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1 I (1)| 2 I.e., 0Ihsou~j according to the Marcionite 2 III, 9 | For according [Ll. 10, 14.] to the great falsehood 3 III, 9 | difficult . . . he [Ll. 17, 24.] gives them a preposterous 4 III, 12 | because they [Ll. 16, 18,19.] teach that the Darkness 5 III, 12 | bodies because (they [Ll. 21, 22.] have) bodies as they 6 III, 16 | how does it revile [L. 23.] Him?] . . . and if (it 7 III, 9 | difficult . . . he [Ll. 17, 24.] gives them a preposterous 8 I, 5 | has a substance, [P. 61, l.28.] but the Light of the fire 9 II, 1 | is opposite it. For [L. 29.] heaviness and weight cannot 10 III, 13 | but, also, it [L. 30.] is unable to understand 11 III, 12 | that thou shouldst hear [L. 32. L. 37. Ll. 38, 39.] . . . 12 II, 1 | and when it crossed [L. 34.] it, it crossed it in an 13 III, 12 | Darkness . . . this [Ll. 38, 41.] [perturbed] Body . . . 14 I | Stranger, we also will deal [P. 45.] frowardly with the froward, ( 15 I, 2 | should be no Strife and [P. 47.] Contention between him 16 I, 3 | how much more able [P. 48, l.13.] would the Creator 17 III, 7 | to cross the [P. 76, l. 5.] boundary] of fishes, the 18 I, 4 | Domain was likewise full[P. 50.] of him as before, it is 19 I, 5 | localised substance ; and we [P. 52.] do not say that the scent 20 II | the force of another [P. 53.] (supporting them).~ 21 II, 1 | distant from those things [P. 54.] which are beneath, without 22 II, 1 | proper nature of its [P. 55.] (i.e., of the Darkness) 23 II, 2 | then He Who, they say, [P. 56.] is the real cause of all 24 II, 3 | to them, it ought to [P. 57.] have revealed to them ( 25 II, 5 | Darkness, which is beneath [P. 58, l.10.] everything, support 26 II, 5 | on nothing . . . [and [P. 59.] Bardaisan cannot say that 27 II, 6 | perfect, and, therefore, [P. 60]. He is in some sort an 28 III | by the contact of the [P. 62.] Darkness, then that side 29 III | would have destroyed [P. 63.] it by degrees, and made 30 III | was something pleasant [P. 64, l.12.] there"? And if from 31 III, 1 | for their departure [P. 65, l. 9.] hence, that Evil 32 III, 1 | ashamed to say that he [P. 66.] can be swallowed. And 33 III, 3 | open?), it is a thing [P. 67.] repugnant to his nature ; 34 III, 3 | of Passion, behold, [P. 68.] as a harlot, she embraces 35 III, 4 | part, and they will [P. 69.] have profit. But if . . . 36 III, 5 | he perceive it anew, [P. 70, l.11.] or how did HULE(?) 37 III, 6 | their two sides into [P. 71.] contact, like Sun and 38 III, 7 | Light to be injured [P. 72.] like the lamb? And (then) 39 III, 7 | by that, the water by [P. 73, l. 8.] sepulchral vaults, 40 III, 7 | reality of their Enmity [P. 74.] is never lessened! For 41 III, 8 | Light-God who did not [P. 77.] aid himself, whose Light 42 III, 8 | sight proves . . . that [P. 78.] it (i.e., the Darkness), 43 III, 9 | right that they should [P. 79, l. 2, Ll. 7, 8, 9.] be 44 III, 10 | man opens the doors [P. 80, 11.] and windows in the 45 III, 11 | which is within be over[P. 81, l. 13.] come by the Body 46 III, 12 | were found to eat them [P. 82.] greedily, and they were 47 III, 12 | bore it, he would have [P. 83, l. 9.] died ; since it 48 III, 13 | they are not the thing [P. 84.] which they were before 49 III, 13 | and feel it . . . into [P. 85, l. 7] its midst . . . and 50 III, 14 | natures which did not [P. 86.] preserve their Essence?~ 51 III, 16 | about which they say [P. 87.] that its nature is from 52 III, 17 | things, and those Souls [P. 88, l. 3.] who have done much 53 III, 17 | delighted when it was [P. 89.] clay. When it becomes 54 III, 18 | disgraced themselves, [P. 90.] and after great blemishes 55 III, 18 | equal, which is limited.[P. 91.]~THE END OF THE THIRD DISCOURSE.~ ~ 56 III, 7 | come from the nature and abode of the Good (World of Light). 