 Intro, 0| with which the experience of our own utilitarian century 124 Intro, 0| eyes, unmistakably a world of facts, though of facts, 125 Intro, 0| a world of facts, though of facts, as it were, visibly 126 Intro, 0| interpreted by the deeper truth of an art whose insistent presence 127 Intro, 0| presence is on all sides of us. Here is Casa Tolomei, 128 Intro, 0| Casa Tolomei, a huge cube of rough-hewn stone stained 129 Intro, 0| stone stained to the color of tarnished silver with age, 130 Intro, 0| with age, once the home of that Madonna Pia whose story 131 Intro, 0| lives forever in the verse of Dante. Who shall distinguish 132 Intro, 0| between her actual tale of days and the immortal life 133 Intro, 0| the poet? In her moment of suffering at least she has 134 Intro, 0| street, is another house of medieval Siena -- no palace 135 Intro, 0| Benincasa, a dyer. Part of it has now been converted 136 Intro, 0| a chapel, over the door of which are inscribed the 137 Intro, 0| Caterina, who still lives one of the purest glories of the 138 Intro, 0| one of the purest glories of the Christian Church under 139 Intro, 0| Christian Church under the name of St. Catherine of Siena. 140 Intro, 0| the name of St. Catherine of Siena. More than 500 years 141 Intro, 0| passed since the daughter of the Siennese dyer entered 142 Intro, 0| dyer entered into the rest of that sublime and touching 143 Intro, 0| teaching as to the destiny of man. Another case, but how 144 Intro, 0| more significant than that of poor Madonna Pia, of the 145 Intro, 0| that of poor Madonna Pia, of the intertwining of the 146 Intro, 0| Pia, of the intertwining of the world of fact with the 147 Intro, 0| intertwining of the world of fact with the deeper truth 148 Intro, 0| fact with the deeper truth of art. ~ 149 Intro, 0| piety. Lapa, the daughter of one Mucio Piagenti, a now 150 Intro, 0| children to her husband, of whom thirteen only appear 151 Intro, 0| little house, till the death of Giacomo in 1368. ~ 152 Intro, 0| hagiology. Who can read unmoved of the struggles towards his 153 Intro, 0| struggles towards his ideal of an Augustine or a Loyola, 154 Intro, 0| Augustine or a Loyola, or of the heroic courage of a 155 Intro, 0| or of the heroic courage of a Theresa, affirming against 156 Intro, 0| human odds the divinity of her mission, and justifying, 157 Intro, 0| justifying, after years of labor, her incredible assertions 158 Intro, 0| assertions by the steadfastness of her will? There are other 159 Intro, 0| other pages in the lives of the saints, less dramatic, 160 Intro, 0| their own: the childhood of those servants of Christ 161 Intro, 0| childhood of those servants of Christ who have borne His 162 Intro, 0| borne His yoke from the dawn of their days forms their charming 163 Intro, 0| the blasting illuminations of the Revelation are toned 164 Intro, 0| which the curves and lines of natural humanity do but 165 Intro, 0| hymn at Lauds for the Feast of the Holy Innocents represents 166 Intro, 0| crowns under the very altar of Heaven: -- ~ 167 Intro, 0| hermits or monasteries instead of the soldiers and housekeeping 168 Intro, 0| and housekeeping beloved of more secular-minded infants. 169 Intro, 0| pious revels: we are told of the Blessed Hermann Joseph, 170 Intro, 0| no exception to the rest of her canonized brothers and 171 Intro, 0| and sisters. At the age of five it was her custom on 172 Intro, 0| ground, much to the alarm of her mother, who confided 173 Intro, 0| confided to Father Raymond of Capua, the Dominican confessor 174 Intro, 0| the Dominican confessor of the family, her fears of 175 Intro, 0| of the family, her fears of an accident. Nor were these 176 Intro, 0| phenomena the only reward of her infant piety. From the 177 Intro, 0| who gave her the pet name of Euphrosyne, to signify the 178 Intro, 0| grief-dispelling effect of her conversation, and who 179 Intro, 0| on an errand to the house of her married sister Bonaventura, 180 Intro, 0| bearing on the great task of her after-life, I will relate 181 Intro, 0| being arrived at the age of six, went one day with her 182 Intro, 0| than herself, to the house of their sister Bonaventura, 183 Intro, 0| opposite side above the Church of the Preaching Friars a most 184 Intro, 0| Jesus Christ, the Savior of the world, clothed in pontifical 185 Intro, 0| with Him were the princes of the Apostles, Peter and 186 Intro, 0| immovable look, gazed, full of love, on her Savior, who, 187 Intro, 0| Himself, fixed on her the eyes of His Majesty, and, with a 188 Intro, 0| hand, and, making the sign of the Holy Cross in the manner 189 Intro, 0| Holy Cross in the manner of a bishop, left with her 190 Intro, 0| left with her the gift of His eternal benediction. 