1-500 | 501-1000 | 1001-1081
     Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

   1    -,     1            |           Gaetano Guglielmi for taking care of website matters, as well
   2    I,     2.  1        |               healthcare and long-term care and promote prevention,
   3    I,     2.  3        |       difficulties in accessing health care services, they may be unable
   4    I,     2.  3        |              the quality of the health care services provided to them
   5    I,     2.  3        |         attitudes to and use of health care services. On the other hand,
   6    I,     2.  3        |            affecting the efficiency of care. This makes additional training
   7    I,     2.  4        |                for all to high quality care reflecting recent technological
   8    I,     2.  4        |          address financial barriers to care, emphasize promotion and
   9    I,     2.  4        |               activities over curative care, and address cultural barriers
  10    I,     2.  4        |             almost universal rights to care and have adapted services
  11    I,     2.  5        |             health and social services care in the community, thus more
  12    I,     2.  5        |          Growing needs in domestic and care services are as follows:~ ~–
  13    I,     2.  5        |               an important consumer of care servicesrepresents the
  14    I,     2.  7        |                the provision of health care. Key dimensions of the variation
  15    I,     2.  9        |              and the quality of health care services and their ability
  16    I,     2. 10.  3    |             networks between points of care (hospitals, laboratories
  17    I,     2. 10.  4(9) |          technology for safer patience care” – UK Departement of Healthh –
  18    I,     2. 10.  4(17)|                   Creation of a Health Care Value Chain through an innovative &
  19    I,     2. 10.  4(19)|           technology for safer patient careUK Depertament of health  20    I,     2. 10.  4(22)|           technology for safer patient careUK Department of Health –
