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Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus
To Scapula

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1 I | ourselves to this sect, fully accepting the terms of its covenant, 2 I | coming even forth of our own accord to the contest; and condemnation 3 II | thing altogether undivine. Accordingly the true God bestows His 4 II | His own elect; upon which account He has appointed an eternal 5 IV | was a case of vexatious accusation; tearing the document in 6 IV | without the presence of his accuser, as not being consistent 7 IV | denial. It is, in fact, an acknowledgment of our innocence that you 8 IV | Christian milk, was intimately acquainted with this man. Both women 9 II | system under whose rules we act is one inculcating a divine 10 III| seem to themselves to have acted with impunity shall not 11 III| had condemned Mavilus of Adrumetum to the wild beasts, you 12 IV | devote himself, save the affairs of his own community, which 13 IV | spirit, was set free from his affliction; as was also the relative 14 | Afterwards 15 V | persons of every sex and every age and every rank, when they 16 III| when there had been some agitation about places of sepulture 17 IV | with our wards; we give aid to the needy; we render 18 I | those who persecute us, aiming at a perfection all its 19 II | able to find followers of Albinus, or Niger, or Cassius, among 20 II | God bestows His blessings alike on wicked men and on His 21 | almost 22 | already 23 | although 24 III| deluge, no doubt, which in ancient times overtook human unbelief 25 V | required? What will be the anguish of Carthage itself, which 26 II | unwilling, unless they are animated by a spirit of contention, 27 IV | assessors of court, that he was annoyed at having had to meddle 28 IV | having once cured him by anointing, he kept him in his palace 29 V | infliction. When Arrius Antoninus was driving things hard 30 III| it came that their own areoe, their threshing-floors, 31 III| and the cry arose, "No areoe--no burial-grounds for the 32 III| for our dead, and the cry arose, "No areoe--no burial-grounds 33 V | invite their infliction. When Arrius Antoninus was driving things 34 V | was driving things hard in Asia, the whole Christians of 35 IV | peace of the community; as Asper, who, in the case of a man 36 IV | object, it is innocence you assail. But how many rulers, men 37 IV | among the advocates and assessors of court, that he was annoyed 38 V | will be undying, for be assured that just in the time of 39 II | helps another man. It is assuredly no part of religion to compel 40 III| and house. You have the astrologers, consult them about it. 41 I | ignorance of men; for we have attached ourselves to this sect, 42 IV | raging populace. Marcus Aurelius also, in his expedition 43 III| their threshing-floors, were awanting, for they gathered in no 44 | away 45 IV | and gave them publicly back to us from the hands of 46 V | province, in one united band, presented themselves before 47 II | though you reckon us to be--in any theft, far less in 48 III| distress us that no state shall bear unpunished the guilt of 49 III| of Adrumetum to the wild beasts, you were overtaken by those 50 | become 51 IV | never pollute the marriage bed; we deal faithfully with 52 IV | those who falsely pretend to belong to us, and whom we, too, 53 II | thunders you tremble, whose benefits minister to your happiness. 54 | besides 55 II | hands of Him who is able to bestow it. And one would think 56 II | Accordingly the true God bestows His blessings alike on wicked 57 II | the true God bestows His blessings alike on wicked men and 58 III| reason you are called to a blood-reckoning. But do not forget the future.~ 59 III| a contagious malady, he boiled out in living worms, and 60 IV | remain uninjured; but he even bore distinguished testimony 61 IV | the name of Jupiter, have borne witness to our God. Then 62 IV | another, and the little boy of a third. How many men 63 IV | his fellow-citizens would break the peace of the community; 64 V | seeming overthrow it is built up into greater power. For 65 III| cry arose, "No areoe--no burial-grounds for the Christians," it 66 III| As to the rains of the bygone year, it is abundantly plain 67 III| that doom which overtook Byzantium, Caecilius Capella could 68 III| which overtook Byzantium, Caecilius Capella could not help crying 69 III| the same reason you are called to a blood-reckoning. But 70 IV | acquittal; as Vespronius Candidus, who dismissed from his 71 III| overtook Byzantium, Caecilius Capella could not help crying out, " 72 III| Claudius Lucius Herminianus in Cappadocia, enraged that his wife had 73 II | of