57 III, 7 | strangers as regards their abodes and . . . in their nature, 58 III, 7 | is the opponent and the abolisher of Darkness whenever it 59 III, 10 | Light which is from outside absorbs it. If we say that it stays 60 III, 8 | though the Heretics speak absurdities. And if the nature of the 61 I, 5 | one small place is able to accommodate them because they are substances, 62 III, 9 | gives them a preposterous account of a thing which we see 63 II, 4 | Bardaisan's revelation was not accredited by Signs nor is it Scriptural. ~ 64 | across 65 III | it carried its will into action, the Darkness had no need 66 III, 7 | and comparisons which they adduce are also confused like them ( 67 III, 8 | let us turn and ask the advocates of Error, that is, its Preachers -- 68 III, 7 | how does the eater have affection for that which is eaten, 69 III, 18 | cause of the negligence long ago (which brought it about) 70 III, 12 | the Light was pleasant and agreeable and sweet to those Sons 71 III, 8 | Light-God who did not [P. 77.] aid himself, whose Light was 72 II (3)| perhaps pa&mflogoj, "the all-flaming." ~ 73 I | Maker, so that he is the all-sustaining Maker, as indeed is the 74 I, 2 | Stranger above [L. 39.] allowed him, let them show us why. . . . 75 II (2)| 1 Ephraim alludes to the Heavens of the Stranger, 76 III, 15 | visiting the sick, in its hands alms for the needy, in its heart 77 | already 78 III, 10 | seeing that it vanishes altogether. But a house full of darkness 79 | always 80 II, 2 | upon him, and with what amazement we should wonder at him!~ 81 | amongst 82 III, 4 | which he had not (formerly) and2 Knowledge which he had not, 83 III, 5 | how did he perceive it anew, [P. 70, l.11.] or how did 84 III, 7 | to the Darkness are not anxious to cross the [P. 76, l. 85 | anywhere 86 III, 15 | how it is not such as the apostates state (when they say), " 87 III, 12 | are self contradictory, applaud them when they hear them? 88 III, 3 | employ (lit., bring) is applicable to the matter, (namely), 89 III | it, behold it would have approached it stealthily by degrees, 90 Note1 | words. In respect to this an approximately correct inference may be 91 Note2 | numbered with Roman numerals.  Arabic numbers and line numbers 92 III, 15 | and a temple . . . for its architect when . . . in (?) the body . . . 93 III, 3 | manifested her beauty to the Archons, so that they were ravished 94 III, 3 | is possible to use (and argue), that if that Virgin of 95 | around 96 II, 2 | and found out a method and arranged the Cause to make the Evil 97 I, 2 | also rent it asunder and ascended, as they falsely state, 98 III, 3 | And who caused that false ascetic to offend? Can it have been 99 II | the party of Bardaisan be asked concerning those Entities 100 III, 4 | again [we refute them by asking how Mind could be acquired 101 II, 2 | stirred up that Evil which was asleep, and gave power to what 102 III, 17 | if any one by regulation associates two Natures with the Nature, 103 III, 1 | that 'he who leads them astray' is so great? For by his 104 I, 2 | and the Souls also rent it asunder and ascended, as they falsely 105 III, 18 | to guard. But after those atrocities which the Darkness wrought [ 106 Note1 | mutilation, italics indicate an attempt to summarise the argument 107 III | difficulties. How did the attractiveness of Light reach the Senses 108 III, 7 | Passion for its injurer? They attribute to Darkness that it desires, 109 III, 1 | Souls who are subject to his authority, [Cf. p. lxxii. l. 3.] especially, 110 III, 6 | Thought.' And in seeking to avoid refutation, he came to such 111 III, 5 | Marcion, which first [made him aware of] that which was beneath 112 Note2 | Syriac text printed at the back of the paper volume.  ~ ~ 113 III, 7 | it, and that there is a bad and filthy and foul sepulchre, 114 III, 12 | of Light were not used as bait (?) to catch the Sons of 115 III, 17 | becomes a vessel moulded and baked in an oven, it becomes the 116 II, 2 | They say that the Wind beat upon it and stirred it up. 117 III | there? And how did this beautiful Fragrance ever smite the 118 II, 4 | dew which dropped upon his bed! But let them give us the 119 | beforehand 120 III, 5 | Darkness . . . [that its Sons began to rage and ascend to see 121 III, 9 | but also those who believe. (?) For according [Ll. 122 II, 4 | secrets which he taught may be believed. But if the Prophets and 123 III, 13 | eaten and entered into the belly and were digested in the 124 III | take the pure Souls who belonged to him, and to 'hurl' them 125 | below 126 | besides 127 | beyond 128 I, 2 | living air, and (across) a bitter waste which nothing had 129 III, 18 | blasphemies which the Souls blasphemed against their Father, and 130 III, 18 | the Light, and after those blasphemies which the Souls blasphemed 131 III, 18 | P. 90.] and after great blemishes have