Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5. 12.  5|           2005). In the absence of a vaccine, the control of HCV has
 2   II,     6.Acr    |            Multi-Drug Resistance~MMR vaccine~Measles, Mumps and Rubella
 3   II,     6.Acr    |           Measles, Mumps and Rubella Vaccine~MRSA~Methycillin-Resistant
 4   II,     6.  3.  3|            introduction in 2006 of a vaccine, but is not a reportable
 5   II,     6.  3.  3|            have included hepatitis B vaccine in their national vaccination
 6   II,     6.  3.  3|            virus (HCV), for which no vaccine is available. Up to 90%
 7   II,     6.  3.  4|             H3N2, and similar to the vaccine strain for the season. Influenza
 8   II,     6.  3.  4|          European countries but this vaccine is currently underused in
 9   II,     6.  3.  4|           reduces this risk. The BCG vaccine may be effective in limiting
10   II,     6.  3.  4|          high-risk groups. Since the vaccine is not without adverse effects,
11   II,     6.  3.  5|          diseases covered by the MMR vaccine (measles, mumps and rubella),
12   II,     6.  3.  5|           recent years), even though vaccine coverage is not uniform,
13   II,     6.  3.  5|            that have introduced this vaccine. For pertussis, the picture
14   II,     6.  3.  5|             from previously attained vaccine coverage levels. Political
15   II,     6.  3.  5|            but with over 95% measles vaccine coverage; most of these
16   II,     6.  3.  5|           Figure 6.5. Measles (MCV1) vaccine coverage.~ ~
17   II,     6.  3.  5|              Conjugated pneumococcal vaccine was registered in the EU
18   II,     6.  3.  5|         introduced it as a universal vaccine in their childhood vaccination
19   II,     6.  3.  5|             children at-risk. As the vaccine does not cover all serotypes
20   II,     6.  3.  5|               using a new conjugated vaccine, but to date there is no
21   II,     6.  3.  5|              but to date there is no vaccine against serogroup B disease.~ ~
22   II,     6.  3.  5|  introduction of the meningococcal C vaccine in high-risk populations.
23   II,     6.  3.  5|              the introduction of the vaccine. In 2005, a total of 5 494
24   II,     6.  3.  5|     pertussis. There is an effective vaccine for this disease.~In the
25   II,     6.  3.  5|           known to be preventable by vaccine, still affects several European
26   II,     6.  3.  5|        humans. There is an effective vaccine available.~ ~An overall
27   II,     6.  3.  5|          disease is preventable by a vaccine that provides life-long
28   II,     6.  3.  5|            Mumps is preventable by a vaccine.~ ~Between 1996 and 2005,
29   II,     6.  3.  5|           reflect a variation in the vaccine coverage by sex (some vaccination
30   II,     6.  3.  5|           are changing from the live vaccine to inactivated vaccines
31   II,     6.  3.  5|           vaccines in order to avoid vaccine associated flaccid paralysis.~ ~
32   II,     6.  3.  6|          surveillance. The available vaccine for S typhi is used mostly
33   II,     6.  3.  6|              countries. An effective vaccine is available but it is recommended
34   II,     6.  3.  6|          recent years. The available vaccine is used mostly for travellers
35   II,     6.  3.  6|          described. A very effective vaccine is available. Almost 210
36   II,     6.  3.  7|           has not been documented. A vaccine is available to protect
37   II,     6.  3.  7|       occupational risk is required. Vaccine is limited to occupational,
38   II,     6.  3.  7|              Europe. No treatment or vaccine is currently available,
39   II,     6.  3.  7|             no specific treatment or vaccine available, and up to 30%
40   II,     6.  3.  7|              fluids. No treatment or vaccine is available for either
41   II,     6.  3.  7| administration of a highly effective vaccine.~ ~Yellow fever has not
42   II,     9.  2.  3|   particularly those categorised as ‘vaccine preventable’. However, with
43   II,     9.  2.  3|              what can be consideredvaccine preventable’ is not static,
44   II,     9.  2.  3|          measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine. The apparent scientific
45   II,     9.  2.  3|             of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine during childhood means that
46   II,     9.  3.  1|      infection with genital warts. A vaccine for HPV has become recently
47  III,    10.  3.  3|              countries. An effective vaccine is available but it is recommended
48   IV,    12.  2    |              to the development of a vaccine against the Human Papilloma
49   IV,    12. 10    |       authorised establishments. The vaccine against the human papilloma