Albinus, or Niger, or Cassius, among Christians; while 74 IV | contrived to get quit of such causes altogether,--as Cincius 75 II | of whose existence and character Nature teaches all men; 76 IV | the incest or the cruelty charged against it? It is for freedom 77 IV | such causes altogether,--as Cincius Severus, who himself suggested 78 V | friends of those of your own circle? Spare thyself, if not us 79 V | the leading persons of the city, and either kinsmen or friends 80 II | but the majority in every city--we conduct ourselves so 81 IV | charge, and yet remember the claims of humanity; if on no other 82 III| against us, lost his eyesight. Claudius Lucius Herminianus in Cappadocia, 83 II | think it must be abundantly clear to you that the religious 84 IV | voice as it suits them. The clerk of one of them who was liable 85 V | constrained to rush forth to the combat, if only to prove that we 86 I | grapple with your utmost rage, coming even forth of our own accord 87 IV | do so). For is not your commission simply to condemn those 88 IV | rank (to say nothing of common people) have been delivered 89 I | of a higher type than the commonplace goodness of the world. For 90 II | individuals than as organized communities, and remarkable only for 91 V | there his relatives and companions, as he sees there it may 92 I | over your ignorance, and compassionating human error, and looking 93 II | service to your gods by compelling us to sacrifice. For they 94 IV | themselves. In a word, who has complaint to make against us on other 95 I | about ourselves, but in much concern for you and for all our 96 III| immediately after you had condemned Mavilus of Adrumetum to 97 II | majority in every city--we conduct ourselves so quietly and 98 IV | instructions to wring from the confessing a denial. It is, in fact, 99 IV | living God, that we are consigned to the flames; for this 100 IV | his accuser, as not being consistent with the imperial commands. 101 II | our numbers are so great--constituting all but the majority in 102 V | we do not feel ourselves constrained to rush forth to the combat, 103 III| You have the astrologers, consult them about it. We can point 104 III| palace, suffering under a contagious malady, he boiled out in 105 II | we daily hold them up to contempt; we exorcise them from their 106 II | animated by a spirit of contention, which is a thing altogether 107 I | of our own accord to the contest; and condemnation gives 108 II | long as that shall Rome continue. To the emperor, therefore, 109 V | dread of them, but on the contrary, even invite their infliction. 110 IV | cruel than you are, have contrived to get quit of such causes 111 II | worship according to his own convictions: one man's religion neither 112 I | accepting the terms of its covenant, so that, as men whose very 113 II | simple prayer. For God, Creator of the universe, has no 114 IV | It is for freedom from crime so singular, for a probity 115 IV | men more resolute and more cruel than you are, have contrived 116 III| sepulture for our dead, and the cry arose, "No areoe--no burial-grounds 117 IV | gratitude for his having once cured him by anointing, he kept 118 II | spirits: we overcome them; we daily hold them up to contempt; 119 III| places of sepulture for our dead, and the cry arose, "No 120 IV | pollute the marriage bed; we deal faithfully with our wards; 121 IV | palace till the day of his death. Antonine, too, brought 122 III| can point you also to the deaths of some provincial rulers, 123 V | which you will have to decimate, as each one recognises 124 II | found guilty of sacrilegious deeds. We have not time to unfold 125 IV | common people) have been delivered from devils, and healed 126 III| intended to remind men--of the deluge, no doubt, which in ancient 127 IV | wring from the confessing a denial. It is, in fact, an acknowledgment 128 IV | Then we never deny the deposit placed in our hands; we 129 II | be according to his own desires. For thus--as less only 130 II | your gods are mocked and despised by their own votaries. So, 131 II | bar. Yet you have never detected us--sacrilegious wretches 132 IV | else does the Christian devote himself, save the affairs 133 | did 134 III| tortures he inflicted, and died almost a Christian himself. 