appeared in them, so 132 III, 15 | thanksgiving, and in its lips is blessing, in its feet is the habit 133 I, 5 | as there are flowers or blossoms or one of the roots which 134 III | i.e., the Darkness) waxed bold like a strong one to trample 135 III (6)| 1 I.e. Dia&boloj. Cf. p. lx. l. 33. ~ 136 III, 17 | midst of one whom they call BOLOS?6 As they say that "when 137 III, 12 | by the Primal [Man] who bore it, he would have [P. 83, 138 I | found enfolded within his bosom there is required for them 139 Note1 | in italics inside square brackets are to be regarded as conjectural 140 II | Space in which there is no breath of air supporting all, especially 141 III, 10 | that "it verily ate those brilliant Shining Ones (ZIWANE) who 142 III, 6 | therefore, it suits Mani, he brings their two sides into [P. 143 III, 18 | he has planned to-day to build a Grave for the Darkness 144 III, 7 | themselves in mud and in the burrows4 of moles ; is it not, therefore, 145 III | sweet smell and effulgence burst forth and entered even there? 146 III, 12 | eat lambs and lions eat calves, and the eater and the [ 147 I, 2 | But if that boundary was capable of being crossed so that 148 III | to everlasting; and if it carried its will into action, the 149 III, 12 | not used as bait (?) to catch the Sons of Darkness. ~And 150 III, 12 | goes into anything which he catches.[L. 22.]~ 151 I, 5 | them ; and (just as) the censer cannot fill the house, but 152 III | there"? And if from the centre of the Earth (of Light) 153 III, 5 | There arose a cause by chance, and the Wind was impelled 154 I, 4 | And if again they wish to change their ground, and say a 155 III, 17 | may happen in the cases of changeable Natures which are created 156 III, 15 | body clothe themselves with chastity, its ears with purity, its 157 III, 2 | set before them; let them choose one, whichever they wish, 158 III, 6 | blaspheme at all. For let the circumcised foreigners prove that each 159 I, 5 | Sun has substance and a circumference, too, and the eye sets bounds 160 III | is enough to refute its claim to perfection. For its one 161 III, 17 | delighted when it was [P. 89.] clay. When it becomes a vessel 162 II, 4 | any one who wishes to see clearly that there is a great gulf 163 III | gave it Pleasure was in close contact on its side from 164 III, 15 | eyes of the glorious body clothe themselves with chastity, 165 III, 11 | this Body with which we are clothed is of the same nature as 166 III, 13 | it is clear that if he collects and compounds them, . . . 167 III, 3 | this ; so that we will not commit them to writing, but we 168 III, 18 | their Father, and after they committed fornication and folly and 169 II, 1 | heavier by measure than their companions, do greatly flee towards 170 III, 3 | perpetual contact. But if a comparison such as that which they 171 III, 7 | Truth? For those proofs and comparisons which they adduce are also 172 III, 6 | confusion. And because he was compelled he named two Roots ; and 173 III, 13 | that if he collects and compounds them, . . . has compounded 174 I, 4 | means of other veils it is concealed from us.~ 175 III, 2 | their wise Teacher, who concocted for them a Teaching which 176 III, 8 | which exists in the natural condition of its original Essence, 177 III, 16 | its deeds and . . . in its conduct. . . . And if (it is) from 178 III, 4 | that is to say, when they confess that they are in an evil 179 II, 5 | everything on nothing, he confesses, though unwillingly, that 180 III, 18 | formerly? But if this energy conies from another place, why 181 Note1 | brackets are to be regarded as conjectural translations or paraphrases.~ 182 III, 6 | suits him regardless of consistency. ~And see how like the perverse 183 Note2 | footnotes to the end.  Those consisting of "Read [syriac] for [syriac]" 184 III, 6 | had suddenly met it, he constructed the theory 'that sometimes 185 Note1 | inference may be drawn by consulting the Syriac text.~Double 186 III, 11 | Darkness which is akin to it is consumed and swallowed by the Light?