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The diocese of Upper Karlovac

"Make haste to help me, O Lord,
my salvation!"
(Psalm 38:22)

 

 

The Diocese of Upper Karlovac comprises the most western Serbian territories: Banija, Kordun, Lika, Krbava, Gorski Kotar, as well as northern Croatia and Istria. It was named after the town of Karlovac, where its See is located. These territories have been settled by Serbians ever since the 15th century, and more intensely in the first decades of the 16th century. The main settlements were Zumberak and Bela Krajina, and then the areas near Gomirje and Gorski Kotar. During Turkish rule in central Lika (15281699), the Serbians moved to cragged, rugged land of Lika from Dalmatia, while Serbians from Bosnia settled mostly in Krbava. Many of them migrated from there to Austrian-held territories, i.e., to the area of the Vojna Krajina (Military "Buffer" Zone).

During the 16th century, the spiritual life of Orthodox Serbians of this area was guided by the metropolitans of Dabar-Bosnia. The See of this Metropolitanate was at one time in Monastery Rmanj, at the tri-juncture of Bosnia-Dalmatia-Lika. When parts of Lika, Banija and Krbava, which had been to this time under Turkish rule, were liberated at the end of the 17th century, a separate Diocese of Karlovac-Zrinopolje was established (1695). The first Bishop of the Diocese was a refugee from Bosnia, Metropolitan of Dabar-Bosnia Atanasije Ljubojevic (16961712).

In 1713, the Diocese of Karlovac-Zrinopolje was divided into two: the Diocese of Karlovac-Senj-Coastlands and the Diocese of Kostajnica-Zrinopolje. Danilo Ljubotina, Bishop of the former, founded his Episcopal Residence in Plaski. During the 18th century, the areas under Austrian rule were administered by the Bishops of Marca.

Roman Catholic proselytism and forced conversion to the Uniate Church (recognizing the authority of the Roman Pontiff) were a constant danger for Orthodox Serbians within the borders of the Diocese of Karlovac. Proof of that religious aggressiveness is the fate of the Serbian people in Zumberak, forcibly subjected to the Uniate Church in the 17th and 18th centuries. In that disparate struggle between the Roman Catholic Church, supported by the Austrian Court and Army, the loss of Zumberak was inevitable. Moreover, the military authorities, under the advice of the Roman Catholic clergy, expelled Orthodox priests, denying the Orthodox Bishop access to these regions. In order to preserve the Serbians in the faith of their fathers and the spirit of Saint Sava, Bishop Pavle Nenadovic (17441749), later Metropolitan of Karlovci, founded a "Central School" in Plaski for the educating of young seminarians. Also through the efforts of this eminent Bishop a similar school was established in Zaluznice, near Vrhovina. Bishop Danilo Jaksic (17511771), a Hierarch of great pastoral devoutness and holy life, also worked hard for the enlightenment of Serbian youth. Thanks to his zeal, a school in Metka was opened.

In the historic line of the Bishops of Karlovac the following are mentioned: Atanasije Ljubojevic (16881712), Danilo Ljubotina (17131739), Pavle Nenadovic (17441749), Danilo Jaksic (17511771), Josif Stojanovic (17711774), Petar Petrovic (177141784), Jovan Jovanovic (17841786), Genadije Dimovic (17861796), Stefan Avakumovic (17981801), Petar Petrovic Vidak (18011806), Mojsije Miokovic (18071823), Lukijan Musicki (18281837), Evgenije Jovanovic (18391854), Sergije Kacanski (18581859), Petar Jovanovic (18591864), Lukijan Nikolajevic (18651872), Teofan Zivkovic (18741890), Mihailo Grujic (18911914), Ilarion Zeremski (19201931), Maksimilijan Hajdin (19321936), Sava Trlajic (19381941), Nikanor Ilicic (19471951) and Simeon Zlokovic (19511990). The present Bishop of Upper Karlovac is Nikanor (Bogunovic).

In World War II, Bishop Sava Trlajic of Upper Karlovac was martyred. The Bishop was arrested on 13 June, 1941, together with thirteen other prominent Serbians, among whom there were also three Serbian priests. They were confined in a barn belonging to an Ustasha camp-officer Tomljenovic, where they were tortured in various ways. When they were being beaten, the church hymn "For as many of you as were baptized into Christ…" (Gal 3:27a) was played on a record-player. From there they were taken by freight-train to Gospic on 20 June. Bishop Sava was allowed to say good-bye to his 83-year old mother, but with his hands tied and legs fettered. In mid-August of 1941, Bishop Sava Trlajic was taken to Mount Velebit, where he was, with numerous other Serbians, thrown into the pit "Jadovno".

