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Council of Trent

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     Document,  Part
1503 25,4 | this present moment, a suit pending, in whatsoever stage of 1504 17,2 | of heresy and schism had penetrated, and how much the morals 1505 15,1 | the coming of Christ was penitance a sacrament, nor is it such, 1506 | per 1507 17,1 | therefore, the said holy Synod perceived that all places, and especially 1508 1 | committed unto us,--already perceiving unto what troubled times, 1509 26,14| Trent.~I, Marcus Antonius PEREGRINUS, of Como, notary of the 1510 25,1 | Himself, the institutor and perfecter of the venerable sacraments, 1511 26,1 | be discharged, not in a perfunctory manner, but diligently and 1512 26,3 | Boniface VIII., which begins Periculoso, enjoins on all bishops, 1513 1 | often, in the extremest perils of the Christian commonweal, 1514 24,2 | they are bound, at their periol, not to do deceitfully. 1515 26,4 | canons; and if they have perished in the conflict itself, 1516 8,3 | even under the pain of perjury and of the other penalties 1517 24,2 | Council, to judge of the permissions granted by himself, or by 1518 7,1 | those that are good, not permissively only, but properly, and 1519 26,3 | s leave. ~The holy Synod permits that henceforth real property 1520 15,1 | truth of the Gospel, which perniciously extend the ministry of the 1521 22,2 | form of law, make unions in perpetuity--without prejudice, however, 1522 17,2 | servants of God, for the perpeual memory hereof. ~Immediately 1523 7,1 | who standeth that he stand perseveringly, and to restore him who 1524 26,4 | suspended; and, if they persist therein, they shall be reported 1525 26,4 | and contumacy, and their persistance therein, be punished, by 1526 26,4 | the bishop. If, however, persisting in the same crime, with 1527 6,2 | of the churches be bound personally--if they be not lawfully 1528 15,2 | manifestly at variance with the perspicuous words of so great an apostle. 1529 15,1 | alone be their endeavour, to persuade penitents to repair to superior 1530 5,2 | of faith, and of morals pertaining to the edification of Christian 1531 26,3 | subject, in what-soever pertains to the said cure and the 1532 15,1 | Baptism ; that so, their perverseness renounced and amended, they 1533 27 | Furthermore, in order to avoid the perversion and confusion which might 1534 15,5 | therein; and whereas they pervert these letters, in many ways, 1535 17,2 | horror, how far and wide the pestilence of heresy and schism had 1536 18,1 | to the chair of Blessed Peter-according to the form and tenour of 1537 16,1 | the holy Synod has been petitioned in their name, that the 1538 26,4 | the law, and to yield to petitioners on account of precedent, 1539 25,3 | with her live in per- ./. petual adultery; an evil which 1540 5,2 | Furthermore, in order to restrain petulant spirits, It decrees, that 1541 5,1 | Timothy, (one) to Titus, to Philemon, to the Hebrews; two of 1542 5,1 | to the Ephesians, to the Philippians, to the Colossians, two 1543 15,1 | to show his wound to the physician, his medical art cures not 1544 4,1 | also for us under Pontius Pilate, he suffered and was buried; 1545 14,1 | journeying of this miserable pilgrimage, be able to arrive at their 1546 14,1 | the Church, which, as the pillar and ground of truth, has 1547 14,1 | universal Church, may either pine away weakened and broken; 1548 15,5 | their morals; but to such a pitch, in these days, have the 1549 3,1 | sentiments, even under the word Placet, (It pleaseth us,) are present 1550 15,1 | error is refuted in the plainest manner possible. And truly 1551 6,2 | them with briefness and plainness of discourse, the vices 1552 1 | us, to the end that some plan of concord might be devised, 1553 1 | had been contemplated and planned against Italy, Austria, 1554 15,5 | any rights which may be pleaded as his from having been 1555 14,3 | happens that, under false pleas, which notwithstanding seem 1556 23,1 | to wit, are received most plentifully through this unbloody one; 1557 15,1 | protection of the Holy Ghost, pointed out and extirpated, Catholic 1558 24,2 | expedient, in the metro-politan, or in some other more convenient 1559 3,1 | sedulous meditation they ponder diligently within themselves, 1560 25,4 | nature, as that were it to be pondered upon in proportion to its 1561 15,3 | bitterness of his soul, by pondering on the grievousness, the 1562 4,1 | crucified also for us under Pontius Pilate, he suffered and 1563 26,4 | priests who preside over the poorer churches; to the praise 1564 26,3 | convents within cities or popu-lous towns, calling in even, 1565 26,1 | piety, be excluded from popular discourses before the uneducated 1566 6,2 | city be distinguished and populous,--and also in collegiate 1567 26,3 | except as to the power of possessing real property in common. 