191 Intro, 0| eternal benediction. The grace of this gift was so efficacious, 192 Intro, 0| disappeared, according to the will of Him who had granted it, 193 Intro, 0| earth." Such was the "call" of St. Catherine of Siena, 194 Intro, 0| call" of St. Catherine of Siena, and, to a mind intent 195 Intro, 0| significance, the appearance of Christ, in the semblance 196 Intro, 0| Christ, in the semblance of His Vicar, may fitly appear 197 Intro, 0| symbolize the great mission of her after-life to the Holy 198 Intro, 0| Much might be said of the action of Catherine 199 Intro, 0| might be said of the action of Catherine on her generation. 200 Intro, 0| so remarkable an imprint of their personality on the 201 Intro, 0| personality on the events of their time. Catherine the 202 Intro, 0| reconciles warring factions of her native city and heals 203 Intro, 0| Consoler pours the balm of her gentle spirit into the 204 Intro, 0| into the lacerated souls of the suffering wherever she 205 Intro, 0| hospital ward. She is one of the most voluminous of letter-writers, 206 Intro, 0| one of the most voluminous of letter-writers, keeping 207 Intro, 0| correspondence with a band of disciples, male and female, 208 Intro, 0| The trecento, the apogee of the middle ages was over. 209 Intro, 0| still the first fervor of the original inspiration 210 Intro, 0| had fled. The moral state of the secular clergy was, 211 Intro, 0| Catherine herself, too often one of the deepest degradation, 212 Intro, 0| degradation, while, in the absence of the Pontiff, the States 213 Intro, 0| the Pontiff, the States of the Church were governed 214 Intro, 0| papal legates, mostly men of blood and lust, who ground 215 Intro, 0| subjects could learn the path of peace. The Pope's residence 216 Intro, 0| resolved upon, a wise measure of temporary retreat before 217 Intro, 0| was raging round the city of St. Peter. But not many 218 Intro, 0| who profited by the exile of the Pope. Whatever the truth 219 Intro, 0| may be about the details of Clement's election, so far 220 Intro, 0| have remained Archbishop of Bordeaux to the end of his 221 Intro, 0| Archbishop of Bordeaux to the end of his days. He accepted for 222 Intro, 0| gravely suspicious matter of the suppression of the Templars. 223 Intro, 0| matter of the suppression of the Templars. Gradually 224 Intro, 0| more and more the vassal of the French crown. Such a 225 Intro, 0| practice, Christendom grew shy of a French Pope, living under 226 Intro, 0| under the eye and power of the French king. The Romans, 227 Intro, 0| their contempt for the Popes of Avignon, who, as a matter 228 Intro, 0| Avignon, who, as a matter of fact, though weak and compliant, 229 Intro, 0| genuine zeal in the cause of learning, or the energy 230 Intro, 0| noble charity at the time of the plague, and also the 231 Intro, 0| commentary on the ethics of the Gospel. ~ 232 Intro, 0| Christendom was the possibility of an Italian anti-Pope who 233 Intro, 0| the time by the iron hand of Pope Boniface, rather flourished 234 Intro, 0| inherited a garbled version of the mysticism of Joachim 235 Intro, 0| version of the mysticism of Joachim of Flora, which 236 Intro, 0| the mysticism of Joachim of Flora, which constituted 237 Intro, 0| revolutionary than that of any heretics before or since. 238 Intro, 0| belief in a new revelation of the Spirit, which was to 239 Intro, 0| supersede the dispensation of the Son as that had taken 240 Intro, 0| that had taken the place of the dispensation of the 241 Intro, 0| place of the dispensation of the Father. According to 242 Intro, 0| According to the Eternal Gospel of Gerard of San Domino, who 243 Intro, 0| Eternal Gospel of Gerard of San Domino, who had derived 244 Intro, 0| manipulation, from the writings of Abbot Joachim, the Roman 245 Intro, 0| Roman Church was on the eve of destruction, and it was 246 Intro, 0| destruction, and it was the duty of the Spirituali, the saints 247 Intro, 0| fly from the