During World War II, the Diocese of Upper Karlovac endured an unprecedented spiritual genocide: 116 Serbian churches were destroyed, and 39 heavily damaged; two chapels were destroyed, along with 84 parish homes and other church buildings (53 being dynamited and 31 set afire). Church libraries and archives suffered the same fate: 154 archives were destroyed, 13 plundered. Out of 171 church and monastery libraries, 154 were destroyed while 17 were pillaged.

This devastation of Serbian holy sites on the territory of the Diocese of Upper Karlovac continued even after the war. The places of worship which remained after the war, in general damaged and demolished, were totally destroyed on the strict order of "the People’s authority". Thus, the "People’s Committee of the Municipality of Udbina" on 22 March, 1960, addressed an official act to the Serbian Orthodox Church, i.e., the Diocese of Upper Karlovac, stating among other things: "Our People’s Committee of the Municipality, at its meeting of 14 July 1957, and on the basis of legal sanctions, has passed a decision concerning the destruction of what is left of the walls of buildings set afire during the war or demolished by other means… In reference to this, and as on the territory of this Municipality there are still a number of such walls of burnt down Orthodox churches (Josan, Mekinjar, Svrackovo Selo, Mutilic, et. al.), we have addressed ourselves personally to Your Diocese in Karlovac, with the demand that these walls be finally, after 15 years since the end of the Second World War, be removed, i.e., torn down. In the event that you do not undertake measures, this People’s Committee will be forced to do so on its own, and to demolish those walls at the expense of the above-addressee." This decision was signed by Bogdan Korac.

The war of 19911995 added to this distress, thus continuing and confirming the continuity of the spiritual genocide on Serbian ecclesiastial monuments within the boundaries of the Diocese of Upper Karlovac. In the war from 1991 until 1993, five Serbian churches were demolished, and 18 damaged on the territory of this Diocese. Three parish homes were dynamited and seven damaged. Five cemeteries were destroyed. The Cathedral Church of Saint Nicholas in Karlovac, built during the period of 1785 to 1787, was dynamited by the Ustashas on Serbian Orthodox Christmas in 1992. The church of Saint Spyridon in Petrinja, dating from 1787, was destroyed by the Ustasha at the beginning of World War II; the new church was finished only in 1976. In the present war, this church was several times dynamited by Croatian nationalists, and finally on 12 August, 1991, razed to the ground. The Bishop’s Residence in Karlovac was shelled, plundered and finally destroyed. Thus on Saturday, 25 December, 1993, on Roman Catholic Christmas at 4:18 a.m., the See of the Diocese of Upper Karlovac was blown up by explosives. Within the walls of the Residence the Diocesan Museum Treasury, Archives and Library was located.

Following the Croatian aggression on the Republic of Serbian Krajina, in August of 1995, the Serbian population of this ancient Diocese was driven out (many being killed), and their churches desecrated, damaged or destroyed. The 18th-century wooden church in Buzeta, near Glina, a unique example of church architecture, was burnt totally to the ground. On the territory of this Diocese, 11 churches were destroyed, while 45 were damaged during the war period 19911995. Eight parish homes and other churches buildings were also destroyed, while 14 suffered serious damage. Unfortunately, now that the Serbs have been expelled from this region, many churches and other buildings remain abandoned and exposed to the ravages of decay.

 

Karlovac

 

Cathedral Church of Saint Nicholasbuilt between 17851787. Iconostasis painted by Arsa Teodorovic and wall-frescoes by Dragutin Inkiostri Medenjak. Church served as storehouse for objects looted from the Serbs and Jews (19911945). Church twice damaged: during direct war operations in 1991, and by explosives outside the zone of conflict on Christmas, 1992. "...We entered the remains of the church from the south, because the narthex was demolished and the choir loft had collapsed, blocking the west-side entrance. The altar apse was completely demolished, falling towards the parapet of the iconostasis. The roof had fallen into the nave; beneath the beam in the middle of the church one can see the great chandelier; a part of the ceiling still remained... The inside walls lean outward. They could fall at any time... Everything in the church was demolished..." (Report of 2 September, 1992). Church completely razed in 1993.

