Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5. 14.  3|     difficulty in finding a dental provider who will treat them, even
 2   II,     9.  3.  1|        when the primary healthcare provider should assess a woman’s
 3   IV,    11.  1.  1|    technical efficiency, including provider payment methods. It then
 4   IV,    11.  1.  2|          financing, waiting times, provider payment methods, and health
 5   IV,    11.  1.  5|            refers to a health care provider’s or facility’s capacity
 6   IV,    11.  1.  5|          Taggiasco et al, 1992).~ ~Provider payment methods and quality
 7   IV,    11.  1.  6|          the NHS.~ ~Efficiency and provider payment methods~ ~The methods
 8   IV,    11.  1.  6|    powerful incentives that affect provider behaviour and the efficiency,
 9   IV,    11.  1.  6|          and freedom to choose the provider. It fails when providers
10   IV,    11.  1.  6|         set amount of money to the provider to insure that services
11   IV,    11.  1.  6|           a given time period. The provider agrees to provide all agreed
12   IV,    11.  1.  6|           only from the designated provider unless additional money
13   IV,    11.  2.  1|     chronic disease management for provider organizations and an offshoot
14   IV,    11.  6.  2|         third party instead of the provider. One exception is Slovenia,
15   IV,    11.  6.  4| retrospective reimbursement of all provider costs has been identified
16   IV,    11.  6.  4|      efficiency for information on provider payment methods.~ ~ ~Redistribution (
17   IV,    11.  6.  5|         Hanvoravongchai P (2003): "Provider payments and patient charges
18   IV,    11.  6.  5|             from the system to the provider." International Journal
19   IV,    11.  6.  5|           Walley T et al. (2005): "Provider incentives and prescribing
20   IV,    12. 10    |       Safety/risk awareness at the provider level of health related
21   IV,    12. 10    |           products is addressed by provider’s (organizations) themselves