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The diocese of Slavonia

"Sacrifice and offering
thou didst not desire;
mine ears hast thou opened;
burnt offering and sin offering
hast thou not required."
(Psalm 40:6)

 

 

The Diocese of Slavonia stretches across the central area of Old Slavonia. It represents a spiritual continuity from the previous Diocese of Pozega, founded in 1557, at the time of the restoration of the Patriarchate of Pec. Its See was in Monastery Orahovica, the spiritual and focal point of the Serbs of Lower Slavonia (Donja Slavonija), e. i., the Podravina.

Monastery Orahovica was founded in the first half of the 15th century and the present church of the Translation of the Relics of Saint Nicholas was built in 1592. The church was adorned with frescoes in 1594. In the Diocese of Slavonia, alongside Monastery Orahovica, there are four other Monasteries: Saint Anna (from 1412); Pakra (from the 16th century); Dejanovac and Drenovac (from the 18th century), abolished by Empress Maria Theresia in the second half of the 18th century.

Among the first Slavonian bishops we know only of Josif (1585), Vasilije (1590), then Sofronije and Grigorije (both from the 17th century). Bishop Vasilije went from Monastery Orahovica to the territory of Upper Slavonia in 1595, where he established the Diocese of Marca.

Turkish rule in the region of Slavonia lasted 150 years. From that period little has remained of historical significance. The facts known today indicate that the life of the Serbs and the Serbian Orthodox Church under the "infidels" was exceptionally difficult.

The Great Migrations of the Serbs under the leadership of Patriarch Arsenije III Carnojevic brought about considerable changes in the life of Old Slavonia. Patriarch Arsenije III started to visit the areas and spiritual centers of the Serbian people, who suffered because of the proselytism of the Roman Catholic Uniate church. The Patriarch appointed Sofronije Podgoricanin as Bishop of Slavonia in Pakrac, in 1705, and through that act confirmed the continuity of Orthodoxy in those areas. From then until the Second World War permanent spiritual growth was felt in the Diocese of Slavonia, i. e., in the Diocese of Pakrac, which included parts of the Diocese of Marca (the Severin–Lepavina Diocese in 1771): namely, the areas between the Sava and the Drava Rivers and the western side of the Ilova River. As an administrative unit, it was in existence until 1931, when, according to the new Constitution of the Serbian Church, the Diocese of Zagreb was formed from these areas.

In Pakrac, in 1810, a Theological Seminary was founded, which was active until 1872. In 1871, a Teachers’ Training College was opened for teachers of Serbian religious schools.

From that time, there have been 19 Bishops on the Throne of the Diocese of Slavonia. Among these eminent prelates, special mention should be made of Nicifor Stefanovic (1722–1743) and Sofronije Jovanovic (1743–1757), well-educated and esteemed ecclesiastics; Josif Jovanovic Sakabenta (1781–1783), a great opponent of Roman Catholic proselytism; Kiril Zivkovic (1786–1807), author of educational and theological tracts; Nikanor Grujic (1829–1839), writer and orator, better known as Srb Milutin; Miron Nikolic (1888–1941), one of the most respected Bishops of the Serbian Church; as well as Emilijan Marinovic (1951–1981), during whose incumbency the Diocese of Pakrac regained its original name (1959) as the Diocese of Slavonia. Since 1985 the Bishop of Slavonia has been Lukijan (Pantelic).

 