135 IV | from devils, and healed of diseases! Even Severus himself, the 136 IV | uninjured; but he even bore distinguished testimony in their favour, 137 III| remarked, it cannot but distress us that no state shall bear 138 II | act is one inculcating a divine patience; since, though 139 IV | accusation; tearing the document in pieces, he refused so 140 | does 141 IV | once when we confess. In doing your utmost to extirpate 142 III| Christian himself. In that doom which overtook Byzantium, 143 III| remind men--of the deluge, no doubt, which in ancient times 144 V | When Arrius Antoninus was driving things hard in Asia, the 145 IV | When, indeed, have not droughts been put away by our kneelings 146 IV | God. You may perform the duties of your charge, and yet 147 | each 148 III| occurred from an ordinary eclipse, situated as the lord of 149 II | wicked men and on His own elect; upon which account He has 150 | else 151 II | sworn by the genii of the emperors, who had offered and vowed 152 II | desire, with that of the empire over which he reigns so 153 III| and Christian wives take encouragement." Afterwards he came to 154 V | such things as these to endure, we do not feel ourselves 155 IV | even now our people are enduring persecution from the governors 156 II | imperial throne. A Christian is enemy to none, least of all to 157 I | lives are not their own, we engage in these conflicts, our 158 II | after the manner God has enjoined, in simple prayer. For God, 159 III| Herminianus in Cappadocia, enraged that his wife had become 160 V | truth, they straightway enrol themselves its disciples.~ 161 III| with impunity shall not escape the day of judgment. For 162 II | account He has appointed an eternal judgment, when both thankful 163 IV | Torpacion, the steward of Euhodias, and in gratitude for his 164 V | inflamed with desire to examine into the matter in question; 165 III| living worms, and was heard exclaiming, "Let nobody know of it, 166 V | a few to be led forth to execution, he said to the rest, "O 167 II | them up to contempt; we exorcise them from their victims, 168 II | our own hands, which we expect to come from God.~ 169 IV | Marcus Aurelius also, in his expedition to Germany, by the prayers 170 III| local. Sure are they to experience it one day in its universal 171 III| Utica, with light all but extinguished, was a portent which could 172 IV | In doing your utmost to extirpate us, if that is your object, 173 V | subjected to the threats and extortions at once of the soldiers 174 III| sword against us, lost his eyesight. Claudius Lucius Herminianus 175 IV | confessing a denial. It is, in fact, an acknowledgment of our 176 IV | of a man who gave up his faith under slight infliction 177 IV | the marriage bed; we deal faithfully with our wards; we give 178 IV | righteousness, for purity, for faithfulness, for truth, for the living 179 IV | by our kneelings and our fastings? At times like these, moreover, 180 IV | Even Severus himself, the father of Antonine, was graciously 181 IV | distinguished testimony in their favour, and gave them publicly 182 IV | IV.~We who are without fear ourselves are not seeking 183 V | these to endure, we do not feel ourselves constrained to 184 IV | ground that to satisfy his fellow-citizens would break the peace of 185 | few 186 IV | possible by warning them not to fight with God. You may perform 187 III| day in its universal and final form, who interpret otherwise 188 II | one has ever been able to find followers of Albinus, or 189 IV | we are consigned to the flames; for this is a punishment 190 II | blood. These things are the food of devils. But we not only 191 II | which free-will and not force should lead us--the sacrificial 192 III| blood-reckoning. But do not forget the future.~ 193 III| its universal and final form, who interpret otherwise 194 | former 195 IV | an evil spirit, was set free from his affliction; as 196 II | compel religion--to which free-will and not force should lead 197 IV | charged against it? It is for freedom from crime so singular, 198 IV | ourselves are not seeking to frighten you, but we would save all 199 I | ourselves to this sect, fully accepting the terms of its 200 II | devils. However, it is a fundamental human right, a privilege 201 III| were awanting, for they gathered in no harvests. As to the 202 II | men who had sworn by the genii of the emperors, who had 203 IV | also, in his expedition to Germany, by the prayers his Christian 204 IV | you are, have contrived to get quit of such causes altogether,-- 205 I | contest; and condemnation gives us more pleas-are than acquittal. 206 V | V.~Your cruelty is our glory. Only see you to it, that 207 II | less only than the true God--he is greater than all besides. 