  21    I,     2. 11        |             spatial behavior in health care utilization among residents
  22    I,     2. 11        |               healthcare and long-term care. [on-liine publication available
  23    I,     2. 11        |       Understanding barriers to health care: a review of disparities
  24    I,     2. 11        |               of disparities in health care services among indigenous
  25    I,     3.  3        |             the financing of long-term care.~ ~These general trends
  26   II,     4.Acr        |              limitations~LTC~Long Term Care~MEHM~Minimum European Health
  27   II,     4.  1        |          relying on formal or informal care for daily survival.~ ~Trends
  28   II,     4.  1        |                and requiring long term care. For survivors at the age
  29   II,     4.  1        |           point more towards long term care (LTC) services than to employment
  30   II,     4.  1        |         institutions such as long-term care establishments). EUROSTAT
  31   II,     5.  1.  2    |             fundamental expressions in care and also one of the most
  32   II,     5.  1.  2    |              may have the same type of care. This gives weight to the
  33   II,     5.  1.  2    |              difficult it is to define care since its efficiency is
  34   II,     5.  1.  2    |             subdivided in dimension of care and psycho-social dimension.
  35   II,     5.  1.  2    |       simultaneously”. Difficulties in care delivery often arise because
  36   II,     5.  1.  2    |   simultaneously into account. Patient care oscillates between technical
  37   II,     5.  1.  2    |                tests, x-rays, hospital care, financial coverage through
  38   II,     5.  1.  2    |               to a large degree to the care process. The doctor, in
  39   II,     5.  1.  2    |             all the things we probably care most about. Doctors and
  40   II,     5.  1.  2    |        complexity and heterogeneity of care are not so easy to understand,
  41   II,     5.  1.  2    |          understand, as the quality of care does not depend only on
  42   II,     5.  1.  3    |             the patient and his health care professional in order to
  43   II,     5.  1.  3    |          process, integrated in health care. Moreover, it is patient-centered
  44   II,     5.  1.  3    |         disease, prescribed treatment, care, hospital and other health
  45   II,     5.  1.  3    |              hospital and other health care settings, organizational
  46   II,     5.  1.  3    |       treatment, cooperate with health care providers, live healthily,
  47   II,     5.  1.  3    |            process, provided by health care providers trained in the
  48   II,     5.  1.  3    |         integral part of treatment and care.~Therapeutic patient education
  49   II,     5.  1.  3    |               is part of the long-term care of the patient and has to
  50   II,     5.  1.  3    |                and its effects. Health care providers tend to talk to
  51   II,     5.  1.  3    |         reducing the cost of long-term care for patients and our society.
  52   II,     5.  1.  3    |    self-management and high quality of care for all long-term diseases
  53   II,     5.  1.  3    |            education managed by health care providers trained in the
  54   II,     5.  1.  4    |           person should know what good care is, i.e. he/she must be
  55   II,     5.  1.  4    |         informed about the standard of care. People affected by chronic
  56   II,     5.  2.  1    |             directly related to health care and social services, but
  57   II,     5.  2.  2    |              al, 2000) and CVD medical care (Tunstall-Pedoe et al, 2000)~ ~
  58   II,     5.  2.  2    |               future trends in medical care.~The ICD codes for IHD (
  59   II,     5.  2.  2    |               advancements in coronary care to the decline in CVD mortality.
  60   II,     5.  2.  3    |               future trends in medical care.~ ~Table 5.2.2. Crude hospital
  61   II,     5.  2.  3    |           recommended for IHD in acute care setting: thrombolytic drugs,
  62   II,     5.  2.  4    |             physical activity, medical care and genetic and environmental
  63   II,     5.  2.  5    |               eligible for low medical care expenditures in the last
  64   II,     5.  2.  7    |   contributions of changes in coronary care to improving survival, event
  65   II,     5.  3.  2    |         registries, other CRs, primary care facilities, nursing homes
  66   II,     5.  3.  2    |       Evaluating the quality of cancer care by providing comparative
  67   II,     5.  3.  2    |        programme planning, and patient care improvement;~· cancer registry
  68   II,     5.  3.  2    |          reduce inequalities in cancer care, by extending collaboration,
  69   II,     5.  3.  2    |          global inequalities in cancer care and practice in Europe.
  70   II,     5.  3.  2    |         clinical research, patterns of care, national societies/registries
  71   II,     5.  3.  3    |              of results and quality of care. The Czech Republic intends
  72   II,     5.  3.  5    |            proxy of the overall cancer care performance. In 2006, 3,
  73   II,     5.  3.  6    |           might indicate better cancer care. Wealthy countries with
  74   II,     5.  3.  7    |                     5.3.6.3. Oncologic care and practice~ ~International
  75   II,     5.  3.  7    |           overall investment in health care (Coleman et al, 2003).~Estimating
  76   II,     5.  3.  7    |               and investment in health care (Coleman et al, 2003). Therefore,
  77   II,     5.  3.  7    |                the field of palliative care.~· The organization of medical
  78   II,     5.  3.  7    |              for developing palliative care.~· The rapidly increasing
  79   II,     5.  3.  7    |               available for the health care system and hospital budgets
  80   II,     5.  3.  7    |             addressed up front. Health care systems and the pharmaceutical
  81   II,     5.  3.  7    |                 it comes to the health care system to integrate these