~ 187 III, 4 | by a Nature which did not contain it. It could only come from 188 III, 1 | cannot be swallowed not contend (?) with the Darkness and 189 III, 12 | L. 11.] eaten are quite content with one another! And these 190 I, 2 | make him quarrelsome and contentious. And if they say that the 191 III | Good and Evil were thus contiguous, all that side which bordered 192 II, 1 | demands that it] should be continually sent beneath. And because 193 III, 12 | and those which are self contradictory, applaud them when they 194 III, 1 | howsoever that Good (Being) may contrive to form ways and means for 195 III, 1 | they were not swallowed, he contrived to swallow them, now that 196 III, 6 | i.e., Falsehood) finds convenient.~ 197 I, 3 | weary, who has no need of a conveyance of any kind, and requires 198 II, 1 | or in Air. These things convince concerning themselves how ( 199 III, 9 | true evidence, whereof the correctness is seen by practice? . . . 200 III | side) has contact with the corrupt Darkness from everlasting 201 III | defiled, and infected, and corrupted by the contact of the Darkness. 202 III, 3 | fornicators, and they run corruptly into all evils. And who 203 III, 18 | of their spots cannot be covered up, after all this Strife 204 III, 15 | say), "that the Body is a covering which is from the evil Nature." 205 III, 6 | see how like the perverse crabs are to one another, each 206 III, 17 | it when it was dust, and crawled in it, and was delighted 207 III, 17 | according to its liking it crawls in it and dwells in it. 208 II, 3 | that Upper Being must have crept and come down from his natural 209 I, 2 | invented, redound (lit., cry out) to his praise. But 210 III, 9 | we should stand -- on the cunning tale which is proclaimed 211 Note1 | l.2] means line 2 of the current page of the accompanying 212 III, 7 | their nature, and do not dare to cross their borders, 213 III, 7 | found that these blind and dark moles do (in reality) come 214 III, 16 | Soul which they say is the Daughter of the Light puts on that 215 III, 9 | practice correctly every day. For it seems that he made 216 III, 10 | 11.] and windows in the daytime, whither can that darkness, 217 I, 2 | mountain, and (through) a dead region in which there was 218 I | the Stranger, we also will deal [P. 45.] frowardly with 219 III, 3 | loved, the experience of debauchees refutes them, (namely), 220 III | the fabricated system of deceit, for in all this the Pleasantness 221 III, 8 | whose true nature it cannot declare. But, because those names 222 III, 16 | on that Darkness in its deeds and . . . in its conduct. . . . 223 III | Frontier. But if it was a defenceless Frontier, one which could 224 III | deficient thing, the very word deficiency is enough to refute its 225 III | unclean became unclean and defiled, and infected, and corrupted 226 III, 17 | and crawled in it, and was delighted when it was [P. 89.] clay. 227 III, 7 | depths~Here are correct demonstrations which refute those who have 228 III, 16 | Being), how has it become a den and nest of unmixed Evil?~ 229 III, 1 | ways and means for their departure [P. 65, l. 9.] hence, that 230 II, 3 | on which all the causes depended.~ 231 I, 4 | Domain, his Domain was not deprived of him at all, because he 232 III, 7 | not Entities, and are not (derived) from Entities, and were 233 III, 7 | and 'first' (used to describe him)? But if their Father 234 II | that they are placed in a deserted and empty Space in which 235 III | made an Assault. And if it desired to rob it, behold it would 236 I, 2 | neighbour, let his Heralds be despised who make him quarrelsome 237 III, 6 | again, when he is forced he destroys the first and mixes them 238 III, 15 | they will be persuaded by a devil. How did he(?) force . . .~ 239 III, 7 | fishes, the fishes will devour it -- and if, therefore, 240 II, 4 | was unable to prevent the dew which dropped upon his bed! 241 III (6)| 1 I.e. Dia&boloj. Cf. p. lx. l. 33. ~ 242 III, 12 | would have [P. 83, l. 9.] died ; since it is difficult . . . 243 I, 3 | who grows not old nor ever dies or grows weary, who has 244 III | thereby introduced great difficulties. How did the attractiveness 245 III, 13 | into the belly and were digested in the stomach, it must 246 II, 1 | crossed it in an upward direction, then (let me ask), which 247 III, 2 | confusion in it. But if in both directions they are put to confusion, 248 III, 8 | that which is swallowed to disappear. Or has the Creator's own 249 III, 4 | How did Darkness discover this Light? ~And if our 250 I, 5 | And by this proof it is discovered that the child is greater 251 III, 7 | to the water, so fishes disdain to go up to the dry land? 252 I, 5 | omnipresence of the Stranger, they dishonour him. ~But the Sun is one 253 I, 5 | like a perfume, which is dissipated and like a flame which is 254 III, 17 | say that "when the fire dissolves all his interior, there 255 II, 1 | way down through the great distance to the Darkness beneath 256 II, 1 | the depths, how much more distant from those things [P. 54.] 