contamination of her communion. An anti-Pope 248 Intro, 0| allegiance these elements of schism would have been a 249 Intro, 0| for grave anxiety. Germs of heresy were fermenting north 250 Intro, 0| heresy were fermenting north of the Alps; the preaching 251 Intro, 0| the Alps; the preaching of Wycliffe, the semi-Islamism 252 Intro, 0| Wycliffe, the semi-Islamism of the Hungarian Beghards, 253 Intro, 0| Hungarian Beghards, the Theism of the Patarini of Dalmatia, 254 Intro, 0| the Theism of the Patarini of Dalmatia, the erotic mysticism 255 Intro, 0| Dalmatia, the erotic mysticism of the Adamites of Paris, indicated 256 Intro, 0| mysticism of the Adamites of Paris, indicated a widespread 257 Intro, 0| widespread anarchy in the minds of Christians. Moreover, the 258 Intro, 0| the spiritual difficulties of the Pope were complicated 259 Intro, 0| essential to the action of the Holy See that the successor 260 Intro, 0| Holy See that the successor of the penniless fisherman 261 Intro, 0| place among the princes of the earth. ~ 262 Intro, 0| been the inevitable force of circumstances. The decay 263 Intro, 0| circumstances. The decay of the Imperial power in Italy 264 Intro, 0| the practical abandonment of the Western Empire -- for 265 Intro, 0| Empire -- for the ruler of Constantinople lived at 266 Intro, 0| be an effective Emperor of the West -- had resulted 267 Intro, 0| resulted in a natural increase of secular importance to the 268 Intro, 0| secular importance to the See of Rome. To the genius of Pope 269 Intro, 0| See of Rome. To the genius of Pope Gregory I., one of 270 Intro, 0| of Pope Gregory I., one of the few men whom their fellows 271 Intro, 0| was due the development of the political situation 272 Intro, 0| Chief and greatest of bishops in his day was St. 273 Intro, 0| insight. Himself a Roman of Rome, Romano di Roma, as 274 Intro, 0| themselves today, the instinct of government was his by hereditary 275 Intro, 0| as well as the qualities of the statesman. His theological 276 Intro, 0| marked rather by a sort of canonized common sense than 277 Intro, 0| than by exalted flights of spirituality. His missionary 278 Intro, 0| condescension to the limitations of human nature. Thus he counsels 279 Intro, 0| him as to the best means of extirpating the pagan customs 280 Intro, 0| extirpating the pagan customs of our English forefathers, 281 Intro, 0| ruled that the celebration of the Festivals of the Sabots 282 Intro, 0| celebration of the Festivals of the Sabots should if possible 283 Intro, 0| people had been in the habit of meeting together to worship 284 Intro, 0| looked upon as the founder of popular Catholicism, that " 285 Intro, 0| assuredly in the entirety of its details Christian, but 286 Intro, 0| weaving together in the web of its own secular experience 287 Intro, 0| its own secular experience of man so large a proportion 288 Intro, 0| man so large a proportion of the many-colored threads 289 Intro, 0| depended on him, at the mercy of the invading Lombard. More 290 Intro, 0| Roman Church. By the end of the sixth century the Bishop 291 Intro, 0| sixth century the Bishop of Rome held, by the right 292 Intro, 0| Rome held, by the right of such donations to his See, 293 Intro, 0| to his See, large tracts of country, not only in Italy, 294 Intro, 0| and came to the relief of the starving population 295 Intro, 0| laying deep in the hearts of the people the foundations 296 Intro, 0| the people the foundations of the secular power of the 297 Intro, 0| foundations of the secular power of the Papacy. ~ 298 Intro, 0| first as the Italian vicar of a distant emperor, and at 299 Intro, 0| at length, as the result of astute statecraft and the 300 Intro, 0| statecraft and the necessities of the case, among the princes 301 Intro, 0| case, among the princes of Europe, as their chief and 302 Intro, 0| necessary for the comprehension of the task with which Catherine 303 Intro, 0| was given to the Popolana of Siena, by the effect of 304 Intro, 0| of Siena, by the effect of her eloquence in persuading 305 Intro, 0| persuading the wavering will of the Pope to return to his 306 Intro, 0| the only possible solution of that Roman question, which, 307 Intro, 0| perpetually round the skirts of the Bride of Christ, seems 308 Intro, 0| the skirts of the Bride of Christ, seems at every step 309 Intro, 0| the