1568 15,5 | on them in their goods, possessions, and rights, obtain certain 1569 24,2 | Secular arm, compel the possessors of benefices, dignities, 1570 7,1 | and on the necessity and possibility thereof. ~But no one, how 1571 6,1 | himself alone, and not his posterity; and that the holiness and 1572 14,4 | DECREE FOR POSTPONING THE DEFINITION OF FOUR ARTICLES 1573 17,1 | of the all good and all powerful God, the progress of the 1574 25,4 | is understood to be the practice, derived either from the 1575 25,4 | holy Synod detests these practices, It enjoins on bishops, 1576 15,1 | with true sorrow of mind, practise these works of penitence. 1577 25,3 | provinces have herein in use any praise-worthy customs and ceremonies, 1578 22,2 | corruptions tending to simoniacal pravity; and they who shall act 1579 1 | Contarini, of the title of St. Praxedes, acted as our legate with 1580 7,1 | holy Church begs, when she prays, "Give unto us, O Lord, 1581 19,2 | Legates of the Apostolic See pre- ./. siding therein, resolves 1582 17,2 | reformed; that peace may be pre-served amongst Christian princes. 1583 6,2 | benefices. ~CHAPTER II. ~On Preachers of the word of God, and 1584 26,3 | Processions. ~All disputes about precedence, which very often, with 1585 26,3 | shall settle disputes about precedency. Exempted persons, not living 1586 7,1 | and this virtue always precedes and accompanies and follows 1587 23,3 | is derived, the fruit so precious and heavenly of this most 1588 1 | everything with greater precision. We, in the mean time, applied 1589 1 | approaching calends of November precluded our having the opportunity 1590 7,2 | their own salvation, and preferring earthly things to heavenly, 1591 23,1 | that oblation which was prefigured by various types of sacrifices, 1592 3,1 | council, none shall thereby be prejudiced, none acquire a new right. ~ 1593 8,1 | and which are exceedingly prejudicial to the purity of the Catholic 1594 23,1 | festivals. ~CHAPTER IX. ~Preliminary Remark on the following 1595 24,2 | singular the above-mentioned premises, any privileges, exemptions-even 1596 23,4 | their privilege, exemption, prerogative, or nobility of birth; otherwise 1597 26,10| their ./. own rights and prerogatives, and those of their own 1598 26,4 | ecclesiastics), they (the presentees) shall nevertheless be examined 1599 7,1 | their own flesh, and by presenting them as instruments of justice 1600 26,14| protect earthly kings, the preservers of the right faith. ~The 1601 24,2 | the said seminary, and in preserving the same, and refuse to 1602 26,13| Morone, the first Legate and President, blessing the holy Synod 1603 15,1 | profitably, and without any presumption declared in confession, 1604 7,1 | CHAPTER XII. ~That a rash presumptuousness in the matter of Predestination 1605 14,3 | grace, obtained under false pretences, for the absolution of any 1606 26,3 | How to proceed in cases of pretended invalidity of profession.~ 1607 25,4 | or the solicitations of pretenders, but by what the merits 1608 11,2 | which for a long time have prevailed in Germany to the disturbance 1609 25,4 | exemptions, indults, privileges, preventions, appropriations, new provisions, 1610 14,1 | own beloved soul as the price of our salvation, and gave 1611 3,1 | soever constituted in the priestly order, who are celebrating 1612 26,3 | created provincial, abbot, or prior, shall be from that time 1613 26,3 | be elected as abbess, or prioress,--or by whatsoever other 1614 26,4 | who succeed; any indult or privelege whatsoever notwithstanding; 1615 7,1 | indeed, but one receiveth the prize? So run that you may obtain. 1616 19,3 | the said Synod, and the pro tection of its agents ; 1617 22,2 | so slight, that they are probably disregarded, a third part 1618 24,2 | appointed times; unless his probity and morals be recommended 1619 26,4 | themselves by solemn oath to this procedure. And also if there be any 1620 4,1 | and the giver of life, who proceedeth from the Father and the 1621 26,10| Seculars, whether in Session, procession, or in any other acts whatsoever, 1622 25,4 | competent a person as can be procured: if anything be done contrary 1623 14,3 | spirituals, shall absolutely produce, before the judge to whom 1624 26,3 | then either, unless he has produced before his own superior, 1625 26,4 | despised than feared, and produces ruin rather than safety. 