257 III, 12 | how do they who will not distinguish between statements which 258 III, 5 | the original cause of the Disturbance. ~[L. 40.] For Bardaisan 259 II, 2 | of all confusion, He who disturbed things in their state of 260 II, 6 | dependent on it (i.e. the Divine Will) and existing by His 261 II, 6 | and a Domain in which His Divinity may dwell. But if the Will 262 I, 4 | concerning its nature that it is divisible. And if again they wish 263 III, 7 | two things are laid at the door of the Darkness, has not 264 III, 10 | that if a man opens the doors [P. 80, 11.] and windows 265 III, 12 | they hear them? For how dost thou receive (this) into 266 Note1 | consulting the Syriac text.~Double inverted commas mark quotations 267 II, 1 | not natural, or to be sent downwards according to its nature? 268 III, 17 | unbelief are found like dregs in the midst of one whom 269 III, 6 | prove that each of them is a drop of poison 'of the troubled 270 II, 4 | to prevent the dew which dropped upon his bed! But let them 271 III, 9 | seems that he made them drunk first, and then he told 272 III, 17 | dust of the earth is the dwelling of every creeping thing, 273 II, 1 | then (let me ask), which is easier -- for a heavy thing to 274 III, 10 | not teach. For a man never eats Light nor ever swallows 275 III, 7 | smells that it may reach the edge of the water and (then) 276 III, 18 | be healed, they cannot be effaced, and the places of their 277 Note2 | Note of the electronic source~I have moved the 278 II, 3 | Upper Being stirred the Element of the Wind in a manner 279 III, 3 | borders of both Domains embrace one another after the manner 280 III, 3 | P. 68.] as a harlot, she embraces the fornicator. For the 281 III, 3 | such as that which they employ (lit., bring) is applicable 282 II | cannot exist unitedly in one enclosure without the force of another [ 283 I, 2 | mountain immeasurable and an endless path, and a vast extent 284 III, 14 | what ear is there which can endure this blasphemy that the 285 III | not injure it. And if the Enemy was unable to get dominion 286 III, 18 | it "formerly? But if this energy conies from another place, 287 I | his possessions are found enfolded within his bosom there is 288 III, 17 | should become at one time his enjoyment, and [that he should like 289 III, 7 | and the reality of their Enmity [P. 74.] is never lessened! 290 III, 10 | For the rays of the Sun entering pursue it. And if it does 291 III | Sons of the Darkness was entirely akin to the Darkness -- 292 III, 14 | judged came hither in his entirety and was mixed with the Body ; 293 II (2)| 1 Ephraim alludes to the Heavens of 294 III, 1 | Error. [How can the Souls escape from this Darkness?] And 295 III, 7 | due to Freedom and not to Essential-nature, (it is due) to Will and 296 III, 8 | saying demands that natures essentially fixed cannot be changed; 297 III, 13 | Darkness . . . how did it eternally and from the beginning both 298 III, 9 | preposterously, or on true evidence, whereof the correctness 299 II, 4 | did, is it not clear and evident to any one who wishes to 300 III, 3 | they run corruptly into all evils. And who caused that false 301 Note1 | asterisks intended to bear any exact relation to the number of 302 III, 12 | mixed with them." O how exceedingly ridiculous that a man . . . 303 III, 13 | they were dissolved in the excrement and waste refuse. For these 304 III, 13 | this nature, as to how it existed from all eternity. For if 305 II, 5 | Bardaisan who said how can it be explained that something comes from 306 III, 12 | 39.] . . . when . . . and explains with explanations which 307 III, 6 | different. Mani takes any explanation that suits him regardless 308 I, 3 | the Stranger, but even to explore the other regions inside 309 III, 6 | because again he was plainly exposed he produced many Natures 310 I, 4 | veil was drawn aside he extended his rays unto us. And when 311 III, 7 | portray these from things external and with simple illustrations 312 III | Space), in addition to the fact that it (i.e., the Darkness) 313 III | is not a thing which is fair but the Darkness. Now, in 314 III, 15 | needy, in its heart is true faith, and in its . . . love (?). 