208 II | as is lawful for us and good for him; regarding him as 209 I | type than the commonplace goodness of the world. For all love 210 IV | soldiers offered to God, got rain in that well-known 211 IV | enduring persecution from the governors of Legio and Mauritania; 212 IV | father of Antonine, was graciously mindful of the Christians; 213 I | Hence we shrink not from the grapple with your utmost rage, coming 214 IV | steward of Euhodias, and in gratitude for his having once cured 215 II | though our numbers are so great--constituting all but the 216 IV | make against us on other grounds? To what else does the Christian 217 V | you have precipices or halters." If we should take it into 218 II | benefits minister to your happiness. You think that others, 219 V | Antoninus was driving things hard in Asia, the whole Christians 220 III| thunders pealed, they who were hardened by them can tell. All these 221 II | one man's religion neither harms nor helps another man. It 222 III| for they gathered in no harvests. As to the rains of the 223 I | alone to love those that hate them. Therefore mourning 224 V | should take it into our heads to do the same thing here, 225 IV | delivered from devils, and healed of diseases! Even Severus 226 IV | he refused so much as to hear him without the presence 227 III| in living worms, and was heard exclaiming, "Let nobody 228 III| the lord of day was in his height and house. You have the 229 III| Caecilius Capella could not help crying out, "Christians, 230 II | religion neither harms nor helps another man. It is assuredly 231 | Hence 232 III| eyesight. Claudius Lucius Herminianus in Cappadocia, enraged that 233 V | before you, and cannot be hidden from you, but to Him you 234 I | disciples something of a higher type than the commonplace 235 IV | man. Both women and men of highest rank, whom Severus knew 236 III| during the presidency of Hilarian, for when there had been 237 II | overcome them; we daily hold them up to contempt; we 238 II | render such reverential homage as is lawful for us and 239 II | and so cannot but love and honour; and whose well-being moreover, 240 III| rulers, who in their last hours had painful memories of 241 III| day was in his height and house. You have the astrologers, 242 IV | yet remember the claims of humanity; if on no other ground than 243 III| to the fires which lately hung all night over the walls 244 II | II.~We are worshippers of one 245 III| III.~However, as we have already 246 II | be it from us to take it ill that we have laid on us 247 III| been a warning only, that, immediately after you had condemned 248 III| things are signs of God's impending wrath, which we must needs 249 III| themselves to have acted with impunity shall not escape the day 250 IV | ever proved guilty of the incest or the cruelty charged against 251 II | whose rules we act is one inculcating a divine patience; since, 252 V | the province, which the indication of your purpose has subjected 253 IV | him, perceiving from the indictment that it was a case of vexatious 254 II | perhaps say, known rather as individuals than as organized communities, 255 V | struck with misgivings, are inflamed with desire to examine into 256 IV | punishment you are not wont to inflict either on the sacrilegious, 257 III| stedfastness by the tortures he inflicted, and died almost a Christian 258 V | but to Him you can do no injury. But those whom you regard 259 IV | yourselves against your instructions to wring from the confessing 260 III| plain of what they were intended to remind men--of the deluge, 261 III| universal and final form, who interpret otherwise these samples 262 IV | was on Christian milk, was intimately acquainted with this man. 263 V | but on the contrary, even invite their infliction. When Arrius 264 | itself 265 IV | IV.~We who are without fear 266 V | presented themselves before his judgment-seat; on which, ordering a few 267 IV | Omnipotent," under the name of Jupiter, have borne witness to our 268 V | undying, for be assured that just in the time of its seeming 269 IV | cured him by anointing, he kept him in his palace till the 270 V | of the city, and either kinsmen or friends of those of your 271 IV | droughts been put away by our kneelings and our fastings? At times 272 IV | highest rank, whom Severus knew well to be Christians, were 273 II | modestly; I might perhaps say, known rather as individuals than 274 II | Emperor of Rome, whom he knows to be appointed by his God, 275 V | your own order, and noble ladies, and all the leading persons 276 | last 277 III| and as to the fires which lately hung all night over the 278 II | reverential homage as is lawful for us and good for him; 279 II | free-will and not force should lead us--the sacrificial victims 280 V | noble ladies, and all the leading persons of the city, and 281 | least 282 V | which, ordering a few to be led forth to execution, he said 283 III| with great cruelty: well, left alone in his palace, suffering 284 IV | persecution from the governors of Legio and Mauritania; but it is 285 I | threatens an unchristian life should overtake us. Hence 286 III| metropolis of Utica, with light all but extinguished, was 287 II | teaches all men; at whose lightnings and thunders you tremble, 288 | like 289 I | the truths you will not listen to openly.