1626 5,2 | men of this description, profaners and violators of the word 1627 24,2 | possess any dignities as professors of theology, and all others 1628 24,2 | dignities, which are called professorships of theology, shall not be 1629 7,1 | without works is dead and profitless; and, In Christ Jesus neither 1630 25,3 | settled homes; and, being of a profligate character, they, after abandoning 1631 22,2 | gratuitously; utterly quashing and prohibiting all taxes to the contrary, 1632 1 | and opportune for this our project; when we found them, at 1633 26,7 | thereof,--whence a most prolific cause of abuses amongst 1634 7,1 | holy fathers announced and promised-that He might both redeem the 1635 24,2 | scholars, or of teachers, for promoting the common good of the Church; 1636 3,1 | effect; that, in the most prompt and prudent manner, the 1637 26,3 | may be the more easily and promptly restored, where it has fallen 1638 16,1 | therein to publish and promulgate the matters aforesaid,-- 1639 7,1 | this translation, since the promulgation of the Gospel, cannot be 1640 24,2 | it be rightly trained, is prone to follow after the pleasures 1641 15,1 | power of the keys, they may pronounce the sentence of forgiveness 1642 15,1 | absolution, which a priest pronounces upon one over whom he has 1643 15,3 | but a bare ministry of pronouncing and declaring sins to be 1644 7,1 | Him God hath proposed as a propitiator, through faith in his blood, 1645 7,1 | confiding that God will be propitious to them for Christ's sake; 1646 6,1 | being transfused into all by propogation, not by imitation, is in 1647 1 | rather to command that a proposal should be openly made, that 1648 14,5 | liberty to confer, make proposals, and treat on those things 1649 15,2 | professes and teaches and proposes to all the faithful of Christ, 1650 23,3 | enumerated, is in such wise propounded to all Ordinaries of places, 1651 23,1 | this sacrifice is truly propritiatory and that by means thereof 1652 16,1 | DECREE FOR PROROGUING THE SESSION~Whereas, in 1653 25,4 | may have a more easy and prosperous issue, all and each of the 1654 26,2 | we uncover the head, and prostrate ourselves, we adore Christ; 1655 26,4 | God hath willed to be the protectors of holy faith and church,-- 1656 9,1 | Session last held, and the protests made in the general congregations 1657 25,4 | by the honorary titles of Protonotary, Acolyte, Count Palatine, 1658 26,2 | them is referred to the prototypes which those images represent; 1659 3,1 | wine, immodest, covetous, proud, blasphemous, and lovers 1660 5,1 | hundred and fifty psalms; the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Canticle 1661 25,4 | CHAPTER XIX. ~Mandates 'de providendo,' Expectatives, and other 1662 26,3 | future, be lawful to appoint provincials, abbots, priors, or any 1663 25,4 | the choir appointed for psalmody. ~They shall, moreover, 1664 5,1 | consisting of a hundred and fifty psalms; the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, 1665 5,1 | Esther, Job, the Davidical Psalter, consisting of a hundred 1666 1 | should be time both for publishing this our decree throughout 1667 7,2 | Church of God which he hath purchased with his own blood, they 1668 6,1 | please God, may, errors being purged away, continue in its own 1669 23,1 | who are not as yet fully purified, is it rightly offered, 1670 10,1 | Reformation, whereon It had purposed to treat, might be established 1671 15,5 | homicide was not committed purposely but accidentally, or when 1672 16,1 | THE SESSION~Whereas, in pursuance of the decrees made in the 1673 15,5 | taken away from the altar, (q) because he has voluntarily 1674 25,4 | Innocent III., which begins, Qualiter et quando, which constitution 1675 25,4 | which begins, Qualiter et quando, which constitution the 1676 25,4 | some places, more grievous quarrels and tumults may easily be 1677 3,1 | charge his servants not to be quarrelsome, given to wine, immodest, 1678 19,3 | assurance might be annulled and quashed, that It wills and grants, 1679 22,2 | altogether gratuitously; utterly quashing and prohibiting all taxes 1680 6,2 | what is false. ~Those who quest for alms--who are also commonly 1681 26,3 | Regular Habit, she shall be questioned by the Ordinary, and again 1682 6,2 | are also commonly called Questors-of whatsoever condition they 1683 7,1 | be disposed through His quickening and assisting grace, to 1684 3,1 | men, that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life, may 1685 26,4 | and other clerics remain, quietly and without hindrances, 1686 24,2 | certain abode. And if he shall quit that place without consulting 1687 15,5 | ways, to an evil meaning quite opposed to the intention 1688 25,4 | accounts, may have obtained a quittance or discharge from the Chapter, 1689 15,5 | of Vienne, and beginning Quoniam, which is hereby renewed 1690 25,1 | impious men of this age raging, have not only had false 1691 7,1 | thieves, covetous, drunkards, railers, extortioners, and all others 1692 15,2 | the remains of sins; and raises up and strengthens the soul 1693 24,2 | revenues will be necessary, for raising the building of the college, 1694 25,3 | all shall be granted, or rarely, and then for a cause, and 1695 6,1 | but says that it is only rased, or not imputed; let him 1696 15,1 | Church of God, and this Synod ratifies it as a thing most true, 1697 8,1 | asked whether they will ratify what their sponsors promised 1698 1 | and finally in the diet of Ratisbon, at which our beloved son, 1699 15,1 | Synod, approving of and re ceiving as most true this 1700 1 | necessary for the perfect re-establishment of peace,--all of which 1701 1 | procuring and treating of a re-union in those diets seemed only 1702 1 | each other; and, having reached Belgium, thence passed into 1703 7,1 | name, yea a name without a reality, a figment, in fine, introduced 1704 8,1 | this cause, they are to be rebaptized when they have attained 1705 1 | emperor, who, to crush that rebellion, traversed France on the 1706 1 | prudence and wisdom. Then, recalling to mind that our predecessors, 1707 25,4 | churches called patrimonial, or receptive, wherein the bishop has 1708 15,1 | searched all the folds and recesses of his conscience, he confess 1709 26,4 | surreptitious. Moreover, any reciprocal resignations which shall 1710 26,12| ON RECITING, IN SESSION, THE DECREES 1711 8,1 | received baptism, to be reckoned amongst the faithful; and 1712 6,1 | wishing now to come to the reclaiming of the erring, and the confirming 1713 6,2 | exemption, or appeal, or reclamation, or action of recovery be 1714 4,1 | chiefly It is assembled, and recognizing with the apostles, that 1715 26,4 | holy humility which so much recom mends us to God. ~Wherefore, 1716 26,8 | soldiers, they sedulously recommend to all the faithful all 1717 23,3 | conditions and bargains for recompenses, and whatsoever is given 1718 15,1 | perfect through charity, and reconciles man with God before this 1719 15,1 | prince of the apostoles, reconmending penitence to sinners who 1720 14,1 | own Blood; words which,-recorded by the holy Evangelists, 1721 25,4 | the Church, cannot avoid recording, that nothing is more necessary 1722 1 | we, as our letters and records attest, indicted an ecumenical 1723 15,1 | will wash my bed, I will recount to thee all my years, in 1724 7,1 | received, or whether they have recovered it when lost,-are to be 1725 1 | must needs refresh and recruit themselves,--exhorted us 1726 25,3 | of what is hidden, cannot rectify, unless some more efficacious 1727 3,1 | may be offended, nor the rectitude of a correct judgment be 1728 23,1 | effusion of His own blood He redeemed us, and delivered us from 1729 25,4 | arising from which cannot be redressed by an appeal from that definitive 1730 25,4 | made in this way, they may reduce those prebends to a less 1731 23,5 | this present decree It doth refer it; who, of his singular 1732 27 | silencing gainsayers, and the refractory, by means of judicial sentences, 1733 1 | its expenses, must needs refresh and recruit themselves,-- 1734 24,2 | especially the sheep ought to be refreshed, and to rejoice in the Lord 1735 25,2 | anathema: seeing that God refuses not that gift to those who 1736 25,3 | admonition given them. But if, regardless of this censure, they shall 1737 15,1 | Penance. ~If such, in all the regenerate, were their gratitude towards 1738 8,3 | in Jerusalem, priest, and Reginald of Saint Mary in Cosmedin, 1739 26,3 | ordained. ~ ./. CHAPTER I. ~All ReguIars shall order their lives 1740 25,1 | taught more plainly, when rehearsing those last words as having 1741 15,5 | ignorant, and who have been rejected by their own bishops as 1742 24,2 | to be refreshed, and to rejoice in the Lord at the presence 1743 23,3 | shall seem to them to have relation hereunto; and may compel 1744 26,4 | for the public good, to relax at times the restraint of 1745 1 | witness, on whose clemency we relied, when we exposed ourselves 1746 27 | hath at length brought relief thereunto by a suitable 1747 26,4 | Churches are to be piously relieved. ~Those are not to be borne 1748 23,4 | regulated, and replete with religiousness; avoiding even slight faults, 1749 14,2 | the true Body of the Lord remaineth not; let him be anathema. ~ 1750 14,2 | Only of the bread and wine remaining-which conversion indeed the Catholic 1751 23,1 | CHAPTER IX. ~Preliminary Remark on the following Canons. ~ 1752 25,1 | after it, that the more remarkable heresies and errors of the 1753 1 | we would fain indeed have remedied the evils wherewith the 1754 17,1 | was the holy Synod from remedying the evils and troubles existing 1755 15,3 | previous meditation are remembered, even those (mortal sins) 1756 26,2 | confirmed in (the habit of) remembering, and continually revolving 1757 7,1 | Catholic Church, the Holy Ghost reminding her thereof, has always 1758 15,1 | length prepares for the remissions of sins, when it is united 1759 15,4 | does not confer grace, nor remit sin, nor comfort(h) the 1760 1 | France, Spain, and the other remoter provinces. And in fixing 1761 25,3 | The holy Synod entirely removes the impediment of justice 1762 15,5 | one that is subject, by rendering due obedience to those set 1763 25,3 | witnesses; the holy Synod renders such wholly incapable of 1764 15,1 | that so, their perverseness renounced and amended, they might, 1765 23,1 | errors and heresies being repelled, be preserved in its own 1766 7,1 | promise himself an assured repentance; for except by special revelation, 1767 6,2 | until the principal himself repenting shall fulfil his own duty. ~ 1768 15,1 | have them cleansed by a repetition of baptism--that being nowise 1769 26,15| reverend lords, the cardinals, replied in these words : Acceding 1770 26,2 | or, that trust is to be reposed in images, as was of old 1771 26,2 | portrayed by paintings or other representations, the people is instructed, 1772 1 | emperor was especially urgent, representing that he had promised those 1773 15,2 | For the unction very aptly represents the grace of the Holy Ghost 1774 5,2 | Besides the above, wishing to repress that temerity, by which 1775 26,3 | it has not been violated; repressing, by ecclesiastical censures 1776 22,1 | which it is not lawful to reprobate, or to change at plea sure, 1777 15,3 | wit, from public sins by reproof only, provided he who is 1778 14,3 | life, in good esteem and reputation; and if they shall have 1779 23,3 | illiberal demands, rather than requests, for alms, and other things 1780 23,4 | ceasing, to receive the requisite orders within a year, whatsoever 1781 11,2 | our letter of exhortation, requisition, monition, statute, declaration, 1782 8,1 | any one saith, that the resemblance of the baptism which they 1783 22,1 | conditions: this same holy Synod reserves the same to another time,-- 1784 26,4 | hindrances, in their own residences and in the discharge of 1785 6,1 | those who consent not, but resist manfully by the grace of 1786 15,2 | sickness; and more readily resists the temptations of the devil 1787 26,3 | that salutary safeguard, resolutely to overcome all the assaults 1788 17,2 | to apply, we formed the resolution of convoking, and, with 1789 10,1 | hath resolved, and doth resolve, that it is good, opportunie, 1790 15,1 | truth may be made clear and resplendent; which (Catholic truth) 1791 1 | Wherefore, relying and resting on the authority of that 1792 7,1 | remission of his sins, and rests on that alone; seeing that 1793 11,2 | BULL FOR THE RESUMPTION OF THE COUNCIL OF TRENT, 1794 8,1 | nimis. ~CHAPTER IV. ~The retainer of several Benefices contrary 1795 14,3 | execution of the law would be retarded; whilst, should they on 1796 15,1 | sentence of forgiveness or retention of sins. For it is manifest, 1797 26,3 | the service of another, or retire from his Monastery: when 1798 25,4 | ought to be added to, or retrenched from, the above regulations 1799 26,15| Morone and Simonetta, lately returned from the sacred Council 1800 26,4 | bishops and prelates, are reunited in his person; otherwise, 1801 7,1 | to be true which God has revealed and promised,-and this especially, 1802 26,2 | be by any perverted into revellings and drunkenness; as if festivals 1803 8,1 | Chapters shall not grant 'reverends' to any unless straitened 1804 1 | discord, we were led to revert to our former remedy, a 1805 8,1 | well those which have been revived from the heresies condemned 1806 1 | Belgium had been incited to revolt against the most serene 1807 26,2 | remembering, and continually revolving in mind the articles of 1808 1 | hanging over our sins,--Rhodes had been lost; Hungary ravaged; 1809 13 | Church, and to the rule of righteous living. ~ ~~ 1810 26,3 | transferred to an order less rigid; nor shall permission be 1811 6,2 | let him be subjected to rigorous punishment. ~Archpriests, 1812 25,3 | shall not obey, shall be rigorously punished, according to the 1813 14,3 | need of the rod, then is rigour to be tempered with gentleness, 1814 7,2 | from their