315 III, 8 | really it is not a case of falling at all. For this takes place ( 316 III, 3 | evils. And who caused that false ascetic to offend? Can it 317 I, 2 | asunder and ascended, as they falsely state, then (it follows 318 III | say. If it is after the fashion of a park, the one side 319 III, 1 | himself from that which he fears? For he is afraid to come 320 III, 15 | lips is blessing, in its feet is the habit of visiting 321 III, 3 | nature ; but if, though he felt desire, he did not make 322 | few 323 III, 18 | what is the cause of its fierceness so that at last the Darkness 324 I, 4 | himself to his Domain he filled the whole of the Domain 325 III, 7 | that there is a bad and filthy and foul sepulchre, and 326 II, 1 | Fire would not be able [to find its way down through the 327 III, 6 | as it (i.e., Falsehood) finds convenient.~ 328 II, 5 | Bardaisan preached and the Firmament (?) and the Earth and those 329 III, 5 | though their mouths were fit to utter something which 330 I, 5 | And just as there are flowers or blossoms or one of the 331 III | dominion over it, and the Foe to tread it down and the 332 I, 2 | falsely state, then (it follows that) a boundary which could 333 I, 3 | any kind, and requires no food, -- and in that Domain there 334 Note2 | source~I have moved the footnotes to the end.  Those consisting 335 III, 6 | And, again, when he is forced he destroys the first and 336 III, 3 | If Darkness had foreledge, he showed restraint.  Did 337 III, 1 | Being) may contrive to form ways and means for their 338 III, 18 | and after they committed fornication and folly and polluted and 339 III, 3 | harlot, she embraces the fornicator. For the borders of both 340 III, 3 | since they are found to be fornicators, and they run corruptly 341 I, 1 | essential being' there is a fortified boundary of 'essential being' 342 III, 7 | is a bad and filthy and foul sepulchre, and moles in 343 I, 5 | price, but the scent of fragrant herbs is freely given to 344 I, 5 | scent of fragrant herbs is freely given to all who come near 345 III, 8 | cannot be changed; but that Freewill, because He created it to 346 I, 4 | those causes which arose in front of him, and impeded the 347 III | in all points, if the two frontiers of Good and Evil were thus 348 I | 45.] frowardly with the froward, (and say) that he who is 349 I | also will deal [P. 45.] frowardly with the froward, (and say) 350 I, 5 | which have sweet-smelling fruits and one small place is able 351 Note1 | translation by dots, and longer gaps by asterisks, but in neither 352 I, 4 | rays unto us. And when he gathered himself in and confined 353 I, 5 | fragrant herbs is freely given to all who come near them ; 354 III, 9 | difficult . . . he [Ll. 17, 24.] gives them a preposterous account 355 III, 15 | Root. For the eyes of the glorious body clothe themselves with 356 III, 15 | with purity, its limbs with glory, its senses with holiness, 357 III, 14 | possessed it, after he had gone thither. And how are they 358 II, 1 | than their companions, do greatly flee towards the depths, 359 I, 4 | 15.] does not lack, and a Greatness which is not lessened, then 360 III, 12 | found to eat them [P. 82.] greedily, and they were cast in and 361 III | And, therefore, on these grounds we have opposed Mani also 362 III, 18 | for the Wise (Being) to guard. But after those atrocities 363 I, 2 | struggle with him? And if he guarded his freedom that there should 364 III, 17 | blaspheme much, and are guilty of great unbelief are found 365 II, 4 | clearly that there is a great gulf between his Error and their 366 III, 15 | blessing, in its feet is the habit of visiting the sick, in 367 III, 15 | visiting the sick, in its hands alms for the needy, in its 368 III, 17 | tortured therein -- this may happen in the cases of changeable 369 III, 3 | Passion, behold, [P. 68.] as a harlot, she embraces the fornicator. 