Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     3.  1.  0(2)|           would start getting their babies earlier than in previous
 2   II,     8.  2.  1   |    disability and other problems if babies with these conditions do
 3   II,     8.  2.  1   |           follow their diets, their babies are very likely to be affected
 4   II,     9           |           higher risk of delivering babies with congenital anomaly
 5   II,     9           |          vaccination programmes for babies and/or young girls are an
 6   II,     9.  1       |              More than five million babies are born yearly in the European
 7   II,     9.  1       |     maximise safety for mothers and babies, improve the efficacy of
 8   II,     9.  1.  1   |      percentage of low birth weight babies. Other topics covered by
 9   II,     9.  1.  1   |            neonatal morbidity among babies at high risk~ F: Neonatal
10   II,     9.  1.  1   |         less than 2500 grams. These babies include those that are preterm,
11   II,     9.  1.  1   |            or low birth weights and babies born at term with growth
12   II,     9.  1.  1   |  impairments in childhood than term babies with normal birth weight.~ ~
13   II,     9.  1.  1   |         available~ ~Data on preterm babies are not currently reported
14   II,     9.  1.  1   |       health outcomes. Very preterm babies have the highest rates of
15   II,     9.  1.  1   |          poor growth. However, even babies born between 33 and 35 weeks
16   II,     9.  1.  1   |     learning difficulties than term babies (Escobar et al, 2006; Kramer
17   II,     9.  1.  1   |            monitoring the health of babies in the EU. The EURO-PERISTAT
18   II,     9.  1.  1   |            in Very Low birth weight Babies~Very Low birth weight (VLBW)
19   II,     9.  1.  1   |            100 times higher in VLBW babies/very preterm than in normal
20   II,     9.  1.  1   |            normal birth weight/term babies. The CP rate among VLBW
21   II,     9.  1.  1   |            1.6. CP rates among VLBW babies in 9 European countries,
22   II,     9.  1.  2   |            with greater referral of babies with a heart murmur for
23   II,     9.  1.  2   |           higher risk of delivering babies with congenital anomaly
24   II,     9.  1.  2   |          vaccination programmes for babies and/or young girls are an
25   II,     9.  1.  2   |            example that survival of babies with Transposition of Great
26   II,     9.  1.  2   |             congenital anomalies in babies of women with Type 1 or
27   II,     9.  3.  2   |      delivering live and still-born babies: (1) eclamptic seizures, (
28   II,     9.  3.  2   |            pregnant women and their babies - and understand the differences
29   II,     9.  3.  2   |        clinicians support women and babies through the process of healthy
30   II,     9.  3.  2   |            of care for very preterm babies which may also have an impact
31   II,     9.  3.  2   |        Table 9.3.2.1. Percentage of babies born after assisted reproductive
32   II,     9.  3.  2   |      outcomes for mothers and their babies. Many of these techniques
33   II,     9.  3.  2   |      evaluation. In many countries, babies born alive at 25 and 26
34   II,     9.  3.  2   |             these extremely preterm babies have a much higher rate
35   II,     9.  3.  2   |          disabling impairments than babies born at term (Wood et al,
36  III,    10.  2.  1   |              Wen SW (2002): Why are babies getting bigger? Temporal
37  III,    10.  3.  1   |           high UVR exposure, whilst babies should always remain in
38  III,    10.  4.  2   | Methemoglobinemia in~infants (‘blue babies’,~especially with bottle~
39  III,    10.  4.  2   |            month for the bottle-fed babies and sixth month for the