infancy to their riper years, having been laudably 1815 14,1 | Christ our Lord, who hath now risen from the dead, to die no 1816 26,3 | without any protection, to the robberies and other crimes of wicked 1817 24,1 | looked upon as thieves and robbers, who have not entered by 1818 7,1 | and spotless, as the first robe given them through Jesus 1819 14,3 | transgression, there be need of the rod, then is rigour to be tempered 1820 11,2 | M. CARDINAL CRESCEN. ~ROM. AMASEUS. ~ ~ ~ 1821 14,1 | It might pluck up by the roots those tares of execrable 1822 22,2 | churches and others that are in ruins, to profane, though not 1823 3,1 | blameless, sober, chaste, ruling well their own household, ( 1824 5,1 | Deuteronomy; Josue, Judges, Ruth, four books of Kings, two 1825 1 | whilst our impious and ruthless enemy the Turk was never 1826 1 | with a vast fleet; took, sacked, ravaged several cities 1827 15,3 | the institution of this sacra ment, to the power of preaching 1828 8,1 | Law do not differ from the sacramnets of the Old Law, save that 1829 14,1 | He would also that this sacrement should be received as the 1830 22,1 | laymen and clerics, when not sacrifising, are not bound, of divine 1831 23,2 | the mass a true and proper sacriflce is not offered to God; or, 1832 8,1 | saith, that, in the three sacrments, Baptism, to wit, Confirmation, 1833 16,2 | terms of the security and safe- conduct as above set down, 1834 26,3 | themselves, by that salutary safeguard, resolutely to overcome 1835 14,5 | Synod; to come freely and safely to the said oecumenical 1836 22,2 | provided still that there be no salary assigned them for the discharge 1837 26,2 | VENERATION, AND RELICS, OF SAlNTS, AND ON SACRED IMAGES.~The 1838 24,2 | who have been promoted per saltum, provided they have not 1839 25,4 | a competent vicar to the same--with a suitable assignment, 1840 23,1 | perfect, as many as were to be sanctified. He, therefore, our God 1841 7,1 | merciful God who washes and sanctifies gratuitously, signing, and 1842 14,1 | then first the power of sanctifying when one uses them, whereas 1843 15,5 | priests of God defile the sanctuaries, and despise the law. But, 1844 6,1 | blood, made unto us justice, santification, and redemption; or if he 1845 15,1 | neither are they neces sary for the administration of 1846 15,1 | pardoned us without any sat is fac tion, as that, taking 1847 7,1 | introduced into the Church by Satan; let him be anathema. ~CANON 1848 14,1 | truth, has detested, as satanical, these inventions devised 1849 1 | could not be accomplished satisfactorily before his return to Germany: 1850 15,1 | wrath. For, doubtless, these satisfactory punishments greatly recall 1851 1 | burthen. For, whereas we saw that peace was needful to 1852 22,2 | who live shamefully and scandalously, they shall, after having 1853 17,2 | salvation of the sheep that are scattered, and the perpetual tranquillity 1854 1 | any hope of peace, and the scheme of procuring and treating 1855 27 | commentaries, glosses, annotations, scholia, or any kind of interpretation 1856 15,1 | of love, by the temporal scourges inflicted of God, and borne 1857 15,5 | privilege soever, considered screened, so as not to be able to 1858 15,5 | who are in the habit of screening themselves thereby--save 1859 19,1 | seem best adapted to remove scruples from the minds of very many, 1860 25,4 | suitable persons. And all the scrutinies, informations, attestations, 1861 5,2 | uses, to wit, to things scurrilous, fabulous, vain, to flatteries, 1862 23,4 | may, by actual examination search into the competency of all 1863 15,1 | himself diligently, and searched all the folds and recesses 1864 23,1 | mercy, and find grace in seasonable aid, if we draw nigh unto 1865 8,3 | forth: wishing to provide seasonably that so holy a work as the 1866 26,3 | to make in their proper seasons, that these things be not 1867 26,4 | they shall have the first seat, and the place which they 1868 17,1 | the most reverend lords, Sebastian, Archbishop of Siponto, 1869 26,4 | those who are called their seconds (sponsors), they shall incur 1870 26,14| MASSARELLI, bishop of Telesia, secretary of the sacred Council of 1871 22,2 | souls, as well Regular as Secular-in whatever way held in commendam, 1872 26,4 | eluded, it is necessary to secure the person, the bishop may 1873 19,3 | this safe-conduct and these securities shall stand good and endure, 1874 7,1 | speeches and good words, seduce the hearts of the innocent, 1875 3,1 | sacred letters, that by sedulous meditation they ponder diligently 1876 22,2 | delegate of the Apostolic See--at the time of the very 1877 25,4 | delegate of the Apostolic See-whose cathedral church is the 1878 7,1 | not born propagated of the seed of Adam, would not be born 1879 26,4 | and kindred, which is the seed-plot of many evils in the church. 