Diocesan Residence built in 1882housing a large collection of portraits of Bishops of the Diocese of Gornji Karlovac. Diocesan Treasury: from 1985 housing many icons, books and liturgical items, removed from Monasteries and Churches of the Diocese during the Second World War by Ustashas, returned to the Serbian Orthodox Church only in 1985. Diocesan Residence broken into, pillaged and destroyed. "On 25 December, 1993, at 0410 hours, following Midnight Mass on the occasion of Roman Catholic Christmas, a very strong explosion occurred in the Bishop’s See. The Diocesan Center was destroyed."

 

 

Blatusa

Church of Saint Nicholasbuilt in 1930, burglarized and interior demolished (Report MNo. 98/97, of 16 April 1997).

 

Blinja (Deanery of Glina)

Church of Saint Elijahbuilt in 1873, renovated in 1991. All windows in the Church shattered by Ustasha shelling detonations October 1991. "The right side of the entrance doors was destroyed." (Report by the Government of the Republic of Croatia, Ministry of Internal Affairs, Zagreb, 1 April 1996)

 

Brdjani

Church of Saint Georgebuilt in 1888. Completely razed by Ustashas in 1941. A small wooden church erected in 1946. New church under construction. "In the 19911995 war the plaster fell from the walls due to detonation, and the dome and roof of the new church being built were damaged. The Parish Home was damaged by detonations in the 19911995 war." (Report of 6 March 1993)

 

Brlog

Church of Saint Savabuilt in 1740. Under State protection as a Monument of cultural significance. Inventory destroyed in 1995. (Report according to the monograph Ranjena crkva u Hrvatskoj, Zagreb 1996, pg. 416) The entire interior damaged by fire. (Report MNo. 69/97 of 14 March 1997)

 

Buvaca

Church of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paulbuilt in 1800, damaged (19411945). Following World War II church was repaired. "In 1991 the windows were broken and the roof damaged by shells and detonations." (Report of 6 March 1993) Church stands open and totally demolished, everything destroyed. Bell in place. (Report MNo. 98/97 of 16 April 1997)

 

Buzeta

 

   

Church of Saint Elijah the Prophetbuilt in 1740 of wood, oldest wooden church in Banija. Renovation begun before the war (1991) but not completed. Icons from the iconostasis dismantled for restoration but not removed. Church burnt down by the Muslim army in August 1995. Icons, liturgical items, books incinerated. Parish Home also burnt down by the Muslim army in August 1995.

 

Velika Popina

Church of Saint Elijah – according to unverified reports destroyed (19911995).

 

 

 

Veljun

 

Church (chapel) of the Transfiguration of the Lord – in the temporary Residence of the Bishop of Gornji Karlovac, broken into and looted by Croats in August 1995. The iconostasis forcibly torn from the walls and thrown in the middle of the Chapel. The Residence (temporary) of the Bishop of Gornji Karlovac pillaged and devastated by Croats in August 1995. Tombstones written in the Cyrillic alphabet in the village graveyard smashed (around 8 in number). Village plundered and partly burned down. In 1995 the Parish of Veljun numbered 450 homes, while now 75 souls live there now. (Report MNo. 98/97 of 16 April 1997)

 

Vlahovic

Church of Saint Elijah the Prophetbuilt in the 18th century. Broken into and looted by Croats in August 1995.

 

Glavace

Church of Saint Petkabuilt in 1784, damaged in the Second World War. Following World War II repaired. "In the Autumn of 1991, while this territory was under the control of the forces of the National Guard and Ministry of Internal Affairs of Croatia, the church was damaged." (Report of 6 March 1993)

 

Glina

 

Church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokosbuilt in the mid-18th century; renovated several times in the 19th century. In 1941, destroyed by Croat Ustashas. Following the war a new church was built; shelled (right apse hit), looted and devastated by Croats in August 1995. Parish Home broken into and looted in August 1995; Memorial plaque smashed.

 

Glinska Poljana

Church of the Ascension of the Lordbuilt in 1806. Taken over by the Roman Catholics and local Orthodox faithful forcibly converted (19411945). Church archives and service books burnt at that time. Following World War II building returned to the Serbian Orthodox Church. Church dynamited together with inventory of religious and artistic value on 8 and 9 October 1991; completely destroyed. Parish Home completely destroyed (19911993).

 

Gornje Dubrave (near Ogulin)

Church of Saint Paraskeva (Petka) – damaged by Croatian army in 1992. Lighting rod, cross, and roof on belltower damaged by shotgun fire. Interior shot up. Western doors and windows destroyed. Graveyard desecrated.