~ 290 IV | relative of another, and the little boy of a third. How many 291 I | that, as men whose very lives are not their own, we engage 292 III| must pray it may be only local. Sure are they to experience 293 I | compassionating human error, and looking on to that future of which 294 III| eclipse, situated as the lord of day was in his height 295 III| used the sword against us, lost his eyesight. Claudius Lucius 296 III| lost his eyesight. Claudius Lucius Herminianus in Cappadocia, 297 II | constituting all but the majority in every city--we conduct 298 III| suffering under a contagious malady, he boiled out in living 299 II | God and his, and after the manner God has enjoined, in simple 300 IV | hands of a raging populace. Marcus Aurelius also, in his expedition 301 IV | hands; we never pollute the marriage bed; we deal faithfully 302 V | the noble patience of its martyrs, as struck with misgivings, 303 V | private enemies. We have no master but God. He is before you, 304 V | those whom you regard as masters are only men, and one day 305 V | desire to examine into the matter in question; and as soon 306 IV | the governors of Legio and Mauritania; but it is only with the 307 III| after you had condemned Mavilus of Adrumetum to the wild 308 | meanwhile 309 IV | annoyed at having had to meddle with such a case. Pudens, 310 III| their last hours had painful memories of their sin in persecuting 311 III| were intended to remind men--of the deluge, no doubt, 312 IV | be Christians, were not merely permitted by him to remain 313 III| it. That sun, too, in the metropolis of Utica, with light all 314 IV | up as he was on Christian milk, was intimately acquainted 315 II | being required of a willing mind. You will render no real 316 IV | Antonine, was graciously mindful of the Christians; for he 317 II | tremble, whose benefits minister to your happiness. You think 318 V | he said to the rest, "O miserable men, if you wish to die, 319 V | martyrs, as struck with misgivings, are inflamed with desire 320 II | other ways your gods are mocked and despised by their own 321 II | ourselves so quietly and modestly; I might perhaps say, known 322 I | that hate them. Therefore mourning over your ignorance, and 323 V | many thousands, of such a multitude of men and women, persons 324 II | them from their victims, as multitudes can testify. So all the 325 IV | alone Omnipotent," under the name of Jupiter, have borne witness 326 IV | of whom you have so many. Nay, even now our people are 327 I | shows threatening signs, necessity is laid on us to come forth 328 II | of the universe, has no need of odours or of blood. These 329 IV | wards; we give aid to the needy; we render to none evil 330 | neither 331 | next 332 II | followers of Albinus, or Niger, or Cassius, among Christians; 333 III| fires which lately hung all night over the walls of Carthage, 334 | nobody 335 | nor 336 IV | officially brought Under your notice, and by the very advocates, 337 II | patience; since, though our numbers are so great--constituting 338 V | execution, he said to the rest, "O miserable men, if you wish 339 IV | extirpate us, if that is your object, it is innocence you assail. 340 IV | are themselves also under obligations to us, although in court 341 I | conflicts, our desire being to obtain God's promised rewards, 342 III| portent which could not have occurred from an ordinary eclipse, 343 II | universe, has no need of odours or of blood. These things 344 IV | torture, did not compel the offering of sacrifice, having owned 345 II | they can have no desire of offerings from the unwilling, unless 346 IV | commands. All this might be officially brought Under your notice, 347 | often 348 IV | the God of gods, the alone Omnipotent," under the name of Jupiter, 349 I | truths you will not listen to openly.~ 350 IV | as from the first it was ordained that we should suffer. But 351 V | it may be men of your own order, and noble ladies, and all 352 V | judgment-seat; on which, ordering a few to be led forth to 353 III| not have occurred from an ordinary eclipse, situated as the 354 II | rather as individuals than as organized communities, and remarkable 355 | others 356 | otherwise 357 IV | punishment yourself, (you ought to do so). For is not your 358 II | those wicked spirits: we overcome them; we daily hold them 359 I | unchristian life should overtake us. Hence we shrink not 360 III| the wild beasts, you were overtaken by those troubles, and that 361 V | the time of its seeming overthrow it is built up