The Diocese of Slavonia suffered greatly in the Second World War (1941–1945), as well as in the recent one (1991–1995). In World War II 54 churches were destroyed and 21 were damaged in this Diocese. Monastery Orahovica and Monastery Pakra were plundered and then burnt down. At that time, 73 archives and 66 parish church and monastery libraries were ruined. Only a part of the religious art and historical heritage had been returned to the Diocese of Slavonia by 1985. The ancient diocesan library, one of the most valuable national treasuries, was renovated and opened in 1990, on the occasion of the 300th anniversary of the Great Migrations of the Serbs under the leadership of Patriarch Arsenije III Carnojevic in 1690. On the same occasion, the Treasury of the Diocese of Slavonia in Pakrac, one of the most valuable in the Serbian Orthodox Church, was also restored. After the Second World War new places of worship were constructed in place of those destroyed: in Jasenovac, Nova Gradiska, Slavonski Brod, Slavonska Pozega, and other places. Some of them are still unfinished. The descendants of the vandals from World War II have followed in their fathers’ footsteps and again ravaged Serbian places of worship, so that in the past war (1991–1995) 39 churches were destroyed and 41 considerably damaged. The Bishop’s Residence in Pakrac, one of the oldest buildings in the Baroque style (from 1732), was plundered, shelled and devastated. The fate of the ancient Diocesan library, paintings of Bishops from the 18th and 19th centuries, furniture of the period and numerous priceless art objects is still unknown. The Cathedral Church was set afire. All the church buildings in Pakrac (eight in all) have been destroyed (either dynamited or burnt down). The spiritual genocide continues. The churches in Nova Gradiska are razed to the ground (this being the fourth destruction of a Serbian church in this place within the last 250 years). The church which was still under construction in Slavonski Brod has been destroyed as well.

 

The Church of the Holy Trinity in Nova Gradiska, erected in 1982 was at the time the largest church built within the Patriarchate of Serbia after World War II. This monumental edifice was damaged by explosives placed by Ustashas nine times. Because of its solid construction and location (in the center of the city), the last explosives were laid by experts from Zagreb. The debris was removed and the entire lot paved over. In this town along the Sava River a church dedicated to the Translation of the Relics of Saint Nicholas in the Serbian Orthodox Cemetery was also destroyed. Almost all the Orthodox churches in the Pakrac region were destroyed: in Kusonje, Sirac, Bijela, Batinjani, Obrijez Donja, Kukunjevac.

More than 80% of the churches and other sacral monuments were destroyed in the last war outside the military zone. The church of Saints Peter and Paul in Kucanci, the birth-place of Serbian Patriarch Pavle was dynamited far from any front line.

In addition to all these, 25 Parish Homes were destroyed and 15 damaged.

 

A characteristic of the desecration and destruction carried out on the territory of this Diocese, especially in the Pakrac, Daruvar and Novogradiste Deaneries, was that the Holy Altar Tables were shattered and profaned, and the icons on the iconostases were either slashed with sharp objects or set afire. When the Abbot of Monastery Orahovica was taken to the hospital for reasons of health in September 1996, the Monastery was devastated and pillaged. Numerous icons and other valuable items from the Monastery have disappeared.

 

Pakrac

 

Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity – constructed from 1757 to 1768 on foundations of older church, alongside which a Chapel to Saint Tryphon was erected in 1747. The most important renovation of the church was carried out by Hermann Bohle in 1898. At that time the church received a new iconostasis, with icons painted by Steva Todorovic, as well as new furnishings. During World War II the Ustashas destroyed church books and archives and pillaged other religious art objects. During that period the church was converted into a Roman Catholic church. At the end of 1991, the bell-tower and roof were greatly damaged; and at the beginning of 1992, the Cathedral was dynamited by the Croatian army, on which occasion the iconostasis and valuables were destroyed (Report ECMM   3/95, 36). Before Orthodox Christmas (according to the Julian Calendar) in 1996, the tomb of Bishop Emilijan of Pakrac, located within the church, was dynamited.

 

  

 

Bishop’s Residence built in 1732 on the site of a previous wooden construction. The Residence was later rebuilt in the 18th and 19th centuries. A chapel dedicated to the Annunciation of the Most Holy Theotokos, the old Diocesan Treasury located in the Residence. The old Library and book fund, plundered during World War II, returned in 1985. During fighting in 1991–1992 Bishop’s Residence heavily damaged, especially the roof. Entire inventory and old Library partly destroyed and pillaged. During 1991–1993 the main office of the Croatian Ministry of the Interior was located in the Residence. The Residence still unoccupied, demolished and in exceptionally poor condition.

Church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos in Gavrinica – built by Bishop Petronije Ljubibratic at the end of 17th century as his mausoleum. Since then has served as burial site of the bishops of the Diocese of Slavonia. Church reconstructed out of solid material by Gavrilo Popovic, Bishop of Pakrac 1715–1716. Church and area around it named after him as Gavrinica. During World War II (1941–1945) the church was seriously damaged. Many icons and objects of the Divine Services destroyed. Church rebuilt in 1972. During fighting in 1991–1992 the church set afire by Croatian army. Only ruined walls remain (Report ECMM,   3/95,36). Reconstruction began and roof replaced in 1993. In May 993, during Croatian aggression, cemetery chapel at Gavrinica broken into and devastated.