 

Gornji Skrad

Church of Saint Prince Lazarbuilt in 1932, looted and devastated. (Report MNo. 98/97 of 16 April 1997)

 

Gospic

Church of Saint Georgebuilt in 1785. Set afire by the Ustashas (19411945). Iconostasis destroyed, together with church inventory, furnishings and service books. A great number of Serbs put to death inside the church by the Ustashas. New church built on same location in 1964. Destroyed, entire church inventory destroyed (19911993). Parish Home destroyed (19911993).

 

Dvor na Uni

Church of Greatmartyr Saint Georgeburglarized (19911995). Parish Home heavily damaged, destroyed in August 1995.

 

Donji Budacki

Church of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paulset afire during the Second World War; new church built in 1963; broken into and plundered by Croats in 1995. Parish Home broken into and looted by Croats in 1995.

 

Dragotina (near Glina)

Church of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokosburnt down during the Second World War; forcibly entered in August 1995.

 

Dubica

Church of the Descent of the Holy Spiritbuilt in 1805. Destroyed by the Ustashas (19411945). New church built in 1972. Damaged (19911993); broken into and inventory damaged. (Report No. 178/97 of 9 June 1997) Parish Home demolished (19911993); damaged to a great extent together with inventory, archives and library. (Report No. 178/97 of 9 June 1997)

 

Zivaja

Church of Saint Elijahbuilt in 1885, destroyed in 1941. Reconstruction begun in 1989. "The belltower was destroyed, the bell remains amid the ruins. The church itself is closed and locked on the North side, while the door on the East is open and damaged. Icons, liturgical books and vestments are scattered around the Sanctuary. A large number of undamaged icons remain on the iconostasis. The window panes are broken. The interior contains construction matérial for planned renovation. (Report of the Government of the Republic of Croatia, Ministry of Internal Affairs, Zagreb 1 April 1996). According to a report dated 24 September 1997 the church was dynamited.

 

Josavica

Church of Greatmartyr Saint Georgebuilt in 1777. Damaged in the Second World War. Renovated in 1968. Church hit with shells, icons from the iconostasis stolen in 1996

 

Kolaric

 

Church of Saint Petka (old church) – built in 1804, set afire in the Second World War with 90 people inside. New church built nearby in 1969, consecrated to the Ascension of the Lord; burglarized and devastated. In March 1997 explosives thrown into the church; all the windows shattered, and the icons on the iconostasis and walls damaged, and everything within the church scattered and broken. (Report MNo. 98/97 of 16 April 1997)

 

Komogovina

Church of the Transfiguration of the Lordbuilt in 1688. Damaged in World War II (not restored). Church suffered during the fighting in 1991 and 1994, belltower and bell damaged. "The damage on the belltower is visible, presumably from an earlier period, since there is no construction matérial around the church suggesting that the belltower was damaged during or after the ‘Stormoperation." (Report of the Government of the Republic of Croatia, Ministry of Internal Affairs, Zagreb 1 April 1996)

 

Kosinj

Church of Saint Nicholasbuilt in 1873, broken into, desecrated, looted and demolished. (Report MNo. 69/97 of 14 March 1997)

 

Kostajnica

Church of the Holy Archangels Michael and GabrielCathedral Church of the old Diocese of Kostajnica built in 1743. Iconostasis painted by Ukrainian Vasilije Romanovic in 1759. Church completely destroyed by Ustashas in 1941. New church, containing some of the icons remaining from the old iconostasis, built in 1972. Damaged by machine-gun fire (19911993) and detonations when the bridge of the Una River was mined in Autumn 1995; broken into and inventory partly destroyed. (Report No. 178/97 of 9 June 1997) Relics of Saint Theodore of Komogovina stolen. Parish Home damaged and looted (19911993); all furniture destroyed. (Report No. 178/97 of 9 June 1997)

 

Kukuruzari

Church of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokosbuilt in 1838, dynamited by the Ustashas in 1945. Still under construction. "Inspection of the church reveals that the church was not damaged, except for the entrance door, which is destroyed. There are no sacral objects in the church, but there is construction matérial, suggesting that the church was being renovated from an earlier time." (Report of the Government of the Republic of Croatia, Ministry of Internal Affairs, Zagreb 1 April 1996)

 

Licko Petrovo Selo

Church of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paulbuilt in 1892, set afire in 1941, renovated in 1973. Church remains whole, but the interior is devastated, two icons from the Thrones stolen, the antimension and Gospel Book missing; bells and iconostasis still in place. Village partly burned and pillaged. (Report MNo. 98/97 of 16 April 1997)

 

Majske Poljane

Church of the Ascension of the Lordbuilt of wood in 1820. Interior slightly damaged in 1995.