  82   II,     5.  3.  7    |              treatment and end of life care. Organising and delivering
  83   II,     5.  3.  7    |   multidisciplinary approach to cancer care is required to make the
  84   II,     5.  3.  7    |              Most cancer patients need care for diagnosis and/or treatment
  85   II,     5.  3.  7    |                 secondary and tertiary care levels. All parts of the
  86   II,     5.  3.  7    |            reflected in the quality of care given to individuals. These
  87   II,     5.  3.  7    |              follow-up, and palliative care. The Parliament’s health
  88   II,     5.  3.  7    |    implementing innovation into cancer care.~ ~Eurocan+Plus involves
  89   II,     5.  3.  8    |            best possible treatment and care to cancer patients, exchange
  90   II,     5.  3.  8    |          rehabilitation and palliative care.~ ~Long-term objectives (
  91   II,     5.  4.  1    |                has measured the health care costs of people with type
  92   II,     5.  4.  1    |                834 in 1999. The health care costs of diabetes as a percentage
  93   II,     5.  4.  1    |             greater than direct health care costs (WHO 2002). Unfortunately,
  94   II,     5.  4.  2    |               risk factors, quality of care, and population outcomes.~
  95   II,     5.  4.  2    |                need to optimise health care in all EU countries through
  96   II,     5.  4.  2    |             later.~Tracking quality of care is paramount to prevent
  97   II,     5.  4.  2    |                quality audit of health care~-> National, regional and
  98   II,     5.  4.  2    |                    5.4.2.3. Quality of care monitoring~ ~The St.Vincent
  99   II,     5.  4.  2    |               definition of quality of care (QOC) information across
 100   II,     5.  4.  2    |                 and beyond. Quality of care can be measured by a range
 101   II,     5.  4.  2    |           monitoring of QOC in primary care has been created by national
 102   II,     5.  4.  2    |             Name~Processes of diabetes care~Annual HbA1c testing~Annual
 103   II,     5.  4.  2    |          several EU countries, primary care based sentinel practice
 104   II,     5.  4.  2    |              Furthermore, only primary care is included and mainly diagnoses
 105   II,     5.  4.  3    |              decline in the quality of care, despite the existing recommendations
 106   II,     5.  4.  6    |                the level of quality of care that must be ensured by
 107   II,     5.  4.  6    |             areas: for most quality of care indicators the gold standard
 108   II,     5.  4.  6    |         separate part of treatment and care for people with diabetes
 109   II,     5.  4.  6    |               European Council to make care and prevention of diabetes
 110   II,     5.  4.  6    |                secondary and community care, social services and education
 111   II,     5.  4.  7    |               diagnosis, treatment and care. Diabetes, like other chronic
 112   II,     5.  4.  7    |       information exchange in diabetes care, for monitoring, updating
 113   II,     5.  4.  8    |       Collection Update Report, Health Care Quality Indicators Project,
 114   II,     5.  4.  8    |     population-based equitable patient care: the Tayside Regional Diabetes
 115   II,     5.  4.  8    |                Improvement in Diabetes Care.Diabetes Care. 2003 Apr;
 116   II,     5.  4.  8    |              in Diabetes Care.Diabetes Care. 2003 Apr;26(4):1270-6.~
 117   II,     5.  4.  8    |                the quality of Diabetes Care at the health systems level
 118   II,     5.  4.  8    |                Excess costs of medical care 1 and 8 years after diagnosis
 119   II,     5.  4.  8    |              and projections. Diabetes Care, 21(9):1414-31~Massi Benedetti
 120   II,     5.  4.  8    |         projections for 2030. Diabetes Care. ;27(5):1047-53~ ~ ~
 121   II,     5.  5.Int    |              to approach their primary care physician for help. Doctors
 122   II,     5.  5.Int    |               specialist mental health care and are the main users of
 123   II,     5.  5.Int    |                main users of inpatient care11,12. Women’s social roles
 124   II,     5.  5.Int    |            Italy and the UK have moved care into community settings,
 125   II,     5.  5.Int    |               people for long periods. Care homes or “asylumsaccommodate
 126   II,     5.  5.Int    |                a huge burden on health care resources. More data on
 127   II,     5.  5.Int    |              prevention, diagnosis and care; Regional policy supports
 128   II,     5.  5.Int    |          mental health, the quality of care and welfare for people with
 129   II,     5.  5.Int    |          courses for health and social care professionals; combating
 130   II,     5.  5.  1    |       committed suicide had had health care within the month prior to
 131   II,     5.  5.  1    |       disorders, number of psychiatric care beds, long term beds in
 132   II,     5.  5.  1    |            rates. Reports of access to care is influenced by differences
 133   II,     5.  5.  1    |                Table 5.5.1.2. Level of care use (%) among those with
 134   II,     5.  5.  1    |                Practice and the Health Care System (2002-4).~· Promoting
 135   II,     5.  5.  1    |      psychological distress. Access to care should also be monitored.~ ~
 136   II,     5.  5.  1    |              mental health and primary care providers before suicide:
 137   II,     5.  5.  1    |                access to mental health care. Epidemiol Psichiatr Soc
 138   II,     5.  5.  2    |        families and European long term care. The risk of dementia can
 139   II,     5.  5.  2    |         solutions to finance long-term care. In some countries (e.g.
 140   II,     5.  5.  2    |                insurance for long-term care. In Austria, too, people
 141   II,     5.  5.  2    |                entitled to a long-term care allowance. In other countries,
 142   II,     5.  5.  2    |             other countries, long-term care is covered within the framework
 143   II,     5.  5.  2    |             provided in the context of care for the elderly on the basis
