Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  3|           BE, Zaslavsky AM, Ustun TB, Chatterji S; WHO World
 2   II,     5. 11.  3|            LA Goldsmith, SI Katz, TB Fitzpatrick (eds), 5th ed.
 3   II,     6.  3.  1|         the remainder (apart from TB) affect the economically
 4   II,     6.  3.  2|        the global killer diseases TB, malaria, HIV and pneumococcal
 5   II,     6.  3.  2|          effective agents against TB, isoniazid and rifampicin, (
 6   II,     6.  3.  2|      poses a serious challenge to TB control today. Multi-drug
 7   II,     6.  3.  2|       today. Multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) was present in
 8   II,     6.  3.  4|           6.3.4.2. Tuberculosis~ ~TB is a bacterial disease,
 9   II,     6.  3.  4|           infected develop active TB. HIV infection increases
10   II,     6.  3.  4|          transmission. Therefore, TB control relies mainly on
11   II,     6.  3.  4|         or stabilisation in their TB notification rates. Subsequently,
12   II,     6.  3.  4| authorities. In many EU countries TB is becoming a rare disease
13   II,     6.  3.  4|            largely as a result of TB in immigrants. With the
14   II,     6.  3.  4|  tubercolosis~ ~ ~ ~Figure 6.A1.1 TB cases per 100,000 selected
15   II,     6.  3.  4|             Table 6.A1.2 Cases of TB between 1995 and 2004~ ~ ~ ~
16   II,     6.  3.  4|             Table 6.A1.3 Cases of TB by age groups~ ~ ~ ~ ~The
17   II,     6.  3.  4|          patterns with respect to TB:~ ~· Industrialised countries
18   II,     6.  3.  4|       Westernised economies where TB rates are low and disease
19   II,     6.  3.  4|         and drug-resistance among TB cases is low to moderate.~·
20   II,     6.  3.  4|     States, characterised by high TB rates, low migrant TB and
21   II,     6.  3.  4|        high TB rates, low migrant TB and high frequency of drug
22   II,     6.  3.  4|         steadily increasing among TB patients.~· Countries in
23   II,     6.  3.  4|      joined the EU in 2004, where TB rates are moderate, cases
24   II,     6.  3.  4|        and Norway reported 59 497 TB cases corresponding to an
25   II,     6.  3.  4|           has changed. In the EU, TB is most prevalent in migrants
26   II,     6.  3.  4|       prisoners and drug users.~ ~TB is more common in males (
27   II,     6.  3.  4|         people of foreign origin, TB concentrates in young adulthood,
28   II,     6.  3.  4|       2005, 22% of AIDS cases had TB as the initial AIDS-indicator
29   II,     6.  3.  4|        contribution of HIV to the TB caseload differs between
30   II,     6.  3.  4|           countries. While 15% of TB cases in Portugal were HIV
31   II,     6.  3.  4|   migration. HIV prevalence among TB cases has also increased
32   II,     6.  3.  4|         prevention and control of TB in immigrants, needs to
33   II,     9.  2.  3|       resurgence of tuberculosis (TB) in recent years has apparently
34   II,     9.  4.  3|         of a higher prevalence of TB in older individuals. This
35   II,     9.  4.  8|    Sexually transmitted infection~TB~Tuberculosis~UK~United Kingdom~
36  III,    10.  3.  3|        the global killer diseases TB, malaria, HIV and pneumococcal
37  III,    10.  5.  1|   uninterrupted treatment such as TB and HIV are often inadequately
38   IV,    11.  6.  4|           diabetes, hypertension, TB, AIDS (84.5% based on historical