into greater 362 IV | offering of sacrifice, having owned before, among the advocates 363 III| in their last hours had painful memories of their sin in 364 II | man. It is assuredly no part of religion to compel religion-- 365 IV | fellow-citizens would break the peace of the community; as Asper, 366 III| what the preceding thunders pealed, they who were hardened 367 I | those who love them; it is peculiar to Christians alone to love 368 IV | was brought before him, perceiving from the indictment that 369 I | persecute us, aiming at a perfection all its own, and seeking 370 IV | fight with God. You may perform the duties of your charge, 371 | perhaps 372 IV | which during all the long period of its existence no one 373 IV | Christians, were not merely permitted by him to remain uninjured; 374 I | and to pray for those who persecute us, aiming at a perfection 375 III| memories of their sin in persecuting the followers of Christ. 376 IV | our people are enduring persecution from the governors of Legio 377 I | perturbation or alarm about the persecutions we suffer from the ignorance 378 III| rejoice!" Yes, and the persecutors who seem to themselves to 379 I | WE are not in any great perturbation or alarm about the persecutions 380 IV | tearing the document in pieces, he refused so much as to 381 III| see, indeed, in what took place during the presidency of 382 IV | we never deny the deposit placed in our hands; we never pollute 383 III| been some agitation about places of sepulture for our dead, 384 III| bygone year, it is abundantly plain of what they were intended 385 I | condemnation gives us more pleas-are than acquittal. We have 386 II | things we wish, or in any way plot the vengeance at our own 387 III| consult them about it. We can point you also to the deaths of 388 IV | the remedy at Thysdris, pointing out how the Christians should 389 IV | placed in our hands; we never pollute the marriage bed; we deal 390 V | Spare thyself, if not us poor Christians! Spare Carthage, 391 IV | from the hands of a raging populace. Marcus Aurelius also, in 392 III| but extinguished, was a portent which could not have occurred 393 II | has enjoined, in simple prayer. For God, Creator of the 394 IV | expedition to Germany, by the prayers his Christian soldiers offered 395 III| threatened; and what the preceding thunders pealed, they who 396 V | you wish to die, you have precipices or halters." If we should 397 IV | to hear him without the presence of his accuser, as not being 398 V | and every rank, when they present themselves before you? How 399 V | province, in one united band, presented themselves before his judgment-seat; 400 III| what took place during the presidency of Hilarian, for when there 401 IV | As for those who falsely pretend to belong to us, and whom 402 V | once of the soldiers and of private enemies. We have no master 403 II | fundamental human right, a privilege of nature, that every man 404 IV | crime so singular, for a probity so great, for righteousness, 405 III| we must needs publish and proclaim in every possible way; and 406 IV | sought out the Christian Proculus, surnamed Torpacion, the 407 I | desire being to obtain God's promised rewards, and our dread lest 408 II | their safety, who had often pronounced condemnation on Christ's 409 IV | existence no one has ever proved guilty of the incest or 410 III| also to the deaths of some provincial rulers, who in their last 411 IV | sacrilegious, or on undoubted public enemies, or on the treason-tainted, 412 IV | their favour, and gave them publicly back to us from the hands 413 III| wrath, which we must needs publish and proclaim in every possible 414 IV | meddle with such a case. Pudens, too, at once dismissed 415 IV | for righteousness, for purity, for faithfulness, for truth, 416 V | which the indication of your purpose has subjected to the threats 417 IV | have not droughts been put away by our kneelings and 418 V | examine into the matter in question; and as soon as they come 419 II | we conduct ourselves so quietly and modestly; I might perhaps 420 IV | are, have contrived to get quit of such causes altogether,-- 421 I | grapple with your utmost rage, coming even forth of our 422 IV | to us from the hands of a raging populace. Marcus Aurelius 423 IV | soldiers offered to God, got rain in that well-known thirst. 424 III| in no harvests. As to the rains of the bygone year, it is 425 | rather 426 II | mind. You will render no real service to your gods by 427 III| that even now for the same reason you are called to a blood-reckoning. 