 144   II,     5.  5.  2    |              is on relatives providing care (e.g. in Greece and Romania),
 145   II,     5.  5.  2    |                higher costs for health care and support services, but
 146   II,     5.  5.  2    |             even be legally obliged to care for their elderly dependent
 147   II,     5.  5.  2    |             rights to special leave to care for the person with dementia
 148   II,     5.  5.  2    |               the provision of respite care).~ ~Lastly, as Europe’s
 149   II,     5.  5.  2    |        introduced to finance long-term care and measures introduced
 150   II,     5.  5.  2    |          introduction of the long-term care insurance but also more
 151   II,     5.  5.  2    |             and improving the level of care;~· Addressing the huge information
 152   II,     5.  5.  2    |           cares? The state of dementia care in Europe. Alzheimer Europe~ ~
 153   II,     5.  5.  3    |               Anorexia Nervosa. Health care providers report treatment
 154   II,     5.  5.  3    |             parents, educators, health care providers, children and
 155   II,     5.  5.  3    |              not receiving appropriate care according to evidence based
 156   II,     5.  5.  3    |             The quality of psychiatric care differs between European
 157   II,     5.  5.  3    |               countries. Institutional care still dominates in the European
 158   II,     5.  5.  3    |             expenditures of the health care system is due to schizophrenia
 159   II,     5.  5.  3    |           increased reliance on social care and welfare support (Andlin-Sobocki
 160   II,     5.  5.  3    |                specialized psychiatric care (none at all or treated
 161   II,     5.  5.  3    |             underestimate the need for care in schizophrenia and the
 162   II,     5.  5.  3    |         between European mental health care systems.~ ~Statistics based
 163   II,     5.  5.  3    |                towards community based care, the lack of respective
 164   II,     5.  5.  3    |              gap of information on the care of patients with schizophrenia.~ ~
 165   II,     5.  5.  3    |            have to be interpreted with care.~ ~The main group of substances
 166   II,     5.  5.  3    |            have to be interpreted with care taking into account the
 167   II,     5.  5.  3    |             differences in psychiatric care, actually it is more likely
 168   II,     5.  5.  3    |           rates from the pre-community care era and in the years 1994 –
 169   II,     5.  5.  3    |       differences in the mental health care systems, the extent of variation
 170   II,     5.  5.  3    |                with data on outpatient care.~Disability adjusted life-years~
 171   II,     5.  5.  3    |                different structures of care, prevention programmes will
 172   II,     5.  5.  3    |         treatment gap in mental health care, European data on this topic
 173   II,     5.  5.  3    |         treatment gap in mental health care (people remaining untreated
 174   II,     5.  5.  3    |                what is done in routine care, what psychiatrists do and
 175   II,     5.  5.  3    |    psycho-social treatments in routine care, the standard of guidelines,
 176   II,     5.  5.  3    |          reasons, the routine clinical care of schizophrenia is far
 177   II,     5.  5.  3    |          research settings and routine care (patient population, artificial
 178   II,     5.  5.  3    |               overview on resources of care available in the EU member
 179   II,     5.  5.  3    |             regards to community-based care.~The 2001 World Health Report
 180   II,     5.  5.  3    |            benefits of community-based care delivered close to home
 181   II,     5.  5.  3    |              effective community-based care. This may be reflected in
 182   II,     5.  5.  3    |            mental hospitals to provide care for people with the most
 183   II,     5.  5.  3    |               quality of mental health care in European countries is
 184   II,     5.  5.  3    |   antiepilepticavailable in primary care. About a tenth does not
 185   II,     5.  5.  3    |             allocated to mental health care. Research is necessary to
 186   II,     5.  5.  3    |        expenditures reflect quality of care. However, insufficient treatment
 187   II,     5.  5.  3    |           obstacle to the provision of care (Sartorius, 2007). Stigma
 188   II,     5.  5.  3    |                improving mental health care. An evaluation of the effects
 189   II,     5.  5.  3    |              as high as for outpatient care (see Table 5.5.3.3.6). Since
 190   II,     5.  5.  3    |         Expenditures by kind of health care service for year 2002 and
 191   II,     5.  5.  3    |    psychological) burden. Providers of care are aware of this fact,
 192   II,     5.  5.  3    |          according to different health care services, reflect the practice
 193   II,     5.  5.  3    |               assignment to outpatient care and rehabilitative measures.~
 194   II,     5.  5.  3    |              data on the mental health care system. www Mental Health
 195   II,     5.  5.  3    |             direction of mental health care was edited in the UK. This
 196   II,     5.  5.  3    |              the database, and improve care.~Guidelines~The development
 197   II,     5.  5.  3    |                hospitals and community care;~· to accelerate knowledge
 198   II,     5.  5.  3    |              delivery of mental health care by providing area-wide community
 199   II,     5.  5.  3    |              area-wide community based care and other resources necessary
 200   II,     5.  5.  3    |               project. Qual Saf Health Care 12:18-23.~Andlin-Sobocki
 201   II,     5.  5.  3    |             direction of mental health care. Open University Press,
 202   II,     5.  5.  3    |         treatment gap in mental health care. Bull World Health Organ.
 203   II,     5.  5.  3    |               1998): Patterns of usual care for schizophrenia: initial
 204   II,     5.  5.  3    |               gap between research and care. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin
 205   II,     5.  5.  3    |         generated by health and social care provision (59%), followed
 206   II,     5.  5.  3    |                range of health, social care and education and commissioning
 207   II,     5.  5.  3    |                of the available health care facilities. Although a causative
 208   II,     5.  5.  3    |               improvement in perinatal care and the increasing use of
 209   II,     5.  5.  3    |              made of high standards of care to patients with epilepsy
 210   II,     5.  5.  3    |          situation. Networks of health care workers (physicians, nurses,
 211   II,     5.  5.  3    |            between professional health care workers should be increased
 212   II,     5.  5.  3    |     improvement of the national health care system, multiple large population-based
 213   II,     5.  5.  3    |             setting, access to medical care, number of neurologists,
 214   II,     5.  5.  3    |            healthcare costs [inpatient care, outpatient care, drug costs
 215   II,     5.  5.  3    |             inpatient care, outpatient care, drug costs and tests],
 216   II,     5.  5.  3    |              investments] and informal care), indirect costs (production
 217   II,     5.  5.  3    |              costs, excluding informal care, amount to 56% of the total
 218   II,     5.  5.  3    |                intense use of informal care (22% of total costs) to
 219   II,     5.  5.  3    |                2006). Also, home-based care has been shown to be more
 220   II,     5.  5.  3    |               diagnosis, treatment and care of people with ms within
 221   II,     5.  5.  3    |         implications for the optimised care of MS patients. The multiple
 222   II,     5.  5.  3    |              Position Paper Palliative care among people severely affected
 223   II,     5.  5.  3    |              have access to palliative care assessments and services.~·
 224   II,     5.  5.  3    |           system of different national care approaches to MS, which
 225   II,     5.  5.  3    |                member statesnational care approaches towards the diagnosis,
 226   II,     5.  5.  3    |              Position Paper Palliative care among people severely affected
 227   II,     5.  5.  3    |       Noseworthy J, Compston A (2006): Care of the person with multiple
 228   II,     5.  5.  3    |               strong need for informal care (family and further caregivers)
 229   II,     5.  5.  3    |               as well as for community care. Social services and private
 230   II,     5.  5.  3    |            while costs due to informal care and earnings loss are substantial (
 231   II,     5.  5.  3    |                This burden of informal care and earnings loss will be
 232   II,     5.  5.  3    |             critical for future health care planning in societies which
 233   II,     5.  5.  3    |         different economies and health care systems.~NGOs, which are
 234   II,     5.  5.  3    |               in family structure, the care of the elderly will not
 235   II,     5.  5.  3    |           their relatives for help and care or financial assistance; (
 236   II,     5.  5.  3    |      delivering cost-effective medical care represents an enormous public
 237   II,     5.  5.  3    |             1995): Quality of life and care in Parkinson’s disease.
 238   II,     5.  5.  3    |               aspects of the long-term care of parkinsonian patients.
 239   II,     5.  6.  1    |            burden on health and social care, are one of the most expensive
 240   II,     5.  6.  1    |         Yearbook of Health and Medical Care, 2001).~ ~The burden of
 241   II,     5.  6.  3    |                quality of life; health care utilization; economic impact
 242   II,     5.  6.  3    |           Lopez et al, 2006).~ ~Health care utilization~ ~Musculoskeletal
 243   II,     5.  6.  3    |              common reason for primary care consultation even though
 244   II,     5.  6.  3    |               do not consult a primary care physician (Lock et al, 1999;
 245   II,     5.  6.  3    |         Yearbook of Health and Medical Care, 2001).~ ~In the Netherlands,
 246   II,     5.  6.  3    |              ranked second as a health care cost in 1994 (Meerding et
 247   II,     5.  6.  3    |      accounting for 6% of total health care costs compared to 8.1% for
 248   II,     5.  6.  3    |                costs, such as informal care would have greatly increased
 249   II,     5.  6.  3    |            number presenting to health care with OA by agreed criteria.
 250   II,     5.  6.  3    |               and of social and health care. There is little data available
 251   II,     5.  6.  3    |             million) was for inpatient care and SEK 6.4 billion (Euro
 252   II,     5.  6.  3    |                direct costs of medical care (Levy et al, 1993). OA is
 253   II,     5.  6.  3    |                influenced by inpatient care and admission rates which
 254   II,     5.  6.  3    |     independence and require long-term care. Only half those surviving
 255   II,     5.  6.  3    |           require subsequent long-term care, especially those of advanced
 256   II,     5.  6.  4    |        resources for health and social care. Most of the costs are indirect
 257   II,     5.  6.  4    |             work disability and social care, with a minor part of costs
 258   II,     5.  6.  4    |             the direct costs of health care, although these are not
 259   II,     5.  6.  4    |           Norway 1997.~ ~Use of health care services~ ~About one-quarter
 260   II,     5.  6.  4    |                  The associated health care costs that are generated
 261   II,     5.  6.  5    |            representatives; and health care providers want to be achieved.
 262   II,     5.  6.  6    |                 disability, and health care utilization: findings from
 263   II,     5.  6.  6    |            effect of multidisciplinary care on the retention of functional
 264   II,     5.  6.  6    |                J Technol Assess Health Care 16(4):1193-200~Juni P, Dieppe
 265   II,     5.  6.  6    |               gatekeeper-model managed care plan. Am J Manag Care 6:
 266   II,     5.  6.  6    |          managed care plan. Am J Manag Care 6:669-678~Linos A, Worthington
 267   II,     5.  6.  6    |         Yearbook of Health and Medical Care 2001. Available at URL: htt ~ ~
 268   II,     5.  7.  1    |               large fraction of health care resources, full recognition
 269   II,     5.  7.  1    |               1.8% of the total health care budget was spent for ESRD
 270   II,     5.  7.  2    |        formulation of policies for the care of renal failure in the
 271   II,     5.  7.  4    |               to and quality of health care and by survival from so-called
 272   II,     5.  7.  5    |          declaration on the quality of care for renal patients.~· In
 273   II,     5.  7.  5    |                element of the dialysis care system. The government has
 274   II,     5.  7.  5    |        provision and quality of health care. At present, there is a
 275   II,     5.  7.  5    |              planning of the supply of care should be related to population
 276   II,     5.  7.  5    |                regarding evaluation of care including CKD are currently
 277   II,     5.  7.  5    |            quantity and quality of RRT care using electronic methods
 278   II,     5.  7.  5    |            Registry (OEDTR) shall take care of quality assurance in
 279   II,     5.  7.  6    |         aspects on the quality of ESRD care, but also projects to stimulate
 280   II,     5.  7.  7    |            2006): Standards of medical care in diabetes-2006. Diabetes
 281   II,     5.  7.  7    |                diabetes-2006. Diabetes Care 2006;29:S1-S85.~Annual data
 282   II,     5.  7.  7    |          International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing
 283   II,     5.  7.  7    |         evolving reality. Int J Health Care Finance Econ 2007 Jul 20.~
 284   II,     5.  7.  7    |                 2004): Cost of medical care for chronic kidney disease
 285   II,     5.  8.  3    |              Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, a comprehensive
 286   II,     5.  8.  3    |               of veterans who received care through the Upper Midwest
 287   II,     5.  8.  3    |             Economic burden and health care utilization~ ~Several studies
 288   II,     5.  8.  3    |                4.7 were for ambulatory care, 2.7 for drugs, 2.9 for
 289   II,     5.  8.  3    |               drugs, 2.9 for inpatient care and 28.4 for lost work days (
 290   II,     5.  8.  4    |             managed through particular care towards prevention and cost-effectiveness
 291   II,     5.  8.  6    |               Higher standards of COPD care and studies on the effectiveness
 292   II,     5.  8.  6    |            some aspects of COPD health care should also be also taken
 293   II,     5.  8.  6    |            little comparison of health care utilization during this
 294   II,     5.  8.  6    |       institutionalized in a long term care setting (41% vs. 12.5%,
 295   II,     5.  8.  6    |              to receive long-term home care (26% vs 9.7%, p<0.05), but
 296   II,     5.  8.  6    |           likely to receive palliative care in hospital (47.6% vs 5.
 297   II,     5.  8.  6    |           available through palliative care programs, partially due
 298   II,     5.  8.  6    |       responsive models of end-of-life care for this population will
 299   II,     5.  8.  6    |             current patterns of health care utilization.~ ~
 300   II,     5.  8.  7    |              167.5.787. Am.J.Resp.Crit.Care Med. 167(5): 787-797.~ ~
 301   II,     5.  8.  7    |          Disease. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 167: 787-797~ ~Bergdahl
 302   II,     5.  8.  7    |              disease. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2003; 167: 418–424.~ ~