social consequences of her actions that constitute 310 Intro, 0| constitute the true greatness of St. Catherine. Great ends 311 Intro, 0| an aridity and narrowness of temper that goes far to 312 Intro, 0| in particular the history of the Church, is not wanting 313 Intro, 0| before himself -- the freedom of his country and the regeneration 314 Intro, 0| country and the regeneration of the state; but the spirit 315 Intro, 0| excludes him from that Pantheon of gracious souls in which 316 Intro, 0| benefactors. "Soul, as a quality of style, is a fact," and the 317 Intro, 0| is a fact," and the soul of St. Catherine's gesta expressed 318 Intro, 0| to make her the dearest of friends to all who had the 319 Intro, 0| all who had the privilege of intimate association with 320 Intro, 0| and a permanent source of refreshment to the human 321 Intro, 0| possible forms, the forms of Beauty and Love. Truth and 322 Intro, 0| means for the achievement of those two supreme ends. 323 Intro, 0| supreme ends. The sheer beauty of the soul "in a state of 324 Intro, 0| of the soul "in a state of Grace" is a point on which 325 Intro, 0| Similarly the ugliness of sin, as much as its wickedness, 326 Intro, 0| wickedness, should warn us of its true nature. Love, that 327 Intro, 0| nature. Love, that love of man for man which, in deepest 328 Intro, 0| truth, is, in the words of the writer of the First 329 Intro, 0| the words of the writer of the First Epistle of St. 330 Intro, 0| writer of the First Epistle of St. John, God Himself, is, 331 Intro, 0| the highest achievement of man and his supreme and 332 Intro, 0| satisfying beatitude. The Symbols of Catholic theology were to 333 Intro, 0| necessary and fitting means of transit, so to speak. See, 334 Intro, 0| pages, the fine allegory of the Bridge of the Sacred 335 Intro, 0| fine allegory of the Bridge of the Sacred Humanity, of 336 Intro, 0| of the Sacred Humanity, of the soul in vi‰ on its dusty 337 Intro, 0| towards those gleaming heights of vision. "Truth" was to her 338 Intro, 0| was to her the handmaid of the spiritualized imagination, 339 Intro, 0| too often in these days of the twilight of the soul, 340 Intro, 0| these days of the twilight of the soul, its tyrant and 341 Intro, 0| tyrant and its gaoler. Many of those who pass lives of 342 Intro, 0| of those who pass lives of unremitting preoccupation 343 Intro, 0| preoccupation with the problems of truth and goodness are wearied 344 Intro, 0| they fly to the embrace of those rare souls who inhabit 345 Intro, 0| atmosphere. Among these spirits of the air, St. Catherine has 346 Intro, 0| is among the few guides of humanity who have the perfect 347 Intro, 0| irresistible attractiveness, of that positive purity of 348 Intro, 0| of that positive purity of heart, which not only sees 349 Intro, 0| as by some natural law of refraction, over the hearts 350 Intro, 0| refraction, over the hearts of men. The Divine nuptials, 351 Intro, 0| together, and the mysteries of her religion seem but the 352 Intro, 0| but the natural expression of a perfectly balanced character, 353 Intro, 0| The Dialogue of St. Catherine of Siena was 354 Intro, 0| Dialogue of St. Catherine of Siena was dictated to her 355 Intro, 0| extraordinary circumstances of its production, this work 356 Intro, 0| The composition of the Siennese dyer's daughter, 357 Intro, 0| an almost unique specimen of what may be called "ecclesiastical" 358 Intro, 0| than a mystical exposition of the creeds taught to every 359 Intro, 0| instance, is the analysis of the state of the "worldly 360 Intro, 0| the analysis of the state of the "worldly man" who loves 361 Intro, 0| profit! The special snares of the devout are cut through 362 Intro, 0| through by the keen logic of one who has experienced 363 Intro, 0| the "unworthy ministers of the Blood." ~ 364 Intro, 0| so every well-known form of Christian life, healthy 365 Intro, 0| or parasitic, is treated of, detailed, analyzed incisively, 366 Intro, 0| under the general conception of God's infinite loving-kindness 367 Intro, 0| reached; their own treatment of the preliminary stages of 368 Intro, 0| of the preliminary stages of spirituality is frequently 369 Intro, 0| the two succeeding ones, of Ruysbrock's Ornement des 370 Intro, 0| spirituelles, that unique breviary of the Christian Platonician. 