Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     4.  2    |     countries in North, Western, South, Central and Eastern Europe.
 2   II,     5.  3.  6|          countries, and West and South Europe) and Europe as a
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|          rates in Uusimaa in the south. Prevalence increased between
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|          peak rate of 110 in the south, in the Czech Republic,
 5   II,     5.  5.  3|       1993): Prevalence of MS in South Estonia. Evidence of a new
 6   II,     5.  5.  3|         of multiple sclerosis in South Lower Saxony, Germany. Neuroepidemiology
 7   II,     5.  5.  3|         of multiple sclerosis in South East Scotland: evidence
 8   II,     5.  6.  3|      prevalence of RA going from South (lowest) to North (highest).
 9   II,     5.  9.  4|       High~–~–~–~–~High~Belgium~ South Antwerp~–~–~Low~–~–~–~Low~
10   II,     5. 11.  3|         with higher rates in the South East and industrialized
11   II,     8.  2.  1|           in whites and 0.32% in South Asian residents in Leicestershire,
12   II,     9.  1.  2|        of countries in North and South America, where such a strategy
13   II,     9.  3.  3|         the ‘60s, whereas in the South the new trend dates back
14   II,     9.  5.  3| physical activity and sport (New South Wales Department of Education
15   II,     9.  5.  6|         accessed 12.07.07)~ ~New South Wales Department of Education
16  III,    10.  2.  1|       and all-cause mortality in south Germany. Results from the
17  III,    10.  2.  1|     Ólafsdóttir AS~Ireland~North South Ireland Food Consumption
18  III,    10.  4.  5|     Environmental Assessment~SEE~South East and Eastern Europe
19  III,    10.  4.  5|     groundwater contamination in South Eastern Europe (EEA 2007b).
20  III,    10.  5.  1|    school studies from China and South Korea have demonstrated
21  III,    10.  6.  1|          West Europe compared to South Europe and East Europe for