Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  9    |         years, with the greatest losses in spring and summer, and
 2   II,     5.  5.  3|         components.~ ~Production losses and especially early retirement (
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|          costs due to production losses associated with the disability
 4   II,     5.  6.  3|        million) for productivity losses (Jonsson and Husberg, 2000).
 5   II,     6.  4.  3|        paralysed, heavy economic losses, ethical dilemmas and social
 6   II,     7.  4.  1|         are in particular tragic losses, both for the families and
 7   II,     9.  3.  1|         G (2005): Effects of war losses on mortality estimates for
 8  III,    10.  2.  1|   premature deaths, productivity losses, foregone income taxes and
 9  III,    10.  2.  1| deficiency can be excessive iron losses for example due to bleeding,
10  III,    10.  2.  4|          and recurrent pregnancy losses..~ ~Currently, the following “
11  III,    10.  3.  2|      pollution but also economic losses. Chemical spills can occur
12  III,    10.  3.  4|           The resulting economic losses affected a wider population
13  III,    10.  4.  5|       main local sources include losses of contaminants during industrial
14  III,    10.  4.  5|       commercial sites, handling losses, leakages from tanks and
15  III,    10.  5.  3|        and costs from production losses will be presented.~ ~Absence
16  III,    10.  5.  3|     health problems~ ~Production losses~Production losses are caused
17  III,    10.  5.  3|     Production losses~Production losses are caused by absence from
18  III,    10.  5.  3|          to sickness. Production losses have not been calculated
19  III,    10.  5.  3|    billion), 21% to productivity losses (€ 35 billion) and 17% due
20  III,    10.  5.  3|    production (and productivity) losses in the workplace. An increasing
21   IV,    13.  6.  1|        detrimental effect. These losses of social and educational