Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     4.  2    |            the fact that number of smokers among women continued to
 2   II,     5.  1.  1|        COPD reached 50% in elderly smokers.~Chronic Kidney Disease
 3   II,     5.  2.  3|     reduction in the prevalence of smokers. The first two could be
 4   II,     5.  2.  4|            30% to smoking and that smokers and former smokers are at
 5   II,     5.  2.  4|            that smokers and former smokers are at almost twice the
 6   II,     5.  2.  4|          those who have never been smokers (see Chapter 5.1.2.).~Unfortunately,
 7   II,     5.  4.  2|       relates to the percentage of smokers in the diabetic population.~
 8   II,     5.  4.  4|    measurements. An average of 20% smokers among diabetics is realistic
 9   II,     5.  5.  3|           the lowest risk in heavy smokers. Alcohol intake, however,
10   II,     5.  8.  3|     criteria27 in persistent never smokers was reported. In another
11   II,     5.  8.  3|            significantly higher in smokers (18.8%).~ ~A study by Johannessen
12   II,     5.  8.  3| GOLD-defined COPD of 1.8% in never smokers, in a 9-year follow-up of
13   II,     5.  8.  3|      observed in 4% for male never smokers (9% in women). The 25-year
14   II,     5.  8.  3|        severe COPD was 1% in never smokers, with no significant differences
15   II,     5.  8.  3|           to 6.07) compared to non smokers..~ ~COPD has some important
16   II,     5.  8.  4|        respectively, in continuous smokers, and to 22% and 12% in never-smokers (
17   II,     5.  8.  4|      ranged from 4% for male never smokers (9% in women) to 41% for
18   II,     5.  8.  4|            41% for male continuous smokers (31% in women). The 25-year
19   II,     5.  8.  4|           was 24.3 % in continuous smokers, compared to 1% in never
20   II,     5.  8.  4|            compared to 1% in never smokers, with no significant differences
21   II,     5.  8.  4|        COPD reached 50% in elderly smokers.~ ~Furthermore, COPD has
22   II,     5.  8.  4|            to contribute by 10% in smokers and by 50% in never-smokers
23   II,     5.  8.  5|           ml FEV1 among continuing smokers (Scanlon et al, 2000).~ ~
24   II,     5.  8.  5|           in 24.3% of 40+ year old smokers with a smoking history of
25   II,     5.  8.  5|       among which 64% were current smokers, 25.1% former smokers and
26   II,     5.  8.  5|      current smokers, 25.1% former smokers and 10.9% lifelong non-smokers.
27   II,     5.  8.  5|             AL was found in 23% of smokers aged 40 with a history of
28   II,     5.  8.  5|            high risk of COPD, i.e. smokers, can reveal the early presence
29   II,     5.  8.  7|        airflow obstruction in male smokers 40-65 years old. Fam Pract
30   II,     5.  8.  7|         Studies. Not 15 but 50% of smokers develop COPD? Report from
31   II,     5.  8.  7|         screening by invitation of smokers aged 40 to 55 years. Br
32   II,     9.  5.  3|         the rates of regular daily smokers were slightly higher in
33  III,    10.  2.  1|            the percentage of adult smokers mostly on the basis of health
34  III,    10.  2.  1|           smoker' or includes 'all smokers', thus also occasional smokers.
35  III,    10.  2.  1|     smokers', thus also occasional smokers. Likewise, ages defined
36  III,    10.  2.  1|         example, the percentage of smokers is now higher among women
37  III,    10.  2.  1|        Europeans aged 13 to 15 are smokers, more than twice the global
38  III,    10.  2.  1|     smoking related diseases among smokers and second-hand smoke (SHS)
39  III,    10.  2.  1|           to social security among smokers, patient-SHS victims and
40  III,    10.  2.  1|          interventions.~Only 3% of smokers manage to quit smoking using
41  III,    10.  2.  1|         symptoms that prevent many smokers from quitting. It contains
42  III,    10.  2.  1|            who wish to quit). Most smokers will at some point attempt
43  III,    10.  2.  1|         and for smoking cessation. Smokers who will not or cannot quit
44  III,    10.  2.  1|       snuff users may later become smokers - an argument which has
45  III,    10.  2.  1|      Trends in the Exposure of Non smokers in the US Population to
46  III,    10.  2.  1|      demand for antioxidants (e.g, smokers) and vitamins have been
47  III,    10.  5.  2|              1.56), and that heavy smokers also tend to be urban dwellers (
48   IV,    12.  2    |     behavioral therapy. Only 3% of smokers manage to quit smoking using
49   IV,    12.  2    |         symptoms that prevent many smokers from quitting. It contains
50   IV,    12. 10    |           Day (every year) and Non Smokers Day celebrations (every
51  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|         Slovakia~Slovenia~smallpox~smokers~smoking~socio-cultural~socio-economic~