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makes 4
males 1
mammae 1
man 81
man- 1
manifest 3
manifold 2
Frequency    [«  »]
108 have
88 if
83 all
81 man
80 should
80 things
79 their
Lucius Caecilius Firmianus Lactantius
On the workmanship of God

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man

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1 1intro| avoided by the foresight of man. Therefore it is the highest 2 1intro| soul, that is, the true man himself, is contained, and 3 1intro| because Marcus Tullius, a man of remarkable talent, in 4 1intro| to explain that which a man of the greatest eloquence 5 2 | PRODUCTION OF THE BEASTS AND OF MAN.~For our Creator and Parent, 6 2 | Parent, God, has given to man perception and reason, that 7 2 | contributes to the beauty of man. For if He had given to 8 2 | For if He had given to man the teeth of wild beasts, 9 2 | beauty. But with reference to man, whom He formed an eternal 10 3 | CONDITION OF THE BEASTS AND MAN.~They complain that man 11 3 | MAN.~They complain that man is born in a more feeble 12 3 | by natural coverings; but man, on the contrary, being 13 3 | creation, but has so produced man, that, without resources, 14 3 | they think to be wanting in man, on account of his being 15 3 | say, the bringing up of man costs the greatest labours: 16 3 | more fragile than that of man? Inasmuch as they do not 17 3 | they prefer the wisdom of man together with his weakness, 18 3 | neither desire the reason of man together with frailty, nor 19 3 | adorning and protection of man, that nothing greater or 20 3 | given by God. Finally, since man is possessed of a body which 21 3 | are unable to be safe from man. Thus it comes to pass that 22 3 | that reason bestows more on man than nature does on the 23 3 | strength, are subservient to man, complain respecting God, 24 3 | the part of an ungrateful man, or (to speak more truly) 25 3 | nature that he was born a man. How much better and more 26 3 | perceived that the condition of man was better, than they did 27 4 | IV. OF THE WEAKNESS OF MAN.~They also complain that 28 4 | They also complain that man is liable to diseases, and 29 4 | we show from this, that man was made with no foresight, 30 4 | Assuredly they wish that no man should die, unless when 31 4 | that be, which can render a man firm and impregnable against 32 4 | frailty and death? That man, therefore, may not be liable 33 4 | weak. Since, therefore, man had to be so formed by God, 34 4 | possible, as they wish, that man is not born under those 35 4 | Therefore the case requires that man, who cannot die before an 36 4 | food, he will now not be a man, but will become a god. 37 4 | complain of the frailty of man, make this complaint especially, 38 4 | with immortality: for if a man is mortal in old age, he 39 4 | mortality for a time, place man in such a condition that 40 4 | appointed for a fixed age, man would become most arrogant, 41 4 | their force and strength. If man also, in the same manner, 42 4 | would be more harsh than man? What more brutal? What 43 4 | live by himself apart from man, he desires society, that 44 4 | that the whole reason of man centres most of all in this, 45 4 | should be taken away from man, reason also, and wisdom, 46 4 | much concerning the body of man only, that I may show in 47 4 | concerning the vessel itself of man, which we see.~ 48 5 | the hinder ones; but in man they are hands, which are 49 5 | either they are two as in man, or four as in a quadruped. 50 5 | trunk of an elephant; and man would be altogether snake-handed,-- 51 6 | are dealing with a foolish man, lest he should think himself 52 7 | quadruped which is naked, or a man that is covered. But, however, 53 7 | nakedness itself on the part of man tends in a wonderful manner 54 8 | VIII. OF THE PARTS OF MAN: THE EYES AND EARS,~Now 55 8 | show the plan of the whole man, and will explain the uses 56 8 | all the animals to make man alone heavenly, and all 57 8 | and elevated position of man alone, and his countenance, 58 10 | X. OF THE OUTER LIMBS OF MAN, AND THEIR USE.~But let 59 10 | But these things relate to man alone, or to birds, in which 60 10 | God appears to have made man only, as it were, reclining 61 10 | earth. But He made that of man open and erect, because, 62 11 | OF TITLE INTESTINES IN MAN, AND THEIR USE.~It necessarily 63 11 | all the members. But since man is composed of body and 64 11 | therefore, there are in man two receptacles,--one of 65 13 | a round appearance, lest man should be unable to stand, 66 14 | it is beyond the power of man to see through them clearly. 67 15 | exceed the understanding of man; so, however, it must be 68 16 | therefore, that the soul in man exists in a manner like 69 16 | harmony from the lyre to man. For the lyre cannot of 70 18 | but this especially to man, that when God gave this 71 18 | Himself the power of teaching man future events by means of 72 19 | receive it; and to this work man's power is limited, nor 73 19 | contributes to the preservation of man: it is His gift that we 74 19 | sources, He also gives to man wisdom, which no earthly 75 19 | having granted this, He bound man himself by the mystery of 76 19 | the mysterious purpose of man; and if any one shall not 77 19 | error whosoever judges of man by his flesh. For this worthless 78 19 | clothed is the receptacle of man. For man himself, can neither 79 19 | the receptacle of man. For man himself, can neither be 80 20 | be wished for by a wise man, assuredly I should wish 81 20 | discharged the duty of a man, if my labour shall have


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