 

Building of the old Theological Seminary built in 1850–1853. During fighting 1991–1992 building was burnt down, leaving only ruins of four walls.

Two Parish homes burnt down in 1991–1992 outside zone of combat. Only ruined walls remain.

Home for priests’ widows burnt down 1991–1992 outside zone of combat; only walls remain.

 

Summer Residence in Episcopal vineyard burnt down 1991–1993 outside zone of combat; only walls remain.

 

 

Batinjani

 

Church of Saint Demetrius – built in 1739. Iconostasis work of Father Stanoje Popovic from 1747–1751. Church completely rebuilt in 1990. Dynamited outside zone of combat in 1992.

 

 

Bebrina

Church of Saint Prince Lazar dynamited by Croatian army in August 1991. Only foundations remain (Report ECMM,   2/95, 54).

 

Bijela

 

Church of the Holy Archangels Michael and Gabriel – built in 1751; restored in 1885–1886. Iconostasis dates from 1759. Church demolished by Ustashas during Second World War. Registries, liturgical books and archives destroyed. Parish Home also burnt down. Church and Parish Home restored in 1956. Church set afire outside zone of combat during 1991–1992. Iconostasis, liturgical books and items, Registries and archives destroyed. Parish Home set afire outside of zone of combat 1991–1992.

 

 

Bodegraji

Chapel of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos, founded in the Parish Home after World War II, with bell–tower added later. In May 1995 forcibly entered, entrance destroyed with a number of windows.

Brodski Zdenci

Church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos – built in 1926. Dynamited by Croats in 1993.

Veliki Bastaji

Church of Greatmartyr Saint George – built in 1765 on site of older one; restored in 1880. Iconostasis painted by Mojsije Subotic in 1785. During Second World War outside of church damaged and Registries and liturgical books with archives destroyed. During fighting 1991–1992 church damaged. Parish Home dynamited outside zone of combat at end of 1991.

Vocin

Church of the Holy 318 God–bearing Fathers – built in 1790. Burnt down in 1942; Parish Home razed. Church reconstructed in 1976 and new bell–tower also built. New Parish Home built in 1956. Church dynamited during night of December 13 1991; only walls remain (Report ECMM   1/94, 90). Parish Home dynamited on night of December 13 1991; only walls remain.

Vrbovnjani

Chapel of Saint Sava located in the Parish Home, with bell–tower added. Burglarized and devastated by Croatian army in May 1995. Parish Home plundered and devastated also.

Gazije

Church of the Most Holy Trinity – built in 1754; renovated in 1811 and 1883. Church facade damaged by gunfire. Eight icons missing (1991–1995).

Gorice

 

Church of the Ascension of the Lord. Burnt down during fighting 1991–1992; only walls remain.

Gornja Bukovica

Church of Saint Elijah the Prophet – built in 1795. Destroyed by Ustashas in 1942. New church built in 1989. Explosive thrown inside and outside hit by gunfire (1991–1993).

Gornji Miholjac

Church of the Descent of the Holy Spirit – built in 1793; renovated in 1825. During Second World War church inventory destroyed; church converted into Roman Catholic church. Damaged during fighting (1991–1992). Parish Home destroyed outside zone of combat (1991–1995).

Gornji Rajic

Church of Saint Sava damaged by Croatian army in May 1995. Interior of church demolished and plundered, set afire (Report ECMM   3/95, 44).

Gradiste Bektesko

Newly built Parish Home from 1990 destroyed outside zone of combat (1991–1992).

Grahovljani (Donji)

Church of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul burglarized in 1991. Entrance doors broken down, interior devastated. Numerous icons missing from iconostasis. Stone Holy Altar Table totally destroyed, parts of it thrown about in Sanctuary. Bell–tower damaged, bells removed; windows broken. Roofing damaged causing rain damage above iconostasis. During 1997 unknown persons removed and took away tile roofing from the church (Report   144/97 of 18 May 1997). Parish Home destroyed; only walls remain.

