Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     6.  3.  6|               in contaminated surface waters have been shown as a possible
 2   II,     6.  3.  6|               in contaminated coastal waters, transmitting diseases through
 3   II,     6.  3.  6|              are contaminated surface waters and humans. Infection occurs
 4  III,    10.  2.  1|        October 2007).~ ~Summerbell C, Waters E, Edmunds LD, Kelly S,
 5  III,    10.  3.  2|              of PGEs found in surface waters. The authors postulate that
 6  III,    10.  4.  3|             on the quality of coastal waters which are of important recreational
 7  III,    10.  4.  3|            drinking- and recreational waters and when reflecting upon
 8  III,    10.  4.  3|            untreated waste and sewage waters resulting in the contamination
 9  III,    10.  4.  3|              of pollution of European waters. Waste water discharges
10  III,    10.  4.  3|    wide-ranging impacts on our ground waters, rivers, lakes and coastal
11  III,    10.  4.  3|            good water status" for all waters by the year 2015. The purpose
12  III,    10.  4.  3|          general good status of other waters, including all water resources (
13  III,    10.  4.  3|          Directive to protect surface waters from pollution (European
14  III,    10.  4.  3|             concentrations in surface waters of 41 dangerous chemical
15  III,    10.  4.  3|               contamination of source waters, the reduction or removal
16  III,    10.  4.  3|             are contaminating natural waters and drinking water sources.
17  III,    10.  4.  3|               to be developed. Ground waters are occasionally contaminated
18  III,    10.  4.  3|         quality standards for surface waters of 41 dangerous chemical
19  III,    10.  4.  5|               to health, recreational waters such as rivers, lakes, streams
20  III,    10.  4.  5|            lakes, streams and coastal waters are known to harbour enteric
21  III,    10.  4.  5|  eutrophication of coastal and inland waters and possibly by climate
22  III,    10.  4.  5|       ingested.~ ~Use of recreational waters provides opportunities for
23  III,    10.  4.  5|            general quality of bathing waters, as measured by the presence
24  III,    10.  4.  5|             monitored coastal bathing waters and 92% on inland bathing
25  III,    10.  4.  5|             and 92% on inland bathing waters complied with the mandatory
26  III,    10.  4.  5| eutrophication of coastal- and inland waters but also climate change
27  III,    10.  4.  5|              blooms make recreational waters less attractive because
28  III,    10.  4.  5|      freshwater and in marine coastal waters in the Northern parts of
29  III,    10.  4.  5|      Directive, the tests for bathing waters have been simplified to
30  III,    10.  4.  5|                 Most European bathing waters are hosted in coastal regions
31  III,    10.  4.  5|           Directive. However, coastal waters are part of the larger marine
32  III,    10.  4.  5|             status of the EU's marine waters by 2021 and to protect the
33  III,    10.  4.  5|         quality standards for surface waters of 41 dangerous chemical
34  III,    10.  4.  5|           Volume 1: Coastal and fresh waters. Available at: htt ~ ~
35   IV,    12. 10    |            Practice for Protection of Waters) Regulations 2006 & 2007~ ~
36   IV,    12. 10    |            Practice for Protection of Waters Regulations.~ ~ ~Soil contamination
37   IV,    12. 10    |       swimming-pools and recreational waters;~- Development of surveillance
38   IV,    12. 10    |             quality norms for bathing waters from natural zones according