371 Intro, 0| Platonician. Another result of their having done so is 372 Intro, 0| exceptions, the literature of this subject has fallen 373 Intro, 0| has fallen into the hands of a class of writers, or rather 374 Intro, 0| into the hands of a class of writers, or rather purveyors, 375 Intro, 0| describe as the feuilletonistes of piety. Such works, brightly 376 Intro, 0| healthy and raise the tone of devotional literature is 377 Intro, 0| an eighth spiritual work of mercy. St. Philip Neri's 378 Intro, 0| were preceded by the title of Saint. In the Dialogo we 379 Intro, 0| have a great saint, one of the most extraordinary women 380 Intro, 0| become almost colloquial, of the elements of practical 381 Intro, 0| colloquial, of the elements of practical Christianity. 382 Intro, 0| Passages occur frequently of lofty eloquence, and also 383 Intro, 0| lofty eloquence, and also of such literary perfection 384 Intro, 0| held by critics to be one of the classics of the age 385 Intro, 0| to be one of the classics of the age and land which produced 386 Intro, 0| To-day, in the streets of Siena, the same Tuscan idiom 387 Intro, 0| hardly altered since the days of St. Catherine. ~ 388 Intro, 0| always followed the text of Gigli, a learned Siennese 389 Intro, 0| edited the complete works of St. Catherine in the last 390 Intro, 0| the latest edition printed of the Dialogo. Once or twice 391 Intro, 0| the characteristic rhythm of the sentences, so suggestive 392 Intro, 0| so suggestive in its way of the sing-song articulation 393 Intro, 0| the sing-song articulation of the Siennese of today. St. 394 Intro, 0| articulation of the Siennese of today. St. Catherine has 395 Intro, 0| occasionally taken the liberty of adhering to the first simile 396 Intro, 0| simile when the confusion of metaphor in the original 397 Intro, 0| involves hopeless obscurity of expression. Viareggio, September 398 1 | A TREATISE OF DIVINE PROVIDENCE ~ 399 1, 1 | soul, elevated by desire of the honor of God, and of 400 1, 1 | elevated by desire of the honor of God, and of the salvation 401 1, 1 | of the honor of God, and of the salvation of her neighbors, 402 1, 1 | God, and of the salvation of her neighbors, exercising 403 1, 1 | after she had seen the union of the soul, through love, 404 1, 1 | through love, with God, asked of God four requests. ~ 405 1, 1 | yearning desire for the honor of God and the salvation of 406 1, 1 | of God and the salvation of souls, begins by exercising 407 1, 1 | herself, for a certain space of time, in the ordinary virtues, 408 1, 1 | virtues, remaining in the cell of self-knowledge, in order 409 1, 1 | know better the goodness of God towards her. This she 410 1, 1 | creature receive such a taste of the truth, or so brilliant 411 1, 1 | light therefrom, as by means of humble and continuous prayer, 412 1, 1 | prayer, founded on knowledge of herself and of God; because 413 1, 1 | knowledge of herself and of God; because prayer, exercising 414 1, 1 | that follows the footprints of Christ Crucified, and thus, 415 1, 1 | and affection, and union of love, makes her another 416 1, 1 | indeed, through the effect of love, that the soul becomes 417 1, 1 | having heard from a handmaid of God, namely, that, when 418 1, 1 | prayer, with great elevation of mind, God was not wont to 419 1, 1 | to conceal, from the eye of her intellect, the love 420 1, 1 | used to say: "Open the eye of your intellect, and gaze 421 1, 1 | you shall see the beauty of My rational creature. And 422 1, 1 | garment (that is, the garment of love), adorned with many 423 1, 1 | the sweet and amorous Word of God) "they are another Myself, 424 1, 1 | with God by the affection of love. ~ 425 1, 1 | that a soul could not be of use, whether in doctrine, 426 1, 1 | second for the reformation of the Holy Church; the third 427 1, 1 | particular for the peace of Christians who rebel, with 428 1, 2 | How the desire of this soul grew when God 429 1, 2 | showed her the neediness of the world. ~ 430 1, 2 | showed her the neediness of the world, and in what a 431 1, 2 | world, and in what a tempest of offense against God it lay. 432 1, 2 | from the spiritual Father of her soul, in which he explained 433 1, 2 | against God, and the loss of souls, and the persecutions 434 1, 2 | souls, and the persecutions of Holy Church. ~ 435 1, 2 | All this lighted the fire of her holy