 

Gredjani

 

Church of Saint Paraskeva (Petka) – built in 1750 on foundations of former church. Renovated in 1858. During World War II church damaged by Ustashas; only walls remained. Iconostasis, church inventory, liturgical books and items destroyed. Church reconstructed and bell–tower erected in 1975. Church damaged and icons slashed with bayonets during 1991–1993. Parish Home extensively damaged (1991–1993).

 

Daruvar

 

Church of the 318 God–bearing Fathers – built in 1756 on older foundations. Renovated in 1879. During Second World War damaged exterior damaged and Registries and archives destroyed. Renovated several times after World War II. Church slightly damaged 1991–1993.

Dijelka

Chapel in Parish Home and bell–tower destroyed outside zone of combat in 1992.

Dobrovic

Church of the Ascension of the Lord – built in 1749; renovated in 1774. Church destroyed by Ustashas in 1942. Parish Home with chapel dynamited and destroyed by Croats. Liturgical items, Registries and archives destroyed (1991–1995).

Doljani

Church of the Holy Prophet Elijah – built in 1804 on foundations of older church of wooden construction. Renovated in 1904. Church damaged on Patron Saint’s Day in 1943; wood–carving on iconostasis, liturgical items, books and archives destroyed. Church renovated in 1979. Devastated, damaged by detonations in 1992. Parish Home dynamited outside zone of combat by Croatian nationalists.

 

Donji Bogicevci

 

Church of Saint Charalampos – from second half of 18th century. Church shelled during fighting 1991–1992.

Donji Rajic

Church of the Transfiguration of the Lord – built in 1813 on site of earlier church. Destroyed by Ustashas in 1941. New church begun in 1983 and finished in 1990. During fighting in 1991 exterior damaged. In May 1995 during Croatian aggression church burglarized and devastated.

Donji Caglic

Church of Saint Nicholas – dating from 1757. Burnt down in 1942; iconostasis, liturgical items, books and archives destroyed. Church reconstructed in 1990. Heavily shelled by Croatian army during 1991–1992. Renovated in 1994. During Croatian aggression in May 1995 church shelled, broken into and devastated (Report ECMM,   3/95, 43 and 70).

Dragovic

Church of the Holy Archdeacon Stephen – built in 1940. Exterior and interior damaged by Croatian army in 1991–1992 (Report ECMM   3/95, 39). Bell stolen from bell-tower, used by United Nations Monitors as observation point (Report   144/97 from 18 May 1997).

Jazavica

Chapel of Saint Paraskeva (Petka) – built in 19th century. Plundered and devastated by Ustashas on 4 October, 1991.

Jasenovac

 

Church of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist – built in 1775. In 1941 church destroyed by Croatian Ustashas. Iconostasis, church furnishing, liturgical books and items destroyed. New church built in 1984. Damaged during fighting in 1991–1992. During Croatian aggression in May 1995 church shelled; roof and walls damaged. Plundered and devastated (Report ECMM,   3/95, 71). Parish Home burnt down (1991–1995).

 

 

Katinci

Church of the Holy Apostle Peter and Paul – built in 1750; renovated in 1864 and 1872. Iconostasis painted by Evtimije Subotic. At the end of 1991 burglarized, plundered and interior devastated (Holy Altar Table totally destroyed, and nine icons removed from iconostasis).

 

 

Klokocevik

Church of the Most Holy Trinity – dating from 1756–1760. During World War II church leveled by Croatian Ustashas. Iconostasis, Registries, archives and liturgical items destroyed. New church built after the war in the cemetery as foundation of Professor Dr. Dusan Glumac. In 1988 a new church erected in original place. Destroyed by Croatian army in November 1991, outside war zone; only foundations remain (Report ECMM   2/95, 55).

Korenicani

Church of Saint Nicholas demolished, inventory devastated. Holy Altar Table overturned. Bell–tower hit by shelling and damaged, along with part of roof. Rain leaks in number of places.

Krestelovac

Church of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos – built in 1745; renovated in 1938 and 1957; known as "Svetinja". Desecrated.

Kukunjevci

 

Church of Saint Petka – built about 1782 on site of previous church. Iconostasis painted by Muravic in 1896. During World War II church heavily damaged and Parish Home burnt down. Reconstructed several times after the war. In December 1991 Croatian army shelled the church, rendering it unfit for liturgical use (Report ECMM,   3/95, 40). New built Parish Home dynamited by Croatian army in December 1991.