 303   II,     5.  8.  7    |                Stang M (2008):. Health care utilization of patients
 304   II,     5.  8.  7    |              Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Chest 2005; 128:
 305   II,     5.  8.  7    |             COPD and asthma in primary care. Chest 2005; 128: 2099-2107.~ ~
 306   II,     5.  8.  7    |           detection of COPD in primary care: screening by invitation
 307   II,     5.  8.  7    |            Adults Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 172:1139-1145.~ ~Van
 308   II,     5.  8.  7    |             Study Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 163:1572-1577.~ ~ ~
 309   II,     5.  9. FB    |             burden, in terms of health care utilization, medication
 310   II,     5.  9. FB    |            diseases require the health care system to ensure regular
 311   II,     5.  9. FB    |             The organization of health care should be reconsidered on
 312   II,     5.  9. FB    |                effectiveness of health care systems and professional
 313   II,     5.  9. FB    |              besides increasing health care costs and lost productivity.
 314   II,     5.  9. FB    |      additional expenditure for health care systems for then reducing
 315   II,     5.  9. FB    |             the cost of the allergenic care for society as a whole.~ ~
 316   II,     5.  9.  3    |           quality of outpatient health care.~ ~Deaths due to asthma
 317   II,     5.  9.  3    |                    The costs of health care~ ~Data provided by the National
 318   II,     5.  9.  3    |              concerning asthma primary care serving a population of
 319   II,     5.  9.  3    |              of Allergy, 1997), health care providers and authorities
 320   II,     5.  9.  3    |         estimated - in terms of health care and absenteeism, for example -
 321   II,     5.  9.  3    |      additional expenditure for health care systems but then reducing
 322   II,     5.  9.  3    |             the cost of the allergenic care to society as a whole.~ ~
 323   II,     5.  9.  3    |             whole.~ ~The total cost of care for asthma amounts to €17.
 324   II,     5.  9.  3    |             ERJ). The burden of asthma care in Europe is consistent
 325   II,     5.  9.  3    |              outpatient and ambulatory care (€ 3.8 billion), drugs (€
 326   II,     5.  9.  3    |               6 billion) and inpatient care (€ 0.5 billion) (Lung Health
 327   II,     5.  9.  3    |              of direct costs of asthma care. The average physician costs
 328   II,     5.  9.  4    |             all age ranges; particular care should be given to the paediatric
 329   II,     5.  9.  4    |               OR = 0.6); attending day care (OR = 0.4) and infant school (
 330   II,     5.  9.  5    |                expenditures for health care systems, but also reducing
 331   II,     5.  9.  5    |         reducing the costs of allergic care to society as a whole.~ ~
 332   II,     5.  9.  5    |             The organization of health care has to be reconsidered on
 333   II,     5.  9.  5    |                effectiveness of health care systems and professional
 334   II,     5.  9.  5    |           reality, also primary health care teams must be strengthened
 335   II,     5.  9.  5    |              the quality of ambulatory care and adopting audit procedures
 336   II,     5.  9.  5    |          general, two levels of health care are to be considered. The
 337   II,     5.  9.  5    |              one is the primary health care level in which general practitioners,
 338   II,     5.  9.  5    |               level is the specialized care in which patients are referred
 339   II,     5.  9.  5    |              of these models of health care organization and there is
 340   II,     5.  9.  5    |           intervention onto the health care systems.~ ~
 341   II,     5.  9.  6    |                only in terms of health care costs and lost productivity
 342   II,     5. 11.  1    |              those involved in primary care have a very different point
 343   II,     5. 11.  1    |            which benefits from medical care is very common, affecting
 344   II,     5. 11.  3    |             does not need dermatologic care (Williams et al, 2006).~ ~
 345   II,     5. 11.  3    |             thought to warrant medical care with 7.3%, 3.4% 8.9% and
 346   II,     5. 11.  3    |        capacity of many current health care systems to cope with such
 347   II,     5. 11.  4    |           effect on a country’s health care budget because skin disease
 348   II,     5. 11.  4    |               topical therapy and skin care in many skin diseases also
 349   II,     5. 11.  6    |   effectiveness for the various health care systems that currently operate
 350   II,     5. 11.  7    |               related need for medical care among persons 174 years,
 351   II,     5. 11.  7    |          prevalence and use of medical care. Brit J Prev Soc Med 1976;
 352   II,     5. 11.  7    |                 Raftery J, eds. Health Care Needs Assessment, second
 353   II,     5. 13        |        accounts for up to 7% of health care costs and this amount will
 354   II,     5. 14.  1    |           desirable patterns of dental care. Information from the surveys
 355   II,     5. 14.  1    |           patterns of untreated dental care in Europe will assist in
 356   II,     5. 14.  1    |          establishments, and levels of care. Thus, the importance of
 357   II,     5. 14.  1    |              must take place in health care delivery cannot be underestimated.~ ~
 358   II,     5. 14.  2    |                Dentists and Other Oral Care Clinical Providers~The number
 359   II,     5. 14.  2    |                dentists and other oral care clinical providers per 100,
 360   II,     5. 14.  2    |             the quality of oral health care and systems is encouraged.~
 361   II,     5. 14.  2    |              private and public health care financing agencies, and
 362   II,     5. 14.  2    |          extend more affordable dental care to a wider public.~ ~The
 363   II,     5. 14.  3    |                cases of quality dental care, meaning more fillings and
 364   II,     5. 14.  3    |            advanced public oral health care programmes for children.
 365   II,     5. 14.  3    |         children are in need of dental care. In adults, the data underlined
 366   II,     5. 14.  3    |         reported high needs for dental care. Physical functioning together
 367   II,     5. 14.  3    |                effectiveness of dental care.~ ~Therefore, the « traditional»
