Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  4    |          children within a broader universal approach. Efforts to tackle
 2    I,     2.  4    |            States have implemented universal or almost universal rights
 3    I,     2.  4    |    implemented universal or almost universal rights to care and have
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|        policy statement “Towards a universal understanding of epilepsy”.
 5   II,     5. 11.  3|          so common as to be almost universal during teenage years. Yet
 6   II,     5. 12.  5|   prevention of alcohol drinking .~Universal vaccination against HBV
 7   II,     6.  3.  5|        have now introduced it as a universal vaccine in their childhood
 8   II,     7.  2.  4|           countries which have a « universal » Social Security system.
 9   II,     9.  2.  5|         monitored, and is far from universal.~ ~Special provisions need
10   II,     9.  3.  1|         function is common but not universal with ageing. There may be
11   II,     9.  3.  1|             Currently, there is no universal consensus on the hormonal
12  III,    10.  2.  1| school-based and community-located universal prevention are nowadays
13  III,    10.  2.  1|         approaches.~ ~School-based universal prevention should be implemented
14  III,    10.  2.  1|           widespread in Europe. In universal community-located prevention,
15  III,    10.  2.  1|           time provision. Finally, universal family-based prevention
16  III,    10.  2.  1|          revealed that there is no universal or even commonly used measure
17  III,    10.  2.  4|        2249-2256.~ ~UNESCO (1997): Universal Declaration on the Human
18  III,    10.  6.  2|            States have implemented universal or almost universal rights
19  III,    10.  6.  2|    implemented universal or almost universal rights to care and have
20   IV,    11.  1.  4|      coverage by health insurance. Universal, or near universal, coverage
21   IV,    11.  1.  4|      insurance. Universal, or near universal, coverage of the population
22   IV,    11.  1.  4|            However, even when near universal coverage is achieved, there
23   IV,    11.  1.  4|          even among countries with universal coverage and largely publicly
24   IV,    11.  1.  5|          their occurrence, such as universal underreporting, assessing
25   IV,    11.  6.  2|         Most countries now provide universal coverage, though the scope (
26   IV,    11.  6.  2|        with the majority providing universal (or near universal) statutory
27   IV,    11.  6.  2|       providing universal (or near universal) statutory health coverage.
28   IV,    11.  6.  2|          monopsony purchaser and a universal risk pool, which is more
29   IV,    11.  6.  4|       insurance, the attainment of universal coverage is fairly recent
30   IV,    11.  6.  4|          extent. Note that data on universal coverage may be misleading,
31   IV,    11.  6.  4|            In CEE countries, while universal coverage of the population
32   IV,    13.  5    |         committed to ensuring near universal access. While some differences
33   IV,    13.  5    |           into a comprehensive and universal framework for long term
34   IV,    13.  5    |            States have implemented universal or almost universal rights
35   IV,    13.  5    |    implemented universal or almost universal rights to care and have
36   IV,    13.  5    |        responsibility for ensuring universal access to high-quality care,