Kusonje

Church of Greatmartyr Saint George – dating from 1734. Burnt down by Ustashas on 13 August 1942, when 450 Orthodox Serbs were massacred inside the church. After the war (1987), reconstruction began despite opposition from Regional Institute in Osijek. Church damaged in 1991–1992; not fit for liturgical use. During 1997 tile roofing and bell stolen from the church (Report   144/97 of 18 May 1997). Newly built Parish Home shelled by Croatian army 1991–1992; not fit for use (Report ECMM   3/95, 41).

 

Kucanci

  

Church of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul – built in 1828 on foundations of old wooden church from 1748. Iconostasis painted by Ilija Dimitrijevic, academic artist, in 1888. Church dynamited on 20 December 1991 (Report ECMM   2/95, 57).

Ladjevac

Church of Saint Nicholas damaged and vandalized in May 1995 (Report ECMM   3/95, 58).

Lisicine

Church of Greatmartyr Saint George – built in 1869 on site of earlier church (1748). During World War II church damaged, Registries, liturgical books and archives destroyed. Church reconstructed in 1990. At end of 1991 church destroyed by Ustashas. Iconostasis removed and thus saved in Belgrade.

Lovska

Church of Saint Theodore of Tyron – built in 1746. Iconostasis painted in 1842. During World War II (1945) church shelled. Reconstruction began in 1985. In 1991–1992 church shelled by Croatian army and damaged, together with Parish Home.

Londzica

Parish Home dynamited in early September 1993 by Croatian Ustashas outside zone of combat.

Luzani

Church of the Most Holy Trinity destroyed in World War II. New church built after the war. Interior of church dynamited by Ustashas outside zone of combat 1991–1992.

Malino

Church of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul destroyed by Ustashas in 1941. New church built after the war. Destroyed by Croatian Ustashas outside zone of combat 1991–1992.

Monastery Pakra

Monastery of the Presentation of the Most Holy Theotokos – founded in 1556. Present church built in 1765; iconostasis painted several years later by Vasa Ostojic, artist from Novi Sad. During World War II the Monastery was pillaged and devastated, living quarters burnt down. New living quarters built after the War. Near the end of 1991 the sisters were forced to flee; the living quarters and other buildings burglarized, devastated and plundered. Valuable icons from 17th and 18th centuries missing.

Monastery of Saint Anne

Church of Saint Anne – built in 1412 as a monastery for Pauline monastics. In the 17th century given to Orthodox monastics. Renovated at end of 17th century when Patriarch Arsenije III Carnojevic resided in the area. During Second World War plundered. During fighting in November 1991, roof and walls damaged (ECMM   1/94/72 and 84). In May 1995, Croatian army devastated the church. The sisters of this Monastery joined by sisters from Monastery Pakra.

Masic

Church of Saint Elijah the Prophet – built in second decade of 19th century on foundations of earlier church from 1772. In spring of 1991 church shelled by Croatian army outside zone of combat. Not fit for use (Report ECMM   3/95, 70).

 

Masicka Sagovina

Chapel of the Ascension of the Lord – built at beginning of 20th century. Damaged by Ustashas in 1992.

 

Medari

Church of the Transfiguration of the Lord – built in 1777; renovated in 1834. In World War II church burnt down by Ustashas; reconstructed after the War. In 1991–1992 during fighting church damaged by shelling from both Croat and Serbian armies. New Parish Home seriously damaged during fighting in 1991–1992.

Medinci

Church of Saint Paraskeva (Petka) – built in 1747. In World War II destroyed by Ustashas. New church built in 1972. A shell hit the church but without exploding (1991–1993).

Mikleus

Church of the Most Holy Trinity – built in 1747; renovated in 1777 and 1844. In Second World War church converted into Roman Catholic church. Renovated after the war. Church dynamited by Ustashas in April 1992. Valuable liturgical items and rich collection of liturgical books destroyed. Parish Home burglarized, pillaged and devastated (1991–1993).

Miokovicevo

Bell-tower destroyed by Croatian Ustashas on 24 July 1992. At same time homes belonging to Serbs were set afire in the village.