 368   II,     5. 14.  3    |           failure of the dental health care system. It is therefore
 369   II,     5. 14.  3    |               would reduce the cost of care for periodontal disease
 370   II,     5. 14.  3    |           professional time and health care funds to patients who need
 371   II,     5. 14.  3    |             Prior to 1989, oral health care for children was provided
 372   II,     5. 14.  3    |              the access to oral health care across Europe, especially
 373   II,     5. 14.  3    |              income.~ ~The oral health care system in Europe, which
 374   II,     5. 14.  3    |         disparities observed in health care expenses. 245 169 dentists,
 375   II,     5. 14.  3    |          employment in advanced health care. Dental expenditures represent
 376   II,     5. 14.  3    |                3.8 to 8% of all health care expenditures. For the eight
 377   II,     5. 14.  3    |                expenditures for dental care per individual increased
 378   II,     5. 14.  3    |                expenditures for dental care represented an average of
 379   II,     5. 14.  3    |               1/17th of overall health care expenditures. Germany spent
 380   II,     5. 14.  3    |              the GDP devoted to health care and 0.5% reserved for dental
 381   II,     5. 14.  3    |               0.5% reserved for dental care. Finland (0.4%) and the
 382   II,     5. 14.  5    |                for a better quality of care. Clearly health priorities
 383   II,     5. 14.  5    |         surveillance and evaluation of care programmes. The oral health
 384   II,     5. 14.  5    |            towards primary oral health care and services that may better
 385   II,     5. 14.  5    |              formulated for quality of care and access to care, or in
 386   II,     5. 14.  5    |          quality of care and access to care, or in terms of social life
 387   II,     5. 14.  5    |           desirable patterns of dental care. Information from the surveys
 388   II,     5. 14.  5    |           patterns of untreated dental care in Europe will assist in
 389   II,     5. 14.  5    |               enrolled in primary oral care services, expanding the
 390   II,     5. 14.  5    |         prevention activities. Primary care services need to be accessible
 391   II,     5. 14.  5    |          expanding oral health service care services for vulnerable
 392   II,     5. 14.  5    |        restorative primary oral health care.~ ~The burden of oral disease
 393   II,     5. 14.  5    |            age-friendly primary health care.~ ~
 394   II,     5. 14.  6    |       appropriately with dental health care professionals and limiting
 395   II,     5. 14.  7    |               get the necessary dental care. More directed efforts are
 396   II,     5. 14.  7    |            assure adequate oral health care for indigent, institutionalized
 397   II,     5. 15.  1    |             the organisation of health care services, a condition is
 398   II,     5. 15.  1    |         hospitalisation and outpatient care.~ ~Most rare diseases are
 399   II,     5. 15.  3    |                In addition, the health care system, both in Northern
 400   II,     5. 15.  4    |        Products and adapt their health care systems to the needs of
 401   II,     5. 15.  4    |      prevention, diagnosis, treatment, care, and research for rare diseases
 402   II,     5. 15.  4    |           improvement of diagnosis and care of patients with RD; accelerate
 403   II,     5. 15.  5    |    rare diseases diagnosis and patient care in the EU are expected to
 404   II,     5. 15.  5    |             for the delivery of health care and medical services in
 405   II,     5. 15.  5    |            resources from their health care sector to provide a full
 406   II,     5. 15.  5    |            health services and medical care are not in the European
 407   II,     5. 15.  5    |               national/regional health care systems.~ ~The scope of
 408   II,     5. 15.  5    |             organisation of the health care system.~ ~RD are model diseases
 409   II,     5. 15.  5    |           recognition and for improved care. Patient organizations now
 410   II,     5. 15.  6    |                J Technol Assess Health Care. 2007 Winter;23(1):36-42~
 411   II,     6.Acr        |          Hepatitis B Virus~HCAI~Health Care Associated Infections~HCV~
 412   II,     6.  3.  2    |        Hospitals, especially intensive care units often have their own
 413   II,     6.  3.  2    |                Although not all health care associated infections (HCAI)
 414   II,     6.  3.  2    |               two days in an intensive care unit, 7.2% acquired pneumonia,
 415   II,     6.  3.  2    |         populations (such as intensive care patients) or infection types (
 416   II,     6.  3.  3    |           receive life-long treatment, care and support. Currently 90%
 417   II,     6.  3.  3    |                coverage with antenatal care services and supervised
 418   II,     6.  3.  3    |         services and supervised labour care of pregnant women.~ ~ ~
 419   II,     6.  3.  6    |                are not used in medical care.~ ~The transmission of vCJD
 420   II,     7.Acr        |                ConsumersOrganisation~CARE~Community Road Accident
 421   II,     7.  1        |          HFA-DB (WHO), COD (EuroStat), CARE, IRTAD, ESAW, HDD (Apollo),
 422   II,     7.  1        |             products (e.g. toys, child care articles, sport equipment,
 423   II,     7.  1        |            that improvements in trauma care have led to a significant
 424   II,     7.  2.  2    |               discharges~ ~Most health care data available at EuroStat
 425   II,     7.  2.  2    |               way of organising health care and may not always be completely
 426   II,     7.  2.  3    |                                 7.2.3. CARE (Community Road Accident
 427   II,     7.  2.  3    |              Road Accident Database)~ ~CARE is a Community database
 428   II,     7.  2.  3    |               major difference between CARE and most other existing
 429   II,     7.  2.  3    |                of desegregations, i.e. CARE comprises detailed data
 430   II,     7.  2.  3    |          Member States. The purpose of CARE system is to provide a powerful
 431   II,     7.  2.  7    |             WHO WHOSIS database and by CARE database on road accidents
 432   II,     7.  3.  1    |             Also, indicators on health care consumption (hospital bed
 433   II,     7.  3.  4    |                Road Accident Database (CARE) and the International Road
 434   II,     7.  4.  2    |     professional groups, management of care facilities and associations