428 II | to God who from God has received all his power, and is less 429 II | sacrilegious wretches though you reckon us to be--in any theft, 430 V | to decimate, as each one recognises there his relatives and 431 II | remarkable only for the reformation of our former vices. For 432 IV | of our innocence that you refuse to condemn us at once when 433 IV | the document in pieces, he refused so much as to hear him without 434 V | injury. But those whom you regard as masters are only men, 435 II | for us and good for him; regarding him as the human being next 436 II | the empire over which he reigns so long as the world shall 437 II | devils. But we not only reject those wicked spirits: we 438 IV | affliction; as was also the relative of another, and the little 439 V | one recognises there his relatives and companions, as he sees 440 II | part of religion to compel religion--to which free-will and not 441 II | abundantly clear to you that the religious system under whose rules 442 IV | merely permitted by him to remain uninjured; but he even bore 443 II | organized communities, and remarkable only for the reformation 444 III| However, as we have already remarked, it cannot but distress 445 IV | who himself suggested the remedy at Thysdris, pointing out 446 IV | of your charge, and yet remember the claims of humanity; 447 III| what they were intended to remind men--of the deluge, no doubt, 448 IV | to us, and whom we, too, repudiate, let them answer for themselves. 449 IV | how many rulers, men more resolute and more cruel than you 450 V | execution, he said to the rest, "O miserable men, if you 451 II | therefore, we render such reverential homage as is lawful for 452 II | it is a fundamental human right, a privilege of nature, 453 IV | a probity so great, for righteousness, for purity, for faithfulness, 454 II | in any sacrilege. But the robbers of your temples, all of 455 II | religious system under whose rules we act is one inculcating 456 V | ourselves constrained to rush forth to the combat, if 457 II | who had offered and vowed sacrifices for their safety, who had 458 II | force should lead us--the sacrificial victims even being required 459 II | any theft, far less in any sacrilege. But the robbers of your 460 V | led forth to execution, he said to the rest, "O miserable 461 III| interpret otherwise these samples of it. That sun, too, in 462 IV | Christian, on the ground that to satisfy his fellow-citizens would 463 III| followers of Christ. Vigellius Saturninus, who first here used the 464 III| walls of Carthage, they who saw them know what they threatened; 465 I | attached ourselves to this sect, fully accepting the terms 466 IV | should answer that they might secure an acquittal; as Vespronius 467 II | well-being, as those who seek it at the hands of Him who 468 | seem 469 | seeming 470 V | relatives and companions, as he sees there it may be men of your 471 I | than acquittal. We have sent, therefore, this tract to 472 III| agitation about places of sepulture for our dead, and the cry 473 II | You will render no real service to your gods by compelling 474 V | women, persons of every sex and every age and every 475 III| unpunished the guilt of shedding Christian blood; as you 476 I | future of which every day shows threatening signs, necessity 477 I | should overtake us. Hence we shrink not from the grapple with 478 II | manner God has enjoined, in simple prayer. For God, Creator 479 IV | For is not your commission simply to condemn those who confess 480 III| painful memories of their sin in persecuting the followers 481 | since 482 III| of judgment. For you we sincerely wish it may prove to have 483 IV | for freedom from crime so singular, for a probity so great, 484 III| from an ordinary eclipse, situated as the lord of day was in 485 IV | gave up his faith under slight infliction of the torture, 486 | something 487 V | matter in question; and as soon as they come to know the 488 IV | of the Christians; for he sought out the Christian Proculus, 489 II | only reject those wicked spirits: we overcome them; we daily 490 II | unthankful will have to stand before His bar. Yet you 491 II | long as the world shall stand--for so long as that shall 492 III| but distress us that no state shall bear unpunished the 493 III| tempted so many from their stedfastness by the tortures he inflicted, 494 IV | surnamed Torpacion, the steward of Euhodias, and in gratitude 495 | still 496 V | to know the truth, they straightway enrol themselves its disciples.~ 497 V | patience of its martyrs, as struck with misgivings, are inflamed 498 II | themselves, even they, too, being subject to him. We therefore sacrifice 499 V | indication of your purpose has subjected to the threats and extortions 500 III| left alone in his palace, suffering under a contagious malady,


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