370 III, 18 | although their wounds may be healed, they cannot be effaced, 371 III, 12 | Hearer, and how is there a (healthy) ear . . . that thou shouldst 372 III, 12 | this) into thy mind, O wise Hearer, and how is there a (healthy) 373 III, 7 | they may be easy for their hearers. For let us suppose that 374 I | place who (says) that a heaven is found also beneath the 375 II, 1 | And if these which are heavier by measure than their companions, 376 II, 1 | Darkness be which exists more heavily than all! For lo, all its 377 II, 3 | come down from his natural height; and what Cause, then, stirred 378 III, 1 | And in his muttering whose help would be invoke? (Would 379 I, 2 | and his neighbour, let his Heralds be despised who make him 380 I, 5 | but the scent of fragrant herbs is freely given to all who 381 III, 4 | they were from everlasting hidden in one another. If this 382 III, 10 | which is in it, go up [to hide]? There is no room for it 383 I, 3 | Domain there were no walls to hinder him, -- how was the Maker 384 I, 3 | him, -- how was the Maker hindered from travelling to see what 385 III, 15 | with glory, its senses with holiness, in its mouth is praise 386 III, 16 | and if (it is) from [the Holy One, how is it impure] . . . 387 I, 5 | scattered, though they wish to honour him, they reduce him to 388 III, 1 | go forth hence, because, howsoever that Good (Being) may contrive 389 III, 12 | as (into the mouths) of hunters, and that the Light was 390 II, 6 | in every respect, Who is identical with His own Domain and 391 III, 1 | are to-day existing in Ignorance and Error. [How can the 392 II | II. Bardaisan's teaching; what 393 III | III. Mani's Teaching; he placed 394 I, 5 | the Light of the Sun to illustrate the omnipresence of the 395 III, 7 | Domains of Good and Evil illustrated from the natural places 396 III, 7 | external and with simple illustrations in order that they may be 397 I, 4 | arose in front of him, and impeded the Light; and here his 398 III, 5 | chance, and the Wind was impelled against the Fire.' Marcion 399 I, 3 | statements which they make is impossible.] For (being) a Person who 400 III, 18 | stupidly for the Darkness, an impregnable wall should have been built, 401 I, 2 | crossed? And if they make the improbable statement that "the Stranger 402 III, 16 | the Holy One, how is it impure] . . . and if (it is) from . . . 403 III, 7 | is it not, therefore, incontestably clear that just as moles 404 | indeed 405 I, 5 | make him (to be) without an independent substantial Existence.~ ~ 406 Note1 | great mutilation, italics indicate an attempt to summarise 407 Note1 | 10):~[Short lacunae are indicated in the translation by dots, 408 Note1 | the fragments.]~[P.101] indicates page 101 of the accompanying 409 III | unclean and defiled, and infected, and corrupted by the contact 410 Note1 | an approximately correct inference may be drawn by consulting 411 I, 2 | that he was far from him, infinitely far, if it was a mountain 412 III | everlasting to everlasting, the injurious contact could not injure 413 III | Earth (of Light) or from the inner sides he received the smell 414 | instead 415 Note1 | of the dots or asterisks intended to bear any exact relation 416 III, 17 | the fire dissolves all his interior, there is collected every 417 Note1 | Note from Vol. 1 Introduction, p. (10):~[Short lacunae 418 I, 2 | which he (i.e., Marcion) has invented, redound (lit., cry out) 419 I | collected those Souls whom ISU1 brought up hence. For a 420 I (1)| 2 I.e., 0Ihsou~j according to the Marcionite 421 III | victorious Frontier into the jaws of the Darkness? For it 422 I, 3 | on that immeasurable journey, how much more able [P. 423 III, 14 | opposites? For He also who judges the judged came hither in 424 III, 18 | for the Just (Being) to keep in repair, and proper for 425 III, 7 | Natures -- since if thou kill a mole and cast it to the 426 I, 4 | P. 49, l.15.] does not lack, and a Greatness which is 427 II, 6 | makes everything. For if He lacks any one of these things, 428 Note1 | Introduction, p. (10):~[Short lacunae are indicated in the translation 429 III, 12 | blasphemy! . . . wolves eat lambs and lions eat calves, and 430 | latter 431 III, 17 | that creeping thing which lay in it when it was dust, 432 III, 1 | refined,' seeing that 'he who leads them astray' is so great? 