Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  9    |   expected to increase in the near future. The tiger mosquito,
 2   II,     4.  1    |  populations will come in the near future and policy makers
 3   II,     4.  2    |    that an upper limit may be near.~Even though life expectancy
 4   II,     5.  3.  1| ongoing or is expected in the near future (WHO, 2003; Micheli,
 5   II,     5.  4.  1|     for blood vessel changes. Near normalisation of blood glucose
 6   II,     5.  4.  6|  prevented if the appropriate near normoglycaemia is obtained
 7   II,     5.  5.  3|       their lifetime, usually near illness onset” (Palmer et
 8   II,     9.  1.  2|      a rapid development. The near future will bring less invasive
 9   II,     9.  3.  1|    population), followed by a near fourfold increase in the
10  III,    10.  1    |       sprayed fields, or work near spraying operations.~ ~Today
11  III,    10.  2.  1| financial consequences in the near future and access to treatment
12  III,    10.  2.  1|      fully implemented in the near future. Furthermore, there
13  III,    10.  2.  4|     already contribute in the near future to the development
14  III,    10.  4.  1| HEIMTSA: htt INTARESE: htt ~ ~Near real time information on
15  III,    10.  4.  5|  association between residing near a landfill site and adverse
16  III,    10.  4.  5|   Health effects of residence near hazardous waste landfill
17   IV,    11.  1.  4|      insurance. Universal, or near universal, coverage of the
18   IV,    11.  1.  4| countries. However, even when near universal coverage is achieved,
19   IV,    11.  3.  1| increase significantly in the near future, many countries will
20   IV,    11.  6.  2|       providing universal (or near universal) statutory health
21   IV,    12.  2    |  prevented if the appropriate near normo-glycaemia is obtained
22   IV,    13.  2.  3|       sprayed fields, or work near spraying operations. According
23   IV,    13.  5    |     are committed to ensuring near universal access. While