 

Medak

Church of the Nativity of Saint John the Forerunnerbuilt in 1724, renovated in 1880. Damaged by the Ustashas in World War II; later rebuilt. Shelled and looted by Croatian army in August 1995.

 

Meminska (near Kostajnica)

Parish Home devastated and looted in August 1995.

 

Mecencani

Church of the Protection of the Most Holy Theotokosbuilt in 1877. "The church is not damaged, the entrance door is unlocked, the windows closed. The altar area is likewise not damaged. The icons, liturgical books and vestments are partly damaged from age and lack of care. (Report of the Government of the Republic of Croatia, Ministry of Internal Affairs, Zagreb, 1 April 1996)

 

Munjava (Josipdol)

 

Church of the Holy Archangels Michael and Gabrielbuilt in 1838. Razed by the Ustashas in the Second World War; later rebuilt. Burglarized in 1991, and damaged (19911993).

 

Obljaj

Church of the Ascension of the Lordbuilt in 1873; renovated in 1982. Church stands in its entirety, enterior empty, louted (Report of 17 October 1996).

 

Ogulin

Church of Saint Georgebuilt in 1867. Damaged (19411945). Restored in 1976. "The church was broken into from the southern side, the door smashed to pieces. Upon entering the church one has the impression that a bomb hit it. The ciborium is shredded and scattered throughout the nave. The church banners are also shredded and scattered about. Candles, icons, votive lamps and sacral books, as well as sand, are everywhere mixed together about the floor. Several windows on the church are broken, shrapnel damage is visible. The iconostasis is slightly damaged but not destroyed." (Report of 1 September 1992) At the end of 1992, the church was looted. According to unverified information, the iconostasis was pillaged sometime between 19931995. The Parish Home broken into and looted. (Report MNo. 69/97 of 14 March 1997)

 

Otocac

Church of Saint Georgebuilt in 1863. Iconostasis and other church inventory date from that period. Church damaged during military operations (19911993). Parish Home destroyed (19911993).

 

Peroj

Church of Saint Spyridonbuilt in 1787. Interior damaged by a hand grenade in 1992.

 

 

Petrinja

 

 

Church of Saint Spyridonbuilt in 1785. Iconostasis painted by Mihajlo Popovic from Oravica around 1815. Fresco-painting carried out by Dragutin Inkiostri Medenjak. At the order of Ustasha officers in Petrinja, the church was razed to the ground at the beginning of World War II. The wooden-carved iconostasis and sacral-artistic valuables destroyed. New church built in 1976. Deliberately dynamited and destroyed outside of war operations on 12 August 1991. On the foundations of the destroyed church, a new one was begun, whose foundations were consecrated in 1994. Croats destroyed the 2-meter high walls with a bulldozer in April 1997. (Report No. 178/97 of 9 June 1997) Parish Home demolished (19911993). A chapel was founded in the Parish Home in 1992. In August 1995 the Croatian army shelled it, at which time the local priest was wounded.

Church of Saint Nicholas (in the graveyard) – built in 1878. Façade damaged by gunshot (19911993).

 

Plaski

Church of the Presentation of the Most Holy TheotokosCathedral Church burglarized and devastated (19911995). Parish Home set afire (19911995).

 

Primislje (near Slunj)

Church of the Descent of the Holy Spiritbuilt in 1807, set afire in the Second World War, razed in 1958, reconstruction begun in 1994. The Parish of Primislje includes: Primislje, Gornje Primislje, Donje Primislje and Trzic Primisljanski. The Serbian villages of Trzic and Primislje totally destroyed and burnt down; construction matérial prepared for renovation stolen from the churchyard in Primislje. (Report MNo. 98/97 of 16 April 1997)

 

Pula

Church of Saint Nicholasbuilt in the 6th century, damaged (19411945). Renovated in 1963. Church broken into and plundered at the end of March 1990. Italo-Cretan icons from the 16th century stolen; gold-plated silver chalice and a number of priceless liturgical books also missing. Church stoned in 1992.