desire with grief 436 1, 2 | offenses, and with the joy of the lively hope, with which 437 1, 2 | she desired the arrival of the morning (for the morrow 438 1, 2 | for the morrow was a feast of Mary) in order to hear Mass. 439 1, 2 | morning came, and the hour of the Mass, she sought with 440 1, 2 | with a great knowledge of herself, being ashamed of 441 1, 2 | of herself, being ashamed of her own imperfection, appearing 442 1, 2 | herself to be the cause of all the evil that was happening 443 1, 2 | against herself, and a feeling of holy justice, with which 444 1, 2 | as my sins are the cause of the sufferings which my 445 1, 3 | the perpetual affection of love. ~ 446 1, 3 | in sending down the fire of the clemency of the Holy 447 1, 3 | the fire of the clemency of the Holy Spirit, seizing 448 1, 3 | Spirit, seizing the sacrifice of desire that she made of 449 1, 3 | of desire that she made of herself, saying: "Do you 450 1, 3 | be expiated by the desire of the soul, that is, by true 451 1, 3 | neighbors commit against Me. Of such as these, inasmuch 452 1, 3 | joined to Me by an affection of love, and therefore grieve 453 1, 3 | they possess the virtue of desire, and sustain their 454 1, 3 | said: If I had the tongues of angels, and if I knew the 455 1, 3 | and if I knew the things of the future and gave my body 456 1, 3 | recompense, without the condiment of the affection of love." ~ 457 1, 3 | condiment of the affection of love." ~ 458 1, 4 | How desire and contrition of heart satisfies, both for 459 1, 4 | desire, love, and contrition of the heart; not by virtue 460 1, 4 | the heart; not by virtue of the pain, but by virtue 461 1, 4 | the pain, but by virtue of the desire of the soul; 462 1, 4 | by virtue of the desire of the soul; inasmuch as desire 463 1, 4 | desire and every virtue is of value, and has life in itself, 464 1, 4 | in no other, are virtues of value, and in this way, 465 1, 4 | acquired in the knowledge of My goodness, and in the 466 1, 4 | bitterness and contrition of heart acquired by knowledge 467 1, 4 | heart acquired by knowledge of one's self and one's own 468 1, 4 | she deems herself worthy of pains and unworthy of reward." ~ 469 1, 4 | worthy of pains and unworthy of reward." ~ 470 1, 4 | See how, by contrition of the heart, together with 471 1, 4 | deeming themselves worthy of pain and unworthy of reward, 472 1, 4 | worthy of pain and unworthy of reward, such souls endure 473 1, 4 | knowledge and enjoyment of Me, the Eternal Truth, that 474 1, 4 | go outside the knowledge of yourself, and, by humbling 475 1, 4 | humbling yourself in the valley of humility, you will know 476 1, 4 | foster-mother and nurse of charity. In self-knowledge, 477 1, 4 | re-created you in the Blood of My only-begotten Son, spilt 478 1, 4 | spilt with so great a fire of love. This Blood teaches 479 1, 4 | self-knowledge, dissipates the cloud of self-love, and in no other 480 1, 4 | herself in this knowledge of Me with an ineffable love, 481 1, 4 | faults, and the ingratitude of men, she endures intolerable 482 1, 4 | for the glory and praise of My Name; thus will you endure 483 1, 4 | your sins, and with love of virtue for the glory and 484 1, 4 | for the glory and praise of My Name. If you act thus, 485 1, 4 | your sins, and for those of My other servants, inasmuch 486 1, 4 | sufficient, through the virtue of love, for satisfaction and 487 1, 4 | you will receive the fruit of life, when the stains of 488 1, 4 | of life, when the stains of your ignorance are effaced, 489 1, 4 | to receive the doctrine of My servants, will I remit 490 1, 4 | sins. So that, by means of prayer, and their desire 491 1, 4 | prayer, and their desire of serving Me, they receive 492 1, 4 | they receive the fruit of grace, receiving it humbly 493 1, 4 | according to the extent of their exercise of virtue 494 1, 4 | extent of their exercise of virtue and grace in general. 495 1, 4 | condemn them through contempt of the Blood, which, with such 496 1, 4 | constrained by the prayers of My servants, is that I give 497 1, 4 | wake up in them the hound of conscience, and make them 498 1, 4 | make them smell the odor of virtue, and take delight 499 1, 4 | delight in the conversation of My servants. ~ 500 1, 4 | by that inestimable love of Mine, by which I created


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