 

Nova Gradiska

  

Church of the Holy Trinity – first built in 1738; restored in 1824 and 1885. On 7 July 1941 church razed by Croatian Ustashas. Iconostasis from 1814 destroyed, as well as valu-

able liturgical items and art objects. In 1982 new church consecrated, largest church built in the Serbian Patriarchate after World War II. In spring of 1992 church dynamited nine times with explosives laid by experts from Zagreb. Remaining rubble cleared from the site, now a park area (Report ECMM   2/95, 56).

 

Nova Gradiska

Church of the Translation of the Relics of Saint Nicholas (in cemetery) – built in 1818; renovated in 1866. Church destroyed by Croatian Ustashas in 1992, outside zone of combat. Two Parish Homes forcibly entered; new tenants moved in (1991–1995).

Novo Topolje

Church of the Holy Prophet Elijah – dating from 1847 on the site of earlier church from 1778. Iconostasis painted by Djordje Protic from Sombor. In 1941 church destroyed by Ustashas New church erected in 1987/88. Heavily damaged by Ustashas in 1991–1992.

Obradovci

Church of Saint Petka – built in 1774; reconstruction in 1823 and 1881. Iconostasis dates from 18th century. During Second World War church heavily damaged by Germans and Croatian Ustashas. Iconostasis demolished and liturgical items, books and archives destroyed. Church restored in 1984. Dynamited by Ustashas on 27 November 1991. Iconostasis from 1763 with 42 icons, more than 20 printed books from the 18th century, as well as silver-plated Gospel printed in 1747, all destroyed.

Obrijez Donja

Church of Saint John the Theologian – dating from 1747. Renovated several times after World War II, and completely restored in 1989/90. Church destroyed by Ustashas at end of 1991.

 

Okucani

Church of Saint Demetrius – built in 1752. Razed to the ground by Ustashas in 1942; iconostasis, church furnishings, liturgical items and books destroyed. New church built near site of old in 1969. Church damaged on exterior on Feast Day of Saint Demetrius in 1991. During the aggression of the Croat army in May 1995, church broken into and devastated (Report ECMM,   3/95,42). During 1997 church desecrated (Report MNo. 33/97 of 6 February 1997). Parish Home was damaged and partly destroyed towards end of 1991. During 1992 it was made habitable. On 11 April 1997, at 21:15 hours, fire set causing great damage (Report   144/97 of 18 May 1997).

Oljasi

Chapel of Saint Petka in Parish Home, both damaged by shelling in 1991–1992.

Orahovica

Church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos – built between 1758 and 1762; renovated in 1887. Iconostasis painted in 1775. Church destroyed by Ustashas on Christmas 1942. Iconostasis removed by them to Zagreb before destruction; returned to Pakrac in 1985. After World War II chapel set up in Parish Home; dynamited in 1991/1992 outside zone of combat. Bell from wooden bell-tower removed, religious and art objects destroyed.

Podravska Slatina

Church of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul – built in 1750; renovated in 1813 and 1877. Iconostasis painted by Jovan Cetirevic Grabovan in 1785. Church destroyed by Ustashas in 1941. Reconstructed in 1977. Damaged by shelling in 1991–1992; broken into and devastated in 1995. Parish Home also damaged by shelling 1991–1992.

Poljane (near Medari)

Chapel dating from beginning of 20th century. Renovated in 1990–1991. Razed by Ustashas in late 1991.

Pusina

Bell-tower devastated by Croats in 1991–1992.

Rajevo Selo

Church of Saint Procopius – built in 1866. Devastated and pillaged (1991–1993).

Ratkovac

Church of the Protection of the Most Holy Theotokos – built in 1800 on site of earlier church from the mid-18th century. During World War II damaged and pillaged. In May 1995 shelled by Croatian army; devastated and pillaged (Report ECMM   3/95, 42). During 1977 iconostasis plundered (Report MNo. 33/97 of 6 February 1997).

Ratkovica

Church of Saint Demetrius (Saint Paraskeva) – dating from 1874. Destroyed by Croatian Ustashas in 1941. New church built in 1980. Destroyed by explosives in December 1991; all religious and art objects in the church destroyed (Report ECMM   2/95, 57).