1880 15,2 | For though our adversary seeks and seizes opportunities, 1881 26,3 | it his care,-as far as he sees that the times will permit,-- 1882 23,4 | and revenues which he has seized upon, or in whatsoever way 1883 15,2 | our adversary seeks and seizes opportunities, all our life 1884 22,2 | orders almost without any selection whatever; who, by various 1885 5,2 | name of the author; nor to sell them in future, or even 1886 6,2 | be disseminated under the semblance of piety, the same holy 1887 25,4 | colleges, universities, senates, or to any individuals whatsoever, 1888 24,2 | the advice of two of the senior and most experienced canons 1889 5,2 | sacred Scripture to his own senses, presume to interpret the 1890 19,1 | that It may more easily separate the various and strange 1891 25,2 | that, for many causes, a separation may take place between husband 1892 26,4 | deprived of ecclesiastical sepulture. Those also who have given 1893 15,1 | be followed by peace and serenity of conscience, with exceed 1894 15,1 | of the priest of acting seriously and absolving truly,--he 1895 26,4 | which is a kind of perpetual sermon; but above all that they 1896 5,2 | lectures, disputations, sermons and expositions, held as 1897 6,1 | doctrine; whereas that old serpent, the perpetual enemy of 1898 24,2 | ecclesiastical dress and tonsure, he serves in some church by the bishop' 1899 25,4 | require a longer term of service-otherwise every offender shall, for 1900 24,1 | in the most well-ordered settlement of the church, there should 1901 7,2 | the subjecting him to a severer censure of the sacred canons, 1902 14,2 | Christ's faithful of both sexes are bound, when they have 1903 25,3 | their parish priest, he shall-even though he may plead that 1904 26,4 | concubines is prescribed.~How shameful a thing, and how unworthy 1905 22,2 | whatsoever. But, those who live shamefully and scandalously, they shall, 1906 24,2 | and refuse to pay their share; it will be the duty of 1907 14,3 | afterwards to proceed to sharper and more violent remedies, 1908 24,2 | chasteness of morals, as that a shining example of good works and 1909 1 | engaged in fortifying our shores, and in furnishing assistance 1910 21,1 | business of the Council, shorten, or lengthen, the said term, 1911 1 | could not, on account of the shortness of the time, be completed 1912 23,4 | employments, to be by them shunned,--the same shall be henceforth 1913 15,2 | inconveniences and pains of his sickness; and more readily resists 1914 23,1 | as also because from His side there came out blood and 1915 19,2 | the Apostolic See pre- ./. siding therein, resolves and decrees, 1916 15,1 | retained. By which action so signal, and words so clear, the 1917 7,1 | sanctifies gratuitously, signing, and anointing with the 1918 15,5 | themselves can be by one word silenced by them, for that they suffer 1919 27 | any way concerned therein; silencing gainsayers, and the refractory, 1920 17,1 | pressing a necessity, but to be silent till better times ; that 1921 15,5 | when they have to answer silently to themselves, that they 1922 23,4 | Regular, he shall have a similar attestation from the superiors 1923 26,2 | venerate the saints, whose similitude they bear: as, by the decrees 1924 25,4 | penalties set forth against simoniacs by the sacred canons, and 1925 23,3 | but little removed from a simonical taint, or at all events, 1926 25,4 | will incur the guilt of simony, from which they shall not 1927 26,4 | which does not manifest simplicity, zeal towards God, and a 1928 14,1 | teaches, and openly and simply professes, that, in the 1929 17,2 | and princes,--who it were sincerely to be wished could be present 1930 26,4 | excommunication is the very sinews of ecclesiastical discipline, 1931 23,4 | that some shall say, or sing, mass, others the Gospel, 1932 26,3 | Innocent III., beginning In singulis, published in a general 1933 17,1 | Sebastian, Archbishop of Siponto, and Aloysius, Bishop of 1934 8,3 | measures therein in the said sity of Trent; and also to continue, 1935 6,1 | the constitutions of Pope Sixtus IV., of happy memory, are 1936 26,14| archbishops, one hundred and sixty-eight bishops, seven abbots, thirty-nine 1937 27 | thousand five hundred and sixty-four, on the seventh of the calends 1938 15,1 | impossible, or to call it a slaughter-house of consciences: for it is 1939 7,1 | in order to excite their sloth, and to encourage themselves 1940 26,4 | to the other penalties, smite them