 

Radovica

Church of the Transfiguration of the Lordbuilt in 1857. Destroyed (19411945). On the same site a new, smaller church built, dedicated to the Protection of the Most Holy Theotokos. Damaged by shelling and detonations and plundered (19911995). Parish Home broken into and plundered (19911995).

 

Rijeka

Church of Saint George (on Susak) – built in 1939. Broken into and devastated in 1992.

 

Rujevac

Church of the Transfiguration of the Lordbuilt in 1885; entire inventory destroyed in 1941. Renovated 197072. Church broken into and partly looted, with no glass in the windows of the bell-tower. (Report of 17 October 1996).

 

Sadilovac

Church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokosbuilt in 1826. On 31 July 1942, Ustashas burnt down the church with a great number of local Serbs (from new born babies to old men and women). Church rebuilt in 1989, the remains of the bodies of 463 persons murdered in the church being interred under its floor. Church heavily damagedwindows shattered, roof damaged, entrance doors broken. Interior devastated, everything broken and thrown about the church. The iconostasis still stands, as do the bells and marble plaque on which are written the names of those who died in the church. The Thrones moved and broken, attempts being made to burn the icon of Saint Sava on one of the Thrones, but it was only slightly burnt. Village entirely burnt down. The plaque about the construction of the church damaged by gunfire, and a monument written in the Cyrillic alphabet behind the church smashed. (Report MNo. 98/97 of 16 April 1997).

 

Seliste

Church of the Holy Archangel Michael (in the cemetery) – built in the 19th century, damaged in World War II. Renovated following the war. Broken into and pillaged by Croats in August 1995.

 

Slabinja

Church of Saint Paraskevabuilt in 1828; destroyed in the Second World War (194145). Renovation begun in the 1970’s. Church roofless, only wall remain (Report of 24 September 1996).

 

Slana

 

Church destroyed in Autumn 1991. (Report according to the monograph Ranjena crkva u Hrvatskoj, Zagreb 1996, pg. 424)

 

Slunj

Church of the Holy Archangel Michaelbuilt at the end of the 19th century. During the Second World War turned into a Roman Catholic church; burnt down near the end of the war. Rebuilt in 1967. "In the Autumn of 1991, while forces of the National Guard and Croatian Ministry of Internal Affairs were in Slunj, the church was damaged (façade, roof, glass and woodwork)." (Report of 6 March 1993) Afterwards church demolished (19911995). Parish Home broken into and demolished (19911995). Occupied in 1995.

 

Smiljan

Church of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paulrazed by the Ustashas in 1941, rebuilt after World War II. Parish Home (birth-place of Nikola Tesla) near the church turned into Memorial Museum. Icons, ethnic items, furniture, library and personal items belonging to Nikola Tesla on display in the Museum. In Autumn 1991, Parish Home-Museum vandalized by paramilitary Croatian forces. (Report of ECMM No. 1/94, 75).

 

Staro Selo (near Otocac)

Church of the Nativity of Saint John the Forerunnerbuilt in 1740. Iconostasis done by painters from the icon-painting school in Gomirje. Church damaged by explosives in 1946; later completely rebuilt. Burnt and totally destroyed, together with iconostasis and church inventory (19911993). Serbian Orthodox cemetery alongside the church leveled by bulldozers and tanks.

 

Topusko

Parish Home broken into, demolished and looted in the Summer of 1991.

 

Trebinja

Church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokosbuilt in 1843, broken into and devastated. Parish Home looted. Village partly destroyed, and resettled with Croats from Bosnia. (Report MNo. 98/97 of 16 April 1997)

 

Cvijanovic Brdo

Church of Greatmartyr Saint Georgebuilt in 1853, devastated and pillaged. Iconostasis in place; one bell (smaller) stolen. Village plundered and set afire. (Report MNo. 98/97 of 16 April 1997)

 

Svica (Ponorinear Otocac)

Church of the Resurrection of the Lordlooted in part (19911995). Parish Home set afire in 1991.

 

Skare

Church of Saint Nicholasbuilt in 1848. Church destroyed by the Ustashas, the iconostasis from the icon-painting school in Gomirje, dismantled and together with other sacral-artistic valuables transported to Zagreb (19411945). Following World War II the church was dynamited. Repaired in 1978. Façade damaged during military operations (19911993).

 

Note: In the villages of Brlog, Drenov Klanac, Rapajin Klanac and Tukljaci Serbian Orthodox cemeteries leveled. In August 1995 all the churches were burglarized and desecrated.




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