Rogolji Donji

Church of Greatmartyr Saint George – dating from the 19th century; renovated in 1990. Damaged in 1991 and again renovated in 1993. In May 1995 church damaged and vandalized (Report ECMM   3/95, 44). During 1977 iconostasis plundered (Report MNo. 33/97 of 6 February 1997).

Sirac

Church of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos – built in 1751 and renovated in 1876. Suffered some damage and plundered by Ustashas in 1943. Church totally destroyed by explosives (1991–1992).

Slavonska Pozega

Church of Greatmartyr Saint George – built in 1730; renovated in 1845. Iconostasis painted be Celestin Medovic. Church destroyed by Ustashas on 1 May, 1941. Iconostasis, liturgical items and books destroyed. New church built in 1990. Shelled several times (1991–1993). Parish Home with chapel dedicated to Saint George set afire and burnt down outside zone of combat in 1991–1992.

 

Slavonski Brod

Church of Greatmartyr Saint George – from 1802. Completely destroyed by Ustashas in 1941. New church, near site of old, built in 1990 according to plans of Architect Dr. Predrag Ristic. Dynamited, devastated and seriously damaged outside zone of combat 1991–1992.

Slavonski Kobas

Church of Greatmartyr Saint George – built in 1779; iconostasis painted in 1801. Destroyed by Ustashas in 1941. All religious and art works within the church destroyed. new church built in 1962. Dynamited in Fall of 1993; only walls remain (Report ECMM   2/95, 53).

Stari Slatnik

Church of Saint Prince Lazar. Razed to the ground by Ustashas in 1941; liturgical items, books and archives destroyed. New church built in 1985; dynamited in Summer of 1991. Not fit for use (Report ECMM   2/95, 53). Memorial Plaque with names of Serbs massacred by Ustashas in 1941–1945 destroyed in Orthodox Cemetery on 12 November 1991.

Subotska

Church of the Holy Archangel Gabriel – built in mid-18th century; restored in 1889. Iconostasis dates from first half of the 18th century. In World War II church damaged by shelling; liturgical items, books and archives destroyed. Church destroyed by Croatian army outside zone of combat 1991–1992. Not fit for use (Report ECMM   3/95, 38).

Toranj

Church of Saint Panteleimon – built in 1931. During Second World War slightly damaged. Part of archives destroyed, liturgical items and books plundered. Renovated in 1989. Dynamited by Croatian army in 1992. Not fit for use (Report ECMM   3/95, 71).

Near village of Toranj, old church dedicated to Saint Panteleimon from 15th century (renovated in 1751) suffered damage from Partisans in World War II. Damaged in 1991–1992.

Trnava

Church of the Ascension of the Lord shelled by Croatian army in 1991–1992; heavily damaged (Report ECMM   3/95, 39).

Trnjani

Church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos destroyed during Second World War by Ustashas. Iconostasis and all religious and art objects destroyed within the church. New church built after the war. Destroyed in October 1992 outside zone of combat; only walls remain (Report ECMM   2/95, 56).

Uljanik

Church of the Birth of Saint John the Forerunner – built in 1760; renovated in 1881,1889 and 1893. Iconostasis dates from 1903. Church restored in 1956. Burglarized in August 1991. Parish Home broken into, pillaged and devastated.

Ustica

Church of Saints Constantine and Helen – built in 1810. Dynamited by Ustashas in 1941; iconostasis and all religious and art objects in the church destroyed. New bell-tower built on ruins of earlier church in 1980. Construction of new church began in 1989. Parish Home with chapel dedicated to Saints Constantine and Helen considerably damaged by shelling in 1991–1992.

 

Crkveni Vrhovci

 

Church of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos – dating from 1778. Renovated in 1990–1991. Destroyed in 1991–1992.

Sagovina Masicka

Chapel of Greatmartyr Saint George – built in the 19th century – Monument of cultural significance. Chapel damaged in August/November 1991 (Report from monograph Ranjena crkva u Hrvatskoj, Zagreb 1996, pg. 425).

 

Sirinci

 

Chapel of Saint Mark the Evangelist – built in the 19th century. Destroyed by Ustashas in 1991, outside zone of combat.

Snjegavic

Church of the Protection of the Most Holy Theotokos – built in 1764. Destroyed outside zone of combat in December 1991. Parish Home burnt down at end of December 1991.




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