433 | less 434 II (2)| Stranger, see above, p. li. ~ 435 III, 8 | himself there, and is the Light-God who did not [P. 77.] aid 436 II, 4 | upon the waters, and moved lightly upon the waves of the sea! 437 III, 7 | dwell in the Darkness as the likeness of the Sons of Darkness, 438 III, 17 | thing, and according to its liking it crawls in it and dwells 439 III, 15 | its ears with purity, its limbs with glory, its senses with 440 III, 12 | wolves eat lambs and lions eat calves, and the eater 441 III, 15 | thanksgiving, and in its lips is blessing, in its feet 442 I, 2 | region in which there was no living air, and (across) a bitter 443 I, 5 | of them because it has no localised substance ; and we [P. 52.] 444 Note1 | translation by dots, and longer gaps by asterisks, but in 445 III, 17 | changed to anything.~For loose dust of the earth is the 446 III, 3 | one loves and another is loved, the experience of debauchees 447 III, 3 | matter, (namely), that one loves and another is loved, the 448 III | could be overcome, and laid low, and trodden down and crossed, 449 I, 5 | i.e., the Sun) from this lower fire; for thus also a flame 450 III, 18 | misery and loss [Cf. p. lvi. ll.13, 26 f.] -- even 451 III, 2 | with the Light]. [Cf. p. lviii. f.]~ 452 III (6)| 1 I.e. Dia&boloj. Cf. p. lx. l. 33. ~ 453 III, 1 | to his authority, [Cf. p. lxxii. l. 3.] especially, too, 454 III, 12 | obvious even to simpletons and madmen, how do they who will not 455 | makes 456 III, 3 | about whom they say that she manifested her beauty to the Archons, 457 III | to tread it down and the Marauder to ascend and cross it, 458 I (1)| 0Ihsou~j according to the Marcionite transliteration.  ~ 459 I, 5 | If Marcionites use the Light of the Sun 460 Note1 | Double inverted commas mark quotations where the original 461 III, 3 | bring) is applicable to the matter, (namely), that one loves 462 I, 3 | were any there! . . . [Thou mayest know that the system of 463 | me 464 III (5)| 3 The meaning is not clear. ~ 465 III | upon their eyes, and if the Melodies of that sweet Player are 466 II | especially inasmuch as he mentions that there are both light 467 III, 6 | Light, as if it had suddenly met it, he constructed the theory ' 468 II, 2 | powerless and found out a method and arranged the Cause to 469 II (3)| 1 I.e. perhaps pa&mflogoj, "the all-flaming." ~ 470 I, 4 | Domain which was in the middle full of him -- a place infinite 471 II, 2 | crossed its Boundary, that misdeed of his teaches us what name 472 III, 18 | Contention, and after all this misery and loss [Cf. p. lvi. ll. 473 Note1 | relation to the number of the missing words. In respect to this 474 III, 6 | he destroys the first and mixes them together -- the Good 475 II, 4 | that it was not revealed to Moses, the chief of the Prophets, 476 III, 1 | knows beforehand all the movements and secrets which are planned 477 III, 7 | and to soil themselves in mud and in the burrows4 of moles ; 478 II, 2 | too? And if the causes are multiplied, what, then, was that which 479 Note1 | text has suffered great mutilation, italics indicate an attempt 480 III, 1 | even Mani himself may have muttered from the midst of the Darkness 481 III, 1 | was swallowed. And in his muttering whose help would be invoke? ( 482 | my 483 II, 6 | they say that there is a myriad of ... each supporting one 484 III, 6 | because he was compelled he named two Roots ; and because 485 III, 16 | The Soul is not necessarily pure. ~Consider again the 486 II, 6 | who bears it up? Until of necessity one great and perfect One 487 II, 5 | create creatures ([so it needed something] on which to place 488 III, 15 | in its hands alms for the needy, in its heart is true faith, 489 III, 18 | what was the cause of the negligence long ago (which brought 490 III, 7 | And they are made to be neighbours to one another ; and in 491 III, 16 | has it become a den and nest of unmixed Evil?~ 492 | nevertheless 493 | none 494 III | is sent forth into their nostrils, and if that Light is diffused 495 Note2 | of Syriac.  The pages are numbered with Roman numerals.  Arabic 496 Note2 | are numbered with Roman numerals.  Arabic numbers and line 497 Note1 | inverted commas are used in numerous cases where the words seem 498 III, 18 | about) that the Darkness obtained dominion over all this and 499 III, 12 | for these things which are obvious even to simpletons and madmen, 500 I, 4 | went out he was the sole occupant (lit., fullness) of that


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