 435   II,     7.  5        |                prevented. Pre-hospital care and rehabilitation services
 436   II,     7.  6        |              e.g. trauma and emergency care). This success is owed to
 437   II,     7.  6        |                successful as emergency care.~ ~The most important challenges
 438   II,     7.  7        |              für Verkehrssicherheit.~ ~CARE - European Road Accident
 439   II,     7.  7        |           https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/care_bo/ accessed (access restricted)
 440   II,     8.  1.  5    |          access to quality support and care services, fostering accessibility
 441   II,     8.  2.  1    |               access to optimal health care. Across the lifespan, not
 442   II,     8.  2.  1    |        Netherlands, where GPs (primary care physicians) are able to
 443   II,     8.  2.  1    |            such as communication, self care, education, work, leisure
 444   II,     8.  2.  1    |              prevention, promotion and care. As Cooper et al (2006)
 445   II,     8.  2.  1    |              associated with access to care, identification of disease
 446   II,     8.  2.  1    |               2004). Visual and dental care needs are often undetected
 447   II,     8.  2.  1    |          prevented with proper medical care. Children diagnosed with
 448   II,     8.  2.  1    |              pregnant. Proper prenatal care lowers the risk of having
 449   II,     8.  2.  1    |                and delivery and in the care of premature infants have
 450   II,     8.  2.  1    |               professionals who are to care intellectually disabled
 451   II,     8.  2.  1    |                Internationally, family care is the dominant form of
 452   II,     8.  2.  1    |      individuals for whom they provide care. Family carers often act
 453   II,     8.  2.  1    |             family members when health care is sought. They may incur
 454   II,     8.  2.  1    | health promotion programmes, to health care and to optimal interventions
 455   II,     8.  2.  1    |             general practices (primary care practices) in the Netherlands
 456   II,     8.  2.  1    |              need and cost barriers to care for developmentally disabled
 457   II,     8.  2.  1    |           Programme mhGAP – Scaling up care for mental, neurological
 458   II,     8.  2.  2    |       surgeries and provide up-to-date care has been suggested as a
 459   II,     8.  2.  2    |            Fifteen years of eye health care service transition in Eastern
 460   II,     9            |          births and neonatal intensive care unit admissions in older
 461   II,     9            |      associated with social and health care factors, including lack
 462   II,     9            |            including lack on antenatal care (Olausson et al, 1997).~ ~
 463   II,     9            |         diabetes, appropriate clinical care can reduce the risk, and
 464   II,     9            |                the highest standard of care (Macintosh et al, 2006).
 465   II,     9.  1        |            associated with substandard care in nearly half of the cases (
 466   II,     9.  1        |                in health and access to care, and use limited health
 467   II,     9.  1        |                 and use limited health care resources effectively. Approaches
 468   II,     9.  1        |               improving the quality of care.~ ~ ~
 469   II,     9.  1.  1    |        pregnancy outcome and maternity care date back at least to the
 470   II,     9.  1.  1    |           health status and quality of care (Macfarlane and Chalmers,
 471   II,     9.  1.  1    |               country of origin~Health care services~C: Distribution
 472   II,     9.  1.  1    |        Maternal deaths and substandard care: the results of a confidential
 473   II,     9.  1.  1    | Characteristics of neonatal units that care for very preterm infants
 474   II,     9.  1.  1    |      Gravenhorst J (2002): Substandard care in immigrant versus indigenous
 475   II,     9.  1.  2    |              system of preconceptional care. Moreover, protecting the
 476   II,     9.  1.  2    |          births and neonatal intensive care unit admissions in older
 477   II,     9.  1.  2    |      associated with social and health care factors, including lack
 478   II,     9.  1.  2    |            including lack on antenatal care (Olausson et al, 1997).~ ~
 479   II,     9.  1.  2    |         diabetes, appropriate clinical care can reduce the risk, and
 480   II,     9.  1.  2    |                the highest standard of care (Macintosh et al, 2006).
 481   II,     9.  1.  2    |      treatments and neonatal intensive care have improved the outcome
 482   II,     9.  1.  2    |         experiencing the full range of care (Garne et al, 1999)~ ~Prenatal
 483   II,     9.  1.  2    |             system of pre-conceptional care is needed, as reduction
 484   II,     9.  2.  1    |              responsibility of duty of care, in that in their early
 485   II,     9.  2.  1    |       adulthood. It spans the complete care of children’s and adolescents’
 486   II,     9.  2.  3    |             also be managed in primary care, from which reporting statistics
 487   II,     9.  2.  5    |               in primary and community care. Across the different countries
 488   II,     9.  2.  5    |        providing primary and community care for children. In some countries
 489   II,     9.  2.  5    |           there are specialist primary care doctors specifically for
 490   II,     9.  2.  5    |           among which the provision of care for every child and the
 491   II,     9.  2.  6    |               in hospitals and primary care to seek improved identification
 492   II,     9.  2.  7    |              the age of 7 years. Child Care Health Dev. 22:55-71.~ ~
 493   II,     9.  3.  1    |            Italy and the UK have moved care into community settings,
 494   II,     9.  3.  1    |               people for long periods. Care homes or ‘asylumsaccommodate
 495   II,     9.  3.  1    |              to approach their primary care physician for help. Doctors
 496   II,     9.  3.  1    |           principal users of inpatient care. (Austbury, 2002; Hallström,
 497   II,     9.  3.  1    |             plan for improved diabetes care focusing on a multidisciplinary
 498   II,     9.  3.  1    |             subjects receiving medical care for the disease, women had
 499   II,     9.  3.  1    |              the age of 7 years. Child Care, Health & Development; 22(
 500   II,     9.  3.  1    |          cancer patientssurvival and care~Euro-REVES~International