also with the sword 1941 1 | of mankind ever sets his snares against holy enterprises, -- 1942 3,1 | bishops to be blameless, sober, chaste, ruling well their 1943 7,1 | God, they are able, living soberly, justly, and godly, to proceed 1944 25,4 | human affection, or the solicitations of pretenders, but by what 1945 7,1 | men, Jesus Christ, His own Son-who had been, both before the 1946 24,2 | cited, even though not per-sonally, by an edict, they shall 1947 5,1 | Micheas, Nahum, Habacuc, Sophonias, Aggaeus, Zacharias, Malachias; 1948 5,2 | diabolical incantations, sorceries, and defamatory libels; ( 1949 1 | either neglected, or not sought for, an opportunity of effecting 1950 26,4 | princes who have the rights of sovereignty within their own dominions, 1951 26,14| souls of the most blessed Soveriegn Pontiffs, Paul III., and 1952 1 | difficulty from France, Spain, and the other remoter provinces. 1953 26,4 | one thereunto, as also the spectators thereof, shall be subjected 1954 7,1 | certain men, who, by pleasing speeches and good words, seduce the 1955 4,1 | adored and glorified; who spoke by the prophets and one 1956 8,3 | Pontificate. ~FAB. BISH. OF SPOL. B. MOTTA. ~ ~ ~ 1957 23,4 | feastings, dances, gambling, sports, and all sorts of crime 1958 23,1 | leave, to His own beloved Spouse the Church, a visible sacrifice, 1959 1 | Council, to the next ensuing Spring, that is, to the next calends 1960 7,1 | him a fountain of water springing up unto life everlasting. 1961 23,3 | publicly and notoriously stained with crime, either to minister 1962 7,1 | able to establish him who standeth that he stand perseveringly, 1963 9,1 | that, from the foregoing statements and other allegations, a 1964 3,1 | others who are placed in high stations, and for all men, that we 1965 26,4 | Boniface VIII., which begins, Statutum, and who are otherwise suited 1966 1 | the two main supports and stays of the Christian name, to 1967 7,1 | according to God worketh penance steadfast unto salvation. And again; 1968 25,4 | more faithful and diligent stewards to take care of the property 1969 16,2 | opportunity ; nor make use of, nor stiffer any one else to make use 1970 7,1 | or-which is more intolerable still-mortally, and consequently deserves 1971 24,2 | both together, of which stipends they may, if negligent, 1972 24,1 | admonish thee that thou stir up the grace of God, which 1973 6,1 | times troubled, has also stirred up not only new, but even 1974 25,4 | against according to the con-stitutions of the sacred canons. As 1975 26,4 | things that have been lost or stolen, shall be issued by no one 1976 17,2 | of the Christian people stood in need of correction; we 1977 25,1 | two, but one flesh; and straightway confirmed the firmness of 1978 15,2 | there no time wherein he strains more vehemently all the 1979 19,1 | separate the various and strange doctrines, as cockle from 1980 24,2 | Furthermore, no cleric, who is a stranger, shall, without letters 1981 14,1 | processions through the streets, and public places. For 1982 26,3 | women, who are living under stricter rule or statutes, the holy 1983 14,3 | they are pastors and not strikers, and that they ought so 1984 26,3 | such property, have been stripped thereof, It ordains that 1985 6,1 | yea, he who shall have striven lawfully shall be crowned. 1986 7,1 | that the more earnestly one strives to dispose himself for grace, 1987 17,2 | enemy of mankind, to wit, striving, and throwing difficulties 1988 17,2 | His mercy conceived the strongest hope that, by the said means 1989 17,1 | churches ; It resolved, not to struggle against so pressing a necessity, 1990 6,2 | also the scholars who are studying in those schools, shall 1991 26,1 | prohibit as scandals and stumbling-blocks of the faithful. But let 1992 26,3 | orders, priors claustral, or sub-prior in those priories that are 1993 24,1 | not of equal rank: for the subdeavonship is classed amongst the greater 1994 7,2 | metropolitan shall, for the subjecting him to a severer censure 1995 25,4 | places, which form is to be submitted to the approval of the most 1996 26,3 | be rendered valid by any subsequent possession, even though 1997 24,2 | of which ecclesiastical subsidies are wont to be paid; and 1998 25,3 | ordains, that no marriage can subsist between the abducer and 1999 26,4 | itself; and others shall be substituted in their place, by those 2000 14,3 | grievances, and, under the subterfuge of an appeal, impede the 2001 1 | carrying out his designs with success. Wherefore, having been, 2002 22,2 | faithfully the alms, and the succours of charity which are offered


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